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JULY 12–18, 2012 | FREE | VOL. 32 NO. 2 | PITCH.COM


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VOTE

NOW

Editor Scott Wilson Managing Editor Justin Kendall Music Editor David Hudnall Staff Writers Charles Ferruzza, Ben Palosaari Editorial Operations Manager Deborah Hirsch Calendar Editor Berry Anderson Clubs Editor Abbie Stutzer Food Blogger, Web Editor Jonathan Bender Proofreader Brent Shepherd Contributing Writers Tracy Abeln, Danny Alexander, Theresa Bembnister, Aaron Carnes, Kyle Eustice, April Fleming, Ian Hrabe, Dan Lybarger, Chris Parker, Nadia Pflaum, Nancy Hull Rigdon, Dan Savage, Brent Shepherd, Nick Spacek, Abbie Stutzer, Crystal K. Wiebe Intern Hayley Bartels

A R T

Art Director Ashford Stamper Contributing Photographers Angela C. Bond, Chris Mullins, Lauren Phillips, Sabrina Staires, Brooke Vandever Design Interns Rachel Krause, Kelly Watts

P R O D U C T I O N

Production Manager Christina Riddle Multimedia Designer Rafaella Chaves

A D V E R T I S I N G

Advertising Director Dawn Jordan Senior Classified Multimedia Specialist Steven Suarez Classified Multimedia Specialist Andrew Disper Multimedia Specialists Michelle Acevedo, Kirin Arnold, Erin Carey, Payton Hatfield Director of Marketing & Operations Jason Dockery Digital Marketing Manager Keli Sweetland

C I R C U L A T I O N

Circulation Director Mike Ryan

WHEELS DOWN Kansas City B-cycle rides into a town that might, at last, be ready to share the road.

B U S I N E S S

BY J O N AT H A N B E N D E R

Accounts Receivable Jodi Waldsmith Publisher Joel Hornbostel

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S O U T H C O M M

Chief Executive Officer Chris Ferrell Chief Operating Officer Rob Jiranek Director of Accounting Todd Patton Director of Operations Susan Torregrossa Creative Director Heather Pierce Director of Content/Online Development Patrick Rains Chief Technology Officer Matt Locke Director of Digital Products Andy Sperry Business Manager Eric Norwood

N A T I O N A L

A D V E R T I S I N G

Voice Media Group 888-278-9866, voicemediagroup.com Senior Vice President Sales Susan Belair Senior Vice President Sales Operations Joe Larkin National Sales Director Ronni Gaun

B I T TER MAN C R U SO E Outlier artist A. Bitterman has gone further off the grid. BY THERESA BEMBNISTER

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B A C K P A G E . C O M

Vice President Sales & Marketing Carl Ferrer Business Manager Jess Adams Accountant David Roberts

D I S T R I B U T I O N

The Pitch distributes 45,000 copies a week and is available free throughout Greater Kansas City, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for $5 each, payable at The Pitch’s office in advance. The Pitch may be distributed only by The Pitch’s authorized independent contractors or authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of The Pitch, take more than one copy of each week’s issue. Mail subscriptions: $22.50 for six months or $45 per year, payable in advance. Application to mail at second-class postage rates is pending at Kansas City, MO 64108.

MO LLI MI GR ATI O N Frida’s moves its highbrow Mexican several blocks north. BY C H A R L E S F E R R U Z Z A

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C O P Y R I G H T

The contents of The Pitch are Copyright 2012 by KC Communications, LLC. No portion may be reproduced in whole or in part by any means without the express written permission of the publisher. The Pitch address: 1701 Main, Kansas City, MO 64108 For The Pitch information, call: 816-561-6061 To report a story, call: 816-218-6915 Editorial fax: 816-756-0502 For classifieds, call: 816-218-6759 For retail advertising, call: 816-218-6702

ON T HE COVE R

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PITCH QUESTIONNAIRE NEWS FEATURE F I LT E R ART CAFÉ FAT CITY MUSIC NIGHTLIFE MUSIC SHOWCASE BALLOT SAVAGE LOVE

MEANWHI LE AT PI TC H. C O M ILLUSTRATION BY BRITT WILSON

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THE PITCH

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Who is your GO-TO BUTCHER in Kansas City? KC’s ALL-STAR GAME as seen by the visitors. FREEBIRDS WORLD BURRITO opens in Mission.

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What career would you choose in an alternate reality? A homesteader in the wilderness

What movie do you watch at least once a year?

What was the last local restaurant you patronized? La Bodega

What local tradition do you take part in every year? Wandering the Plaza Art Fair

Where do you drink? In my bathtub, though I’ve been known to appear at a bar or two.

Celebrity you’d like to ride the Mamba with at Worlds of Fun: Wayne Coyne

What’s your favorite charity? Operation Break-

Favorite person or thing to follow on Twitter:

Favorite place to spend your paycheck: Donna’s Dress Shop, estate sale or Anthropologie

Person or thing you find really irritating at this moment: Dubstep

What local phenomenon do you think is overrated? Border wars

What subscription — print, digital, etc. — do you value most? Rolling Stone

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Last book you read: The Visible Man by Chuck

Finish this sentence: “Other than the Kauffman Center, Kansas City got it right when …”

Favorite day trip: Grandma’s house What was your most embarrassing dating moment? All of them! I get really nervous and turn

“Kansas City screwed up when it …” Lost ac-

into a klutz, so watch out, boys. I will spill my drink in your lap.

“Kansas City needs …” Priorities. I don’t want to hear another word about public transportation until we can teach these kids how to read a map.

Interesting brush with the law? A few. I have to behave myself because I always get caught.

“On my day off, I like to …” Go play outside with my sidekick.

“In five years, I’ll be …” Living in the moment. What TV show do you make sure you watch? I make sure to watch as little TV as possible.

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Where do you like to take out-of-town guests?

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“People might be surprised to know that I …”

Describe a recent triumph: Opening my own business. It would not have been possible without the hard work and support of my family and friends. I am so proud not only of the salon but also the many talented and selfless people I am blessed to know. Araby Salon Collective opened in January. See arabyhair.com.


NEWS

WHEELS DOWN

BY

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Kansas City B-cycle rides into a town that might at last be ready to share the road.

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mo t Last week’s stifling heat added a degree of difficulty to the kickoff event. At Ilus Davis Park, which sits at 11th Street and Oak between City Hall and the Federal Courthouse, riders were already sweating as they ambled up to the registration tent a little before 11 a.m. Helmets dangled from backpacks and belt loops. Dress shoes, sneakers and bike shoes alike awaited their pedals. “I don’t ride much, but I’m getting better,” Matt Filing said, sliding a bright-yellow shirt over his head. “There’s a kiosk in front of my office on Main Street, and I could see hopping on a bike to go to Union Station or somewhere else downtown.” Rogers, standing near the registration tent, heard his phone beep every few minutes, signaling a steady flow of tweets about the event. With the temperature climbing toward the century mark, he was eager to get everybody on the bikes. “This is a short ride,” Rogers said. “But it will be a big one.” Three buses make the seven-minute drive to a grassy field on the north side of the Heart of America Bridge, which had been set up as the staging area. The first-time bike sharers held their helmets on their laps and chattered like kids on a school field trip. Their twowheeled return trip would take 20 minutes. “Step right up and take a bike,” Rogers told them when the buses discharged their passengers. He spread his arms in a ringmaster gesture. The volunteers found their bikes, adjusted the seats, and secured bags and water bottles. They glanced at the advertisements below the handlebars and on the baskets, one of the funding streams for the program. A few passing cars honked to signal support. “I’m happiest when I’m riding my bike,” Peggy Mulvihill said. “I think this is great for

the city. It’s going to make the city safer for bikers because there will be more bikes on the street. If more people in Kansas City rode their bikes, they’d be happier.” When the ride started, at 11:27 a.m., Mulvihill put her left foot down and then her right, slowly pedaling up the incline. The heat promised to make the ride feel longer than one-third of an hour. “It was a good ride across the bridge,” Rick Usher said afterward, back at the park. The assistant to the city manager looked remarkably sweat-free, despite a necktie he hadn’t taken off. “I’m a commuter biker. I live a mile from City Hall and I’ve been riding to work every day. Fourteen years ago, it was just me and another guy who rode into town. Now I’m seeing a lot more bikes in the morning and evening.” In 2007, the U.S. Census Bureau ranked Kansas City 50th out of 50 cities for bike commuting — an estimate of just 50 bike commuters out of a workforce numbering about 216,000 people. In July of that year, the city hired Deb Ridgway to be its bicycle and pedestrian coordinator. By 2009 (the latest year for which numbers are available), Kansas City had risen to 39th. “I know there’s a high interest in bicycling,” Rogers says. “People are starting to do it for reasons of health or transportation or finance. And with all of the development downtown, there’s a lot more to do and see. It’s a better environment to be out bicycling.” A little before 2 p.m. last Tuesday, as traffic halted for a red light at the corner of 12th Street and Grand, bikers pedaled through the crosswalk on their way to a B-cycle docking station at 1233 Grand. One of the bicyclists, seeing that the light had changed, urged her fellow riders to pick up the pace. None of the drivers honked.

e ic

NEWS

B-cycle's fleet takes to the streets.

nsas cit a K ycle s y er rc o

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raffic slowed on the Heart of America Bridge late last Tuesday morning as drivers gawked at a pack of cyclists winding their way downtown. The 88 gray Trek bicycles were headed for Ilus Davis Park, in a volunteer-aided delivery organized by Bike Walk KC to mark the arrival of bike-sharing service B-cycle. “This is how we take Kansas City to the next level,” says Eric Rogers, executive director of Bike Walk KC. “Bike sharing is helping to transform a lot of other cities. We wanted to figure out how to make it happen here.” KC is the 12th city to install the bike-share system developed by B-cycle, a company based in Waterloo, Wisconsin, that’s a partnership of bike manufacturer Trek, managed-care company Humana and ad agency Crispin Porter + Bogusky. B-cycle first rolled out the concept in Denver in 2010, with bikes featuring adjustable seats, built-in locks, and embedded GPS that tracks mileage and calories burned. The local iteration launched last week, with 12 docking stations between the River Market and Crown Center. (Each station resembles a standard bike rack that has been crossed E R MO with an airport luggagecart dispenser.) The 90 bikes that are spread T A INE ONL .COM among those docks are H PITC accessible via daily ($7), weekly ($15), monthly ($25) or yearly ($65) membership cards. The first half-hour is included in the membership price; every additional half-hour costs $2. Rogers likens the model to Redbox’s DVDrental kiosks — you can return a bike to any of the B-cycle stations. “The thing I see here in Kansas City is that we don’t like to walk very far,” Rogers says. “But downtown, there’s still a lot of those awkward distances that someone might consider too far to walk and too short to drive. That’s where bike share comes in.” Blue Cross Blue Shield of Kansas City is the primary first-year sponsor of KC’s $400,000 bike-sharing program. It funded a 2011 feasibility study by Vireo, a Kansas City design and planning firm, to assess residential and employment density and visitor attractions around the city. Vireo then aided in the design of a transportation model centered on short-term downtown rentals. David Gentile, CEO of Blue Cross Blue Shield of Kansas City, says the company is looking for additional support from the downtown business community, in order to expand the program to Westport or the Plaza. “[The Blue Cross offices in] Minneapolis and Omaha saw an increase in the interest of wellness overall, and that got our attention,” he says. “I think that’s because it’s something small that someone can take and run with.”

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THE ARTIST WHO CALLS HIMSELF A. BIT TER M AN KNOWS SOMETHING ABOUT EXILE. NOW HE’S GONE EVEN FURTHER OFF THE GRID.

BY T H E R E S A B E M B N I S T E R | P H O T O G R A P H Y BY B R O O K E VA N D E V E R 62 T TH HE E P P II T TC CH H

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ost businesses in the East Crossroads closed hours ago, but on a balmy Monday night in June, the garage door at Meya Metalworks is still open. There’s a U-Haul parked outside on 16th Street, and two men are dragging what appears to be the gate of a human-sized possum trap onto the truck. It’s less than 24 hours before the artist who calls himself A. Bitterman hits Interstate 70 in the U-Haul and heads east. And while his itinerary doesn’t include hunting, it does call for something akin to camping. The Indianapolis Museum of Art has awarded Bitterman this summer’s Indy Island residency; in a project he calls Indigenous, the artist plans to run wild on the museum’s wooded grounds for six weeks. The brochure he has produced for the IMA explains the residency this way: “A. Bitterman, an artist we know little or nothing about, has been released into the Virginia B. Fairbanks Art and Nature Park. He has assumed a temporary residence on the island and will be ranging throughout the park in June and July.” Imagine the south lawn of the NelsonAtkins Museum of Art sharing DNA with Shawnee Mission Park and you’ll get a rough picture of the Art and Nature Park, which Hoosiers call the 100 Acres. Oxbow Lake, the body of water surrounding Indy Island, sits in the middle of the park, and the White River also borders it. Lisa Freiman, IMA’s senior curator of contemporary art (who selected Bitterman for the residency), has studded the park with pieces by internationally acclaimed contemporary artists, including Andrea Zittel’s “Indianapolis Island,” an inhabitable floating sculpture resembling an igloo with a porthole on top. Zittel earned accolades in the 1990s for sculptural works that examined domestic space. She designed the island as a temporary home for artists who would interact with park visitors. Over the past two summers, Indy Island residents took members of the general public on rowboat excursions, attempted to lower E. coli levels in the lake water, and led riverside yoga sessions. Bitterman has something different in mind. That’s where the human-sized possum trap comes into play.

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. Bitterman the artist is Pete Cowdin, who runs the Brookside children’s bookstore Reading Reptile with his wife, Deborah Pettid. The couple live with their five children and a cat in a modest, two-story house in Armour Hills dominated by bookshelves and materials for Bitterman projects. On the day he showed The Pitch around their home, Cowdin wore his usual gray baseball cap (emblazoned with the toothy grin of Totoro, from the Hayao Miyazaki anime classic My Neighbor Totoro) and spoke in his usual opinion-intensive staccato. A week before his departure for Indianapolis, the two front rooms of the house served as makeshift studios. Most of a room that appeared to serve as a home office was occupied by wooden panels for a lakeside informational kiosk. Boxes holding spotting scopes and a coin-operated candy dispenser sat in corners of the adjacent room. Last summer’s large-scale Bitterman work was an installation mimicking a national park.

The exhibit, titled Point of Interest, was in the Cowdin family’s front yard. Its centerpiece was a wooden panel with illustrations of resident fauna, a map of stratigraphic rock formations, and an outline of the 4.6-billion-year history of the site. The 0.17-mile “Upper Lawn View Trail” took visitors around the front yard, past a picnic table and a tubular sculpture labeled “Cloud gazer.” The audience was largely made up of neighbors and passersby out for a stroll or a jog.

scientist before becoming an artist, doesn’t see eye to eye with the resulting work’s position on nature. “In asserting that people are part of nature, which I agree with, he then seems to extrapolate a view in which all the degradation, reduction in diversity, system collapse, etc., is kind of a natural outcome of the fact that we are one element of the natural world and behaving according to our nature. For myself, I see the capacit y a nd will of

In a still from an instructional video Bitterman made to accompany Indigenous, he teaches Broadway Café owner Sara Honan how to play catch with the artist.

Point of Interest aimed to point out the disconnect between our daily lives and our notions of nature. “Sometimes we travel long distances so that we can be in nature,” read some of Bitterman’s text on a metal plaque in the installation. “We confuse nature for the natural world, and this has generated a kind of madness.” The frontyard national-park exhibit suggested that nature is a place we inhabit, not a place we visit. Cory Imig, who helps run Plug Projects, an artist-run space in the West Bottoms, met Cowdin during a visit to Point of Interest. “I signed up for a Back Country Permit, which, upon approval, granted me time in his backyard,” Imig explains, recalling one of the installation’s nods to national-park bureaucracy. “I invited several friends with me, and we hung out, drank wine and had a picnic.” Point of Interest received a Rocket Grant, funded by the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, and administered locally by the Charlotte Street Foundation and the University of Kansas’ Spencer Museum of Art. Grant coordinator and artist Julia Cole says Cowdin’s application — signed as Bitterman — immediately appealed to the selection committee. “Looking back through previous years, Pete’s application seemed so well thought out, so targeted to a specific community in a thoughtful and generous way. It was humorous. It sunk its teeth into an interesting idea. It fit the opportunity extremely well.” But Cole, who worked as a pattern-formation

humans to resist, create more integrative solutions and then build them — kind of an art practice — as also part of nature.” Of course, there’s a reason that Cowdin has chosen Bitterman as his pseudonym. And this wouldn’t have been a Bitterman project without a little of that persona’s sourness.

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longside Point of Interest, Bitterman also exhibited a piece titled “Lot 18” at the Subterranean Gallery last year. Clayton Skidmore and Ayla Rexroth run Subterranean out of their basement apartment. Skidmore met Cowdin when the artist shopped at the now-defunct SRO Video, where Skidmore worked. “I first got to know Pete because he was a smartass. He would give me trouble about [removing his] late fees.” When Skidmore introduced Cowdin to Rexroth at a December 2010 lecture at the Nelson-Atkins, the artist immediately asked to show at the Subterranean Gallery. Rexroth agreed. Cowdin had big plans for the small space. He had hired aerial photographer Jon Blumb to shoot from a low-flying airplane while the artist was lying on the roof of his house, naked. Cowdin exhibited the resulting video and still images in “Lot 18.” He also hired a roofer who built, along with Rexroth, a roofl ike structure, complete with shingles,

in one corner of the basement gallery. Visitors could lie on the roof, assuming the same pose as Cowdin in the photo shoot, and look at transparencies installed on the ceiling. “Lot 18” made sly references to “land art,” a movement in the 1960s and ’70s in which artists used materials such as dirt and rocks to make monumental sculptures in hard-to-reach, unpopulated areas. Often, these works could be witnessed only through photographs. Bitterman used the Cowdin family home — a tiny suburban plot — to enact his own version of land art. Bitterman’s “Lot 18” exceeded Rexroth’s expectations. “I don’t feel like there is a huge amount of artists in this city who invest in their studio practice on a level that they rent a plane,” she says. Rexroth, who works primarily with emerging artists, says she has learned from observing Cowdin as a businessman. “I didn’t realize how artists were working collaboratively with businesses and institutions,” she says. “We’ve become barterers and traders more. We’re learning how to use our value to our advantage in the community while helping others and building relationships.” As cranky, authority-questioning Bitterman, Cowdin has in fact become a touchstone for young local artists like those Rexroth curates at Subterreanean. The Charlotte Street Foundation selected him as a mentor artist for Urban Culture Project studio resident Andrew Erdrich. “We were skeptical of being assigned someone,” Erdrich says. “Because we were both skeptical, things started off on the right foot.” The two have become friends, and Cowdin enlisted Erdrich’s help in transporting his work to Indianapolis. After her visit to Point of Interest, Imig dropped by the Reading Reptile one day, hoping to chat about art. “We started talking about some of the work he was working on and some of my past work, and all of a sudden we were bouncing ideas off one another left and right. We decided we should attempt to collaborate on a project and see if we could make it work.” The two hope to curate a selection of artwork to install in a grocery store — pending the cooperation of a grocer. Sean Starowitz, who runs Bread KC along with Erdrich, is in talks with Cowdin about collaborating on a project that focuses on abandoned properties in Kansas City. As a Kansas City Art Institute student, Starowitz heard a rumor about a local artist who had been kicked out of the graduate program at Cranbrook Academy of Art for destroying an Eliel Saarinen chair. The story was about Cowdin, the perfect legend to inform the Bitterman character. (And it’s true.) Starowitz says he admires the older artist’s dedication to maintaining his voice. “He runs the Reading Reptile and has a family,” he says. “He lives this double life. In school, you’re told you shouldn’t have a family. And Pete’s done that. He’s gone against the institutional ideas of what makes success.”

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owdin took an unconventional path to become Bitterman. He continued on page 8

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Bitterman Crusoe continued from page 7 studied studio art at Carleton College in Minnesota, then attended Cranbrook, from which he was indeed expelled in 1987, after an art project that involved — yes — the deconstruction of lunchroom chairs designed by Finnish architect Eliel Saarinen. Thus began a 20-year gap in creating art. It was a banana that ended the dry spell. In 2007, Cowdin and Pettid made and installed a gigantic papier-mâché banana outside the Folly Theater that was rendered to look as though it were crashing through the historic building’s façade. “Staying the Course” was part of that year’s Avenue of the Arts series, and it marked a reversal of what Cowdin says was a conscious choice to set aside his art making. “For me, making art has always been a little dangerous, emotionally speaking,” he says. “When I’m doing it, I don’t fuck around, and that can make me a little crazy — sometimes a lot crazy. I know this, and I knew it would not be a good thing to pursue when the kids were younger. So I didn’t.” Cowdin, who started working at Reading Reptile in 1988, introduced A. Bitterman as a pen name for the children’s book reviews he wrote for the store. “I liked the idea of disassociating my writing or art-making self from the bookstore and day-to-day stuff mostly because I don’t like to talk about what I make in that context,” he says. “Of course, my friends and family know

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what I’m doing, but in general, I don’t like to link the two — mainly because if someone knows you as one thing, they don’t take the other thing seriously.” In the early 1990s, Cowdin also studied geology at the University of Missouri–Kansas City. In a lab there, he met Don Wilkison, a fellow geology student. Wilkison didn’t know about Bitterman until he visited a book sale at his daughter’s middle school. “As I was walking though the parking lot, I saw a Jeep Grand Cherokee with this weird-

well-intentioned, but we’re not afraid to say to each other, ‘You’re full of shit.’ ” Wilkison makes art under his own assumed persona, “Minister of Information.” Last year, he surreptitiously planted a tree in the shadow of “Ferment,” Roxy Paine’s metal-tree sculpture on the lawn of the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art. He called the work “Tree for Roxy Paine.” Eventually the museum yanked it out. In a March 2012 issue of the San Franciscobased art publication Art Practical, which was

“OF COURSE, MY FRIEN DS AND FAMILY KNOW WHAT I’M DOIN G , BUT IN G ENERAL, I DON’T LIKE TO LINK THE TWO — MA IN LY BECAUSE IF SOMEONE KNOWS YOU AS ON E THING , THEY DON’T TAKE THE OTHER THIN G SERIOUSLY.” ass painting on it that said, ‘Is this a burning flag or a penis?’ ” Wilkison says. “I thought to myself, I don’t know who owns that but I need to meet this person.” Their resulting friendship, he explains, owes much to their willingness to be brutally honest with each other. “It’s the kind of brother relationship where you have this parry back and forth,” Wilkison says. “It’s

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devoted to Kansas City, Bitterman submitted an essay about his friend’s tree. He withdrew it at the last minute, though, because he believed that the publication’s editing had changed the voice and meaning of the piece. That, Wilkison says, was just Bitterman standing his ground. “He’s willing to put himself on the line when he really believes something. If you

Cowdin’s home work space was more packed than usual in June as he prepared to leave for Indianapolis. look at his work and spend some time with him, you’ll understand that. “Some people say he’s difficult to work with,” Wilkison adds. “I don’t necessarily agree with that. Pete can be an asshole, sure. I can be an asshole. We can all be assholes.” There’s also history between the NelsonAtkins and Bitterman. For the 2010 work “Wal-Mart: A. Bitterman vs. Stephen Holl,” Bitterman constructed a Masonite-and-foam replica of a Wal-Mart sign, then rounded up volunteers to gather on the museum lawn on a Sunday morning to hold the Wal-Mart sign up against the Bloch Building as Blumb snapped pictures. Cowdin says people saw the project as a criticism of the museum, but that wasn’t his intention. It was merely an impulse he wanted to fulfi ll. “Wal-Mart is so loaded,” he says. “It’s a million things, and it’s heavy. It’s infused with layers of hatred and love. The museum, too, is completely loaded. It’s a Stephen Holl building — it’s precious.” The artist mailed photographic prints of the happening to the museum. Jan Schall, curator of modern and contemporary art at the Nelson-Atkins, describes the photographs as “well seen and well made.” The prints remain in the museum archives;


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unsolicited artworks, Schall explains, can’t become part of the collection.

I

n Indianapolis, Cowdin is adjusting to working with a museum staff rather than installing his work guerrilla-style, during off hours. Two weeks into his residency, though, he has encountered a classic jungle-fighter problem. The fictional Bitterman is covered with a real poison-ivy rash. He’s unfazed (though he’s not sleeping on the island — the IMA provides air-conditioned quarters with a real bed). “People really like the cage in general,” Cowdin says. “I can tell.” The possum trap is integral to the narrative he has constructed around Bitterman’s residency: An artist has been released into the wild, free to interact — and mess with the heads of — park visitors. He has placed an easy chair, a TV and a mini refrigerator in the far end of the cage, signs of the artist’s former, domesticated life. Amanda York, the IMA curatorial assistant assigned to Bitterman’s project, explains that audience interaction is key to Indigenous. “Bitterman will be present throughout 100 Acres and may interact with visitors who approach him using the language of hand gestures he’s created,” she says. “There’s also a GPS tracker online [imamuseum.org/ island2012] that reports where Bitterman is in real time, so park visitors can be aware of

KathleenLiggett.ReeceAndNichols.com

his exact location and use Twitter or Instagram to post a picture of him in his habitat. Additionally, people can feed the artists by using the nut dispenser installed in the park, leaving food in the park and clues as to where it may be online, and attend screenings of films created by Bitterman on the island.” For the less digitally inclined, there are old-school viewing stations installed in two locations around the lake — spotting scopes able to zoom in on the island for a closer look. Then there’s Bitterman’s “area of unmediated flux,” his phrase for the part of a dirt path he has lined with taxidermic animals (including a jackrabbit, a possum and a squirrel). He has revived some of the same tools and strategies he used in his front yard, but on a much larger scale. There’s a kiosk near the lake with the kinds of historic and geological information familiar from Point of Interest. And the six-week Bitterman occupation of this wooded space calls similar attention to connections shared by humans, nature and art. “There’s a notion that our built environment is somehow exempt from the natural world — emotionally, politically, physically,” Cowdin says. “Accordingly, nature becomes a place we visit. Art is the same way. People go to visit art. They keep it separate. Art is at a place you go visit.” And the IMA’s 100 Acres is, he knows, a built environment, a presentation of nature, dressed up for human consumption, on the grounds of an art museum. His point is to draw attention to all of this, not to criticize it. “You might think I’m bagging on it, but no. That’s not what I’m trying to do.” So far, Bitterman has attracted visitors from outside the human part of the animal kingdom. Erdrich, who traveled to the museum to help with the installation, reports that the island is full of spiders. And a heron had already taken up residence on the sculpture. “It just sits on it and shits there,” Cowdin says with a Bitterman laugh. “I promised all the museum people that I would kill and roast it.”

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SUMMER CONCERT SERIES

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Above: On the 100 Acres grounds, Cowdin poses in front of the Bitterman possum trap. Left: The lakeside kiosk explaining how to track Bitterman.

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WEEK OF JULY 12-18

15

PAG E

ESDAY

7.18

WE D N

ART

stem, undsy LCD So Up Give It

A half-century of Don Reitz at the Belger.

17

PAG E

CAFÉ Frida’s moves north.

24 PAG E

MUSIC FORECAST Dirty Projectors spin around again.

T H U R S D AY | 7. 1 2 | SIDEWALK HUSTLE

You don’t have to live in Brookside to shop there. Today through Sunday, the merchants on and around 63rd Street between Wornall and Main E R O M are throwing a summer sidewalk sale to purge their inventory of the T A INE ONL .COM things the folks in BrookH C PIT side didn’t want. Stroll the streets, from the World’s Window to the Fiddly Fig, and pick up the things you’ve been waiting to see on sale. We like 5B & Co. Candlemakers (6231 Brookside Plaza, 816-361-6393), where signature scents like Clean Undies, Monkey Burps, and the Bottom of Mom’s Purse waft through the air and remind us that our abodes could always be a little less funky. Go to brooksidekc.org for more information. — BERRY ANDERSON

EVENTS

DISCO INFILTRATORS Has any other band personified “hit it and quit it” better than LCD Soundsystem? Electronic mastermind James Murphy released only three albums but gained universal acclaim in less than 10 years. In February 2011, LCD’s website announced that the act

F R I D AY | 7. 13 |

would play its final show April 2 at Madison Square Garden. The documentary Shut Up and Play the Hits, which chronicles the band’s 48 hours before and after that last hurrah, plays at the Tivoli (4050 Pennsylvania, 816-561-5222) for one night only at 7:30. Tickets cost $8.50. See tivolikc.com. — BERRY ANDERSON

F R I D AY | 7. 1 3 |

MOONRISE KINGDOM

Lois Dodd’s nighttime landscapes of New England on display at the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art — Lois Dodd: Catching the Light — don’t bear much resemblance to the late-night scenes of Powell Gardens. However, folks can make connections between the mythic painted landscapes and real-life garden goings-on when local painter and printmaker Jane Voorhees and Powell Gardens’ director of horticulture, Alan Branhagen, team up for the Kemper’s Double Vision Lecture Series. The free lecture “Soulscapes and the Garden After Dark” begins at 6 p.m. with a meet-and-greet happy hour at the museum (4420 Warwick, 816-753-5784) at 5. Admission is free. For more information, see kemperart.org. The Pitch caught up with Branhagen to ask what goes on in his garden after dark. continued on page 12

WIN OR LOSE, WE’LL STILL BOOZE

“A

ctually, the Jayhawk was not the first KU mascot,” says University Archivist Becky Schulte. What? Shut the front door, Becky. Learn more about this mystery at the “History of the Jayhawk,” a 2:30 p.m. lecture at the Adams Alumni

Center (1266 Oread, Lawrence), where Schulte explains how the mythical beast (and brand) became the most powerful in the land. Tickets cost $10; buy them at osher.ku.edu.

– B ERRY A NDERSON pitch.com

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FRIDAY

7.13

come ueaks The s q ight. n t a t ou

continued from page 11 The Pitch: Are the gardens as peaceful at night as they are during the day? Branhagen: Yes, the sights and sounds are quite different, and the cycle of the moon plays a big role on what we can see. White flowers and white variegated foliage plants seem to glow, while plants with glossy leaves glisten. Coyotes and owls can add some eerie sounds at any season, with a cacophony of various frog and toad species in spring through summer, and wonderful insect songs (mainly cricket and katydid species) at their peak in late summer into fall. Which garden has the most nighttime activity? The Visitor Center terrace garden has a moth border with many flowers that open

only at night for moths as pollinators. The Southern and sweet bay magnolias exude intoxicating, alluring fragrance, and their foliage really glistens on moonlit nights. What types of nocturnal creatures wander Powell Gardens? Great horned, barred and Eastern screech owls at all seasons; whippoorwills and chuck-will’s-widows in summer (all birds of the night), plus coyotes, raccoons, opossum; a huge diversity of moths and other insects. What do you find magical about gardens at night? How one sees almost nothing but the Milky Way and the stars during a new moon and a magically lit landscape during the full moon. — BERRY ANDERSON

S AT U R D AY | 7. 1 4 |

SPORTS ROUNDUP

J

ust because you didn’t make it to the All-Star Game doesn’t mean you’re cheap, lame or a fair-weather sports fan. There are always plenty of chances to see KC athletes in action. —B.A. See one of these games tonight.

KANSAS CITY ROYALS VS. CHICAGO WHITE SOX

KANSAS CITY COMMAND VS. SPOKANE SHOCK

6:10 p.m. 7 p.m. Kauffman Stadium Sprint Center 1 Royal Way, 816-921-8000 cutline 1407here Grand, 816-949-7100 royals.com kccommand.com

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KANSAS CITY T-BONES VS. WICHITA WINGNUTS

7:05 p.m. CommunityAmerica Ballpark 1800 Village West Parkway, Kansas City, Kansas, 913-328-5618 tbonesbaseball.com


K E L LY WAT TS

S U N D AY | 7. 1 5 |

SUN STREAKING

L

ast summer, the crowd at the Heartland Naturists’ annual Sun Run — a nude walk and jog through a rural Kansas nature preserve — swelled: a record 37 participants. So this year, it’s a two-day event. Naturists (the PC term for nudists) are invited to spend the day playing games, skinny-dipping and chilling in the buff before a cookout Saturday night. (Naturists are invited to camp Saturday, and cabins also are available to rent.) The 5k run/walk is today at 9 a.m., followed by more skinny-dipping and grilling. Bring a side dish for the potluck lunch, plus shoes and sunscreen, but leave your camera at home. The location is kept secret to deter gawkers, but it’s — B EN PALOSAARI disclosed to participants after they register online at heartlandnaturists.com.

S U N D AY | 7. 15 | GROUND COVER

What’s it going to take to bring Kansas Citians together? A baseball game? An earnings tax? A citywide ban on crab rangoon? How about a picnic? Last January, local artist Alison Heryer set up workshops across the metro and invited the public to stamp and stencil 5-foot-by-5-foot fabric panels. From noon to 2 p.m. today, everyone who participated, and anyone who likes picnics, is E R O M invited to Hand Built to help assemble the 10,000-square-foot T A INE ONL .COM piece. That’s followed H C PIT by a communitywide picnic from 2 to 4 p.m. It’s all on the south lawn of the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art (Oak Street and Emanuel Cleaver II Boulevard). Entertainment is planned both inside and outside the museum, and food can be purchased or brought. For details, see nelson-atkins.org. — BERRY ANDERSON

EVENTS

5399 Martway Mission, KS 913.432.7000

all those basketball dollars from the winter, Johnny’s will soon be home to two outdoor patios (one for smokers, one for nonsmokers) and, rumor has it, a pizza kitchen. Would Slim Wilson not shed a proud tear for this mecca of Kansas sports-bar finery? Johnny’s is open from 11 a.m. to 2 a.m. — BERRY ANDERSON

1020 S. Weaver St. Olathe, KS 913.782.0279

T U E S D AY | 7. 17 | STIR IT UP

Have you ever wondered what it would be like to be swirled about in a literal human soup? The closest thing we could come up with was the Vortex at the Springs Aquatic Center (9400 North Congress Avenue, 816-880-0279). “It works based on the design of the circular area and the flow of water that creates a circular motion. There is also a pump in the bottom of that area that creates additional flow,” says Eden Dowler, KC district manager of Midwest Pool Management. Try it today from noon until 8 p.m. See springskc.com for more information. — BERRY ANDERSON

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M O N D AY | 7. 16 | NO JOHNNY COME LATELY

Despite the cumbersome construction at 83rd Street and Mission, Johnny’s Tavern (8262 Mission, 913-901-0322) is still open. The 10-year-old bar continues to serve up schooners and its ’78 Classic seven days a week. And now that happy hour is happening in Kansas? Add $2 domestic bottles, domestic drafts and wells to that list from 3 to 6 p.m. Inside, the Jayhawk-friendly joint has lightened up with the addition of west-facing, rolling garage doors and new, small flat screens in the booths. Thanks to

with Federation Of Horsepower & 11After (all female rock band) E-mail submissions to Filter editor Berry Anderson at calendar@pitch.com. Search our complete listings guide online at pitch.com.

$25 Advance, $30 Day of Show or call 816-483-6407

pitch.com

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ART

BY

his fingerprints on the Belger.

T R A C Y A BE L N

BENNETT ROTI

JEFFREY BRUCE

JEFFREY BRUCE

DON TIME

Visionary ceramist Don Reitz leaves

O

ver a career that spans half a century, Don Reitz has become a legendary ceramist. But his real medium might be time. In the artist’s statement that accompanies Reitz’s eponymous exhibition at the Belger Arts Center, he reminds us of the essential connection between time and ceramics. Time “hardens and colors the clay,” he writes, while giving him space to “think and look inward.” Before the ceramist’s process hardens it, clay is dug up from a planet that, gauged against a human life, is ancient. And pottery is one of our oldest art forms, durable enough E R O M to last for centuries. At 82, Reitz understands the passage of time and T A E IN ONL .COM has long since mastered H C IT P transforming it into objects of weight — weight measured in mass as well as in emotional importance. It’s a mastery on impressive display in this retrospective of more than 100 Reitz sculptures. The artist’s hand is visible everywhere here, sometimes literally (as a painted print on the surface of a hefty platter, for example). Like fossils in stone, evidence of his manual labor — pinches, gouges, the long

ART

contact with vessels formed on the potter’s over scratched surfaces. These are huge clay pipes, in fact, that come from a sewer factory wheel — is engagingly visual throughout. in Phoenix. The deviation from the physical The works are arranged in the second-floor demands of throwing, moving and firing is an gallery so that, if you begin by walking in and interesting maneuver for someone Reitz's age. making an immediate right, you can proceed This show’s contents remind us that Reitz studiously through the years. You start with has never been afraid of collaboration or asReitz’s well-crafted products of his graduatestudent work, which clearly demonstrate his sistance. In fact, during the five years after a car accident that left him unable to use his ownership of the medium, then move counleft arm and leg, students made slabs and terclockwise to the “Sara” shields, platters shields for him, on which he drew using tools and vessels of the 1980s. At last, there are and glazes. It was during this period that the numerous towering forms — tea stacks, his 5-year-old niece, Sara, was diagnosed kachinas, large jars — forming the apex of with liver cancer. The letthe artist’s interaction with ters they exchanged helped clay as a structural expresthem as they both healed. sion of the time and energy Don Reitz Through September 8 Sara’s drawings and Reitz’s invested in it. at the Belger Arts Center, childhood memories lend The sheer scope of 2100 Walnut, 816-474-3250, colorful life to his work of the exhibition, however, belgerartscenter.org that period. Charming mesmakes any disciplined adsages etched into the clay herence to a timeline alcomment on the dreamsmost impossible. As with the experience of entering a roomful of capes: “Hay, I’ve been down this road beford [sic],” “An excess of the sensible,” “Don’t party guests, you feel an eagerness to run walk in your flesh all the time,” “Don’t worry up to each simultaneously. On the first floor, you’ve already met very we can fi nd it again,” “Tomorrow this will be just an echo down a rusty railroad track,” quiet Asiatic tea bowls lined up neatly on a cabinet off to the side. In the center of that “Hold tight I’m coming.” Like 3-D storybooks, the pottery from this part of Reitz’s room are some of Reitz’s most recent works: totem tubes painted with designs scattered career shows derailing trains and dragons.

Clockwise from top left: “It's My Watch,” “Spirit Bags” and “You Are Here.” There are also people, part of narratives as nonlinear as real life feels. Reitz’s own career has followed a path not uncommon for artists of his generation. After serving as a diver for the U.S. Navy and studying painting on the G.I. Bill, Reitz did graduate work in the 1960s at Alfred University and then joined the faculty of the University of Wisconsin-Madison for more than two decades. Over the past 20 years, he has lived on a remote ranch in Clarkdale, Arizona, with four wood-fired kilns that continue to give him the satisfaction of creating. Reitz also has taught thousands of workshops — at least one in each of the United States. The Belger Arts Center is known for presenting large-scale, important exhibitions of some of 20th-century art’s major players: Jasper Johns, Terry Winters, Sun Smith-Foret, Robert Stackhouse, Wendell Castle. Its Reitz exhibition is very much in that vein, and Kansas City has benefited from the inspiration of Evelyn Craft, the center’s executive director, who had the vision to curate this display during Reitz's lifetime.

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CAFÉ

MOLLI MIGRATION

Frida’s moves its highbrow Mexican a few blocks north.

BY

CHARLES FERRUZZA

Frida’s Contemporary Mexican Cuisine • 7200 West 121st Street, Overland Park, 913-897-0606 • Hours: 11 a.m.–10 p.m. Monday–Saturday, 11 a.m.–9 p.m. Sunday • Price: $$–$$$

T

he buzz surrounding chef Patrick Ryan, who opened his much-awaited Port Fonda restaurant in Westport, definitely stole much of the thunder from another June opening. Ivan Marquez moved his popular Frida’s Contemporary Mexican Cuisine from 148th Street in Overland Park to a larger location 27 blocks north. By suburban standards, that’s practically like moving to midtown. Marquez needed a bigger space, he says, and he was tired of hearing his Missouri customers — the ones who really do live in midtown — gripe about the long drive. It wasn’t my favorMORE ite drive, either, so I say it’s a damn good move. The 121st Street space, T A INE ONL .COM formerly occupied by H C PIT the short-lived El Espolon Mexican restaurant (which served unmemorable Tex-Mex), now boasts a big main dining room in shades of terra cotta and sage; an enclosed private dining area seating 10; and a long, narrow room, dominated by the bar, with additional seating (and less noise than elsewhere in the restaurant). Marquez is usually here, and he needs to be; this Frida’s is essentially a new restaurant, subject to the issues and frustrations that accompany such a venture. He has brought four of his veteran servers with him but has hired an otherwise different front-of-the-house staff, which is still finding its footing. The food, which has always been the calling card at Frida’s (no one needs to drive south of 119th Street for a combination plate or a taco salad), remains terrific. In the kitchen is the affable Diego Rios Torre (like Marquez, a native of Guadalajara), a chef as serious about his food as this restaurant’s iconic namesake, Frida Kahlo, was about her art. The menu isn’t dramatically different from the one that Marquez introduced in 2010, though Rios Torre has created a few delicious seafood dishes. A f laky filet of wine-poached basa, draped in a brassy raspberry-chipotle sauce and tissue-thin shards of fried spinach, sounds too creative for its own good, but it’s light and fresh. Far simpler but just as good is the pescado al cilantro, broiled with a kicky cilantro pesto and scattered with roasted almonds. A friend of mine who used to spend every winter in Acapulco loves Frida’s but complains that its distinctive mole isn’t quite rich enough. When I passed this along to Marquez, he just sighed. “In Mexico, moles can have as many variations as barbecue sauce in the Midwest,” he said. “People add different ingredients and prepare it different ways. We make a Puebla-style mole. It has a little cacao in it, but it’s not chocolaty.” Which is the way I like it. Chef Rios Torre’s brick-red molli — from the Nahuatl word mean-

ANGELA C. BOND

CAFÉ

Bacon-wrapped pork medallions (left) get a Jamaican touch; a corn husk (above) wraps spicy vegetables with fish cooked in wine.

also serving slices of the sweet, pink fruit — ing “concoction” — isn’t supposed to be supple. ice-cold — with its house-marinated ceviche It is, instead, engagingly tangy, balancing a distant sweetness with only a hint of fire. and crispy sweet-potato chips.) At a glance, Frida’s menu doesn’t look There’s also a note of the aphrodisiac cacao especially vegetarian-friendly, but Marquez (used here in the form of cocoa) in the garlicand-onion “Jamaican sauce” — one of the few says if he listed every meatless option, “The menu would become way too big.” Instead, cross-cultural choices here — poured over the he encourages patrons to ask servers for guidbacon-wrapped pork medallions, each stuffed ance. “We can do a chile with creamy goat cheese, relleno with cheese and spinach and mushrooms. Frida’s Contemporary mushrooms, topped with a If the doomsday reports Mexican Cuisine creamy white walnut-andabout the Mayan calendar pomegranate sauce, or fresh are accurate, then I prefer to Timbal de sandia ............$9.99 vegetables sautéed with a go out with a bang in DecemCeviche de pescado.......$9.99 chapaola sauce made with ber with a huitlacoche quePescado al cilantro...... $18.99 onions, tomatoes and jalasadilla in one hand and a Pescado al peños.” (And there’s always plate of timbal de sandia in frambuesa ..............$18.99 the quesadilla.) the other. The latter, a seaChile en nogado ........$18.99 For carnivores, there sonal dish here, is one of the Tacos placeros .........$15.99 are lavish surprises and best summer salads in town, Espuma de cacao ...... $6.50 reliable f lavors. Achiotea riposte to these blistering roasted pork doesn’t turn days: ribbons of lemon-marinated zucchini tossed with jewel-like squares up on many local menus, and the version at Frida’s is outstanding, marinated in tart of fresh watermelon and bits of goat cheese in an evanescent sauce of white wine and orange juice. The flesh of the stuffed peppers — plump poblanos fi lled with grilled steak, huitlacoche (black corn fungus, an ancient delicacy that conveys an earthy richness). fresh apples and nuts, and fi nished with a blanket of cheese — takes on the consistency While watermelon stays in season, Frida’s is

of butter. The tacos at Frida’s are not the Taco Bell variety, but who wants those when you can get this restaurant’s tasty spin on street tacos, served Mexico City-style, with beef or chicken, guacamole and sautéed onions. The north-of-the-border, California version wraps fried chunks of fl aky white fi sh in grilled corn tortillas with a jumble of fresh cabbage. For those who insist on a conventional finale to a sophisticated meal, Frida’s serves the beloved pastry batons known as churros (with coffee ice cream). I prefer the gloriously creamy — but milk-free — vanilla and caramel ice cream or the espuma de cacao, a dark-chocolate mousse with a discreet chipotle undertone (served with a rubycolored berry sauce). I like Marquez’s new spot, but I won’t mind if he continues the Frida’s journey and moves the place a little farther north every couple of years. Barring a Mayan-predicted apocalypse, the restaurant would reach Prairie Village by 2016.

Have a suggestion for a restaurant The Pitch should review? E-mail charles.ferruzza@pitch.com

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A KC Favorite for 20 Years!

A blazing summer hasn’t slowed the pace of restaurant openings.

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hef Ray “Pete” Peterman has never chosen traditional names for his restaurants. His first venue, north of the river, was called the Sour Octopus, and he riffed on that with his second bistro, S.O. Redux, in Columbus Park. For his latest restaurant, Peterman chose a family nickname: “My mother loved peaches, but she called them peanches,” he says. It’s unusual enough that it’s already caused a buzz on Facebook and in the restaurant community. “Is it called Pinches?” a local restaurant manager asked me. “Does it mean a pinch of this and pinch of that?” Uh, no. The name, like the two-week-old restaurant along Restaurant Row (900 West 39th Street, 816-709-1032), pays homage to Peterman’s late mother, Barbara Gustin, who died in January. The restaurant also honors reMORE gional Missouri cuisine, with a salad of butterT fried chicken gizzards, A E IN ONL .COM a pork cassoulet under PITCH a cornmeal crust, and a Missouri blue trout in a roasted-lemon sauce served atop parsleypotato dumplings. Peanches, which has only 11 tables, is open 5–10 p.m. Tuesday–Thursday and 5–11 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Peterman’s latest joint isn’t the only new name on a scene that’s always in flux. This week, Fat City looks at the restaurants that have opened — and shuttered — around KC in recent days.

CHRIS MULLINS

C

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moved across Brush Creek after more than two decades in the Board of Trade Building. There’s a limited dim sum menu daily and a more elaborate service 10 a.m.–3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. It’s open 11 a.m.–11 p.m. Sunday–Thursday, and an hour later on Friday and Saturday. Minsky’s Pizza Café & Bar (934 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-856-5252) is bringing a taste of Kansas City pizza to KU turf. The area staple opened its 14th location last month, with gluten-free pies on the menu. The pizza shop is open 11 a.m.–10 p.m. Sunday– Thursday and 11 a.m.–11 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Sugo’s Spaghetteria (13386 Metcalf, Overland Park, 913-685-1667) is St. Louis restaurateur Michael Del Pietro’s opening foray in the Kansas City market. The restaurant’s Sicilian and Northern Italian influences inform a menu of fresh pasta, risotto and four daily entrée specials. Sugo’s is open 11 a.m.–9 p.m. Monday–Thursday, 11 a.m.–10 p.m. Friday, and 5–10 p.m. Saturday. A i x o i s B r a s s e r i e ( 1 0 0 6 Wa l n u t , 816-474-0000) opened in the downtown loop in June. The second restaurant from husbandand-wife team Emmanuel and Megan Langlade features a number of the dishes made popular at their Brookside Aixois.

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ANGELA C. BOND

FOOD

Port Fonda (4141 Pennsylvania, 816-216-6462)

is now open in Westport. Chef Patrick Ryan’s Nuevo Latino cuisine, which first drew fans when the business was in an Airstream trailer, is now being dished up in a brick-and-mortar restaurant with a serious mescal and tequila list. It’s closed on Mondays; details at portfondakc.com. Sushi By Me (307 Main, 816-474-5088) has arrived in the former Pieroguys Café space in the City Market. Chef David Nguyen’s inventive sushi includes the Crunchy Roll (eight pieces of crawfish salad and cucumbers topped with shrimp, imitation crab, spicy mayo and panko breadcrumbs) and a buildyour-own option. Sushi By Me is open 11 a.m.– 2 p.m. Sunday and Monday, and 11 a.m.–8 p.m. Tuesday–Saturday. Oklahoma Joe’s (11723 Roe, 913-338-5151) has them queuing up in Leawood. The third location of the local barbecue juggernaut has a patio and the same Southern Pride smokers as the Kansas City, Kansas, and Olathe spots. Hours at oklahomajoesbbq.com. Remedy Food + Drink (500 West 75th Street, 816-361-9788) is the concept that has replaced Kennedy’s Bar & Grill in Waldo. Chef Max Watson, formerly of the Rieger Hotel Grill & Exchange and Port Fonda, is kicking out a farm-to-table menu with cauliflower steaks, creamed corn made with corn milk, and freerange fried-chicken dinners. It’s open 11 a.m.– 10 p.m. Sunday–Thursday, and 11 a.m.–11 p.m. Friday and Saturday.

Oklahoma Joe’s (above) opens another spot, and Waid’s and Lakeside Tavern close. Murray’s Tables & Taps (12921 State Line, 816-943-3333) is a pub with a serious food menu. The Reuben, made with house-smoked corned beef, is as thoughtfully made as the fresh-cucumber margaritas. A 50-seat patio awaits a day when the weather cooperates again. The bar is open until 1 a.m. every night, and the kitchen serves food 11 a.m.–10 p.m. Sunday–Thursday, and 11 a.m.–11 p.m. Friday and Saturday.

Closings

Lakeside Tavern (10551 Mission, Leawood) has closed after nine months of operation in Mission Farms. The restaurant space, previously home to Los Cabos and Boudreaux’s Louisiana Seafood & Steaks, is on track to reopen this fall as Rye, a new concept from Bluestem’s Colby and Megan Garrelts. El Rancho (534 Westport Road) has picked up stakes and moved back to Columbia. The place for many a late-night nacho craver in Westport closed last month. The original location is still open in Columbia (1014 East Broadway) for those with a serious hankering. Waid’s (6920 Mission, Prairie Village) has closed its JoCo staple. The once-popular neighborhood diner was a touchstone for those who grew up in this suburb. The last remaining Waid’s is still open at 1130 West 103rd Street. E-mail jonathan.bender@pitch.com pitch.com

MONTH


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P&L DISTRICT BAR LOUIE $3.50 Beer Specials $2 Fresh Fruit Shot FRAN’S RESTAURANT $5.99 Premium Breakfast on Fridays, $4 Bacardi 360 Vodka after 10pm PBR SKY BAR $5 Jack Daniel PIZZA BAR $3 Boulevard Wheat Pints MOSAIC No Cover before 11pm DRUNKEN FISH Appetizers. Sushi rolls. Drinks: Zinn Martini, Asian Marry, and Madam Butterfly. THE DUBLINER $3.50 Boulevard Wheat on Fridays Free cover with wrist band HOWL AT THE MOON 2 for 1 cover MAKER’S MARK $5 Cocktails MC FADDEN’S SPORT’S $4 UV Vodka Drinks

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18TH AND VINE DANNY’S BIG EASY Get Your Wristbands Here! JUKE HOUSE Friday $1 Off Cocktails & $2 Domestic Beer BLUE ROOM $5 Off Cover with Wristband

MARTINI CORNER VELVET DOG $1 Off All Sky Drinks THE DROP $5.50 Specialty Martinis & Cocktails TOWER TAVERN $3.50 Wells $10 Pizza 7pm-12 SOL CANTINA $4 el Jimador Margaritas $2.75 Pacifico Bottles MONACO No Cover Dj’s Friday and Saturday nights

J U LY 1 2 - 1 8 , 2 0 1 2

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19


MUSIC

BAD COMPANY

Why does everybody gotta

BY

harsh the Rock Café’s buzz?

D AV ID HUDN A L L

A

lmost two years ago, a couple of new signs were slapped onto the residential-looking stone building at the southwest corner of 39th Street and Wyoming. Something called the Rock Café was coming soon. Steak burgers were promised. The new establishment’s logo (a red, white and blue electric guitar with a lightning bolt evoking the Grateful Dead’s iconic Steal Your Face image) seemed to imply that music, probably hippie music, would be a component of its business model. The Rock Café finally opened this past March. There are no steak burgers — owner Jeff Gerhardt was unable to acquire the necessary food permits to cook them — but there has been a tremendous amount of hippie music: live hippie music, played outside, ma ny MORE evenings a week. Last Monday, the Rock Café posted an event on its T A INE Facebook page celebratONL .COM PITCH ing the birthday of a man named Liquid Rick. The party, which featured a performance by a group called Famous Seamus and the Travelbongs, was scheduled to begin at 4:20 p.m. This all sounds like fairly harmless stuff — until you take into account the issues of noise and loitering, which is why many businesses and residents in the area are less than mellow about their new neighbor. “It’s not a professional business they’re running,” says Murad Reshiq, the manager at KC Smoke Burgers across the street. “They have a very small menu and no indoor seating, so people just gather outside. They’re not even eating. They’re just hanging around. And the music — it’s some of the worst music I have ever heard. And it’s played very loud. It’s just causing a lot of chaos in the area.” Reshiq’s views are generally consistent with, though perhaps more impassioned than, those of other business owners on the block, many of whom didn't want to be quoted on the record. Kansas City’s Environmental Health Division, which oversees noise-ordinance issues for establishments

M US I C

without liquor licenses, started fielding complaints about the Rock Café as early as April 4. Fliers with instructions on how to contact the city about the Rock Café’s music were posted in shops along 39th Street. Councilwoman Jan Marcason, who represents the city’s 4th District, quickly heard from her constituents. “We were just getting e-mail after e-mail about this place,” says Susan Borge, Marcason’s assistant. “It was about the music, but there were also reports that the customers were buying alcohol across the street and bringing it over. Somebody who lives behind the Rock Café said people were going into the alley to pee and smoke dope.” Tex Houston, the district manager for the 39th Street Community Improvement District, tried to serve as a liaison between frustrated neighbors and the Rock Café. “They [the Rock Café] are part of the CID, so I represent them, too,” Houston says. “They were very cooperative when I’d go over to talk

Gettin' hassled by the Man, man. to them. But it never changed anything. The next night, you could hear the music from three blocks away again.” After delivering both written and verbal warnings to the Rock Café about the volume of its music, the city’s health division sent an inspector April 21 to investigate the noise levels. The business was found to be well over 60 decibels (the maximum), and a citation was issued. Gerhardt pleaded guilty in court, where he reportedly angered the judge by showing up in shorts and a tank top, and paid a $200 fine. On Monday, June 25, after another loud, complaint-fi lled weekend, the health division revoked Rock Café’s permit to sell food, effectively shutting the place down. “Please call our Mayor! … The Rock Cafe is temporarily closed due to corruption in the Kansas City Missouri Health Department,” went the

Facebook post. By that Friday, it was back in business, after Gerhardt signed a statement agreeing to check sound levels on a noise meter every hour. How long the doors will stay open is hard to say, although Gerhardt has some theories. “I’ve been jacked with right and left about my music and my menu,” Gerhardt tells The Pitch. “They told me I can’t serve this or that, that I don’t have proper equipment for this or that. So I got new equipment. Then they told me my place isn’t big enough for that equipment. When they couldn’t find anything else wrong, they just came and took my permit. And I don’t suspect this will be the last time I’m harassed.” Gerhardt also believes that KC Smoke Burgers is conspiring with the health division to put the Rock Café out of business. “I was at the Health Department last week at the same time as the Smoke Burgers guy, and there’s a room full of us in the waiting area, and the inspector comes right out and shakes his hand like he’s his boss or something,” Gerhardt says. “The fact that we planned to serve burgers, and they’re serving burgers — I think it’s a political thing, that they’re trying to put us under. I don’t know if this [Health Department] guy has a financial interest in [KC Smoke Burgers] or what. But I intend to find out.” Borge has a less dramatic take. “Nobody is inventing new rules to get rid of the Rock Café,” she says. “The city can only do what its ordinances allow. But we do have to enforce the laws we have. The noise level there is annoying to the people who live there and [who] have businesses close by. They feel that their businesses are damaged by that noise level. And also, you can’t cook and sell food beyond what your permit allows. You can only do what your permit says you can do. “I think the place looks fun,” she continues. “I think it would be fun to sit in a big comfy chair outside and listen to music. But you’ve gotta follow the rules if you’re gonna have a business in Kansas City.”

E-mail david.hudnall@pitch.com

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J U LY 1 2 - 1 8 , 2 0 1 2

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WHERE THE BEST MUSICIANS IN THE WORLD PLAY

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MUSIC | STREETSIDE

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A First Friday block party, Star Trek, Death Cab, Jon Hamm

BY

D AV ID HUDN A L L

F re e S h u tt le in S u rr o u n d in g A reth e a

JULY

Stefanie Fix 12: Dan Hicks & The Hot Licks Sky Smeed Adam Lee & Tyler Gregory 13: The Cole Porter Band Peter Novelli Band Sara & the Tallboy’s 14: Hearts of Darkness w/ The Grisly Hand 15: Blackberry Smoke w/ Bryant Carter 18: John McEuen & Sons (of the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band)

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JU LY

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J U LY

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A

real jolt to the local economy,” my friend Big Booth said wryly, as we passed through the empty Crossroads streets early Saturday night. Granted, the marquee All-Star Game events were still a few days off. And the Crossroads isn’t really a major nightlife destination. But Big Booth had a point. It seemed, both Friday and Saturday nights, as though there were actually fewer people in Kansas City. Blame the heat. It was 106 degrees Friday afternoon. That’s 100 degrees, plus six more degrees! After work, I walked over to 19th Street and Baltimore, where local label Golden Sound Records was hosting a block party. Food trucks bracketed the street, and at the end, in front of Mildred’s, the Caves were playing. There wasn’t a single person in front of the stage. I'm not even kidding. Not one. Man, bummer for the Caves, I thought. But as I drew closer, I saw a healthy crowd watching the band. They were all huddled in the Mildred’s parking lot to the north of the stage — the only part of the block that offered the shelter of shade. It made little difference; it was still too hot to be outside. I devoured an entire Good You hamburger in about 45 seconds and headed back to work, where I spent an hour basking in the air conditioning and researching the climates of other U.S. cities where I might conceivably move. When I returned, Cowboy Indian Bear was onstage, sounding very epic and Arcade Fire–like, and the block was packed. I was impressed by the huge, professional stage that the Golden Sound guys had hauled in for the event. The drum kits were elevated, like at an arena rock show. “The Judge Judy, I call that,” said my boy Crilly.

T For more info & tickets: knuckleheadskc.com

2715 Rochester, KCMO

816-483-1456

22

THE PITCH

J U LY 1 2 - 1 8 , 2 0 1 2

he heat threatened to break Saturday night, and so, instead of sitting cross-legged and blank-faced in front of my window unit, I hit up the Brick to see My Brothers & Sisters. The last time I saw the band, which is led by former It’s Over frontman Jamie Searle, it contained something like 18 people. On Saturday, it was down to seven, which seems more reasonable. The brass section is apparently new; while introducing the band, Searle forgot two of

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the members’ names. “Our first practice was yesterday,” he explained. The set was upbeat and old-school — Searle has a bit of an Elvis Presley–Chuck Berry frontman thing going on, and the horns added some lively drama to the mix. Afterward, attention turned to the Brick’s TVs, which were showing Star Trek: First Contact. Jean-Luc Picard was shirtless. “Patrick Stewart is cut,” I said to my friend Briny. He nodded. “This is actually a pretty good movie,” he said. “This and Wrath of Khan. The rest are terrible.” “What about IV?” the bartender interjected. “The Voyage Home?” Briny said. “With the whales? That movie is terrible.” “Yeah, but it’s terrible in a good way,” she said. I glanced back at the screen. It looked like Data was maybe dying. “Does Data die in this?” I asked. “Let’s just say he makes a sacrifice for the greater good,” Briny said. He paused. “Come to think of it, not unlike the sacrifice Spock makes in The Wrath of Khan.” “Does Spock die in The Wrath of Khan?” “Well, now we’re getting into Star Trek III: The Search for Spock …” The bartender returned to rinsing a pint glass. Two friends announced that they were headed to Westport. A crowd at the other end of the bar got up and left. We were clearing the place out. “We should probably just kill ourselves after we leave here,” I said, and ordered another bourbon and soda.

D

eath Cab for Cutie is not a band that has ever greatly excited me, and it’s unlikely I would have attended its show Sunday night at the Grinders stage had I not been invited by the good people at Yahoo, who sponsored the show and hosted a very nice party in the old Scion Lab space behind the stage for Very Important People like myself. But I think I might have a newfound respect for Death Cab. They let it rip live — the three-minute lead-in jam to “I Will Possess Your Heart” had me bobbing my head

When the stars aligned in the Crossroads. and looking around like, Are you guys feeling this like I’m feeling this? I’m going to have to let my thoughts simmer for a little while, but it’s possible that Death Cab would have been one of my favorite bands if the singer’s voice didn’t make me feel like such a pussy. The party had free food and alcohol, so I had no intention of leaving until somebody who worked there asked me to. After the show, I filled up a plastic plate with tater tots. I had a drink in my hand, and there wasn’t a surface nearby to set it down, so I brought the plate up to my mouth and ate the tater tots straight from the plate — like a dog, or a pig. It was as I was doing this that I noticed Hollywood actor Jon Hamm standing against a wall talking to a couple of other men. He was wearing a black Cardinals hat, khakis and a plaid shirt. It was around 11 p.m. by then, and probably only 50 people were left at the party. If you were ever going to talk to Jon Hamm, this was the time. I didn’t. I respect Jon Hamm too much to subject him to my drunk self. But I did watch him. How could I not? He’s so famous and handsome. A little later, I was out on the patio, and Jon Hamm walked out. Within a few minutes, almost everybody at the party had moved to the patio. A cute girl came over and started talking to me. She had just talked to Jon Hamm and was obviously using me as a prop while she hatched a plan for how to talk to him again. I glanced over toward Jon Hamm. He was sitting down at one of the picnic tables with some local dudes I recognized. I looked back at the girl. Her eyes were bulging in horror. “Your shirt!” she said. There was a gigantic cockroach crawling up my arm. That seemed about right. A grotesque monster covered in bugs — that’s basically what it feels like to be a man at the same party as Jon Hamm. They kicked us out at midnight, and Jon Hamm walked straight out the front door, up Oak, left on 18th Street, and then disappeared, alone, into the night.

E-mail david.hudnall@pitch.com pitch.com

MONTH


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J U LY 1 2 - 1 8 , 2 0 1 2

THE PITCH

23


MUSIC

RADAR

M U S I C F O R E CAST

BY

Other shows worth seeing this week.

D AV ID HUDN A L L

T H U R S D AY, J U LY 12 Clutch, Prong, Lionize: 7 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Halestorm, New Medicine, Emphatic: sold out. The Midland, 1228 Main, 816-283-9900. Dan Hicks & the Hot Licks: 8 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Nicolay with the Hot At Nights: The Blue Room, 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. Sleigh Bells, Jel, Class Actress: The Beaumont Club, 4050 Pennsylvania, 816-561-2560. Thompson Square: KC Live! Stage at the Power & Light District, 13th St. and Grand.

F R I D AY, J U LY 13 Buckcherry: KC Live! Stage at the Power & Light District, 13th St. and Grand. Brandi Carlile: 7 p.m. Uptown Theater, 3700 Broadway, 816-753-8665. R. Ring, Kristen May, Jake Briscoe: 8 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179.

S AT U R D AY, J U LY 1 4

Clockwise, from left: Fiona Apple, the Gaslight Anthem and Big K.R.I.T.

Big K.R.I.T.

Big K.R.I.T. is my favorite rapper going right now, and I haven’t even heard his debut. I’ve been too busy bumping his mixtapes — he has dropped three in the last 15 months, and they’re all excellent, and free — to get around to actually buying his major-label studio album, Live From the Underground, out last month. K.R.I.T. is from Mississippi, and his version of hip-hop is steeped in the Southern rap tradition of guys like Pimp C, Chamillionaire and T.I. He doesn’t seem content with revivalism, though. I don’t recall UGK ever rapping alongside any smooth jazz saxophones, as K.R.I.T. (who produces his own stuff ) seems increasingly fond of doing. And few rappers from the A are as willing to hazard the kind of socially conscious sincerity that he lays down every fifth or sixth track. Still, he’s probably at his best when he keeps things breezy and street, as on “Rotation,” which goes: I’m just rotating my tires, rotating my tires, rotating my tires, rotating my tires. Monday, July 16, at the Granada (1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390)

act adds prominent Farfisa organs to this mix, which lends a Halloween-like vibe to the songs and makes its name seem especially fitting. The girls (plus one guy) are touring on their solid sophomore album, Vulture. Saturday, July 14, at the Replay Lounge (946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676) Sunday, July 15, at RecordBar (1020 Westport Road, 816-753-5207)

The Gaslight Anthem

The Gaslight Anthem has lost a bit of momentum since the summer of 2010, when it headlined the Midland. But a smaller club like the Bottleneck is probably a better venue for the New Jersey act’s sweaty, romantic, old-school rock and roll. Fellow Garden Stater Bruce Springsteen is the most obvious touchstone, but there’s plenty of Replacements, Tom Petty and Social Distortion in its sound, too. Thursday, July 12, at the Bottleneck (737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483)

Dirty Projectors

Hollows

About three years ago, it became very popular to weave 1960s girl-group melodies into garage-punk fuzz, and one of the better bands working this sound was Hollows. The Chicago

With 2009’s Bitte Orca, Brooklyn’s Dirty Projectors made an art-rock classic: a mishmash of West African guitars, screwball time signatures, funk beats and saintly harmonies that you could somehow dance to. The bar is high for the follow-up, Swing Lo Magellan, out

F O R E C A S T

24

this month. Based on a few cursory streams of it, I think I’m all in. It’s wild and structurally fearless, like Bitte Orca, but there’s more power behind it: Some of these songs really pummel you. I don’t know of another band out there that’s connecting brain and brawn quite so effectively. Wednesday, July 18, at the Granada (1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390)

I caught Fiona Apple live a few months ago at South By Southwest, where she debuted some songs from The Idler Wheel …, her first album in seven years. NBD, it was probably only the biggest event of the entire festival, and I was pretty close to the stage. My take-away was that the new songs are good, her band is tight, and it is very difficult to look away from her while she is performing. It’s not just that she is extremely attractive. She’s so neurotic and tormented and wound-up onstage that you half wonder if you might be witnessing a mental breakdown. You’re tempted to think that maybe it’s all a big affectation, a tortured-artist pose. But it’s not. She is that crazy, and that amazing. Tuesday, July 17, at the Midland (1228 Main, 816-816-283-9921)

K E Y

............................................... Songs About Cars

................................................Songs About Girls

......................................................... Sexy Ladies

.......................................................Thick Frames

.................................................... Kind of Spooky

.........................................American Rock Canon

........................................................ Audio Geeks

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Blackberry Smoke: 8:30 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Ledisi, Eric Benet: The Midland, 1228 Main, 816-283-9900.

M O N D AY, J U LY 16 The Henry Clay People, Dead Ven: 8 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179.

MewithoutYou, Kevin Devine and the Goddamn Band, Buried Beds: 7 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Rockstar Energy Drink Mayhem Festival with Slipknot, Slayer, Motorhead, Anthrax, As I Lay Dying, the Devil Wears Prada, Asking Alexandria, Whitechapel, and more: Cricket Wireless Amphitheater (formerly Sandstone), 633 N. 130th St., Bonner Springs, 913-721-3400. Tedeschi Trucks Band: Uptown Theater, 3700 Broadway, 816-753-8665.

W E D N E S D AY, J U LY 18 Kaskade: Uptown Theater, 3700 Broadway, 816-753-8665. Sevendust: VooDoo Lounge, Harrah’s Casino, 1 Riverboat Dr., North Kansas City, 816-472-7777.

FUTURECAST THURSDAY 19 Indigo Girls: VooDoo Lounge.

..................................................................Blunts

JANUARY 10-16, 2010

S U N D AY, J U LY 15

T U E S D AY, J U LY 17

Fiona Apple

..................................................Pick of the Week

THE PITCH

Liars, Cadence Weapon: 9 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. O.A.R., Rebelution: Crossroads KC at Grinders, 417 E. 18th St., 816-472-5454. Reel Big Fish, Goldfinger, Big D. and the Kids Table, Suburban Legends, and more: The Beaumont Club, 4050 Pennsylvania, 816-561-2560. Rock ’n Roll Dream Concert with Pink Floyd (Brain Damage), Led Zeppelin (Houses of the Holy), U2 (Rattle & Hum), the Eagles (7 Bridges Road): 7 p.m. Cricket Wireless Amphitheater (formerly Sandstone), 633 N. 130th St., Bonner Springs, 913-721-3400.

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SATURDAY 21 James Taylor: Starlight Theatre. WEDNESDAY 25 Childish Gambino, Danny Brown: The Beaumont Club. FRIDAY 27 Big Time Rush: Sprint Center. TUESDAY 31 Star Slinger: The Granada.

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NIGHTLIFE Send submissions to Clubs Editor Abbie Stutzer by e-mail (abbie.stutzer@pitch.com), fax (816-756-0502) or phone (816-218-6926). Continuing items must be resubmitted monthly.

T H U R S D AY 12 ROCK/POP/INDIE Park Place: 117th St. and Nall, Leawood, 913-381-2229. The Doo-Dads. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Louder Than Bombs on the patio with DJs BK, Dame Jeans, Lil’ Bombz, hosted by the Icon. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. The Appleseed Cast, Blood Birds, Muscle Worship, 8 p.m.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Central Atmosphere. The Hideout: 6948 N. Oak Tfwy., 816-468-0550. Rob Foster and Dudes. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Grand Marquis. Mike Kelly’s Westsider: 1515 Westport Rd., 816-931-9417. Shannon and the Rhythm Kings. Trouser Mouse: 625 N.W. Mock Ave., Blue Springs, 816-2201222. Cadillac Flambe.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Brother Bagman, Stereo Reform, Danny McGaw, 9 p.m.

DJ Saints Pub + Patio: 9720 Quivira, Lenexa, 913-492-3900. DJ Brad Sager.

JAZZ Hotel Phillips: 106 W. 12th St., 816-221-7000. The Stan Kessler Duo with Kathleen Holeman. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Billy Ebeling. Star Bar at Pachamama’s: 800 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785841-0990. Floyd the Barber with Tommy Johnson, 8:30 p.m.

COMEDY Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. DC Malone, 7:30 p.m.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS The AllStar Rock Bar: 7210 N.E. 43rd St., 816-452-2660. Thirsty Thursdays Unplugged with Drunk Club Hopper, 9 p.m. Bulldog: 1715 Main, 816-421-4799. Brodioke, 9 p.m. Buzzard Beach: 4110 Pennsylvania, 816-753-4455. Trivia, Ladies’ Night, 7 p.m. Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Hot Caution Thursdays, 10 p.m., free. Double Nickel Bar: 189 S. Rogers, Ste. 1614, Olathe, 913-3900363. Texas Hold ’em. Fuel: 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park, 913-451-0444. Bike night. Hamburger Mary’s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-842-1919. Charity Bingo with Valerie Versace, 8 p.m., $1 per game. MoJo’s Bar & Grill: 1513 S.W. Hwy. 7, Blue Springs. Pool and dart leagues; happy hour, free pool, 4-6 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Trivia Clash, 7 p.m. Sherlock’s Underground Coffeehouse & Pub: 858 State Route 291, Liberty, 816-429-5262. Karaoke, ladies’ night specials.

EASY LISTENING Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Interactive Acoustic with Jason Kayne, 9 p.m.

F R I D AY 13 ROCK/POP/INDIE Bar West: 7174 Renner Rd., Shawnee, 913-248-9378. Travelers Guild. Barnyard Beer: 925 Iowa, Lawrence, 785-393-9696. Rev Gusto, the Sluts, Captain Ahab and the Narwhals. Clarette Club: 5400 Martway, Mission, 913-384-0986. The Rehabaneros. Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Ours, Mike Borgia & the Problems, Now Now Sleepyhead, 8 p.m. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. My Brother, the Vulture. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Quintron & Miss Pussycat, Lazy, 9 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-7497676. Radio Romantica, Michael Buck, 6 p.m.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Fast Johnny Ricker. The Hideout: 6948 N. Oak Tfwy., 816-468-0550. Billy Ebeling & the Late For Dinner Band. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. The Majestics Rhythm Revue. The Levee: 16 W. 43rd St., 816-561E 2821. The Groove Agency. MOR The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Lonnie Ray Blues Band, 9 p.m. INGS Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., LIST E AT IN L N Overland Park, 913-239-9666. MonO M sters Ink with Janet Jameson. PITCH.CO Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Janet the Planet, Wrong Kata Trio, 10 p.m.

CLUB

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS The Brooksider: 6330 Brookside Plz., 816-363-4070. Noe Palma. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Art Bentley. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. The Cole Porter Band, Peter Novelli Band, Sarah and the Tall Boys, 8 p.m. Mike Kelly’s Westsider: 1515 Westport Rd., 816-931-9417. Casey Rausch and Molly Healey, 10 p.m.

DJ Aura: 3832 Main. DJ Scotty Boy. The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Goomba Rave with Brent Tactic. The Eighth Street Taproom: 801 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-6918. DJ G Train. The Quaff: 1010 Broadway, 816-471-1918. DJ Chris. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-7497676. Mind Expansion and Bodily Reaction with Wake on the patio. 77 South: 5041 W. 135th St., Leawood, 913-742-7727. DJ Knuckles. Z Strike: 1370 Grand, 816-471-2316. Fabowlous Fridays with DJ Nuveau, 9 p.m.

ACOUSTIC Mike Kelly’s Westsider: 1515 Westport Rd., 816-931-9417. Eddie Delahunt, 6 p.m.

JAZZ Take Five Coffee + Bar: 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park, 913948-5550. Mistura Fina featuring Shay Estes.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS

The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Open Mic with Chris Tady. The Indie on Main: 1228 Main, 816-283-9900. Open mic, Low Dough Beer Night, 8 p.m. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 302 S.W. Main, Lee’s Summit, 816-525-1871. Jerry’s Jam Night, 9 p.m.

J. Murphy’s Irish Pub and Grille: 22730 Midland Dr., Shawnee, 913-825-3880. Karaoke, 9 p.m. Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. Ab Fab Fridays on the main floor, 10 p.m. Smokehouse Bar-B-Que: 6304 N. Oak, Gladstone, 816-4544500. Happy hour, 4-6 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Filipino Karaoke, hosted by Sundae Domingo Halog Jr., and open to persons of all nationalities, 7 p.m., $5.

R O C K A B I L LY

FOLK

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS

RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Hog Hunt, Thee Swank Bastards, the Rumblejetts, 9 p.m.

SINGER-SONGWRITER Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Songwriters “In the Round” show with Sky Smeed, Adam Lee, Tyler Gregory, part of the Living Room Sessions, 8 p.m.

Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. MoonRunner, the Natural State, Olassa, 8 p.m. Great Day Café: 7921 Santa Fe Dr., Overland Park, 913-6429090. Half Price Buddha.

REGGAE Californos: 4124 Pennsylvania, 816-531-7878. Born in Babylon.

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R O C K A B I L LY The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. The Rumblejetts, Haunted Creepys, Big Iron.

VA R I E T Y Park Place: 117th St. and Nall, Leawood, 913-381-2229. Paint the Night street party. VooDoo Lounge: Harrah’s Casino, 1 Riverboat Dr., North Kansas City, 816-472-7777. The Strictly Music Showcase.

S AT U R D AY 1 4 ROCK/POP/INDIE The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. The Faded Age, the Del Toros. The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Federation of Horsepower, the Quivers, Electric Lungs, late show. Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Alice Sweet Alice, Daymoths, Deco Auto. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Pizza Party Massacre. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 302 S.W. Main, Lee’s Summit, 816-525-1871. The Clique. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. American Catastrophe, the Latenight Callers, Drakes Hotel, 9 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. The Lucky, B.O.D., More Than Many, 7 p.m.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Samantha Fish Blues Band, 9 p.m. Mama Ray Jazz Meets Blues Jam, 2 p.m. Mike Kelly’s Westsider: 1515 Westport Rd., 816-931-9417. Allied Saints. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. The Brody Buster Band, 9 p.m. Trouser Mouse: 625 N.W. Mock Ave., Blue Springs, 816-2201222. Lonesome Hank and the Heartaches. Uncle Bo’s: 420 E. Sixth St., Topeka, 785-234-5400. Sarah and the Tall Boys.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS Barnyard Beer: 925 Iowa, Lawrence, 785-393-9696. Filthy Still, the Ready Brothers, the Konza Swamp Band. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Hearts of Darkness, the Grisly Hand, 9 p.m.

DJ The Eighth Street Taproom: 801 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-6918. DJ Candlepants. The Quaff: 1010 Broadway, 816-471-1918. DJ Chris. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. DJ Approach on the patio; The Warm Up with Wolfgod, 6 p.m. VooDoo Lounge: Harrah’s Casino, 1 Riverboat Dr., North Kansas City, 816-472-7777. DJ Eric Coomes.

HIP-HOP Mike’s Tavern: 5424 Troost, 816-437-9400. Shameless Mgmt. Showcase with Huey P. Nuisance, I-r NeKo and more.

ACOUSTIC Great Day Café: 7921 Santa Fe Dr., Overland Park, 913-642-9090. 4 Ukulele Clubs celebrate Woody Guthrie’s 100th Birthday.

JAZZ R Bar & Patio: 610 Florida, Lawrence, 785-856-6969. Billy Ebeling. Take Five Coffee + Bar: 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park, 913948-5550. Killer Strayhorn.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS Hamburger Mary’s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-842-1919. Charity Bingo, 5 p.m.; Mary-oke with Chad Slater, 9 p.m. The Indie on Main: 1228 Main, 816-283-9900. Karaoke with KJ David, 9:30 p.m. The Red Balloon: 10325 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-9622330. Karaoke, 8 p.m., free.

M E TA L / P U N K The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Tamuzz with Kilmat, Plague of Sinai, Night Creation, In the Shadow, 6 p.m.

REGGAE Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Ras Neville & the Kingstonians.

S U N D AY 15 ROCK/POP/INDIE Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. The Stolen Winnebagos.

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Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Daymoths, Olassa; Hidden Pictures (record release), Shadow Paint, Lonnie Fisher and the Terms, 6 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. City of Ships, Sundiver, A Light Within, Daffy’s Elixir, 8 p.m.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Lee McBee and the Confessors. Trouser Mouse: 625 N.W. Mock Ave., Blue Springs, 816-2201222. The End Times Spasm Band.

DJ Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. KC Disco Club. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Sunday Funday with DJ G Train on the patio.

COMEDY Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. DC Malone, 7 p.m. Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. Dirty Dorothy on the main floor, 10 p.m.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Smackdown Trivia and Karaoke. Bulldog: 1715 Main, 816-421-4799. Game night, beer pong, TV trivia, shot dice. Clarette Club: 5400 Martway, Mission, 913-384-0986. Texas Hold ’em, 7 & 10 p.m. Fuel: 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park, 913-451-0444. SIN. Hurricane Allie’s Bar and Grill: 5541 Merriam Dr., Shawnee, 913217-7665. Double Deuce Poker League, 4 p.m.; karaoke, 8:30 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Sunday Solace, 2 p.m., free. Smokehouse Bar-B-Que: 6304 N. Oak, Gladstone, 816-4544500. Happy hour, 4-6 p.m. Wallaby’s Grill and Pub: 9562 Lackman, Lenexa, 913-5419255. Texas Hold ’em, 6 & 9 p.m. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. Texas Hold ’em, 3 & 6 p.m.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Bleachers Bar & Grill: 210 S.W. Greenwich Dr., Lee’s Summit, 816623-3410. Open Blues and Funk Jam with Syncopation, 6 p.m. The Hideout: 6948 N. Oak Tfwy., 816-468-0550. Open blues jam, 7 p.m. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Sunday Salvation with Booty Bass, 10 p.m., $3. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Open Jam with Levee Town, 2 p.m., free. R.G.’s Lounge: 9100 E. 35th St., Independence, 816-358-5777. Jam Night hosted by Dennis Nickell, Scotty Yates, Rick Eidson, and Jan Lamb, 5 p.m.

M O N D AY 16 ROCK/POP/INDIE Jerry’s Bait Shop: 302 S.W. Main, Lee’s Summit, 816-525-1871. Red Stinger, the Faded Age.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL The Hideout: 6948 N. Oak Tfwy., 816-468-0550. Blue Monday Trio.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS Barnyard Beer: 925 Iowa, Lawrence, 785-393-9696. Mudstomp Mondays.

DJ Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Cinemaphonic, 9 p.m. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Liquid Lounge. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. DJ Feast.

JAZZ The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. Blue Monday Jam with Todd Wilkinson. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Jazzbo.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Rural Grit Happy Hour, 6 p.m. Cronin’s Bar and Grill: 12227 W. 87th St. Pkwy., Lenexa, 913-322-1000. S.I.N., half-price appetizers, shot and beer specials, 7 p.m. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Karaoke Idol with Tanya McNaughty. MoJo’s Bar & Grill: 1513 S.W. Hwy. 7, Blue Springs. Pool and dart leagues; happy hour, free pool, 4-6 p.m.


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Nara: 1617 Main, 816-221-6272. Brodioke, 9 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Sonic Spectrum Music Trivia, 7 p.m., $5. The Red Balloon: 10325 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-9622330. Karaoke, 8 p.m., free.

M E TA L / P U N K The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Metal Monday.

VA R I E T Y Californos: 4124 Pennsylvania, 816-531-7878. Opera Supper, 6-9 p.m.

T U E S D AY 17 ROCK/POP/INDIE Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Plan-B Rejects, 99 Bottles, 9 p.m. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Travelers Guild. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Winston Apple, 6 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Signals Midwest, Doubleplus, 10 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Rags & Ribbons, Is Paris Burning, 8 p.m.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Trampled Under Foot. The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Pacific Dub, Katastro, the Dirty Rhythm Band.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS Barnyard Beer: 925 Iowa, Lawrence, 785-393-9696. Ryan Mcbride & the Groomsmen. Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Elkheart’s Downtown Outlaw Fiasco, 6 p.m.

DJ Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. DJ Whatshisname, service industry night, 10 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Tasteless Tuesdays hosted by Kim and Candice, with DJ Charlie, rock, punk, Nintendo games, Missouri beer specials, and midnight riot, 9 p.m.

JAZZ Finnigan’s Hall: 503 E. 18th Ave., North Kansas City, 816-2213466. Abel Ramirez Big Band, 6 p.m.

COMEDY RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Comedy Show with Martin Plant, Teague Hayes, 9 p.m.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS

Presents

Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. Coda Pursuit Team Trivia with Teague Hayes, 7 p.m. The Drop: 409 E. 31st St., 816-756-3767. Brodioke, 9:30 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. Clash of the Comics, 7:30 p.m. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. It’s Karaoke Time! Mike Kelly’s Westsider: 1515 Westport Rd., 816-931-9417. Critters Tye Dye Tuesday. The Roxy: 7230 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-236-6211. Karaoke. Smokehouse Bar-B-Que: 6304 N. Oak, Gladstone, 816-4544500. Happy hour, 4-6 p.m. Tower Tavern: 401 E. 31st St., 816-931-9300. Trivia, 8 p.m. The Velvet Dog: 400 E. 31st St., 816-753-9990. Beer Pong, team registration starts at 9:30 p.m., tournament starts at 10 p.m. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. Chess Club, 7 p.m.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS

SEPTEMBER 29th, 2012 8:00PM Listen to 94.9 KCMO to WIN Tickets Tickets on-sale NOW at midlandkc.com 28

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Bleachers Bar & Grill: 210 S.W. Greenwich Dr., Lee’s Summit, 816-623-3410. Open Mic Acoustic Jam. DiCarlo’s Mustard Seed Mexican-Americana Restaurant & Bar: 15015 E. U.S. 40 Hwy., 816-373-4240. Blues, country and classic rock hosted by Rick Eidson and friends . Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. Open Mic Night, 7:30 p.m. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Dave Hays Band Open Jam. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Open Mic Night. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Vanguard Open Mic.

VA R I E T Y Jerry’s Bait Shop: 302 S.W. Main, Lee’s Summit, 816-525-1871. Club Wars.

W E D N E S D AY 18 ROCK/POP/INDIE Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Quintron & Miss Pussycat, Up the Academy, Dry Bonnet, Mouthbreathers. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Rock Paper Scissors. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Bob Walkenhorst, 7 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Mark Mallman, the Melismatics. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Broken Mast, Japanese Game Show, Bowinero, 9:30 p.m. 77 South: 5041 W. 135th St., Leawood, 913-742-7727. Sean McNown.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Shinetop Jr. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 302 S.W. Main, Lee’s Summit, 816-525-1871. Josh Johnson. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Gospel Lounge with Carl Butler, 7:30 p.m.; the McEuens (album release), 8 p.m. Trouser Mouse: 625 N.W. Mock Ave., Blue Springs, 816-2201222. Kyle Elliott.

DJ Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Punker Than Hell, 10 p.m.

HIP-HOP RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Midwest Got Next 4 with 3 the Hardway (Dutch Newman, JL of B.Hood, Joey Cool), Team Coa (thePhantom*, KJ), Tef Poe, hosted by Steddy P, 9 p.m.

ACOUSTIC Mike Kelly’s Westsider: 1515 Westport Rd., 816-931-9417. Michael Schultz Acoustic Showcase.

JAZZ The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. The Brian Ruskin Quartet.

COMEDY Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. The Kick Comedy. Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. Dirty Dorothy on the main floor, 10 p.m.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS The AllStar Rock Bar: 7210 N.E. 43rd St., 816-452-2660. Karaoke, Ladies’ Night. Beer Kitchen: 435 Westport Rd., 816-389-4180. Brodioke. The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Super Nerd Night. Bulldog: 1715 Main, 816-421-4799. Liquid Lounge drink specials. Danny’s Bar and Grill: 13350 College Blvd., Lenexa, 913-3459717. Trivia and karaoke with DJ Smooth, 8 p.m. 403 Club: 403 N. Fifth St., 913-499-8392. Pinball tournament, cash prize for winner, 8:30 p.m., $5 entry fee. Hamburger Mary’s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-842-1919. Charity Bingo with Valerie Versace, 8 p.m., $1 per game. Hurricane Allie’s Bar and Grill: 5541 Merriam Dr., Shawnee, 913-217-7665. Karaoke, 8:30 p.m. The Indie on Main: 1228 Main, 816-283-9900. Karaoke, 9:30 p.m. J. Murphy’s Irish Pub and Grille: 22730 Midland Dr., Shawnee, 913-825-3880. Karaoke, 9 p.m. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 302 S.W. Main, Lee’s Summit, 816-525-1871. Club Jerry’s, reverse happy hour, 9 p.m.-12 a.m. Outabounds Sports Bar & Grill: 3601 Broadway, 816-2148732. Karaoke with DJ Chad, 9 p.m. The Roxy: 7230 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-236-6211. Karaoke. The Union of Westport: 421 Westport Rd. Pop Culture Trivia.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Bleachers Bar & Grill: 210 S.W. Greenwich Dr., Lee’s Summit, 816623-3410. Open Blues and Funk Jam with Syncopation, 7 p.m. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Jam Night, 9 p.m. Tonahill’s 3 of a Kind: 11703 E. 23rd St., Independence, 816833-5021. Blues, country and classic rock hosted by Rick Eidson and friends.

SINGER-SONGWRITER

VA R I E T Y

The AllStar Rock Bar: 7210 N.E. 43rd St., 816-452-2660. Scott Ford Songwriter Showcase, 7 p.m.

Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Amy Farrand’s Weirdo Wednesday Social Club, 7 p.m., no cover.


FRIDAY, JULY 13th Groove Agency - 10pm SATURDAY, JULY 14th Camp Harlow - 5pm The Patrick Lentz Band - 10pm NIGHTLY SPECIALS

FOOD AND DRINK

PATIO & DECK BANQUET & PRIVATE PARTY FACILITY

OFFICIAL BALLOT

Winners will be announced at The Pitch Music Awards on August 12 at the Uptown Theater and in The Pitch on August 16.

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LIVE MUSIC. NO COVER

THU 7/12 FRI 7/13

BRIAN RUSKIN ACOUSTIC SHOWCASE

SHANNON & THE RHYTHM KINGS EDDIE DELAHUNT 6PM

CASEY ROUSCH & MOLLY HEALY 10PM

SAT 7/14

ALLIED SAINTS

TUES 7/17

CRITTERS TYE DYE TUESDAY

WED 7/18

MICHAEL SCHULTZ ACOUSTIC SHOWCASE

WIFI NOW AVAILABLE!

CHECK OUT THE NEW ALL DAY HAPPY HOUR

$4.95 DAILY LUNCH SPECIALS • NIGHTLY DINNER & DRINK SPECIALS

SIGHTS, SOUNDS, IMPERIAL FLAVOR 1531 GRAND, KANSAS CITY, MO (816) 421-0300 - www.czarkc.com

NOW HIRING

FOOD BY

❑ The Blackbird Revue ❑ The Roseline ❑ The Grisly Hand ❑ Quiet Corral ❑ Root & Stem ❑ Dead Voices

DJ

❑ Brent Tactic ❑ Andrew Northern ❑ Morri$ ❑ Paul DeMatteo ❑ Sheppa

ELECTRONIC BLUES

❑ The B’Dinas ❑ Coyote Bill & His Wild Ones ❑ Samantha Fish ❑ Grand Marquis ❑ Katy & Go-Go ❑ Linda Shell & the Blues Thang ❑ Trampled Under Foot

COUNTRY/ROCK ABILLY

❑ Adam Lee & the Dead Horse Sound Company ❑ The Crybaby Ranch ❑ The Rumblejetts ❑ The Blue Boot Heelers ❑ The Nace Brothers ❑ Them Damned Young Livers

❑ 18 Carat Affair ❑ Max Justus ❑ Motorboater ❑ Power and Light ❑ Say My Name

EMERGING ACT

❑ Deco Auto ❑ Fullbloods ❑ Radkey ❑ The Cave Girls ❑ The Clementines ❑ Shy Boys

E XPERIMENTAL

❑ Umberto ❑ Expo ’70 ❑ Monta At Odds ❑ Scammers ❑ CS Luxem

GAR AGE/PUNK

❑ The Conquerors ❑ Hipshot Killer ❑ Mouthbreathers ❑ Nature Boys ❑ Pizza Party Massacre ❑ Sucked Dry ❑ U.S.Americans

RULES: Check one choice per category. One ballot per voter. Ballot stuffing will be detected. Original ballots only (no photocopies or other reproductions). Entries may be filled out online or mailed to The Pitch, or completed at any Showcase venue on the evening of August 4. Tickets to the August 4 Pitch Music Showcase cost $6 through July 27, $8 from July

TUE - TacoTuesday w/Czar-rita specials WED - Indie Hit Makers Showcase w/Industry Q&A Panel from 6-9:30pm w/Host Mike Borgia/Gurerilla Movement Showcase 10pm-Close THUR - Philly Thursday’s/Hot Caution w/Vi Tran, Katie Gilchrist & friends FRI - Fish Taco Friday’s w/Czar-rita & craft beer specials

28 through August 3, or $10 the day of the event. They’re available at The Pitch office and all of the Showcase venues: the Riot Room, McCoy’s, the Foundry, the Union, and the Back Yard at the Beaumont Club. Tickets to the August 14 Pitch Music Awards show are $6 in advance or $10 the day of the event, available at the Uptown Theater box office, 816-753-8665 or ticketmaster.com (VIP tickets: $20 in advance or $25 the day of the event).

SINGER-SONGWRITER

POP

❑ Alaturka ❑ Diverse ❑ Snuff Jazz ❑ The People’s Liberation Big Band

❑ Hermon Mehari ❑ Jeff Harshbarger ❑ Mark Lowrey ❑ Matt Otto

METAL

❑ At the Left Hand of God ❑ Hammerlord ❑ Mansion ❑ Sicadis ❑ Wrath and Ruin

❑ Greg Enemy ❑ Reach ❑ Ron Ron ❑ Soul Servers ❑ Stik Figa ❑ thePhantom*

JA ZZ SOLO

ROCK

❑ Ad Astra Arkestra ❑ Hearts of Darkness ❑ The Latenight Callers ❑ Making Movies ❑ The Good Foot ❑ The New Riddim

HIP-HOP

JA ZZ ENSEMBLE

LIVE ACT

❑ Capybara ❑ Fourth of July ❑ Ghosty ❑ Hidden Pictures ❑ The Caves ❑ The ACBs

❑ Soft Reeds ❑ Cherokee Rock Rifle ❑ Cowboy Indian Bear ❑ Muscle Worship ❑ The Dead Girls ❑ Thee Water MoccaSins

(FEMALE)

❑ Amy Farrand ❑ Katlyn Conroy ❑ Margo May ❑ Sara Swenson

SINGER-SONGWRITER (MALE)

❑ Clay Hughes ❑ John Velghe ❑ Lennon Bone ❑ Thom Hoskins

M A IL TO 17 01 Main Kans as Cit y, MO 6 4108 or comple te your ballot online at pitch.com

❑ Yes! Please include me on the pitch.com e-mail list so I can be the first to hear about exciting, upcoming events and promotions.

Name: Address: City:

State:

Phone:

E-mail:

Zip:

SAT 7/28 Jay Brannan 7pm

1ST FRIDAY EVENTS FEATURING LOCAL AND REGIONAL ARTISTS EVERY MONTH! pitch.comM OJNUTLY - 1 8X, , 22001 0 2X T T HH E EP P IT pitch.com H X1 2X–X I TC CH H 29 1


S AVA G E L O V E

AT A LOSS

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Open 7 Days & 7 Nights a Week, in the Heart of the CrossRoads Arts District. We’re America’s Hottest ShowClub! 1717 Main St. Kansas City, MO 816/421.1915 facebook.com/bazookasshowgirls bazookasshowgirls.com 30

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Dear Dan: I’m a smart, professional woman in my mid-30s who dates the same. I also use a wheelchair; I was diagnosed shortly after my first birthday with a motor neuron disease. I have about as much physical strength as a quadriplegic but I have full sensation. I’m careful about who I date because of my physical dependence on the people around me. I’m also wary of folks who call themselves “devotees” (individuals with disability-related fetishes). They gravitate toward amputees, but some are attracted to women in chairs. I’m not sure what about this bothers me so much; I suppose it feels reductionist, and I’ve spent my adult life becoming more than a girl in a chair. I’m sure you can see where this is going. I started dating a lovely, successful, witty woman a little more than a year ago. As time progressed, it became clear that we were sexually compatible. Things have been great. At the eight-month point, I told my BFF that this might be “the one.” At the nine-month point, she confessed to being a devotee. I was crushed. But I trusted her, as I had gotten no icky feelings from her. Then she wanted to try using my chair during sex — with our roles reversed. Because I try to be GGG, I consented, as long as she agreed to couples therapy, which she did. In therapy, she said she had no idea I was in a chair before we met — it was a blind date — and she just felt lucky when I showed up in a chair. Then she didn’t know how to tell me. We’ve been working it out. Until last night. We were out with friends, and she asked me to take a picture on her phone. I found pics of me, from the neck down (clothed), and pics of my chair. I sent them to myself and later checked them on Google Images. My fears were confirmed: She’s been posting them without my consent to “devotee” websites. I feel sick and heartbroken but haven’t confronted her yet. Is it time to DTMFA?

Girl in Massive Pain Dear GIMP: Yes, it’s time to DTMFA. And do it like you mean it. You can’t be a lesbian about this: no “taking a break,” no “putting things on hold,” no “scheduling an appointment” with your couples counselor. Your soon-to-be ex-girlfriend needs to understand that she was promptly and unambiguously dumped as a result of her selfish actions. It’s the only way she’ll ever be able to wrap her head around how thoroughly she violated you. (Who sets a friend up on a blind date with someone in a wheelchair without mentioning that fact?) She destroyed your sense of sexual safety and shat over the trust placed in her by her dream girl (you). And for a cheap thrill? bragging rights? After your ex has had time to wallow in regret and self-recrimination, give her a call. Depending on what you hear — hopefully an extended apology and that she’s in therapy — you can decide whether you wanna TTMFB (take the motherfucker back).

BY

D A N S AVA G E

Maybe she can be salvaged. Maybe losing you will be the shock she needs to get help. If she got help of her own accord, not because she thought it would win you back (because that wasn’t on the table), then bizarro DTMFA (date the motherfucker again) might be an option. But you two should start seeing a counselor together if you TTMFB and take things four times as slowly. And she should get a phone without a camera.

Dear Dan: I’m a straight 32-year-old woman who

has been in a monogamous relationship with a guy for two years. Recently, we moved in. We had experimented before with some kinky stuff. (I’ve never come so hard or fast as the first time I fucked him in the ass with a strap-on.) Then he told me, after moving in, that he had given thought to poly relationships before committing to me. Now I’m feeling insecure about this relationship, though he claims no desire to be in a poly situation now. He’s a soulmate whom I see myself growing with over time, but I feel that I alone won’t be able to fulfill him entirely.

Fem Fetish Frosh Dear FFF: You alone will never be able to fulfill your boyfriend entirely, just as he will never fulfi ll you entirely. One person can’t be all things to another person — sexually or otherwise. All coupled people walk around feeling a little unfulfi lled (single people, too). No one gets everything they want. While aspects of the polyamorous lifestyle appeal to your boyfriend, he has decided that he prefers the relationship he’s in now, with its perks and drawbacks, to the hypothetical polyamorous scenarios he used to contemplate, with their own perks and drawbacks. Your relationship is doomed if you can’t bring yourself to take his “yes” — to you, to monoamory — for an answer. Dear Dan: My husband and I have been together for three years and we’re not having as much sex as we used to. In the time we’ve been together, he’s put on a lot of weight. I’m not blaming that for my libido issues. I need to shut up and put out more. But is it ethical to incentivize his weight loss with more sex? Sex every time he drops 3 pounds? Sex once a week once he hits his target weight?

Like Boys Slimmer Dear LBS: If he’s not weepily sensitive about his weight, if he likes set goals and specific rewards, then toss this proposal on the table next to that bag of Doritos. Of course, I couldn’t give you the same advice if the genders were reversed because … well, we’ll leave the gendered politics of fat for a future column. Find the Savage Lovecast (my weekly podcast) every Tuesday at thestranger.com/savage.

Have a question for Dan Savage? E-mail him at mail@savagelove.net


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The Pitch July 12, 2012