Issuu on Google+


J U LY 2 6 –A U G U S T 1 , 2 0 1 2 | V O L . 3 2 N O . 4 E D I T O R I A L

Editor Scott Wilson Managing Editor Justin Kendall Music Editor David Hudnall Staff Writers Charles Ferruzza, Ben Palosaari Editorial Operations Manager Deborah Hirsch Calendar Editor Berry Anderson Clubs Editor Abbie Stutzer Food Blogger, Web Editor Jonathan Bender Proofreader Brent Shepherd Contributing Writers Tracy Abeln, Danny Alexander, Theresa Bembnister, Aaron Carnes, Kyle Eustice, April Fleming, Ian Hrabe, Dan Lybarger, Chris Parker, Nadia Pflaum, Dan Savage, Nick Spacek, Abbie Stutzer, Crystal K. Wiebe Intern Hayley Bartels

TWISTED ROOTS All in one family: John the Baptist, Suco the chimp, and the largest false-claims tax-fraud case in Missouri history. BY B E N PA L O S A A R I

7

A R T

Art Director Ashford Stamper Contributing Photographers Angela C. Bond, Chris Mullins, Lauren Phillips, Sabrina Staires, Brooke Vandever Design Interns Rachel Krause, Kelly Watts

C HI NESE R EVO LU TI O N

P R O D U C T I O N

Production Manager Christina Riddle Multimedia Designer Rafaella Chaves

A D V E R T I S I N G

Advertising Director Dawn Jordan Senior Classified Multimedia Specialist Steven Suarez Classified Multimedia Specialist Andrew Disper Multimedia Specialists Michelle Acevedo, Kirin Arnold, Erin Carey, Payton Hatfield Director of Marketing & Operations Jason Dockery Digital Marketing Manager Keli Sweetland

C I R C U L A T I O N

Circulation Director Mike Ryan

B U S I N E S S

E>C4

=>F

Accounts Receivable Jodi Waldsmith Publisher Joel Hornbostel

S O U T H C O M M

Chief Executive Officer Chris Ferrell Chief Operating Officer Rob Jiranek Director of Accounting Todd Patton Director of Operations Susan Torregrossa Creative Director Heather Pierce Director of Content/Online Development Patrick Rains Chief Technology Officer Matt Locke Director of Digital Products Andy Sperry Business Manager Eric Norwood

N A T I O N A L

With its new Plaza location, Bo Lings gets bigger — and better. BY C H A R L E S F E R R U Z Z A

A D V E R T I S I N G

19

Voice Media Group 888-278-9866, voicemediagroup.com Senior Vice President Sales Susan Belair Senior Vice President Sales Operations Joe Larkin National Sales Director Ronni Gaun

LAB EL MAK ER S

B A C K P A G E . C O M

Vice President Sales & Marketing Carl Ferrer Business Manager Jess Adams Accountant David Roberts

D I S T R I B U T I O N

The Pitch distributes 45,000 copies a week and is available free throughout Greater Kansas City, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for $5 each, payable at The Pitch’s office in advance. The Pitch may be distributed only by The Pitch’s authorized independent contractors or authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of The Pitch, take more than one copy of each week’s issue. Mail subscriptions: $22.50 for six months or $45 per year, payable in advance. Application to mail at second-class postage rates is pending at Kansas City, MO 64108.

Golden Sound Records and the evolving role of the record label. BY DAV I D H U D N A L L

22

C O P Y R I G H T

The contents of The Pitch are Copyright 2012 by KC Communications, LLC. No portion may be reproduced in whole or in part by any means without the express written permission of the publisher. The Pitch address: 1701 Main, Kansas City, MO 64108 For The Pitch information, call: 816-561-6061 To report a story, call: 816-218-6915 Editorial fax: 816-756-0502 For classifieds, call: 816-218-6759 For retail advertising, call: 816-218-6702

ON T HE COVE R

4 5 7 11 15 17 19 20 22 28 30 34

PITCH QUESTIONNAIRE PLOG FEATURE F I LT E R ART STAGE CAFÉ FAT CITY MUSIC MUSIC SHOWCASE BALLOT NIGHTLIFE SAVAGE LOVE

MEANWHI LE AT PI TC H. C O M ILLUSTRATION BY ASHFORD STAMPER

2

THE PITCH

J U LY 2 6 - A U G U S T 1 , 2 0 1 2

pitch.com

pitch.com

FRINGE is under way. THE RESERVE is taking reservations at the Ambassador. THOMAS JEFFERSON wants to save Kansas.

M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X

THE PITCH

2


QUESTIONNAIRE

MICHAEL MACKIE Hometown: Des Moines (aka City of Intrigue)

Person or thing you find irritating: That my

take up a lot of space in my iTunes. The B-52s. I have at least three B’s songs in every playlist I’ve created. Tin roof rusted, indeed!

Who or what is your sidekick? KMBZ 980’s

Dana Wright is my best gal pal. She’s never wrong, often crass and always has good hair. What more could you possibly want in a BFF? Oh, and she drinks and swears like a sailor, too. She’s my idol.

Celebrity you’d ride the Mamba with: Kim Zolciak from Real Housewives of Atlanta. I’m curious to see how long that wig would stay on her head.

What career would you choose in an alternate reality? Before I got this sweet gig, I traveled a

Favorite thing to follow on Twitter: Without a doubt, it’s @OMGFactsCelebs. Did you know that Ben Stiller brings his own plastic-sealed bagels to restaurants and asks the staff to toast them? I did!

lot for my previous job. I always thought being a flight attendant would be a cool career — but only if I got the plum assignments like Paris, London and Rome. I’d really rather not fly to Poughkeepsie three times a week.

Last book you read: Drop Dead Healthy [by A.J. Jacobs], about the guy who tried every diet and workout regimen known to man. Priceless. He’s my idol.

What was the last local restaurant you patronized? I went to Orange Box for lunch and Café

Trio near the Plaza for dinner. I’m at Trio at least once a week. I should demand my own booth. And a drink named after me.

Favorite day trip: Once I flew to Berlin for the weekend. Does that count?

Where do you drink? I’ll drink pretty much

wherever. I’m not picky as long as someone else is buying. Which reminds me … I’m nearly out of La Crema chardonnay, people.

Where do you like to take out-of-town guests?

Funny thing is, they usually tell me where they want to go. It’s refreshing, given that people often tell me exactly where I can go.

What’s your favorite charity? SAVE Inc. is a

small local charity in midtown. They help house socially and medically disadvantaged people to improve their health and lead stable lives with personal dignity. I’ve been on the board for several years, and it’s awe-inspiring what this organization does to enrich and empower the lives of 700-plus clients.

4

THE PITCH

KSHB Channel 41

spray tan doesn’t last longer.

Current neighborhood: JoCo

Favorite place to spend your paycheck: Well, given that I haven’t bought a drink for myself since before the Clinton administration, I’ll say online shopping.

Co-host, Kansas City Live,

Most embarrassing dating moment: I’m getting set up on an upcoming blind date. First time ever. Let me get back to you on this question.

Nearly keeled over dead from a stroke two years ago. By the grace of God, I’ve recovered nicely with no lingering effects.

What do you do on your day off? When I’m not a co-host, I’m a fitness instructor on the side. I’m also a celebrity blogger. And an acting coach. I never have a day off. I’ll sleep when I’m dead.

“In five years I’ll …” Still be hosting Kansas City Live with my oh-so adoresy co-host, Michelle Davidson. And I’ll still be telling people I’m way, way younger than she is.

Interesting brush with the law: I’ve been pulled over for speeding seven times … and only gotten one ticket. Uh, but never in Kansas or Missouri.

“Kansas City needs …” Direct flights to Palm

What local phenomenon do you think is overrated? I went to the Jones Pool once. Once.

Recent triumph: I had to keep my new Kansas

What local tradition do you take part in every year? Pick an art fair, any art fair — Plaza,

What TV shows do you watch? I never miss The Walking Dead, which oddly is my 80-year-old mom’s fave show, too. And I just discovered Restaurant: Impossible.

Finish this sentence: “Other than Kauffman Center, Kansas City got it right when …” They installed

that curfew on the Plaza. Lord knows, I don’t want to be the victim of a drive-by when I’m wolfing down a second piece of Oreo cheesecake on the patio at the Cheesecake Factory.

“Kansas City screwed up when …” They out-

lawed foie gras. Oh, wait – that was California. Never mind. Springs — pronto.

Brookside, Westport — and I’m there.

J U LY 2 6 - A U G U S T 1 , 2 0 1 2

pitch.com

“People might be surprised to know that I …”

pitch.com

City Live co-hosting gig a secret for nearly two weeks until it was announced. That nearly caused me to have another stroke.

Watch Kansas City Live at 10 a.m. weekdays on KSHB Channel 41.

M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X

THE PITCH

1


PLOG

LOOSE E NDS

How Avenue of the Arts’ “Float” fell to Earth.

ne way to measure a thing’s success is to note how fast people miss it when it goes away. By that standard, artist Jarrett Mellenbruch’s “Float” — the dozen hammocks that were until recently arranged on the south lawn of the Bartle Hall Ballroom as part of the 2012 Avenue of the Arts program — was a big deal. Another way to gauge success, of course, is Facebook, where “Float” had become one of the summer’s top photographic subjects, and where word quickly spread about its removal. On Mellenbruch’s Facebook page for “Float,” you can still see the hammocks: in photographer Eric Bowers’ fi ltered city light, luring anonymous convention participants as they take breaks, with artists such as Cory Imig and Peregrine Honig. Ceramic G O L Steve Gorman P E R MO INE AT sculptor noted the visual diaONL M / P L O G logue between the supP IT C H .C O port cables of the Bartle Hall towers (themselves topped with R.M. Fischer’s Sky Stations, perhaps the city’s most visible public art) and the hammocks’ triangular ends. (He also liked the way the installation’s title alluded to the sail-like vaults of the Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts, to the south.) But the popularity of “Float” was mostly about the sheer fun of sharing a little sunny joy and unexpected relaxation. During the piece’s June installation, Mellenbruch says, the scene — conventioneers wondering whether they could really try out the hammocks — began to remind him of a beach. “You know how you want to get there early to get the great spot and the umbrella? They would stream out at lunch break or at 5, when the day was over, and make a beeline to the hammocks. In a matter of five minutes, they’d be full.”

B R O O K E VA N D E V E R

O

But early on, the hammock frames started to show signs of structural trouble. During the June 15 opening reception for Avenue of the Arts (at the other end of Central Avenue, at the Folly Theater), Mellenbruch got a text from a friend telling him that one of the hammock frames had broken. “I was hoping it was an anomaly,” Mellenbruch tells The Pitch. The frames he had chosen were touted as heavy-duty, able to withstand years of use and weight loads up to 450 pounds. But even after Mullenbruch substituted new parts, cannibalized from extra frames he had purchased, hammocks continued to break. The ruptures were always in the same spot, at the foot; the welds were holding, but

What summer used to look like. the steel itself would bend and snap. When seven came apart this way, Mellenbruch decided to take down all 12 of them. Given the limited hours that people tended to “float” and the fact that the area is patrolled by security, Mellenbruch doesn’t suspect that misuse or vandalism is to blame. (He received one e-mail from a contrite hammock user who happened to have been lying in one when its frame broke. He wanted to pay for a replacement; Mellenbruch declined the offer.) He says local welders and metalworkers who have seen the broken pieces believe that the steel is thin. The manufacturer is holding out against replacement or refund, though, say-

BY

T R A C Y A BE L N

ing the hammocks were used “commercially” rather than in someone’s private yard. The Municipal Art Commission’s Porter Arneill, who manages the Avenue of the Arts project, tells The Pitch that public projects like “Float” are always subject to practical issues. He and Mellenbruch talked about installing posts instead of free-standing frames, but that would have interfered with Bartle’s irrigation system and lawn maintenance. It has often been too hot this summer for anyone to want to hang out under a cloudless, 100-degree sky. Even Mayor Sly James said so, on Twitter, before the hammocks’ removal. But Mellenbruch has been looking for frames, from another manufacturer, made of a thicker-gauge steel. They cost about 12 percent more than what he used before. “If I could find a way to raise funds for the stronger stands, I’d like to have them there for September,” Mellenbruch says. (Avenue of the Arts ends September 30.) But he’s hesitant to turn something intended to be free into a donation drive. He’s looking into programs that issue arts grants on an emergency-fast basis. Kickstarter, which he calls “asking friends for money,” isn’t on his agenda. Those friends, however, might feel like a restored “Float” would offer a good return on their investment. After all, anyone who tried out the hammocks or simply admired the sight of them came away with a closer understanding of public art. “I’m super-happy just being able to be a part of Avenue of the Arts,” Mellenbruch says. That the frames broke feels, he adds, like a footnote to the project because the concept of transforming the space was so successful. “It just was a little more temporary than I had hoped.” Whenever it becomes feasible, though, he hopes eventually to install a permanent version of “Float” somewhere.

E-mail feedback@pitch.com

STRUNG ALONG Google is finally making a Fiber announcement. But let’s look at what led us here. March 30, 2011: Google announces that Kansas

City, Kansas, beat out 1,100 other U.S. cities to be the first place to receive Google Fiber Internet, with speeds expected to be 100 times faster than current connections. “In selecting a city, our goal was to find a location where we could build efficiently, make an impact on the community and develop relationships with local government and community organizations,” Google stated in a blog post announcing the plan. “We’ve found this in Kansas City.” April 1, 2011: While everybody in KCK loses their minds over Fiber, Unified Government Commissioner Nathan Barnes plays killjoy, questioning whether the UG should partner

with Google. “I just found out about this 48 hours ago, and now I’m making this big decision to ratify this, and not knowing where we are going to be able to intervene to make changes to that agreement that we are ratifying tonight,” Barnes said during debate. He voted for it anyway. May 17, 2011: KCMO upstages KCK once again when Google announces that it will build its Fiber infrastructure on both sides of the state line. August 2011: A Google Fiber test run in California results in upload speeds of 298 megabytes per second and download speeds of 528 MBs. Online pirates cream their jeans. February 6, 2012: Google Fiber’s blog declares progress: “We’ve measured utility

poles; we’ve studied maps and surveyed neighborhoods; we’ve come up with a comprehensive set of detailed engineering plans; and we’ve eaten way too much barbecue. Now, starting today, we’re ready to lay fiber.” Ten months after the announcement, the plan finally feels real. February 2012: While giving a speech at a Spanish technology forum, Google CEO Eric Schwartz says one of the benefits that Fiber will bring the area is “people will want to move to Kansas City, Kansas.” The audience laughs. Bloggers see it as a cheap shot. Google says Schwartz was being sincere. Video evidence proves inconclusive. April 4, 2012: After months of inactivity, the Google Fiber blog vaguely announces

how the infrastructure will work. A fi beroptic cable is plugged into a “Google Fiber Hut” and strung along utility poles and attached to houses. The post doesn’t give more details. Honestly, would we understand a more technical explanation? July 2012: Time Warner Cable, the largest cable and Internet provider in Kansas City, gets spooked by Google Fiber and posts a flier encouraging local employees to pass along “tips, rumors and rumblings” about Fiber. The bounty is pretty weak: Tipsters are entered into a drawing each week to win one of three $50 gift cards. July 18, 2012: Google promises a special announcement for Thursday, July 26, where the “next chapter of the Internet” will be revealed. July 26, 2012: ???

pitch.com J U LY 26 S T X1,, 220001 2 pitch.com MO N -TAHU G XU X–X X

—BEN PALOSAARI

TT H E P I T C H

5 1


5399 Martway Mission, KS 913.432.7000 1020 S. Weaver St. Olathe, KS 913.782.0279

$60 PER LANE

UP TO 6 PEOPLE WITH RESERVATION

MISSIONBOWL.COM THREADZ BY HEADZ ZE OF FOR THE HEADS DAWG DATICKETS CLOTHING - JEWELRY ACCESSORIES - ART

SUMMER ABLE NOW AVAIL OFFICIAL CROSSROADS TICKET OUTLET

1607 Westport Rd. KCMO 816-442-8400 4VU;O\YZ WT‹-YP:H[WT‹:\UWT

Own Your Own Salon! Get Hands-On Training in: U

Cosmetology

U

Esthetics

U

Nail Technology

(Skin Care)

4VU;O\YZ WT‹-YP:H[WT‹:\UWT

Campus Locations LAWRENCE

U

MANHATTAN

U

OVERLAND PARK

U

TOPEKA

U

WICHITA

800.648.3413 Defining Beauty Education Since 1905

www.marinello.com Accredited by NACCAS | Programs vary by location | Career Placement assistance for graduates Financial aid available to those who qualify l For Gainful Employment Disclosures, visit www.marinello.com/disclosure

6

THE PITCH

J U LY 2 6 - A U G U S T 1 , 2 0 1 2

pitch.com

MENTION THIS PITCH AD AND RECEIVE DOUBLE YOUR RIDE TIME! Please call for details!

25825  Edgemore  Rd.  Paoloa,  KS 913-783-4301        kcwatersports.com


KANSAS CITY’S STRANGEST BLOODLINE INCLUDES JOHN THE BAPTIST, SUCO THE CHIMP, AND THE LARGEST FEDERAL FALSE-CLAIMS TAX-FRAUD CASE PROSECUTED IN MISSOURI HISTORY. BY BEN PALOSAARI

T

he largest federal false-claims taxfraud scheme in Missouri history was operated out of a karate studio in a shabby row of businesses in Blue Springs. It was there, say federal prosecutors, that between 2008 and 2011, Gerald Poynter II, also known as “Brother Jerry Love,” issued more fraudulent tax forms than black belts. Poynter and 13 defendants, whom he referred to as “branch managers,” are accused of operating a nationwide scheme to defraud the Internal Revenue Service of nearly $100 million. One of Poynter’s branch managers was Shirley Oyer, matriarch of one of Kansas City’s most colorful families. Last year, Oyer’s son Christopher wrote a book in which he claimed to be the second coming of John the Baptist. Oyer’s other son, John Michael, is known for his clashes with Kansas City, Missouri, officials — most recently over custody of his pet chimpanzee, Suco. A September 2011 indictment alleges that Poynter, 52, and his branch managers would pitch potential clients for his “1099-OID Re-

coupment Process” at speaking engagements in homes and hotel ballrooms. “I’ve made OIDs payable to Spider-Man, Superman,” Poynter allegedly bragged in a meeting recorded in Georgia. “You can make it to SpongeBob. You can make it to anybody you want for however much that you want, for $100,000, for example. … The man’s getting paid. They are 24 months behind on processing OIDs. You could make an OID out and slaughter it. Completely fill it out in any way you want to fill it out, booger that thing up bad. No joke.” Of the $96 million in refunds claimed by Poynter’s clients, the IRS refunded more than $3.5 million. A notable exception was John Perdido. Court records say the Temecula, California, man received the largest refund of any branch manager: $805,749 in 2009, $118,000 of which, authorities say, he gave to Poynter. He then moved $200,000 to the Philippines, where he bought a home and a car. This past June, Perdido pleaded guilty to his role in the conspiracy. Oyer, 71, recruited 12 clients for the scheme

and helped file 26 fraudulent tax returns, claiming $12.4 million in refunds. The IRS issued just $92,974 of the requested amount. Federal prosecutors called the plan “nonsensical” when announcing the charges on September 22, 2011. However, variants of the scheme have been around for decades, and the IRS has devoted a lengthy section of its website to explaining frivolous tax arguments like this one. Here’s how the feds say the conspiracy worked: Poynter’s so-called branch managers prepared taxes for at least 145 clients, listing each individual’s debts — mortgages, loans, car payments, foreclosure records, bank statements, credit-card statements, etc. — on a Form 1099-OID. This was made to look like as though an authentic 1099 had been issued by the clients’ creditors, reporting taxable interest income. The branch managers then filed their clients’ 1040 tax returns, “fraudulently reporting over-withholding of tax on purported interest income, making them appear due a tax refund,” according to the

indictment. Their clients then filed for refunds based on the total amount of their debts. Poynter and his branch managers allegedly split up to $3,000 in upfront fees from each client and an additional 15 percent of any refund issued to the client. Poynter allegedly tried to shield himself from prosecution by asking his clients to forgo paying him a fee and to make “love donations” instead to “Jerry Love Ministries,” a company he set up for that purpose. (He also ran Black Belt Tax, as well as a couple of karate dojos.) Feds say Oyer received $2,862.20 in fees and deposited the money in the bank account of her family’s business, a local ABC Seamless Siding franchise. She is facing one count of conspiracy to defraud the United States and five counts of filing false claims for tax refunds.

O

yer declined The Pitch’s interview requests. However, she is credited with a chapter in her son Christopher’s 2011 book, The Newest Testament: One continued on page 8

pitch.com J U LY 2 6 - A U G U S T 1 , 2 0 1 2 pitch.com M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X

THE PITCH THE PITCH

7 1


Twisted Roots

8 2

TH HE E P P II T TC CH H T

Chistopher Oyer

ILLANGI

John Michael Oyer

ANGELA C. BOND

Shirley Oyer

ANGELA C. BOND

continued from page 7 Nation Under God, in which she explains how she came to believe that her son is the second coming of John the Baptist. She also outlines her views on organized religion. “[N]one of the various interpretations of the Bible that I had access to made sense,” she writes. “To me they seemed illogical and irrational. God seemed very loving, but unfortunately, very confused, too.” In the book, she writes of visions and dreams that answered her questions about the Bible. She also writes of witnessing and hearing things no one else could. Through these apparitions, she pieced together her view of Christianity. Shirley’s chapter says, “My doctors told me that I could not have any more children. My dreams and visions led me to believe otherwise, but my doctors kept insisting I was unable to have any more children. Then I had a vision from John the Baptist informing me of his return through me.” In 1976, she and her husband — the couple had three children aged 10, 12 and 14 — went on a trip to Italy. She returned feeling ill and took antibiotics. Her doctor wanted to perform a cancer screening. Oyer insisted on taking a pregnancy test first, which came back positive. She recalls in the book that before a trip that summer to Las Vegas, she was exposed “to some bad fumes that might affect a pregnancy,” and her body attempted “to abort the fetus.” “Thank goodness I was in Las Vegas, as the doctors in Kansas City would not have saved this baby,” she writes.

Christopher Oyer was born August 12, 1976. He weighed, the book says, 3 pounds, 2 ounces. “My opinion in Las Vegas was that everything was in divine order,” Oyer concludes. And the world had a new John the Baptist. Christopher, whose calm, thoughtful demeanor is the antithesis of a fire-andbrimstone preacher, would answer The Pitch’s questions only through e-mail. He says his life’s mission is to bring people together, which he’s doing through his United World Church. “I have returned to make things right and to help humanity cut its ties from primitive thinking,” he writes to The Pitch. “My goal is to unite. We are all one people that have be-

come separated by oppressive and confused governments and religions.” United World Church began as a movement without a brick-and-mortar headquarters. That is soon to change. Oyer tells The Pitch that his church is ready for a physical space. “I am happy to announce that the United World Church is opening an AWAKEN: Higher Brain Living Center located in Overland Park,” he writes. “We are going to rock the metro! There will be things going on in our building that you won’t believe even when you first see it.” Oyer says his mother didn’t indoctrinate him with political or religious teachings when he was a child. She raised him “with unconditional love to be a free thinker,” he says.

“She already knew who I was, so she let me be me,” he says. “I chose the best parents for myself in this life. I have been preprogrammed before I was born. Sharing my inner knowledge with my mom and family has been a very rewarding experience.” Unsurprisingly, Christopher Oyer says his mother is not guilty of tax fraud. “God knows she is innocent and that’s all that matters,” he says. “Governments have a long history of charging and convicting innocent people. Don’t forget that both Jesus and John the Baptist were killed by the government. I was killed because the government feared I would cause an up rise [sic] amongst the people.”

J UOLY - AX–X UGU , X 2 0 1 pitch.com 2 pitch.com M N T 2H6 X X S, T2 01 0


mo t espite tax-fraud allegations and a divine reincarnation, Shirley Oyer’s other son, John Michael Oyer, describes his family as normal. A talkative man who relishes an opportunity to explain his sovereign-citizen theories, Oyer stresses that he doesn’t want his family to be “looked at like a DNA pool of freaks.” “You’re looking at a good, productive family that gets well with everybody that they come in contact with,” he says. John Michael Oyer says his family has lived in Kansas City for five generations, and he doesn’t recall growing up with his mother telling him that his little brother was a notable religious figure. And he’s not quite sure why she named him “John” despite his brother being the second coming of the prophet. “Maybe she [Shirley] just screwed up one name,” he says, laughing. “To err is human, right?” Christopher has a different explanation. “My name was given in a vision right before my birth,” he says. “Christopher shall be my name this time.” John Michael Oyer remembers his mother teaching him to always question authority. And he’s had no problem following that lesson. Oyer is well-known in the halls of Kansas City, Missouri’s Municipal Courthouse for his custody battle with the city for his pet chimpanzee, Suco. In October 2010, the chimp escaped and was seen wandering around land owned by Oyer on Indiana Avenue. Kansas City police and animal-control officers responded to the scene, and the dashboard-camera video of the incident’s climax appeared on every local news

e ic

D

Cafe Racer

John Michael Oyer is feuding with the city over code violations on his property. broadcast: Suco leaps onto the hood of a police cruiser and smashes the car’s windshield. Suco was taken from Oyer and sent to live at the Kansas City Zoo. Oyer is still fighting to get her back, but he has a host of other legal issues to deal with first. City inspectors have cited him numerous times in the last year for property code violations. In April, he was cited for having limbs and brush on his property, keeping an unlicensed vehicle, using RVs for unapproved storage, rank weeds, broken or missing panes of glass, and unapproved parking. Oyer calls these citations the city’s attempt to keep him busy so he won’t sue for custody of Suco. Meanwhile, he also defends his mother. He says if people asked his mother about filing 1099-OID forms and she gave them her opinion, that doesn’t make her an accomplice to a crime. He offers this analogy: If he was asked about putting on a homemade fireworks display, he would tell someone what he knows. However, if there’s an accident, he couldn’t be held responsible, he says. “Now you go out and do something wrong with it — somebody gets hurt, what have you, and they say, ‘What would ever make you do something that ridiculous?’ ” he explains. “ ‘Well, John Michael told me about it.’ Then they come after me? Well, I didn’t do it. That’s exactly what they’re doin her [Shirley].” Poynter’s indictment says he made similar claims to his branch managers: “We are not soliciting an OID process or a recoupment process. Don’t solicit.” During a 2008 training session in Atlanta, Poynter allegedly told his partners: “Don’t put a billboard out telling anybody that this is what we’re doing. What I want you to put on the billboard is that we are a professional tax-services company.” The indictment against Shirley Oyer says she was actively recruiting tax clients to file 1099-OID forms, which she benefited from financially. This week, two defendants pleaded guilty to their roles in the plot. Two others previously pleaded guilty. The trials of Poynter, Shirley Oyer and six other defendants are scheduled for January 7, 2013. If Oyer is convicted on all counts, she could face up to 35 years in prison, plus fines and restitution.

v

In The Newest Testament, Oyer also devotes a chapter to his beliefs on taxes. “The Constitution is a set of rules for the government, not the people,” he explains in an e-mail. “There is no authority to tax the people directly. “The federal government was never given jurisdiction over the people,” he adds. “The things you create do not have jurisdiction or authority over God who created you.” Furthermore, Oyer says Christians have a role model for taxes in their savior. “The Bible states that Jesus was accused of tax protesting,” Oyer writes. He quotes Luke 23:2: “And they began to accuse him, saying, ‘We have found this man subverting our nation. He opposes payment of taxes to Caesar and claims to be Christ, a king.’ ”

nsas cit Ka ycle s y er rc o

Exceptional Motorcycle & Scooter Service 1305 Union Ave. KCMO | 816-221-0711 WE BUY

FREE APPRAISALS FOR ANY TYPE OF SILVER, GOLD AND PLATINUM SCRAP. 913-341-2440 7815 MARTY ST., STE 5 IN DOWNTOWN OVERLAND PARK TUE-FRI 10AM - 7PM | SAT 9AM-1PM WWW.THEGOLDSTOREKC.COM

r(0-%+&8&-3: r(0-%'*--&%+&8&-3: r(0-%1-"5&%+&8&-3: r%&/5"-(0-% r45&3-*/(4*-7&3+&8&-3: r45&3-*/(4*-7&38"3& r5&"4&54 r1-"5*/6.+&8&-3: i3&'*/*/(4&37*$&4 "-40"7"*-"#-&u

lulu’s

A Hip & Trendy Boutique )ZMaW]IT]T]' lulu (loo’loo) n 1. A remarkable person or thing. 2. stunner, mantrap, knockout, beauty, peach

6017 Johnson Drive Mission, KS 913.362.CHIC (2442) luvlulus.com

Northland Lulu’s Coming Soon!

E-mail ben.palosaari@pitch.com. pitch.com J U LY G X–X U S TX1, , 220001X2 pitch.com M O2N6 T- AHUX

TH H EE PP II TT CC HH T

39


WEEK OF JULY 26-AUGUST 1 | BY BERRY ANDERSON

17

PAG E

DAY SATUR

7.28 Tower er of p o w

STAGE Have you Fringed yet?

20 PAG E

FAT C I T Y Lots of room for wine at Amigoni.

26 PAG E

MUSIC FORECAST By the light of the Los Lobos moon.

T H U R S D AY | 7. 2 6 |

KNOWN UNKNOWNS

A

merica is safer, and the world is more secure, because of the service and the leadership of Donald Rumsfeld,” President George W. Bush said at a press conference announcing the resignation of the 21st secretary of defense. Agree? See Rumsfeld defend his position at 4 p.m. at the Dole Institute of Politics (2350 Petefish Drive, Lawrence, 785-864-4900). You can also buy a copy of his memoir. Admission is free. See doleinstitute .org for more information.

LITTLE PINK HOUSES Freedom ain’t free, but access to today’s picnic on the south side of Liberty Memorial is. It’s the second part of the festivities

surrounding the police-escorted Spirit Ride, which goes from Gail’s HarleyDavidson in Grandview (5900 East 150 Highway) to the memorial. The Liberty Memorial grounds (100 West 26th Street) open at 4 p.m., and the picnic starts around 6 with live music from Lee Greenwood and

T H U R S D AY | 7. 2 6 |

Four Fried Chickens and a Coke. The Spirit Ride costs $40 to enter and benefits the National World War I Museum. To register or to learn more about the ride, see feelthepower.com. For more information about the picnic, see the upcoming events section on theworldwar.org.

F R I D AY | 7. 2 7 |

PUNK’D ART

There are only about three weeks left to see the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art exhibit Inventing the Modern World: Decorative Arts at the World’s Fairs 1851-1939. This evening, see it in a different way when the Nelson hosts ARTDynamic: Steampunk, an art, music and hands-on activity happy hour from 6 to 8:30 in the Bloch lobby. “I think it will be a very creative and social time,” says Tara Tonsor, a Nelson-Atkins art educator. She’ll be helping people create their own steampunk-themed artist trading cards while they sip cocktails and listen to the sounds of the External Combustion Orchestra. Admission to the event is free; food and drinks are sold separately, and tickets to the exhibit cost $8 for nonmembers. See nelson-atkins.org for more information.

pitch.com

BOOT SCOOT BROOKSIDE

What’s the complete opposite of next month’s Gathering of the Juggalos at Cave-In-Rock, Illnois? Country Fried Fridays at the Brooksider! Through the end of August, the bar (at 6330 Brookside Plaza, 816-363-4070) is hosting acoustic country acts on its patio from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m., with no cover charge. Tonight, hear E R MO Tonganoxie’s own Joey Glenn, a 24-yearold up-and-coming T A E IN ONL .COM country singer who PITCH has made all the necessary rounds in Nashville and various county fairs before coming to the 63rd Street corridor. “This will be an acoustic performance with guitar, congas and a backup singer,” continued on page 12

EVENTS

J U LY 2 6 - A U G U S T 1 , 2 0 1 2

THE PITCH

11


F R I D AY | 7. 2 7 |

HANGING UP THE CLEATS

T

he history and courage of the Negro Leagues athletes get the children’s stage treatment by Theatre for Young America. Fair Ball, a musical starring Danny Cox and Lonnie McFadden, closes after today, so see it at 10 a.m. or noon at the H&R Block City Stage at Union Station (30 West Pershing Road, 816-460-2020). Tickets cost $9. For more information, call 816-460-2083 or see unionstation.org or tya.org.

continued from page 11 she says. For more information, see brooksiderbarandgrill.com.

S AT U R D AY | 7. 2 8 | PAINTBRUSH

Has Brush Creek finally been tamed? After the September 1977 flood that killed 25 people, the channel running between Roanoke Parkway and Tracy Avenue has been widened, deepened and beautified on the federal, JoCo and KCMO governments’ dimes. This weekend, the effort broadens when the first annual Brush Creek Art Walk, a pleinair painting competition, lines the four miles of streamway. It’s a juried show in which artists create works along Brush Creek Friday through Sunday. (Winners exhibit their works at the UMKC Gallery of Art beginning August 23.) A free concert concludes the art walk at 4 p.m. Sunday at Theis Park (48th Street and Oak), with Howard Iceberg, Hidden Pictures, Barclay Martin and others. The Pitch spoke with Program Director Gregory Summers to get more details. The Pitch: Was this event your idea? Summers: The Kansas City Parks Department approached Anne Garney and myself on how to get people in the newly landscaped eastern end of the Brush Creek streamway. Anne came up with this idea of a “plein-air paint-out,” which are becoming more and more popular across the country among artists and art lovers. How many paintings can each painter enter? Artists can paint as many as they like in the given time period, but due to limited space at UMKC Gallery of Art, we are limiting the number that each artist turns in — no more than one painting per zone. The zones run from 12

THE PITCH

J U LY 2 6 - A U G U S T 1 , 2 0 1 2

pitch.com

Roanoke to Rockhill Road, Rockhill Road to 71 Highway, 71 Highway to Benton Boulevard, and Benton Boulevard to Elmwood. Are you expecting to see any paintings that depict not-so-beautiful visions of Brush Creek? We are not restricting what the artists paint as long as they paint on-site and within the boundaries of the zones. I am sure some less-than-beautiful scenes will be painted, but they sometimes turn out to be the most interesting, or the most beautiful, through the artists’ eyes. What is it about Brush Creek that inspires you? I have been coming down to Brush Creek since the ’60s. It’s a fun, vibrant area where artists, musicians, people of every walk of life gather. A quote from Queen Victoria that I love: “Beware of artists. They mix with all classes of society and are, therefore, the most dangerous.” I think I’m paraphrasing, but I love the people and the land of this area, and all its eccentricities.


Our 63rd Year!

WE D N

ESDAY

8 .1

Independently Owned & Family Operated

ready g KAW Gettin p close-u for its

S U N D AY | 7. 2 9 | CHOICE LEFTOVERS

Encores of the most popular shows at this year’s 10-day Fringe Festival are presented at 1:30, 2, 3, 3:30 and 4:30 p.m. At press time, the acts had not been announced because the final performances are granted to those with the highest attendance numbers. Ticket prices vary. See kcfringe.org for the most up-to-date information and venue locations.

T U E S D AY | 7. 31 | THE FRUIT ROUTE

Thanks to Truman Medical Center and the Hospital Hill Economic Development Corp., the Healthy Harvest Mobile Market cruises through the urban core, delivering

M O N D AY | 7. 3 0 |

H AY L E Y B A R T L E S

NEW REPTILES ARE HERE!

THE WORLD’S GREATEST DRIVE IN

N EWTIL ES R EP HER E! A RE

4k Digital Projection & dts DIGITAL SOUND

Now Showing July 27th -­29th Ice Age: Continental Drift 9:05pm

Depend on us for pet supplies, toys, food, grooming and special orders! Next to Sunfresh 4029 Mill St. (816) 561-7387 | citypets.wordpress.com

Dark Knight Rises 11:40pm

1051 MERRIAM LANE, KCKS WWW.BOULEVARDDRIVEIN.COM

fresh fruit and veggies. Every Tuesday, the former city bus stops at the Jackson County Courthouse (415 East 12th Street) from 9 to 11 a.m., the Lucile H. Bluford Public Library (3050 Prospect) from noon to 3 p.m., and the Boys and Girls Clubs (43rd Street and Cleveland) from 4 to 6 p.m. For more information, see hhedc.com.

REPLAY REDUX

Tuesday television viewing — Frontline, Dance Moms and Bristol Palin: Life’s a Tripp — can be scary, and not in the good way. Entertain yourself in more old-fashioned style with cheap gin and popcorn when the beer garden at the Replay Lounge (946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676) transforms into a bike-in theater, thanks to organizer Emily Scholle (also known as DJ Modrey Hepburn) for Replay Horror Picture Show. “Every Tuesday is a double feature with the first movie as a sort of blockbuster that we legitimately watch. Then the second is shown without sound so I can DJ over it and let the dance party commence,” E MOR she says. Admission is free. Tonight’s film hasn’t been deterT A E IN mined yet. “Let’s just ONL .COM PITCH say that ‘I see you shiver … with antici … pation,’ ” Scholle says. For the full calendar of Replay events, see replaylounge.com.

EVENTS

IF YOU BUILD IT, THEY WILL COME

A

hotel lounge typically isn’t a place with a VIP section or fresh mashup beats. So, ladies, when Enrique Iglesias or Justin Bieber roll through and possibly stay in the cushy new boutique hotel the Ambassador (1111 Grand, 816-298-7700), keep your skirts low and the girls on lockdown because there’s no dancing on the tables here. The Reserve lounge has 20-foot ceilings, white and mahogany décor, and velvet couches. Sit with a bellini and truffled deviled eggs and behave. Look for the grand opening sometime in mid-September. See kansascity .ambassadorhotelcollection.com.

W E D N E S D AY | 8 . 1 | KAW COLLECTIVE

Founded by Natale Collar, KAW Collective officially opens today in the Strawberry Hill neighborhood (405 North Sixth Street, Kansas City, Kansas). Collar and friends have been rehabbing the entire space, which has been created to provide artists an original way to show their works. (Members of the collective are obligated to work one fourhour shift per month and are encouraged to host events.) For more information, see kawcollective.com or search for it on Facebook. — HAYLEY BARTELS E-mail submissions to Filter editor Berry Anderson at calendar@pitch.com. Search our complete listings guide online at pitch.com.

pitch.com

J U LY 2 6 - A U G U S T 1 , 2 0 1 2

THE PITCH

13


’s , G ar y , C K e k i-Q eCa : C o f f e o n s i t o s M ex , T h e E R E H T od rb ILL BE Q, Indios Ca eal GoodFo ll Tour W O H R a W eatb Go BB ilma’s on the un Cabin, W & Magical M j k The Cael Cake Truc Funn

Through Friday July 27

VENUES T I C K E T S F The Union, the Riot Room, McCoy’s, the Foundry, sponsor area, the Back Yard at the Beaumont Club

$6 through July 27, $8 July 28 through August 3, $10 day of. Buy tickets at secure.pitch.com or at any Showcase venue or call 816.561.6061 for information.

E

A

T

U

R

I

N

G

Amy Farrand, Katy & Go-Go, Clay Hughes, Soft Reeds, Mark Lowrey, Jeff Harshbarger, John Velghe, Hipshot Killer, Cherokee Rock Rifle, Max Justus, thePhantom*, the B’Dinas, the Clementines, Diverse, Hidden Pictures, the Latenight Callers, Coyote Bill & His Wild Ones, At the Left Hand of God, Hearts of Darkness, Them Damned Young Livers, The Caves, the Blue Boot Heelers, Making Movies, Root & Stem, DJ Andrew Northern, DJ Sheppa, DJ Tactic, DJ Paul DeMatteo, & more!

Last 2 days to get $6 wristbands at secure.pitch.com before the price increases to $8 on July 28 T-shirts now available for $5 at secure.pitch.com


ART BY

it comes down.

THE RE S A BE MBNI S T E R

BLUE GALLERY

C O U R T E S Y O F L E E D Y-V O U L K O S A R T C E N T E R

LAST CAL L

See this art before

Stephen Dinsmore “Ball Game, Camera Men”

S

tephen Dinsmore paints America’s pastime in the style of that other crowd-pleaser: French Impressionism. (Last year’s Monet exhibition at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art drew nearly 100,000 visitors, though the movement implied in Dinsmore’s brushy, gestural forms is more in line with Degas’ ballet dancers.) Despite the athletics on display in Dinsmore’s paintings of batters, pitchers and fielders, his depictions of ballparks are the standouts in this show. He renders his stadiums with tiny, fleeting strokes that just barely convey their function. The architectural forms take a moment to register with the eye, and the satisfyingly unsettling result is more Dali than Degas. "Ball Game, Camera Men" is part of the exhibition Ballpark Alchemy, closing July 31 at the Blue Gallery, 118 Southwest Boulevard, 816-527-0823, bluegalleryonline.com.

Shannon Sullivan “Metamorphosizing”

T

he 16 football-sized sculptures that make up Shannon Sullivan’s hypnotic wallhanging installation “Metamorphosizing” suggest pods or cocoons — safe spaces to make a transition. But the array of materials in Sullivan’s work feels less like a chrysalis than an attempt to freeze a moment in time. Unexpected ephemera — pills, cigarettes, condoms — share space with sentimental objects, such as handwritten letters, clothing and even chopped-off dreadlocks, in these compressed tight forms. A haikulike comment accompanying each sculpture can be read as a description of each particular memory. “Hanzi paper from Korea that I did not make. Directions to Mu-Sang-Sa temple. 108 bows performed at 3 o’clock every morning,” one recalls.

Ellen W. Wolf “Seasonal Crops: Non-Ethanol Corn” hanks to the rise of agribusiness, corn is no longer just a grain. It’s something bound less for summer picnics than for gas tanks and soda bottles and packaged-food factories. Ellen Wilkins Wolf’s layering of divergent text, colors and images in “Seasonal Crops: Non-Ethanol Corn” reflects this dispiriting complexity. Pieces of candy corn, painted in multiple hues (perhaps representing the controversial high-fructose corn syrup), appear against the backdrop of a cornfield. Around the border, block letters spell out the title’s text. Is Wolf making a judgment? It’s impossible to know, though the corny visual pun might be a hint (if nothing else, it defuses the most preachy interpretation of the politics under discussion), but that only makes the work more intriguing. Both “Seasonal Crops” and “Metamorphosizing” are part of the exhibition Victoria Ann Reed, Shannon Sullivan, Ellen W. Wolf: Terra, which closes July 28 at Leedy-Voulkos Art Center, 2012 Baltimore, 816-474-1919, leedy-voulkos.com.

E-mail feedback@pitch.com

C O U R T E S Y O F L E E D Y-V O U L K O S A R T C E N T E R

T

pitch.com J U LY 2 6 - A U G U S T 1 , 2 0 1 2 T H E P I T C H 15 pitch.com M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X T H E P I T C H 1


DOWNLOAD OUR NEW IPHONE APP

Tickets ONLY $10

Must be purchased at the Trolley stop.

thekansascitystrip.com

816.512.5555

EXPERIENCE KANSAS CITY’S NIGHT LIFE ON FRIDAY & SATURDAYS G heYa_d \b[[j e\ jhebb[oi © ef[hWj_d] Mfc C IWc © N [dj[hjW_dc[dj Z_ijh_Yji K F A h [ i jWk h W d j i < XW h i © [ nY b k i _ l [ \ e e Z < Z h _ d a i f [ Y _ W b i

WALDO

LEW’S GRILL & BAR $2.50 Budlight Pints, FREE SPINACH DIP w/any purchase QUINTON’S $3 Domestic Draws THE WELL BAR - Grill and Rooftop Free Spinach Dip Appetizer with Entree

MCCORMICK & SCHMICK’S Happy Hour 9pm to 1030pm Great Drink and Food Specials! THE OAKROOM at the Intercontinental $5 Wells $5 House Wine $3 Domestics Small plates and Live Music 8-12 RAPHEAL HOTEL Happy Hour 5-Close Live Entertainment GRANFALLOON Smirfnoff Special

BROOKSIDE

O’DOWD’S LITTLE DUBLIN Free Cover & $5 Borulrish Vodka

BOBBY BAKER’S LOUNGE $2 Budweiser Longnecks

BROOKSIDER SPORTS BAR & GRILL $2.50 Corona & Corona Light No Cover CHARLIE HOOPER’S BAR & GRILLE Fridays- $1 off Budweiser $1 off Boulevard Wheat MICHAEL FORBES GRILLE Reverse Happy Hour 9:30pm-1am $1.50 Off Budweiser $1 OFF Boulevard Wheat

PLAZA BLANC BURGERS + BOTTLES Reverse Happy Tacos, Calimari, and gret drink specials! FIGLIO, THE ITALIAN $5 OFF any purchase 7-10pm FRED P OTTS Buy one Burger get one Free M & S GRILL $6 Crown Royal Drinks with Wristband

TOMFOOLERIES Friday & Saturday Happy Hour 9pm-close Dom Draw $2.50, Well $2.75 Call $4.00 Cuervo Marg $4.50

WESTPORT CALIFORNOS $5 OFF $12 purchase BEER KITCHEN Discounts with your Wristband! BUZZARD BEACH $1.25 Domestic Draws $2.50 Wells DARK HORSE $2 Wells $2 Domestic Draws DAVE’S STAGECOACH INN $3 Jameson Shots $1 Off Pinnacle Vodka (Gummy Bear, Cake, Whipcream, etc)

ERNIE BIGG’S (PIANO BAR) 2 for 1 Cover $4 Sweet Tea Vodka FIDEL’S CIGARS 10% Off $20 purchase of Cigars (The Only Cigar shop on The Kc Strip!) FIREFLY $2 Drafts $4 Wells GREEN ROOM BURGERS AND BEER Free Small Fries with Any Entrée HARPO’S RESTAURANT BAR Food and Drink Specials. Half Price Burgers Wednesday and Sunday JOE’S PIZZA Buy the Slice 2 Slices For $5 JERUSALEM CAFÉ $5 off Hooka JERSEY DOG, HOT DOG CART 2 Jumbo Dogs $5 6:30pm-3am FridaySaturday $1 off any menu item KELLY’S WESTPORT INN $1 Off Cover MISSY B’S Free Cover RIOT ROOM $1 OFF any American Craft Beer with wrist band MURRAY’S ICE CREAM & COOKIES $3.75 Single Scoop TORRE’S PIZZERIA Any specialty Pizza $10 2 Slices For $4 WESTPORT CAFE AND BAR $5 Shot and a Beer

WESPORT COFFEE HOUSE 15% OFF Any coffee drink with a wrist band

DOWNTOWN JOHN’S BIG DECK (Upper) $4 Bombs $3.75 Boulevards Bucket of Domestic Bottles(5) with 2 Topping Pizza for $20.

P&L DISTRICT BAR LOUIE $3.50 Beer Specials $2 Fresh Fruit Shot FRAN’S RESTAURANT $5.99 Premium Breakfast on Fridays, $4 Bacardi 360 Vodka after 10pm PBR SKY BAR $5 Jack Daniel PIZZA BAR $3 Boulevard Wheat Pints MOSAIC No Cover before 11pm DRUNKEN FISH Appetizers. Sushi rolls. Drinks: Zinn Martini, Asian Marry, and Madam Butterfly.

TENGO SED CANTINA $3 Eljimador Margaritas ANGELS ROCK BAR No Cover on Friday SHARK BAR $4 Malibu Cocktails Z STRIKE LANES No cover Friday & 2 for 1 Games

18TH AND VINE DANNY’S BIG EASY Get Your Wristbands Here! JUKE HOUSE Friday $1 Off Cocktails & $2 Domestic Beer BLUE ROOM $5 Off Cover with Wristband

MARTINI CORNER VELVET DOG $1 Off All Sky Drinks THE DROP $5.50 Specialty Martinis & Cocktails

THE DUBLINER $3.50 Boulevard Wheat on Fridays Free cover with wrist band HOWL AT THE MOON 2 for 1 cover

TOWER TAVERN $3.50 Wells $10 Pizza 7pm-12 SOL CANTINA $4 el Jimador Margaritas $2.75 Pacifico Bottles

MAKER’S MARK $5 Cocktails MC FADDEN’S SPORT’S $4 UV Vodka Drinks

MONACO No Cover Dj’s Friday and Saturday nights


S TA G E

EVERYTHING ALL THE TIME

Hot, erratic, spread out —

BY

yup, Fringe is still awesome.

D E BO R A H HIRS CH

the Friday audience that this was the form his play would take for the rest of the festival. Kyle Hatley, associate artistic director at the Rep, and Matthew Rapport had rehearsed the revised script for the first time just a few hours before this night’s debut, he said, and would have pages in hand for part of the show. Very discreetly, they did — and they still gave deft, sensitive performances. (They played brothers meeting up at a remote farmhouse to take care of some, shall we say, family business.) Is Genochio’s a perfect script? Well, how could it be? But I found it absorbing, and if Genochio keeps tinkering, I’ll gladly see it again. Lies, Phalluses and Fairytales, performed just three times over the 10 days, played its first night to a small but vocally supportive crowd at the Unicorn’s Main Stage. (I somehow got from Crown Center to 39th and Main with several minutes to spare before the 9:30 start.) A creation of the talented artists’ collective Red Theater Omaha, it isn’t a traditional theater piece but rather a mix of 25 very short “scenes” — averaging a couple of minutes apiece — performed in quick succession, some incorporating movement, song, dance or poetry. Many are funny, some are serious, a few don’t work quite as well. (No performance is the same, according to Colin Ferguson, artistic director and one of the writers and performers.) One, written that day and titled “Perspective,” takes on the Aurora, Colorado, movie shootings. It was an effective (and, I thought, affecting) expression of Fringe’s fluidity and immediacy, and it

H AY L E Y B A R T E L S

H AY L E Y B A R T E L S

onfession: I’m biased. I love Fringe — or, anyway, the idea of it. I love the festival’s motley collision of invention and audacity. Now I just have to learn to love its scale. This thing just gets bigger. In its eighth season, that means a program of 80-plus local, regional and national theater, dance, art, music, film, magic, stand-up, performance-art and burlesque acts. Choosing a manageable itinerary from that something-for-everyone slate, with venues scattered around midtown and downtown, is almost cruelly vexing. There’s no way to see everything, and coordinating my initial picks with the schedule (in its final form at kcfringe.org) is its own challenge. That’s not a complaint, and this year all it took for my bias to kick in again were the first words spoken by the host of the opening-night preview (held for the first time at Kansas City Rep’s Spencer Theatre, on the UMKC campus). “It’s the most awesome thing that happens in Kansas City all year,” Lucky DeLuxe said. Hyperbole? Sure. True? Maybe! That party (the evening of July 19) was billed as a chance to see snippets of the various offerings, but the festive audience that filled the Spencer would have been ready to fringe even without a peek. Part of the excitement, after all, comes from not knowing what to expect. Some Fringe pieces are still getting worked out, and others — not always for the better — have been well-tested. Some are performed by their creators, and some have been cast. With a limited number of performances over 10 days and the competition of so many choices, performers and creators have little opportunity to build an audience. Every site displays promotional cards for other Fringe shows, and volunteers (or the artists themselves) pass out more in the hopes of encouraging attendance. If you take that bait, you won’t keep to your list — and you probably shouldn’t anyway. Something always ends up sounding more interesting. When Fringe officially began last Friday, July 20, I’d already pondered and secondguessed myself before settling on two shows: Tack Driver at Crown Center’s Off Center Theatre (2450 Grand) and Lies, Phalluses and Fairytales at the Unicorn (3828 Main). That doesn’t sound like a long night, but consider the geographic challenges. Crown Center has a lot going on: LegoLand, the aquarium, the Screenland movie theater and, on Friday nights, a free 9 p.m. film at Crown Center Square. So: parking. I needed a space close to the exit for a quick departure so I could be in midtown for the next play. (All shows start on time, and sellouts aren’t uncommon, especially when the venue is small or curiosity is high.) Tack Driver drew a good crowd for its first performance, perhaps owing to the names involved. For one, KC Rep producing director Jerry Genochio was making his debut as a playwright. I’d seen a few minutes of Tack Driver at the preview — after which, he announced on Friday, he had added 40 new pages. He told

H AY L E Y B A R T E L S

C

At the Fringe opening-night preview July 19, clockwise from top: Tack Driver, Red Theater Omaha and host Lucky DeLuxe didn’t overpower a fast-moving, participatory and energetic hour. I got an earlier start Saturday, beginning with a 6 p.m. show at the Fishtank (1715 Wyandotte). The theater filled to capacity for The Greatest Speech of All Time, edited and performed by Timothy Mooney, who brought historical figures — Socrates, Frederick Douglass, Abraham Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Winston Churchill and Martin Luther King Jr. — to life, and relevance, through their own words. It was a powerful performance, and it proved impossible to top as the high point of my evening. After a quick stop at the nearby Pieroguys, I headed straight down Main Street to the Unicorn. A show had just let out, and a crowd, including many involved in local theater, had already gathered in the lobby for the next event. (Each performance doesn’t set up until the show before it has been dismantled.) We were waiting for Ice Cream Social ... Issues, a one-act written by local actress and playwright Natalie Liccardello with her sister, Talia Liccardello. The play got off to a slow start before developing into a comic mélange of family conflict. The witty dialogue quickened, and the seven-person cast played off one another with timing sharp enough to disguise areas of the script that could use some fine-tuning.

Next up: Metropolitan Ensemble Theatre, close by on Main, for four short one-acts by the Kansas City Playwright League, based at MET. Some of the Unicorn audience showed up as well. As a night progresses, and over the course of the festival, faces become familiar — in the crowd and onstage. One of the actresses in Ice Cream Social (Meredith Wolfe) walked into the MET lobby for a role in the first of the four vignettes. Homegrown one-acts, more often than not, aren’t made for keeping, and the four 15-minute plays in 4Play add up to a mixed bag. Local actors — including Philip “Blue Owl” Hooser and Alan Tilson — performed well to Saturday’s full house, and there was room for the farcical, the crude and the simply entertaining. Ultimately, though, the quartet came up a little short and more than a little silly. One, involving a mathoriented sexual kink, was memorably hilarious. (Not as memorable: 4Play kept bringing up mayonnaise.) But even disappointing work can be forgiven easily when it’s local and it’s Fringe. At show’s end, at 10:30, I was ready to call it a night — and happy to map out the next day. Two shows on my list overlapped, forcing another tough decision. Though Dead Wrong hadn’t impressed me at its Thursday-night preview (admittedly a narrow context), an acquaintance I ran into at 4Play recommended it. I was in: 3:30 p.m., the Red Room at Nica’s 320. It was a good choice. Out-of-towner Katherine Glover’s one-woman play ended my weekend on a profound note. In Dead Wrong, her fictional protagonist is dead-sure about the identity of the man who raped her. A writer, storyteller and journalist, Glover has based her monologue on actual people and events. She shows, in a very real way, what happens to those involved, particularly the victim of the crime, when innocent persons are tried and convicted for crimes they didn’t commit. Nica’s 320 isn’t the best venue for this type of work — sound was spotty, a person was eating — but Glover’s work radiates emotion. This is Fringe at its most moving. I’d skipped Dandelion Chains on Sunday in part because it wasn’t on my original list. While in line for The Greatest Speech of All Time, though, I’d met Shanna Shrum in the Fishtank’s lobby, where she was promoting her show. The Chicago artist portrays six characters, men and women with distinct personalities and inner struggles, among them a gay couple battling, in 1988, to keep their adopted daughter. It is yet another absorbing, well-acted original work that demonstrates what can happen when all the elements come together to make good theater — elements that combine in Fringe’s serendipitous festival meetup of artist and audience. And there’s almost a week left. Through July 29. See kcfringe.org for details.

E-mail deborah.hirsch@pitch.com

pitch.com J U LYM2O6N- A S T 1X, , 2200102X TTHHEE PPI ITTCCHH 17 pitch.com TU HGXUX–X 1


Some serious fun...

Killer in the Clown Car The Mystery Train

816-813-9654

www.kcmysterytrain.com

Blue Springs’ Favorite Family Restaurant

Restaurant & Bar

EVERYTHING MUST SELL REGARDLESS OF PRICE! O N L I N E AU C T I O N O N LY !

Overland  Park’s   Longbranch  Ale  House

“Our Signaturre e Skille letini”

www.skylightmo.com

11867 8 6 7 SSW W SState t a t e RRoute outt e 77,, BBlue ou lue SSprings, pringss , M pring MOO

Try Our New Lunch Menu!

816.988.7958 8 16.98 16 988 98 8 .79 .795 58 Mon - Wed 11am - 12:30am Thurs - Sat 11am - 1:30am Sun 11am - 12:30am

Explosive | Groovy | Hot |

Saturday, July 28th, 2012 9pm until 1am

Ends Sunday, July, 29 2012 at 7 pm. Complete  business  liquidation!  Over  600+  lots  of  equipment  from   one  of  Overland  Parks  famous  restaurants.  TV’s,  bar  equipment,   Neons,  patio  furniture,  full  kitchen  and  pizza  equipment.  

This  place  has  it  all! Come and preview all the equipment on Friday, July 27 from 2-­4 pm.

www.equip-­bid.com 18

THE PITCH

J U LY 2 6 - A U G U S T 1 , 2 0 1 2

pitch.com


CAFÉ

CHINESE REVOLUTION

With its new Plaza restaurant, Bo Lings gets bigger — and even better.

BY

CHARLES FERRUZZA

Bo Lings • 4701 Jefferson, 816-753-1718 • Hours: 11 a.m.–10 p.m. Monday–Thursday, 11 a.m.–11 p.m. Friday, 10 a.m.–11 p.m. Saturday, 10 a.m.–10 p.m. Sunday, formal dim sum 10 a.m.–3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday • Price: $$–$$$

hinese restaurants have been in Kansas City for nearly as long as locals have gone out to eat. Chinese settlers arrived here in the 19th century as railroad employees or laborers, and some stayed in the river town to open their own small businesses. As far back as 1900, the city directory listed several Chinese eateries, and soon the city’s fanciest Asian restaurant opened: King Joy Lo. If there’s a Chinese restaurant with a wellestablished brand in Kansas City today, it’s Bo Lings, the best recognized Chinese-food name in Kansas City since King Joy Lo. I’ve met many, many people who won’t go out for Cantonese or Szechuan dishes anywhere else. Owners Richard and Theresa Ng opened their first dining operation at 90th Street and Metcalf, in Overland Park, in 1983. Four years later came a second, in the Board of Trade Building on the Country Club Plaza. Today, their six-restaurant franchise is a mini empire — one with a new flagship on the other side of the Plaza. That dominance has come with certain costs. The Ngs’ expansion, during which they’ve maintained a hands-on presence in each kitchen, has always meant long working hours for the husband-and-wife team. “I think we’re working longer hours now,” says Richard Ng, who turned 56 this month, coinciding with the Plaza Bo Lings’ move across Brush Creek. “Our parents raised our children,” he adds. “We were just so busy.” Beyond that big brand name, of course, the Ngs’ restaurants have a solid reputation for clean kitchens and dining rooms, efficient service, and an accessible menu that unites Cantonese dishes with American-Chinese creations (moo goo gai pan, containing mushrooms and sliced chicken; sweet-and-sour chicken; and — by request, anyway — egg foo yong). “For our new Plaza location,” Richard Ng says, “we’ve combined our two menus for the fi rst time, melding the popular traditional dishes with the Chinese dishes that were mostly only ordered by Asian patrons.” That decision finds visual illustration inside the two-month-old Bo Lings in the Plaza’s Skelly Building. It feels not like a Chinese restaurant but rather a multicultural dining palace reflecting culinary influences as diverse as Vietnamese, Thai and French. This is, for one thing, the fi rst Bo Lings with a pastry kitchen, where bakers whip up feather-light layer cakes slathered with gloriously rich buttercream frosting. That’s an extraordinary delight for diners who, like me, see no reward in ending a meal with bean-paste buns and a fortune cookie. “Fancy desserts are relatively unknown in China because there’s so little dairy in our culinary culture,” Ng says. “But ChineseAmericans love cake. We went into the custom pastry business because we had so many

ANGELA C. BOND

C

Even the shrimp seem bigger now. requests for wedding cakes.” I’m all for the marriage of culinary cultures if it means finishing off a meal of spicy Beijing crispy beef with a big slab of mocha or lemon layer cake as pretty and tasty as anything I’d fi nd at Andre’s Confiserie Suisse. You get a look at those cakes in a refrigerated case near the entrance to this onetime business-office suite. It’s one of several glamorous touches, sending a contemporary, Las Vegas echo through this big space. As though in answer to the King Joy Lo legacy, the tile f loors here gleam like marble. There also are thick glass panels bright with theatrical LED illumination, strikingly modern chairs in bold Mandarin red, and granite-topped tables. Ornate screens close off the private dining rooms, a palatial change from the drab openness of the old Board of Trade space. Behind the rich scenes here, the Ngs’ two children, now young adults, have taken their places in the family business. “Rebecca handles catering and staff training at the Plaza Bo Lings, and Raymond is wearing a number of different hats,” Ng says. And in the kitchen at the Plaza is another new face, a young chef named James Clark — Rebecca Ng’s husband. He’s learning the family business in a trial by fire. The first time I stopped at the new Plaza venue for dinner, I ordered one of its menu additions, a plate of sliced tea-smoked duck.

The menu promised puffy steamed yeast options go, this one is a little Disneyland — the more serious meatless items are better buns, slivers of cool cucumber and sticky served with curry vegetables or one of the plum sauce. It sounded divine. What arrived tofu dishes — but sometimes pretty and fruity before me, however, was a fowl overcooked are in order. to the point of petrifaction. Another new addition to the Bo Lings menu Clark didn’t prepare this duck, but he’d sounds meatless enough: home-style chive seen it being carried through the dining dumplings in a translucent rice wrapper. room (like a rare fossil being presented to a group of archeologists). He was at my table But more than chives and ginger are in this pocket: bits of roasted pork in a flash, offering to bring a and shrimp (unmentioned different dish. But I wanted in the menu I saw). It’s delectea-smoked duck, having Bo Lings table enough that I’d sneak heard Richard Ng lovingly Chive dumplings ........ $8.95 around with it again. describe the long preparaTea-smoked duck ......$17.95 And I’m not quibbling tion process: the way the Pineapple fried rice ... $13.95 over a few unexpected morbreast is marinated in salt Moo goo gai pan ........ $11.95 sels of flesh. This relocated, and spices overnight and Slice of layer cake......$3.75 updated Bo Lings is the culthen oven-smoked, layered mination of everything that with rice, tea and spices for the Ng family has dreamed at least three hours; the about for decades. A limited but deeply satway the bird is then taken out and steamed and, fi nally, roasted to make a light, crispy, isfying dim sum menu is now available every day. (The more formal affair, with the rolling golden crust. “We’re still working out kinks in this carts, remains on Saturday and Sunday.) The featured dishes are beautifully presented kitchen,” Clark said. So no duck that night. But when I returned to taste the duck again, and still affordable. You want cheap fried it was wonderful, as moist and delicious as rice? Go to a buffet. Want luxury? Go to Bo Lings. This one manages to evoke the best of I’d imagined. That first night, I set aside the duck and the Vegas strip and the Ming Dynasty at the tried another new dish: the Polynesian- same time. Finally, you can have your cake influenced fresh pineapple fried rice, served and eat your tofu, too. in a hollowed-out pineapple shell. I prefer the vegetarian version of this creation, in which Have a suggestion for a restaurant the fried rice holds pineapple, scallions, The Pitch should review? carrots, onions and cashews. As vegetarian E-mail charles.ferruzza@pitch.com

pitch.com J U LYM2O6N- A U GXUX–X ST X 1 ,, 2200102X TTHHEE PPIITTCCHH 19 pitch.com TH 1


FAT C I T Y

BOTTLE ROCKET

BY

JON AT H A N BENDER

Amigoni Urban Winery uncorks in the West Bottoms.

Mediterranean

Shrak Chicken Sandwich

Grilled Chicken, Green Peppers, Onions, Cheese, Mayo in a hot grilled wrap.

320 E. 51st St. Kansas City, MO

816.756.5444

saharakc.com

Offer expires August 8, 2012. Discounted item must be of equal or lesser value.

Gyros, Falafel, Salads and more...

located inside SHELL gas station

604 W 75th St Kansas City, MO (816)822-8759 HOURS

Sun-Thur: 11am-9pm Fri-Sat: 11am-10pm

HAPPY HOUR Coming Soon NEW BAR & GRILL IN SHAWNEE! 10901 West 75th, Shawnee, KS 66214 | 913-766-0052

Rise  &  Shine

Breakfast

Catering

& Lunch

Gift Baskets

Breakfast: Mon-Fri 7-11am, Sat 7-12pm, Sun 8-1:30pm Lunch: Mon-Sat 11-3pm, Sun 11-1:30pm

409 W. Gregory, KCMO (816) 444-193rwww.theclassiccookie.com

20

THE PITCH

J U LY 2 6 - A U G U S T 1 , 2 0 1 2

pitch.com

he Amigoni Urban Winery is so hot right now that even thieves have taken notice. Someone with wire cutters made off with owners Michael and Kerry Amigoni’s bottle-shaped sign two weeks ago — the only hiccup in an otherwise smooth coming-out party for the couple’s three-month-old tasting and event space, at 1505 Genessee. “The original space really only had a function as a tasting room, to introduce people to our wine,” Michael Amigoni says. “Whereas this space allows people to hang out.” That first location, which opened in May 2007, was a block away, in the Livestock Exchange Building, at 1600 Genessee. Back then, it was known as Inland Sea — a name that changed in 2010, when the couple bought out former partner John Poston. “I knew we needed to relocate and I knew we needed more exposure,” Kerry Amigoni says. “I just never thought it would be this spectacular. The bones of this building were beautiful. We just had to pick the right paint.” That spectacular skeleton was once the Daily Drovers Telegram Building. With the help of the Dolphin Gallery’s John O’Brien, the duo transformed it from an industrial warehouse to a wine playground. The two-story, octagonal tasting room has a sunlit foyer with creamcolored walls and dark-brown wood. The barrel room, in back, has a more industrial feel, with a poured-concrete floor and wines stored in barrels behind large wooden-and-glass doors. A duo of wine taps dispense small-batch wines not available in bottles (right now: Amigoni’s 2010 Malbec and Unfiltered Urban Bianco). “It’s more green — there’s less bottles and corks,” Michael Amigoni says. “And the wine is fresh because there’s low sulfites and the temperature is perfect.” Beer and wine ($5 for five wine samples) are available six days a week on a walk-in basis. And it’s often Michael or Kerry behind the bar; the two split time between the tasting room and an upstairs office. The beer taps offer Boulevard, with a mix of seasonal and limited-release brews. Five dollars buys a tasting quartet of 4-ounce samples, served in a holder made from a wine-barrel stave. In its new space, Amigoni also offers a cheese plate with cheeses from Green Dirt Farms, and grissini and parmesan crackers from Farm to Market Bread Co. The couple are considering adding a charcuterie plate, with Italian meats from Volpi Foods in St. Louis or Local Pig here in Kansas City. Wine classes, glassware education and cheese tastings are in the works. “We’ve always believed people should be drinking wine with food,” Michael Amigoni says. They don't grow Norton grapes, the staple of many Missouri wineries. Rather, the goal is to bring European varietals to the Missouri countryside. Over the past decade, the winery has expanded from cabernet franc to cabernet sauvignon, petit verdot, chardonnay and

B R O O K E VA N D E V E R

T

The Amigonis in Amigoni viognier, turning to drip irrigation recently in an attempt to combat the high temperatures. Before the vineyard, the Amigonis had tended to 40 grape plants in their backyard — a pair of plants still grows behind their Leawood home. “I hope we’re leading the charge that there are alternatives,” Michael Amigoni says. “Missouri and Kansas have a bad reputation for wine. We will never make a sweet wine, just like Boulevard will never make a light beer.” Amigoni is starting to pop up on local menus, with a dozen restaurants carrying different vintages. At Room 39, the Blue Bird Bistro and Affäre, the Malbec and Urban Bianco are on tap. But the business remains focused on the West Bottoms, with release parties at the nearby Genessee Royale Bistro, visible from Amigoni’s patio. “We love this neighborhood,” Kerry Amigoni says. “We love where it’s headed.” The new sign should be ready in two weeks. Amigoni is open from 11 a.m.–6 p.m. Tuesday– Thursday and Saturday; 11 a.m.–7 p.m. Friday; and 12–5 p.m. Sunday.

E-mail jonathan.bender@pitch.com

BUCKET BRIGADE Amigoni is also the site of one of Deschutes Brewery’s first Base Camp events. The weeklong series of tastings and dinners — meant to introduce the Bend, Oregon, brewery to the Kansas City market — includes a discussion titled “Hats Off to Homebrewers” 6–9 p.m. Tuesday, July 31. Brewers from Deschutes and Boulevard Brewing Co. are slated to join local home-brewer Pancho Luna to talk beer over a spread of Oklahoma Joe’s, Swagger, Green Dirt Farm cheese and Farm to Market bread. Tickets cost $25. Deschutes representatives are in town from Monday July 30, through Saturday, August 4. See deschutesbrewery.com/events/all/MO for a full schedule of Base Camp events.


MIMI’S VIETNAMESE CAFE

A KC Favorite for 20 Years!

OPEN LATE DAILY OPEN EARLY TOO

T ABSOLU A K D O V

.99 5 1 $

750mL

MONDAY NIGHTS: SPRING ROLLS $1 EACH DINE IN ONLY LUNCH: MON-FRI 11-2 SAT 12-3 1806 1/2 W. 39TH ST KCMO DINNER: MO-TH 5-9 FRI/SAT 5-10 (816) 531-4447

WESTPORT 1106 WESTPORT RD KC, MO 816-561-3500

LATIN AMERICAN CUISINE

WALDO 8447 WORNALL RD KC, MO 816-363-3984

 814 Massachusetts St., Lawrence, KS (785) 841-1100 | laparrillalawrence.com Sun, Mon: 11am-9pm | Tues-Thur: 11am-10pm Fri, Sat: 11am-11pm 11977 S. Strang Line Rd., Olathe, KS (913) 829-0450 | LaParrillaKS.com Tues-Thur: 11am-10pm | Fri, Sat: 11am-11pm

Tacos?

Tired  of   900 est Southlvwd B KCMO

Open   t M11aomn  --  7Spam

presents

Family  owne operated  f d  &   or 80  years

816-842-660

1

Specializing in

Pork Tender Sandwiches, Burgers, House Cut Fries

SHOOTER JENNINGS AUG 11 @ 9 pm Advance tickets $20

Eat  on  the  cheap  at  the  best  greasy   spoon  on  the  boulevard.

TICKETS

in advance at knuckleheadskc.com

WHERE THE BEST MUSICIANS IN THE WORLD PLAY

KNUCKLEHEADS 3PDIFTUFSt,$.0t816-483-1456 pitch.com

J U LY 2 6 - A U G U S T 1 , 2 0 1 2

THE PITCH

21


MUSIC

LABEL MAKERS

Golden Sound Records and the

BY

evolving role of the record label.

D AV ID HUDN A L L

A

B R O O K E VA N D E V E R

s business plans go, starting a record label is roughly as advisable as enrolling in a trade school for switchboard operators or investing in a door-to-door milk-distribution company. (Working in print media is a shade less fiscally prudent.) Recorded music is a decreasingly viable commodity, and by now most of us understand why. The Internet has changed the way people approach, consume and value music. Spotify charges $10 a month, and in return, users are afforded the privilege of listening to any song in the world, anytime they want, anywhere they want. Record labels traditionally have asked that we pay about that much for a single album. “It’s weird, because I’m really interested in the way record labels used to work, like old Detroit labels from the 1950s and stuff,” says Mat Shoare. Along with fellow musicians Ross Brown and Jerad Tomasino, Shoare runs Golden Sound Records, a local label. “It’s fun to read about that stuff, but there’s almost nothing that translates to the way things work today. We’re in totally new territory, and it’s incredibly scary. But at the same time, music Future moguls? From left: Brown, Tomasino hasn’t changed. People still want good, quality and Shoare music. So it’s a matter of figuring out how to Everyday/Everynight — into a sustainable reroll with the punches, figure out a new way.” cord label. In addition to the founders’ own Shoare is 22 years old and looks about 17, and projects, Golden Sound is now releasing rehe’s in possession of a contagious optimism cords from more established common to particularly deKansas City acts (the Caves, termined young people. It’s Empty Spaces, Hidden Pictures) and from not impossible to see why. with the Caves out-of-town acts such as In two short years, Golden and Soft Reeds, Baby Teardrops (New York) Sound has grown from a nebThursday, July 26, at the Brick. and Millions of Boys (Omaha). ulous collaboration among What’s in it for these bands Shoare, Brown and Tomaisn’t quantifiable by the old music-model metsino — they’re all solo performers, and they all rics; cash certainly isn’t at the top of the list. play in one another’s indie-rock bands, which “Obviously, there’s not a lot of revenue cominclude the Empty Spaces, Fullbloods and

ing in and out of the label from record sales,” Brown says. “We had some personal investments to the label early on to get things going, and since then we’ve been able to maintain a pretty good balance financially. What we try to do is position ourselves as partners with the artists. There’s only so much money we can provide them to record an album, but we can help them out with other aspects of being in a band.” “For example, Ross has done a good number of the masters we’ve released,” Shoare says. (Brown and Tomasino met at BRC Audio Productions, a training school for audio engineering.) “We can mix records in-house. We can record in-house.”

Richard Gintowt, frontman of Hidden Pictures, says signing on with Golden Sound was something of a why-not decision. “I’ve always released my records independently, and after getting to know those guys and their bands in the last year or so, the prospect of having friends help release our record just sounded more fun,” Gintowt says, “and easier. They have a kick-ass website, a nice store on the site where we can sell digital downloads without going through a third party, and we’ve arranged a little split for digital sales. But more than that, they help us partner with folks, help us with shows. We share contacts and information about places to play, bands to play with, journalists to hit up. It’s continued on page 24

OVER THE RAINBOW

T

he most recent release from Golden Sound Records is Hidden Pictures’ Rainbow Records, a sunny, indie-pop joint with boy-girl harmonies and crunchy power-pop tones. (Think She & Him if they existed in the days of 105.9 the Lazer.) The Pitch recently chatted up frontman and songwriter Richard Gintowt about the record. The Pitch: We talked earlier about Hidden Pictures working with Golden Sound, which is interesting because I feel like a lot of this new record is about things like record labels and record shops, and how those things are kind of disappearing. Gintowt: Yeah, that’s all in there. I didn’t set out to write a themed record, but half to two-thirds of the tracks have something to do with music I grew up with or am nostalgic for. I think it’s partly about taking stock of what I imagined my music career being when I was 18 versus what it is now that I’m 30. It’s not a raging success or a massive disappointment, just somewhere in between. “Solo Record Shop” seems like it’s along those 22

THE PITCH

lines, about the conflicts involved with aging and maturing as a musician. I think some of that stems from a conversation Michelle and I had about how most songwriters have this 15- to 20-year epoch of productiveness. I was making the argument that bands could make great records in their

J U LY 2 6 - A U G U S T 1 , 2 0 1 2

pitch.com

bittersweet feeling, but still some hopefulness 50s. The central point of the conversation, I and excitement about music and record stores. guess, was Wilco. I still like their more recent Is Rainbow Records an actual place or thing? records, but Michelle [Gaume, Hidden Pictures’ singer] doesn’t. I guess I just kind of refuse to or a metaphor? or both? Rainbow Records was a record store in subaccept the idea that all songwriters eventually urban Chicago that I used to frequent. The guy go through a decline. Because there’s guys like who owned it was a little older and very chatty Dylan, Waits and Leonard Cohen who have done some of their best stuff in their later years. — if you started talking to him about classic So how does that connect with the idea of a rock, he’d never let you go. It wasn’t the hippest store around, but I loved that I could find cool solo record shop? What is a solo record shop? indie stuff in the dollar bin. I guess that was sort of The song “Rainbow Records” also inspired by Erik [Voeks], Hidden Pictures, is mostly a lie: I never skipped who has worked in record with Southeast Engine class in eighth grade and I shops his whole life. I was and Erik Voeks barely listened to GNR. But I imagining a record store Saturday, July 28, at RecordBar did love my first New Kids on that sells only solo records by the Block tape, and they were the frontmen of once-great my first concert, and I’ll never forgive my mom bands. Like some old Stephen Stills record that for making us leave early to beat traffic. I guess nobody cares about and wasn’t that good. Just this vacant place where these old songwriters the song seemed to encapsulate some sentiments present in the other tracks, so I made it go to rot. But I think there’s something hopethe title of the album. ful in that, too — they’re going down swinging. — DAVID HUDNALL I think there’s probably a lot of that on the record: a little bit of nostalgia, a little bit of a E-mail david.hudnall@pitch.com pitch.com

M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X

THE PITCH

1


VENUE HOTTEST in Johnson County

LIVE MUSIC 5 NIGHTS A WEEK • OPEN TUES-SAT NO COVER, 4pm - Midnight

WEDNESDAY JULY 25 RICK BACUS TRIO 7-10PM THURSDAY JULY 26 OLD NO.5 8-11PM FRIDAY JULY 27 JEREMY BUTCHER & THE BAILJUMPERS 8-11PM SATURDAY JULY 28 CROSSEYED CAT 8-11PM TUESDAY JULY 31 DAVE HAYS BAND OPEN JAM 8:30PM-12:30AM SERVING JON RUSSELL’S AWARD WINNING BBQ

SERVED FROM 5PM - 10PM

135TH ST. & QUIVIRA

12056 W. 135th St. OPKS 913-239-9666 www.quasimodokc.com

INSIDE | The Clementines 9pm | | Root & Stem 10pm | Soft Reeds 11pm | | Hipshot Killer 12am | The Caves 1am | OUTSIDE | Paul Dematteo 9pm | | Brent Tactic 11pm | Buy your Showcase wristbands now for only $6 through July 27, $8 July 28-Aug 3 & $10 day of! www.secure.pitch.com or 816.561.6061 for more info

continued from page 22 kind of a strength-in-numbers type of thing.” “I’m pretty blown away by their organization and enthusiasm, considering how young they are,” the Caves’ Andrew Ashby says. “They really have their shit together, which is refreshing among musicians playing in several different bands while booking their own tours and putting out their own records. I try not to look back on the accomplishments of my early 20s with shame after spending time getting to know them.” Ashby, Gintowt and Matt Dunnehoo (of Baby Teardrops, formerly of KC’s Doris Henson) are all established songwriters who have been playing in bands for years, which makes it somewhat unusual that they would team up with 20-something upstarts. “Approaching bands that you really like and telling them you want to help them put out their music is really nerve-racking,” Brown says. “You don’t want to blow it. We all play a lot of shows, so we get to know a lot of bands, and naturally we become big fans of certain bands. But it can be a strange thing to say, ‘Hey, I’m a big fan, and also maybe I can help you out with this label I have.’ I think the basis of what we’ve done along those lines so far has been approaching bands with a combination of humility and confidence. Sort of saying, ‘You’ve been maybe doing this longer than we have, and maybe you don’t need our help, but if you do, we love your band, we’re in this for the long haul, so let’s talk about it if you’re interested.’ ” “They expressed interest in putting out the record before we’d even put all of the finishing touches on it or started considering who we might want to put it out, which was flattering,” Ashby says of the Caves’ upcoming LP. “All we knew was that we didn’t want to do another self-release. So it didn’t take very long for us to come around and organize a meeting with them to start discussing details.” Breaking even on an album’s sales is no small feat these days, but it’s also no way to build a business. And so new revenue streams are being explored. In early July, Golden Sound hosted the Crossroads Block Party on 19th Street between Wyandotte and Baltimore, a free showcase of the label’s talent as well as some acts from the Record Machine, another KC label. Shoare estimates attendance at around 800 throughout the course of the night — an encouraging success that further illustrates the evolving nature of record labels. “The block party was an example of us trying to kind of immerse ourselves in Kansas City commerce,” Tomasino says. “There are all these great local businesses to partner with in Kansas City. And for us, it’s a new way to sell our bands.” “Music is so accessible and easily streamed and consumed,” Brown says. “And I think part of our role is to bring it back from Internet land, to bring more of a human interaction to it.” “I think, really, what people want from us is an extra reason to keep going,” Tomasino says. “To be in the music industry is to just tie your hands behind your back and take beating after beating after beating. Shitty show after shitty show. Not getting paid. You need an extra hand every chance you get, some extra footing. And I hope that’s what we can be for people. I think that’s why bands buddy up together: You do a

24 T H E P I T C H J U LY 2 6 - A U G U S T 1 , 2 0 1 2 pitch.com 2 T H E P I T C H M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X pitch.com

joint tour, you do shows together, you look for some organization that can give you reason to take the next steps. Knowing you have people in your corner helps.” “And every Wednesday night we hold a Golden Sound support group,” Brown jokes. “Right — ‘My name’s Jerad,’ ” Tomasino says. “ ‘And I’ve got a record coming out.’ ”

E-mail david.hudnall@pitch.com

THE DOG DAYS ARE JUST THE BEGINNING

M

ore hillbillies than usual — the hippie kind, not the scary Deliverance kind — are in Lone Jack this Thursday through Saturday. That’s owing to the second annual Dawg Daze of Summer Festival, which brings 30 acts — mostly along the jam-folk-bluegrass continuum — to three stages at Lake Paradise Resort. The fest is a mix of bands both national (JJ Grey & Mofro, Steve Molitz, Dirtfoot) and local (Hearts of Darkness, the Clementines, Tyler Gregory), and The Pitch recently caught up with Dawg Daze producer Andrew Earl to get a sense of what to expect. The Pitch: You’ve got some high-profile acts on this bill. How did you pull them all together? Earl: Eric Gould, bassist for Particle and Wolfmanz Brother, a KC-based Phish tribute band, is the one who suggested putting together the Dirty Dawgz for the festival — [Gould], Michael Kang of the String Cheese Incident, Steve Molitz of Particle, and Brandon Draper of Quixotic. This seemed like the right place and time to make it happen. JJ Grey & Mofro’s roots in Southern rock-funk was perfect, and they were touring through the Midwest at the time and hadn’t been at many festivals in the area this year. Dirtfoot was scheduled for last year and had to cancel early on due to some unforeseen circumstances. We were glad to have got things worked out for this year. We worked on Keller Williams and Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe, but timing and schedule conflicts were the main reason those didn’t work this year. We were extremely close, though. Maybe another year. It is a very organic process that takes shape as the booking process goes along. You don’t always get who you set out to have but always have the bands that were meant to be.

’Sup, dawg. What’s up with the hillbilly theme? The hillbilly theme has its roots in southern Missouri, specifically the Springfield-Branson area. I always wanted to see some sort of fun attractions in this area of the state like you find with the Baldknobbers Jamboree in Branson. As the bluegrass scene is starting to really take hold in the northern part of Missouri, we enjoy incorporating that vibe into what we do. In the future, we hope to attract more old-school craftsmen like what you would see at Silver Dollar City: basket weavers, blacksmiths, woodworkers, glass blowers and more. This year, we are glad to have a vendor with real kettle corn and a variety of freshly cooked pork rinds. Do you find that having the festival in a venue that’s more comfortable makes for better times? Meaning, if people can shower, etc., do things run more smoothly? Or do you think that the kinds of people who attend these festivals don’t care either way? It absolutely makes the difference! People want the comforts of home when they travel. Even when you’re camping, you always enjoy a nice cool shower when it’s hot outside or you’re hitting your 10th show in a row and traveling in your VW bus. Our Captain Kirk Stage will be inside, where the air conditioning will be cranking. A sit-down restaurant where you can grab a cold drink and a little something for the stomach can make all the difference. Having a place you can do your laundry on the road is a nice thing to have when you’re running short on clean clothes or your kid just got some kind of funk all over their last pair of shorts and shirt and it’s only Friday. The amenities are definitely a great attraction, besides the music. No dogs at Dawg Daze? Nope. Dogs are allowed at the resort during regular business, but too many things can happen with dogs in big crowds with other dogs running around in the heat at festivals. We’ve seen too many dogfights in which the dogs and owners have been injured, and we want to look out for our animal friends and everyone else by eliminating that problem from the beginning. The “Dawg” is more about the David Grisman type of dawg, and the musicians who we select are the dawgs of the region and music world. We think they’re the best. —BERRY ANDERSON

E-mail feedback@pitch.com


Saturday, August 4, 2012 at 8PM featuring:

KENNY LOGGINS GEORGIA MIDDLEMAN GARY BURR A Benefit Concert for KEVIN KNIGHT BONE MARROW TRANSPLANT SURVIVOR

LIVE at the Folly Theater 12th and Central, Kansas City, MO For more information:

EVENT: caringbridge.org/visit/kevinknight BAND: blueskyridersband.com

TICKETS: $30 – $100

Purchase tickets online at follytheater.org or ticketmaster.com; or at the Folly Theater Box Office: 816-474-4444.

Y A D I R F T

FIRS

Y T R PA

Every First Friday the place to be is the Indie on Main for the First Friday Pitch Party! Become an Indie “Rock Star” and get Happy Hour drink prices all night!

1228 Main St., Kansas City, MO 816.283.9950

presents

9PM TO CLOSE ITS THE

FIRST FRIDAY AFTER PARTY

with DJ_315

TICKETS

in advance at knuckleheadskc.com

AUG 2 @ 8 pm

Advance tickets $20 THE LEGENDARY MEMBERS OF FRANK ZAPPA’S MOTHERS OF INVENTION, PERFORMING THE MUSIC OF FRANK ZAPPA

WHERE THE BEST MUSICIANS IN THE WORLD PLAY

KNUCKLEHEADS 3PDIFTUFSt,$.0t816-483-1456 pitch.com

J U LY 2 6 - A U G U S T 1 , 2 0 1 2

THE PITCH

27


OFFICIAL BALLOT

Winners will be announced at The Pitch Music Awards on August 12 at the Uptown Theater and in The Pitch on August 16.

AMERICANA /BLUEGR ASS

T The Blackbird Revue T The Roseline T The Grisly Hand T Quiet Corral T Root & Stem T Dead Voices

DJ

T Brent Tactic T Andrew Northern T Morri$ T Paul DeMatteo T Sheppa

ELECTRONIC BLUES

T The B’Dinas T Coyote Bill & His Wild Ones T Samantha Fish T Grand Marquis T Katy & Go-Go T Linda Shell & the Blues Thang T Trampled Under Foot

COUNTRY/ROCK ABILLY

T Adam Lee & the Dead Horse Sound Company T The Crybaby Ranch T The Rumblejetts T The Blue Boot Heelers T The Nace Brothers T Them Damned Young Livers

T 18 Carat Affair T Max Justus T Motorboater T Power and Light T Say My Name

EMERGING ACT

T Deco Auto T Fullbloods T Radkey T The Cave Girls T The Clementines T Shy Boys

E XPERIMENTAL

T Umberto T Expo ’70 T Monta At Odds T Scammers T CS Luxem

GAR AGE/PUNK

TThe Conquerors T Hipshot Killer T Mouthbreathers T Nature Boys T Pizza Party Massacre T Sucked Dry T U.S.Americans

RULES: Check one choice per category. One ballot per voter. Ballot stuffing will be detected. Original ballots only (no photocopies or other reproductions). Entries may be filled out online or mailed to The Pitch, or completed at any Showcase venue on the evening of August 4. Tickets to the August 4 Pitch Music Showcase cost $6 through July 27, $8 from July 28 through August 3, or $10 the day of the event. They’re available at The Pitch office and all of the Showcase venues: the Riot Room, McCoy’s, the Foundry, the Union, and the Back Yard at the Beaumont Club. Tickets to the August 14 Pitch Music Awards show are $6 in advance or $10 the day of the event, available at the Uptown Theater box office, 816-753-8665 or ticketmaster.com (VIP tickets: $20 in advance or $25 the day of the event).

28

THE PITCH

J U LY 2 6 - A U G U S T 1 , 2 0 1 2

pitch.com

SINGER-SONGWRITER

POP

T Alaturka T Diverse T Snuff Jazz T The People’s Liberation Big Band T The Project H

T Hermon Mehari T Jeff Harshbarger T Mark Lowrey T Matt Otto

METAL

T At the Left Hand of God T Hammerlord T Mansion T Sicadis T Wrath and Ruin

T Greg Enemy T Reach T Ron Ron T Soul Servers T Stik Figa T thePhantom*

JA ZZ SOLO

ROCK

T Ad Astra Arkestra T Hearts of Darkness T The Latenight Callers T Making Movies T The Good Foot T The New Riddim

HIP-HOP

JA ZZ ENSEMBLE

LIVE ACT

T Capybara T Fourth of July T Ghosty T Hidden Pictures T The Caves T The ACBs

T Soft Reeds T Cherokee Rock Rifle T Cowboy Indian Bear T Muscle Worship T The Dead Girls T Thee Water MoccaSins

(FEMALE)

T Amy Farrand T Katlyn Conroy T Margo May T Sara Swenson

SINGER-SONGWRITER (MALE)

T Clay Hughes T John Velghe T Lennon Bone T Thom Hoskins

M A IL TO 17 01 Main Kans as Cit y, MO 6 4108 or comple te your ballot online at pitch.com

TYes! Please include me on the pitch.com e-mail list so I can be the first to hear about exciting, upcoming events and promotions.

Name: Address: City:

State:

Phone:

E-mail:

pitch.com

Zip:

M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X

THE PITCH

1


STREET TEAM

Each week, Pitch Street Team cruises around to the hottest clubs, bars and concerts. You name it, we will be there. While we are out, we hand out tons of cool stuff. So look for the Street Team... We will be looking for you!

Freebirdnsing Grand Ope

Fringe Festival K ic

koff

s y

The BoDeans @ Knuckleheads

Upcoming Events

Global Dance Festival @ Midland

7.26 - LOS LOBOS @ KNUCKLEHEADS ON 7.27 - BLACK OUT FOR LIGHTS @ LIVESTRONG PARK 7.27 - PERPETUAL CHANGE @ KC LIVE BLOCK 7.29 - ENGAGED @ UNION STATION

See more on the “promotions” link on the p pitch.com

J U LY 2 6 - A U G U S T 1 , 2 0 1 2

THE PITCH

29


NIGHTLIFE

KNUCKLEHEADS SALOON

Outdoor Stage August 17th, 2012 7:00pm

Send submissions to Clubs Editor Abbie Stutzer by e-mail (abbie.stutzer@pitch.com), fax (816-756-0502) or phone (816-218-6926). Continuing items must be resubmitted monthly.

with Federation Of Horsepower & 11After (all female rock band)

$25 Advance, $30 Day of Show

NEW! Knuckleheads Radio 24 hours a day www.knuckleheadskc.com

F re e S h u tt le in S u rr o u n d in g A reth e a

WHERE THE BEST MUSICIANS IN THE WORLD PLAY

KNUCKLEHEADS JULY

TICKETS NOW ON SALE! Ray Bonneville

AUG

Making Movies

11

(Pitch Music Award Nominee)

Maria the Mexican

Coming soon...

27 27: Phantom Blues Band

10: Wanda Jackson 11: Shooter Jennings 16: Ramblin Jack Elliot 17: Skid Row 24: Marty Stuart 25: Hearts of Darkness

(KC’s own Mike Finnigan)

28: Chubby Carrier

Meiko 29: Last Chance Flight

AUGUST

(Pitch Music Award Nominee)

1: Stoneyhogg

presents

2: Grandmothers of Invention original band of Frank Zappa

AU G

24

33: Walter Trout

For more info &

TICKETS

in advance at knuckleheadskc.com

3PDIFTUFSt,$.0t816-483-1456 30

THE PITCH

J U LY 2 6 - A U G U S T 1 , 2 0 1 2

The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. The Empty Spaces, 9 p.m. Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. The End of the Ocean, the Author and the Illustrator, Blackbird Cathedral, 5 p.m. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Jorge Arana Trio, Across the Earth, 9:30 p.m. The Eighth Street Taproom: 801 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785841-6918. Spirit is the Spirit, Atomic Pajama Party, Buffalo Brass. La Esquina: 1000 W. 25th St., 816-221-5115. KC Fringe Festival Experimental Music Showcase, 9 p.m. Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art: 4525 Oak, 816-751-1278. External Combustion Orchestra, 6-8:30 p.m., free. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Birthday Suits, Going to Hell in a Leather Jacket, 10 p.m.

The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. The Sexy Accident, the Hillary Watts Riot, Howard Iceberg and the Titanics. Clarette Club: 5400 Martway, Mission, 913-384-0986. 80s party with the M80s. Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. The Mad Kings, Heavy Figgs. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 302 S.W. Main, Lee’s Summit, 816-525-1871. The Radio Flyers. KC Live Stage at the Power & Light District: 13th St. and Grand. MORE Perpetual Change, 8 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Jeff Bergen’s Elvis Show, 7 p.m. INGS LIST E AT RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., IN ONL 816-753-5207. Fierce Bad Rabbit, M PITCH.CO Mama Lenny & the Remedy, Bambi Raptor, 9 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Soft Reeds, Sleepy Kitty, La Guerre, Palace.

B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. John Paul’s Flying Circus. Mike Kelly’s Westsider: 1515 Westport Rd., 816-931-9417. Blues Jam. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. The Old No. 5s.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS Barnyard Beer: 925 Iowa, Lawrence, 785-393-9696. Dumptruck Butterlips, Paul Waters & the Lonesome Teardrops, 7 p.m. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. James Dean Rose Jr. & friends, 10 p.m. Kanza Hall: 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park, 913-451-0444. The Tippers. KC Live Stage at the Power & Light District: 13th St. and Grand. Andy Gibson, 7 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Hotdog Skeletons, the Big Idea, Orthan Anderthon, 9 p.m.

JAZZ

26: Los Lobos

Belairs

ROCK/POP/INDIE

Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. DJ Kool Ed on the patio, 10 p.m.

presents

(Pitch Music Award Nominee)

F R I D AY 2 7

ROCK/POP/INDIE

DJ

25: TJ Broscoff

Shannon & the Rhythm Kings 4: Nace Brothers

T H U R S D AY 2 6

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL

or call 816-483-6407

pitch.com

Todd Bolender Center for Dance & Creativity: 500 W. Pershing Rd. Burlesque & Beggars, 9 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Late Night with Lucky Deluxe: Fringe Fest Talk Show, 10:30 p.m.

The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Paul Shinn Duo, on the main floor, 6 p.m. Renee Kelly’s at Caenen Castle: 12401 Johnson Dr., Shawnee, 913-631-4100. Billy Ebeling solo. Star Bar at Pachamama’s: 800 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785841-0990. Floyd the Barber with Tommy Johnson, 8:30 p.m.

COMEDY Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. Ian Bagg, 7:30 p.m.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Hot Caution Thursdays, 10 p.m. Fuel: 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park, 913-451-0444. Bike night. Hamburger Mary’s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-842-1919. Charity Bingo with Valerie Versace, 8 p.m., $1 per game. Hotel: 1300 Grand, 816-226-3232. Back to the Hotel with DJ Mike Scott, champagne specials, 9 p.m., free. Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. Karaoke on the main floor, 10 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Trivia Clash, 7 p.m. Sherlock’s Underground Coffeehouse & Pub: 858 State Route 291, Liberty, 816-429-5262. Karaoke, ladies’ night specials. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. Trivia, 9 p.m.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Double T’s Roadhouse: 1421 Merriam Ln., Kansas City, Kan., 913-432-5555. Blues Jam hosted by RocknRick’s Boogie Leggin’ Blues Band, 7 p.m. The Indie on Main: 1228 Main, 816-283-9900. Open mic, Low Dough Beer Night, 8 p.m. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 302 S.W. Main, Lee’s Summit, 816-525-1871. Jerry’s Jam Night, 9 p.m.

VA R I E T Y Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. Deerwolfanimalbear. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Prairie Village People, a show to raise money and gather support for the 100 Good Women organization, 6 p.m., donations accepted at door.

CLUB

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Katy Guillen, Filthy 13, 6 p.m. Trouser Mouse: 625 N.W. Mock Ave., Blue Springs, 816-2201222. Wonderfuzz.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS Barnyard Beer: 925 Iowa, Lawrence, 785-393-9696. The Yawpers, New Inhabitants, 8:30 p.m. Frank James Saloon: 10919 N.W. Hwy. 45, Parkville, 816-5050800. Rex Hobart. Uncle Bo’s: 420 E. Sixth St., Topeka, 785-234-5400. Chubby Carrier and the Bayou Swamp Band.

DJ The Eighth Street Taproom: 801 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-6918. Wet Hot Electric Summer with G Train and Nezbeat, 10 p.m. The Quaff: 1010 Broadway, 816-471-1918. DJ E. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-7497676. DJ Proof on the patio.

ACOUSTIC Bar West: 7174 Renner Rd., Shawnee, 913-248-9378. Dan Brockert. Great Day Café: 7921 Santa Fe Dr., Overland Park, 913-6429090. Karen Hendricks. Mike Kelly’s Westsider: 1515 Westport Rd., 816-931-9417. Eddie Delahunt.

JAZZ The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. The Stan Kessler Quartet, 7 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Lonnie McFadden, 4:30 p.m.; the Garrett Nordstrom Situation, 9 p.m. Take Five Coffee + Bar: 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park, 913948-5550. Brandon Draper with John Brewer.

WORLD Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Making Movies: the Santana Tribute, 10 p.m.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS Hurricane Allie’s Bar and Grill: 5541 Merriam Dr., Shawnee, 913-217-7665. Karaoke, 8:30 p.m. J. Murphy’s Irish Pub and Grille: 22730 Midland Dr., Shawnee, 913-825-3880. Karaoke, 9 p.m. Mission Bowl: 5399 Martway, Mission, 913-432-7000. CountryN-Bowl, wear western clothing, win prizes, 10 p.m.-12:30 a.m. Retro Downtown Drinks & Dance: 1518 McGee, 816-4214201. Trivia Riot, 7 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Karaoke, 7 p.m., $5.

REGGAE Californos: 4124 Pennsylvania, 816-531-7878. Kingstonians, 9 p.m. The Hideout: 6948 N. Oak Tfwy., 816-468-0550. Jah Lion.

VA R I E T Y Todd Bolender Center for Dance & Creativity: 500 W. Pershing Rd. Burlesque & Beggars, 6 p.m.


Liquid Lounge

Every Wednesday Cheap Martinis & Sangria ALL NIGHT LONG

1715 Main 816.421.4799 kcbulldog.com

SIGHTS, SOUNDS, IMPERIAL FLAVOR 1531 GRAND, KANSAS CITY, MO (816) 421-0300 - www.czarkc.com

NOW HIRING

FOOD BY

TUE - TacoTuesday w/Czar-rita specials WED - Indie Hit Makers Showcase w/Industry Q&A Panel from 6-9:30pm w/Host Mike Borgia/Gurerilla Movement Showcase 10pm-Close THUR - Philly Thursday’s/Hot Caution w/Vi Tran, Katie Gilchrist & friends FRI - Fish Taco Friday’s w/Czar-rita & craft beer specials

EVERY WEDNESDAY Lonnie Ray Blues Band EVERY THURSDAY Live Reggae with AZ One FRIDAY, JULY 27th The Magnetics - 10pm SATURDAY, JULY 28st Camp Harlow - 5pm Drew 6 - 10pm NIGHTLY SPECIALS

FOOD AND DRINK

PATIO & DECK BANQUET & PRIVATE PARTY FACILITY

SAT 7/28 Jay Brannan 7pm

1ST FRIDAY EVENTS FEATURING LOCAL AND REGIONAL ARTISTS EVERY MONTH!

OUTSIDE | The Phantom 9pm | |Soul Servers 10:30pm | | Sheppa 11pm |

Buy your Showcase wristbands now for only $6 through July 27, $8 July 28-Aug 3 & $10 day of! www.secure.pitch.com or 816.561.6061 for more info

INSIDE | Clay Huges 8pm | | Diverse 9pm | | Radkey 10pm | | Cherokee Rock Riffle 11:15pm | | Hearts of Darkness 12:30am | | Max Justice 1:30am | pitch.com

J U LY 2 6 - A U G U S T 1 , 2 0 1 2

THE PITCH

31


S AT U R D AY 2 8 ROCK/POP/INDIE The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Be/Non, Lucky Graves, the Ned Ludd Band. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Cello Fury, 7:30 p.m.; Voices Beyond the Door, Sleep Agents, More Like Georgia, 9:30 p.m. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 302 S.W. Main, Lee’s Summit, 816-525-1871. Voice of Reason. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Meiko, part of the Living Room Sessions, 8:30 p.m. La Esquina: 1000 W. 25th St., 816-221-5115. KC Fringe Festival Experimental Music Showcase, 9 p.m. Legends at Village West: 1843 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-788-3700. The Zeros, 5 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Hidden Pictures, Southeast Engine, Erik Voeks, 9 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. The Roseline, Olassa, Danny Pound, 10 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Deadbeat Darling, Appropriate Grammar, the Killian Family, Lazy, 8 p.m.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL Barnyard Beer: 925 Iowa, Lawrence, 785-393-9696. The Blue Tick Hounds, Jonathon Woods, Ryan Harvey, 9 p.m. Danny’s Bar and Grill: 13350 College Blvd., Lenexa, 913-3459717. Trampled Under Foot. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Crosseyed Cat. Trouser Mouse: 625 N.W. Mock Ave., Blue Springs, 816-2201222. The Nace Brothers.

DJ The Eighth Street Taproom: 801 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-6918. Bump and Hustle with Cyrus D. The Quaff: 1010 Broadway, 816-471-1918. DJ Chris. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Thrift Store 45s on the patio; the Warm Up with Wolfgod, 6-9 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Rees Urban, Jason Kidd, Todd Howard, 11 p.m. VooDoo Lounge: Harrah’s Casino, 1 Riverboat Dr., North Kansas City, 816-472-7777. DJ Eric Coomes.

HIP-HOP The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Mista Excel, Enova, Wolf Pack, Kommon Cents.

JAZZ 3402 Main 753-1909

Californos: 4124 Pennsylvania, 816-531-7878. Dave Stephens. Piropos Grille: 4141 N. Mulberry Dr., North Kansas City, 816-7413600. Candace Evans, 7 p.m. Take Five Coffee + Bar: 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park, 913948-5550. Everette DeVan, Jerry Hahn, Zacharie Mejean.

OPEN TIL’ 3AM

8PM/$7

www.daveysuptown.com

WItFI

EVERY WEDNESDAY 7-­9:30PM FREE AMY FARRAND’S WEIRDO WEDNESDAY SUPPER CLUB Wed 7/25 Thu 7/26

ROBERT JON AND THE WRECK

10PM/$5

IAN COOKE (SOLO CELLIST) 7:30PM/$3

ACROSS THE EARTH JORGE ARANA TRIO 10PM/$5

AT YOUR THROAT Fri 7/27 SERVUS

MEDIA BLITZ 9:30PM/$5

CELLO FURY Sat 7/28

(BAD ASS ROCK N’ ROLL CELLO TRIO)

7:30PM

MORE LIKE GEORGIA SLEEP AGENTS ADAM EVOLVING 9:30PM/$5

Mon 8/1 ST DALLAS AND THE SINNERS

BLUE BOOT HEELERS

10PM/$5

AFTON CONCERT SERIES

Tue 8/2 SETH CASTER, CACASIAN DEBRIS, 49 STONES,

JHAY B & TRANSCATION, BRIAN KB-­B EDWARDS, RYAN LEE TOMS 10PM/$5

Wed 8/3 JAHWHEEL DEADMAN FLATS 9:30PM/$6 Thu 8/4

ELENI MANDEL

RUDDY SWAIN MIKEALA SHAPIRO 10PM/$10

32 T H E P I T C H 2 THE PITCH

COMEDY Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. Ian Bagg, 7 p.m.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS Bulldog: 1715 Main, 816-421-4799. Game night, beer pong, TV trivia, shot dice. The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Smackdown Trivia and Karaoke. Clarette Club: 5400 Martway, Mission, 913-384-0986. Texas Hold ’em, 7 & 10 p.m. Frank James Saloon: 10919 N.W. Hwy. 45, Parkville, 816-5050800. Karaoke, 6-10 p.m. The Red Balloon: 10325 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-9622330. Karaoke, 8 p.m., free.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Bleachers Bar & Grill: 210 S.W. Greenwich Dr., Lee’s Summit, 816-623-3410. Open Blues and Funk Jam with Syncopation, 6 p.m. The Hideout: 6948 N. Oak Tfwy., 816-468-0550. Open blues jam, 7 p.m. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Sunday Salvation with Booty Bass, 10 p.m., $3. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Open Jam with Levee Town, 2 p.m., free. R.G.’s Lounge: 9100 E. 35th St., Independence, 816-358-5777. Jam Night hosted by Dennis Nickell, Scotty Yates, Rick Eidson, and Jan Lamb, 5 p.m.

M O N D AY 3 0 ROCK/POP/INDIE RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. The Conquerors, the Electric Shoes, Deadringers, 9 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Bad Weather California. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Girl in a Coma, the Black Box Revelation, Wick & the Tricks, 8 p.m.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Lee McBee and the Confessors. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Open Blues Jam with Brody Buster.

DJ Hamburger Mary’s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-842-1919. Bad Music Sundays with Brett Dietrich, 3:30 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Sunday Funday with DJ G Train on the patio.

J U LY 2 6 - A U G U S T 1 , 2 0 1 2 pitch.com M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X pitch.com

Bleachers Bar & Grill: 210 S.W. Greenwich Dr., Lee’s Summit, 816-623-3410. Open Mic Acoustic Jam. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Dave Hays Band Open Jam.

SINGER-SONGWRITER The AllStar Rock Bar: 7210 N.E. 43rd St., 816-452-2660. Scott Ford Songwriter Showcase, 7 p.m. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Scott Duncan.

W E D N E S D AY 1 ROCK/POP/INDIE

Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Gospel Lounge with Carl Butler, 7:30 p.m. The Levee: 16 W. 43rd St., 816-561-2821. The Lonnie Ray Blues Band.

JAZZ

The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Rural Grit Happy Hour, 6 p.m. Hamburger Mary’s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-842-1919. Maryoke with Chad Slater, 8 p.m. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Karaoke Idol with Tanya McNaughty. MoJo’s Bar & Grill: 1513 S.W. Hwy. 7, Blue Springs. Pool and dart leagues; free pool, happy hour, 4-6 p.m. Nara: 1617 Main, 816-221-6272. Brodioke, 9 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Sonic Spectrum Music Trivia, 7 p.m., $5.

Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. The Stolen Winnebagos. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Heart to Heart, Last Chance Flight Band, 8 p.m., free. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Bloody Knives, JabberJosh, Robocopter, 10 p.m.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS

Barnyard Beer: 925 Iowa, Lawrence, 785-393-9696. Mudstomp Mondays.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS

ROCK/POP/INDIE

The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Lunadaz, 7:30 p.m.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS

S U N D AY 2 9

FOLK

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS

VA R I E T Y

The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Horror Remix. The Hideout: 6948 N. Oak Tfwy., 816-468-0550. Tuesday Troubadours. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. Clash of the Comics, 7:30 p.m. Mike Kelly’s Westsider: 1515 Westport Rd., 816-931-9417. Critter’s Tye Dye Tuesday. MiniBar: 3810 Broadway. Sonic Spectrum Trivia: the Bizarre, Pop Culture and Travel, 7 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Replay Horror Picture Show, starts at sundown. Bike-in Theater. The Roxy: 7230 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-236-6211. Karaoke. Smokehouse Bar-B-Que: 6304 N. Oak, Gladstone, 816-4544500. Happy hour, 4-6 p.m. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. Chess Club, 7 p.m.

RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Bob Walkenhorst, 7 p.m.

Mike Kelly’s Westsider: 1515 Westport Rd., 816-931-9417. The Good Sam Club.

Todd Bolender Center for Dance & Creativity: 500 W. Pershing Rd. Burlesque & Beggars, 10:30 p.m.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS

The Hideout: 6948 N. Oak Tfwy., 816-468-0550. Blue Monday Trio.

The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. Blue Monday Jam with T.J. Martley. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Jazzbo. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Mark Lowrey, in the jazz club, 6 p.m.

Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Elegant Hoodness, late show. The Indie on Main: 1228 Main, 816-283-9900. Karaoke with KJ David, 9:30 p.m. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. Live karaoke with Separated at Birth.

The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Herman Mehari Trio, in the jazz club., 6 p.m.

T U E S D AY 31 ROCK/POP/INDIE Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Travelers Guild. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Night Beats, the Conquerors, 10 p.m.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Radio Moscow, Dirty Streets, 8 p.m.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Sonia Leigh, Scott Ford, the Magnificent, Bang Bangs, 7 p.m.

DJ Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. DJ Whatshisname, service industry night, 10 p.m.

JAZZ Finnigan’s Hall: 503 E. 18th Ave., North Kansas City, 816-2213466. Abel Ramirez Big Band, 6 p.m.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Ugly Lion, Tyler Gregory, La Jeder. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. The Blue Boot Heelers, St. Dallas & the Sinners, 10 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. StonyHogg, 8 p.m.

DJ Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. DJ Robert Moore, 10 p.m. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Punker Than Hell. The Union of Westport: 421 Westport Rd. Hump on the patio with Shaun Duval and guests, 10 p.m.

JAZZ B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. New Vintage Big Band.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS Bulldog: 1715 Main, 816-421-4799. Liquid Lounge drink specials. Danny’s Bar and Grill: 13350 College Blvd., Lenexa, 913-3459717. Trivia and karaoke with DJ Smooth, 8 p.m. 403 Club: 403 N. Fifth St., 913-499-8392. Pinball tournament, cash prize for winner, 8:30 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. Sandman the Hypnotist. Nara: 1617 Main, 816-221-6272. Ladies’ Night. Shark Bar: 1340 Grand Blvd., 816-442-8140. Bar Olympics. Sherlock’s Underground Coffeehouse & Pub: 858 State Route 291, Liberty, 816-429-5262. Open jam blues, bike night specials.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Acoustic Open Mic with host Tyler Gregory, 10 p.m. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Jam Night, 9 p.m.

M E TA L / P U N K Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Slut River, Sex Tapes, 10 p.m.


LiLive Music every Saturday & Sunday! Food & Drink Specials!

Sat 7/28: MID LIFE CRIME SCENE 9pm-1am Sun 7/29: ECHO CREEK 3-7pm $2.50 Draws & $1.50 16oz Aluminums on Sundays 3-7pm Bands - Send your CD & we’ll call you

22730 MIDLAND DR AT K-7 & SHAWNEE MISSION PKWY

913-825-3880

THU 7/26 EMPTY SPACES, THE CAVES, SO FRI 7/27 SEXY ACCENT, HIL FT REEDS Y WATTS RIOT HOWARD ICEBERGLAR AN D THE TITANICS SAT 7/28 THE ASSOCIATE SAT 7/28 BE/NON, LUCKY S 5PM GRAVES, THE NEDLUDDAND TUES 7/31 BINGO WITH AL WED 8/1 VAGABOND SWINGICIA 8PM AMY FREDMAN’S , FRI 8/3 1ST FRIDAY “WAT AVT OPENING EN THIS” FILM TOUR

THE HOME FOR LIVE MUSIC NORTH OF THE RIVER!

FRI 7/27 JAH LION REGGAE BAND 8:30PM SUN 7/29 OPEN JAM HOSTED BY BRIAN RUSKIN 6PM TUE 7/31 TELE-TUESDAY HOSTED BY OUTLAW JIM & THE WHISKEY BENDERS 7PM THU 8/2 BLUEGRASS JAM HOSTED BY LOADED GOAT 7PM FRI 8/3 THE PETE CARROLL GROUP 8:30PM SAT 8/4 BROTHER BAGMAN 8:30PM SUN 8/5 OPEN BLUES JAM HOSTED BY COYOTE BILL 6PM MON 8/6 THE BLUE MONDAY TRIO BLUES JAM 6PM TUE 8/7 TACO TUESDAY TROUBADOUR SONG WRITER OPEN MIC 6PM 6948 N. OAK TRFY, GLADSTONE MO | 816.468.0550 FIND US ON FACEBOOK - THE HIDEOUT BAR AND GRILL

Featuring

| Hidden Pictures 9pm | Amy Farrand 10pm | John Velghe 11pm | | Mark Lowrey 12am | Coyote Bill & His Wild Ones 1am | ~‚~‚ÚN<JKGFIKÚI;ÚÜڅ~ƒ£†€~£†~„

LIVE MUSIC. NO COVER

JAILHOUSE SUMMER CONCERT SERIES

N<;ڄ¢‚ THE DAVIS SHOW K?Lڄ¢ƒ BOBBY CARSON & THE KINGPINS =I@ڄ¢„ EDDIE DELAHUNT J8Kڄ¢… GOOD SAM CLUB KL<Jڄ¢€~ CRITTERS TYE DYE TUESDAY N<;څ¢~ TJ’S HINDU COWBOY GOSPEL PIANO

:,),12:$9$,/$%/(

&+(&.2877+(1(:$//'$<+$33<+285

'$,/</81&+63(&,$/6‡1,*+7/<',11(5 '5,1.63(&,$/6

Also don't miss the dj lineup at Foundry featuring: | Sheppa 9-10:45pm | Andrew Northern 11pm-2am | Buy your Showcase wristbands now for only $6 through July 27, $8 July 28-Aug 3 & $10 day of! www.secure.pitch.com or 816.561.6061 for more info

pitch.com

J U LY 2 6 - A U G U S T 1 , 2 0 1 2

THE PITCH

33


S AVA G E L O V E

TO B E F R A N K Dear Dan: I’m a hetero female, but one of my

I recently started seeing a man. The first time I slept with him, he told me that he was interested in a relationship, and I told him that I wanted to keep things purely casual. Over the next month and a half of talking to him, hanging out and having sex, I started to really like him. I was thinking about changing my mind and taking the relationship to the next level. The last time I saw him was a week ago. He came over, we had sex, and then he mentioned that he had met someone else. As he was beginning to elaborate, I told him to leave. My anger comes from his timing. If he had told me this before we had sex, I would have been able to have a constructive conversation about this. The problem now, if I’m being completely honest with myself, is that I really like him and I don’t want to stop seeing him. Do I reach out to him again? Did I overreact?

Lingerie Without a Man Dear LWAM: (1) There isn’t a name for this

Dear Dan: I’m a heterosexual female. My

husband hates condoms. When we started being exclusive and monogamous, we were both fully screened for STDs, and I went on the pill. That was four years ago. Since then, I have been through eight different versions of the pill. My current one gives me a two-week period. I’ve gained about 25 pounds in two months, and I’m more moody. My doctor just 34

THE PITCH

J U LY 2 6 - A U G U S T 1 , 2 0 1 2

pitch.com

D A N S AVA G E

Dear Dan: I’m a 25-year-old straight woman.

biggest fantasies is for a guy to dress up in women’s underwear. Not full-blown drag, just a teddy, fi shnets and some heels. He doesn’t even have to act like a woman. I just want him to parade around a bit, and just for me. I’ve had the ovaries to bring this up only twice to men I’ve been with. My first boyfriend was game, but I was so insecure with my sexuality at the time that I let it go. My second boyfriend found it degrading and wouldn’t do it. I think there are two things holding me back: (1) I’ve never even heard of this fantasy, and that makes me feel like a creep. Is there a name for it? (2) I know that the first time I will giggle with joy, and I’m afraid that will be a big buzzkill if my hypothetical future boyfriend thinks I’m laughing at him.

fantasy, so let’s come up with one. How about “Frank-N-Furter-ing,” for Dr. FrankN-Furter, a noted research scientist who also enjoyed dressing straight boys up in fishnets, teddies and heels. Your fantasy probably lacks a name because it isn’t that odd or a whole lot to ask. And this fantasy makes you more sexually and romantically marketable than you seem to realize. The world is full of men who aren’t gay, aren’t into drag, and aren’t into fullblown cross-dressing but who are turned on by the idea of wearing the girlfriend’s panties and/or a little lingerie. A lot of these men are with women who barely tolerate their kinks. The single ones, on the other hand, are out there looking for a girlfriend who is turned on by the thought of a guy in panties, teddies, fishnets and heels. Post a few explicit personal ads on online dating sites — Kinkster and Normster — and I promise that you’ll be flooded with responses from guys who want to put on a show for you. (2) It’s permissible to giggle during sex. If you’re worried that your partner might think you’re laughing at him, qualify your giggles in advance. Explain that you’re prone to joyous laughter when you’re turned on and you might get a little giddy during his performance. Emphasize that your giggles are evidence of arousal, not disgust or contempt. Then prove it by fucking the shit out of him. (3) Have you checked out xdress.com? Think of it as your own personal porn stash before you fi nd a boyfriend, and your favorite online shopping destination after.

BY

Left in the Lurch prescribed me a new pill that will likely increase my weight and make me even moodier, but it should decrease the length of the period. I’m sick of this! I think my husband should suck it up and wear a condom. He’s completely resistant. It’s ironic that the pill protects me from pregnancy if I have sex, but we’re having less sex due to the weight gain, bloating, bleeding, no sex drive, and other side effects. My doctor doesn’t think that other options for birth control (such as an intrauterine device) are a good fit for me. Should I continue on the pill or tell my husband that if he wants sex, he has to share responsibility in avoiding pregnancy?

Tired of Pills Dear TOP: Shared responsibility.

And you can keep having sex without pills, condoms or pregnancies. There’s oral (his and hers), anal (ditto) and mutual masturbation (underrated). But if it’s vaginal intercourse he wants, then he’ll have to get used to condoms. Some women can’t take hormonal birth control, and your husband is married to one.

Dear Dan: I was watching a porno featuring

a hot gay threesome. Two tops double-penetrated a bottom. The odd part: The tops shared a single condom! I’m wondering how safe this might be. It certainly doesn’t seem safe.

Dubious in Phoenix Dear DIP: It was safe for the bottom — provided that the overtaxed condom didn’t burst (here’s hoping that they were using a more spacious, more durable female condom) — but it wasn’t safe for the tops. Jamming two dicks into a single condom could result in dick-to-dick transmission of a number of sexually transmitted infections: herpes, HPV, chlamydia, syphilis, gonorrhea, etc.

Dear LITL: I can understand why you were

upset. You had already taken things to the next level in your heart — you were thinking of him as your boyfriend — but hadn’t gotten around to informing him about the upgrade. And you assumed that, when you did get around to letting him know, he would be delighted. Because he was the one who wanted a relationship at the beginning, right? Unfortunately, he took you at your word when you said you weren’t interested in a relationship. Keeping things “purely casual” with you meant he was free to pursue a relationship with someone else. I can’t help but wonder what he was about to say when you told him to get out. He met someone else, which wasn’t a violation of your rules. Did that mean things were over between you two (which would make the timing of the last fuck an insult)? Or was he willing to pass on this other girl if you were ready for a relationship (which would make tossing him out before he could elaborate a mistake)? You probably should’ve heard him out. Go ahead and reach out. Let him know what you were thinking before he told you about the other girl. You were starting to fall for him, you hoped that he felt the same, and you were disappointed. But because he was only doing what you asked — keeping it casual — you can’t fault him for keeping his options open, looking around, dating other girls, etc. And you can’t fault him for failing to read your mind. And tell him that you’d be open to dating — a real, noncasual relationship — if things don’t work out with this other girl. Find the Savage Lovecast (my weekly podcast) every Tuesday at thestranger.com/ savage.

Have a question for Dan Savage? E-mail him at mail@savagelove.net pitch.com

MONTH


The Par t y ’s Always Rockin’ at Bazooka’s!

Open 7 Days & 7 Nights a Week, in the Heart of the CrossRoads Arts District. We’re America’s Hottest ShowClub! 1717 Main St. Kansas City, MO 816/421.1915 facebook.com/bazookasshowgirls bazookasshowgirls.com

pitch.com

J U LY 2 6 - A U G U S T 1 , 2 0 1 2

THE PITCH

35


LICENSED MASSAGE

Alexis Signature Service OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

BODY SHAMPOOS & SHOWER SHAMPOOS AVAILABLE

6505 Frontage, Suite 27 Merriam, KS Cash / Debit Mastercard / Visa Â&#x2021;

MASSAGE

NOW OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

4-Handed Massage Walk-Ins Welcome 7 days a week (913)362-2000

10729 Shawnee Mission Parkway Shawnee, KS 66203

KK  Massage  &  Spa 707 Main Street Eudora, KS

(10 min east of Lawrence on Hwy 10)

LIC # 12-004

(785) 542-2364

36

THE PITCH

J U LY 2 6 - A U G U S T 1 , 2 0 1 2

pitch.com

* * NEW LOCATION * *

140 N. 130th

Bonner Springs, KS (913) 721-1111


Front Desk Clerks Servers Please Apply in Person

NOW HIRING FOR

CONCERTS CONVENTIONS SPORTING EVENTS EVENT STAFF, USHERS, TICKET TAKERS

APPLY IN PERSON 4050 Pennsylvania Ste. 111 KCMO 64111 OR ONLINE www. crowdsystems.com EOE

 Research Subjects Do you have ASTHMA? 3K\VLFLDQVDWWKH$VWKPD&OLQLFDO 5HVHDUFK&HQWHUDW7UXPDQ0HGLFDO &HQWHUKRVSLWDO$UHFXUUHQWO\UHFUXLW LQJIRUVWXGLHVIRU$VWKPDSDWLHQWV Â&#x2021;,I\RXKDYHEHHQGLDJQRVHGZLWK $67+0$RUDVWKPDZLWKFKURQLF UKLQLWLVDQGVLQXVLWLV Â&#x2021;,I\RXDUHDWOHDVW\HDUVROG Â&#x2021;$OOVWXG\UHODWHGFDUHLVSURYLGHGDW QRFRVWIRUWKRVHZKRWDNHSDUW Â&#x2021;)LQDQFLDOFRPSHQVDWLRQIRUWLPHDQG WUDYHODUHDOVRDYDLODEOH 7KLV$VWKPD&HQWHULVRQHRI SUHVWLJLRXVFHQWHUVRIH[FHOOHQFH IXQGHGE\WKH $PHULFDQ/XQJ$VVRFLDWLRQ 3OHDVH&DOOWROHDUQ PRUHDERXWWKLVUHVHDUFKVWXG\

Fall Guide J Fall Sports J Haunted Houses & Pumpkin Patches J Local Music, Concerts & more!

Look for it on stands

AUGUST 30

FOR ADVERTISING INFORMATION: CALL 816-218-6759 or EMAIL dawn.jordan@pitch.com pitch.com

J U LY 2 6 - A U G U S T 1 , 2 0 1 2

THE PITCH

37


YOUR HIGH TECH

HEALTHCARE CAREER

STARTS HERE!

CAREER EDUCATION

NEW

EVENING

4(*7967,9;@4(5(.,4,5;

PROGRAM

4(*(7(9;4,5;:*64 -,(;<9,+7967,9;@ !

7(92*,5;9(3 (7(9;4,5;:

Health Information Technology Organize and manage electronic healthcare records.  !!# !  " # !  ! â&#x20AC;Śand more!

STUDIOSSTARTING AT

$599

We also offer training inâ&#x20AC;Ś $  & !! $#  !  !!% $! "  $! #% $!  !! $ !##% $ " % $   !! CALL FOR A FREE BROCHURE!

888.741.3705 WWW.CONCORDE4ME.COM WWW WW W.CO W. C NC COR O DE DE4M 4ME 4M E.CO E. COM COM

Graduate employment assistance always available. Accredited Member, ACCSC. VA Approved for Eligible Veterans in Approved Programs.

Forr more information about our graduation rates, the median debt of students who completed the program, and other important information, please visit our website at www.concorde.edu/disclosures.

3239 Broadway | Kansas City, MO 64111

12-10558_CON_ad_MOMKC_HIT_HIGHTECH-EVE_4x5_4c_[01].indd 1

6/13/2012 7:46:36 AM

Pet friendly, Gated Parking, Dishwasher, Central Air, Granite Countertops

 ,(YTV\Y2*46

Go. Virtually. Anywhere. Looking for an alternative to the traditional school setting? Thinking about completing your High School Diploma? Enroll now with the 1st Virtual School in Kansas at www.blvs.org

Brenda DeGroot Director bdegroot@usd458.org (913) 724-1727 x.102 38

THE PITCH

J U LY 2 6 - A U G U S T 1 , 2 0 1 2

pitch.com

Nicole Hodges-Williams Assistant Director nwilliams@usd458.org (913) 724-1727 x.106

Ă&#x153;Ă&#x161;><;Ă&#x161;8dl]jfYlan] Ă&#x153;Ă&#x161;8[[j]\al]\ Ă&#x153;Ă&#x161;KmalagfÂŁ=j]]Ă&#x161;^gjĂ&#x161;BYfkYkĂ&#x161;I]ka\]flk Ă&#x153;Ă&#x161;?ge]Ă&#x161;J[`ggdĂ&#x161;:gff][lagf Ă&#x153;Ă&#x161;J]jnaf_Ă&#x161;Baf\]j_Yjl]fĂ&#x161;ÂŁĂ&#x161;~l`Ă&#x161;>jY\] Ă&#x153;Ă&#x161;K]plZggckĂ&#x161;Yf\Ă&#x161;:gehml]jkĂ&#x161;Gjgna\]\ Ă&#x153;Ă&#x161;Â Â&#x2021;Ă&#x161;:]jlax]\Ă&#x161;K]Y[`]jkĂ&#x161;^gjĂ&#x161;Jmhhgjl Ă&#x153;Ă&#x161;8\mdlĂ&#x161;C]Yjf]jkĂ&#x161;Yj]Ă&#x161;N]d[ge]\

Enroll Now for Fall 2012 www.blvs.org


Boveri Realty Group

Crossroads Building Tour July 17th, 4pm - 7pm WILLOWIND APARTMENTS

1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apartments Starting @ $425

1600 Locust: $595,000 2010 McGee: $975,000

Â&#x2039; Â&#x2039;

IOHM mÂ&#x201A;Â&#x201A;Â&#x2026;Â? WÂ&#x152;{ Š aYce LJGGI NGLDIKNDLMLJ

NORTHLAND VILLAGE $100 DEPOSIT ON 1&2 BEDROOMS

Stop by for appetizers and drinks and a chance to win a

$525 / up Large 1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apts and Townhomes Fireplace, Washer/Dryer Hook-ups, Storage Space, Pool.

$50 Grinders Gift Certificate

I-35 & Antiocht(816) 454-5830

Christina Boveri

the

816-333-4040 christina@boverirealty.com

Stylish Apartments in Historic Midtown Building STUDIOS, 1&2 BEDROOMS â&#x20AC;˘ All utilities included â&#x20AC;˘ Off Street Parking â&#x20AC;˘ Laundry Facilities 816-531-3111 â&#x20AC;˘ Huge Windows 1111 W. 39th St. â&#x20AC;˘ High Ceilings KCMO

6WRQHZDOO&RXUW$SWV

Tricia Cartwright

913-620-3852 tricia@boverirealty.com

MoveDowntownKC.com

Boveri Realty Group

Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Miss this Opportunity!

1-Bdrms starting at $395 central air, secure entry, on site laundry, on bus line, close to shopping, nice apts, Sections 8 welcome $100 Deposit (816) 231-2874 M-F 8-5 office hours

426 W. 5th St. KC, MO. 64105

Unbeatable location with great highway access!

WALDO PL AZA DE $99 Quiet, Comfortable 1 & 2 bedrooms in SUPER neighborhood!

POSIT

$570 - $650 No Application Fee!

816-363-8018 Are you out of housing options? We rent to the rent challenged

Holiday Apartments $110/WEEK Studios $100/DEPOSIT* Downtown Area BRING THIS

* Restrictions apply

Month to Month Lease! Laundry facilities - on-site On Metro Bus Route 201

All Utilities Paid

AD IN FOR $20 OFF YOUR FIRST 2 WEEKS

Call (816) 221-1721 -Se Habla Espanol pitch.com

$675,000

Features Include: t&YQPTFE#SJDL t#FBVUJGVM)BSEXPPET t"XFTPNFMPDBUJPOJO3JWFSNBSLFU t5JNCFS#FBNT t(BSBHF1BSLJOH3FBS1BSLJOH t#PBTUT 4R'U t'SFJHIU&MFWBUPS t7BVMUFE$FJMJOHT t(SFBU3PPGUPQ7JFXT t5ISFF4UPSJFT

Andrea Buettner 816.806.9492 andrea@boverirealty.com Christina Boveri 816.606.1398 christina@boverirealty.com

J U LY 2 6 - A U G U S T 1 , 2 0 1 2

THE PITCH

39


APTS/JOBS/STUFF

Ã&#x2DC;

NGLDHGNDLMKO

DO YOU WANT TO HELP KANSANS MAKE THEIR VOICES HEARD?

2HUZHZ.YHZZYVV[ZPZZLLRPUNOHYK^VYRPUN JVTTP[[LKKLWLUKHISLWLVWSL[VJVU[HJ[ ]V[LYZI`NVPUNKVVY[VKVVY

5+1MVNCJOH %SBJO$MFBOJOH )PVST%BZTB8FFL $PNNFSDJBM3FTJEFOUJBM *OEVTUSJBM8BUFS)FBUFST 6OEFSHSPVOE6UJMJUJFT8BUFS4FXFS %SBJO$MFBOJOHQMVTNPSF

$9-$11/hour Flexible Hours Part-time positions available



Contact jobs@kansasgrassroots.com or call Alex at 913-271-1538.

)05&-300.4 ".PUFM $BQJUBM*OO

$-6#&305*$",$999/&5 -JGFTUZMF)PVTF1BSUZ*O,$ 8FE/JHIU.FFU/h(SFFUT 4UBSUJOH!QN

&UI4U)JMMDSFTU3E )#0 1IPOF #BOR)BMM

1BSUJFT&WFSZ'SJ4BU

%BZ8FFL .POUI 5BY

/BLFE1PPM1BSUJFT -JNP"WBJMBCMF  XXXDMVCFSPUJDBLDYYYOFU

277@C523=6EF:E:@? Eh`hVV\ac`XcR^;`Sa]RTV^V_eRddZdeR_TV7EAE ARceZVdHVUUZ_Xd2]hRjdZ_UV^R_U 4R]])"'(&$$*!!E@52J

61*$,*54&-'4&37*$& "6501"354

%6*%8* ,4 .0

3FBM&TUBUF#BOLSVQUDZ 3FBTPOBCMFSBUFT&WFOJOH8FFLFOEBQQU 4VTBO#SBUDIFS XXXCSBUDIFSMBXCJ[

1BZJOH5PQ%PMMBS'PS+VOL$BST5SVDLT.JT TPVSJ,BOTBT

Law Offices of David M. Lurie

DWI, SOLICITATION, TRAFFIC DEFENSE, INTERNET-BASED CRIMES816-221-5900

http://www.the-law.com

ACCURSO & LETT

LAW FIRM

$08508/."--300.

$08508/."--300.

Experienced & Affordable

(JMMIBN1MB[B,$.0 "OUJRVFT $PMMFDUJCMFT "SU 3FDPSET +FXFMSZ #JLFT 'VO &7&3:4VOEBZQN

(JMMIBN1MB[B,$.0 "OUJRVFT $PMMFDUJCMFT "SU 3FDPSET +FXFMSZ #JLFT 'VO &7&3:4VOEBZQN

Missouri- 816-587-4LAW(4529) Kansas- 913-402-6069 www.accursoandlett.com

(&51"*%50%3*/,BOE5&95

50/:4"7"(& */7&45*("5*0/4

4JOT0G5IF1MB[B



(P5P3JHIUT 3BOUTCMPHTQPUDPN

"SNFE6OBSNFE&TDPSU4FSWJDFT $IFBUJOH4QPVTFT %PNFTUJD$JWJM 3FQPTTFTTJPOT 1FSTPOBM&YFDVUJWF 1SPUFDUJPO #BDLHSPVOE 4VSWFJMMBODF UPOZTBWBHFJOWFTUJHBUJPOT!IPUNBJMDPN

$"4)'03$"34

8SFDLFE %BNBHFEPS#SPLFO 3VOOJOHPS/PU

$BTI1BJE XXXBCDBVUPSFDZDMJOHDPN 

$99 DIVORCE $99

Simple, Uncontested + Filing Fee. Don Davis. 816-­531-­1330

THE PITCH

:?E6C?2E:@?2=D49@@= @7AC@76DD:@?2= 32CE6?5:?8

WE CAN HELP

Simple, Uncontested + Filing Fee. Don Davis. 816-­531-­1330

40

%FQPTJU "MM6UJMJUJFT1BJE -BVOESZ'BDJMJUJFT0O .FUSP#VT-JOFBTPG)PMJEBZ"QUT 8)BS MFN3E ,$.04F)BCMF&TQBOPM

TRAFFIC & DWI DEFENSE

$99 DIVORCE $99

&OFSHZ%SJOLNFFUT'BDFCPPL POMZ:06HFU QBJE*NNFEJBUFFBSOJOHTQPUFOUJBMBOEDPN QBOZDBSQSPHSBN #.8.FSDFEFT$BTI  4DSFFOJOHDBOEJEBUFTOPXGPS1BSUPS'VMM 5JNF'3&&FOFSHZESJOLGPSBQQMZJOH JOQFS TPO $BMMPSFNBJM BQQMZOPX!DFOUVSZMJOLOFUUPTFUBQQU

%08/508/"3&"456%*0"15 8&&,.JO

J U LY 2 6 - A U G U S T 1 , 2 0 1 2

pitch.com

5IF5SVUI5IFZ%POhU 8BOU:PV5P,OPX

&3*$"h414:$)*$456%*0

5PYJO'SFFXOBOIPVS 8FDBOIFMQZPVQBTT$PPQFST #SPBEXBZ ,$.0 

5H: 4C:>:?2= EC277:4

277@C523=62EE@C?6J

AcRTeZTVV^aYRdZkZ_X5H:UVWV_dV 6iaVcZV_TVU \_`h]VUXVRS]V Ree`c_VjhZ]]eR\VeYVeZ^Ve` ]ZdeV_R_UZ_W`c^ 7cVVZ_ZeZR]aY`_VT`_df]eReZ`_

7C664@?DF=E2E:@? 4R]]+EYV=Rh@WWZTV`W;AE`_Xd`_ )"'#'&"&"$

E96=2H@77:46@7 56?:D6<:C3J )"'##"$'*"

3FVOJUFT-PWF%FQSFTTJPO'JOBODFT 4VDDFTT(VBSBOUFFE3FTVMUT

3FBEJOHT

DA665:?85H:A@DD6DD:@?2DD2F=E


The Pitch: July 26, 2012