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VOL. 31

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C O N T E N T S VOLUME 31 • NUMBER 37 MARCH 15–21, 2012

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E D I T O R I A L Editor Scott Wilson Managing Editor Justin Kendall Music Editor David Hudnall Staff Writers Charles Ferruzza, Ben Palosaari Editorial Operations Manager Deborah Hirsch Proofreader Brent Shepherd Calendar Editor Berry Anderson Clubs Editor Abbie Stutzer Food Blogger, Web Editor Jonathan Bender Contributing Writers Danny Alexander, Theresa Bembnister, Aaron Carnes, Kyle Eustice, April Fleming, Micah Gutweiler, Ian Hrabe, Megan Metzger, Chris Parker, Nadia Pflaum, Nancy Hull Rigdon, Dan Savage, Brent Shepherd, Nick Spacek, Abbie Stutzer, Crystal K. Wiebe Editorial Intern Micah Gutweiler A R T Art Director Ashford Stamper Contributing Photographers Angela C. Bond, William Lounsbury, Chris Mullins, Lauren Phillips, Sabrina Staires, Brooke Vandever

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S O U T H C O M M Chief Executive Officer Chris Ferrell Chief Operating Officer Rob Jiranek Director of Accounting Todd Patton Director of Operations Susan Torregrossa Creative Director Heather Pierce Director of Content/Online Development Patrick Rains Director of Digital Products Andy Sperry N A T I O N A L A D V E R T I S I N G Voice Media Group 888-278-9866, voicemediagroup.com Senior Vice President Sales Susan Belair Senior Vice President Sales Operations Joe Larkin National Sales Director Ronni Gaun B A C K PA G E . C O M Vice President Sales & Marketing Carl Ferrer Business Manager Jess Adams Accountant David Roberts D I S T R I B U T I O N The Pitch distributes 45,000 copies a week and is available free throughout Greater Kansas City, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for $5 each, payable at The Pitch’s office in advance. The Pitch may be distributed only by The Pitch’s authorized independent contractors or authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of The Pitch, take more than one copy of each week’s issue. Mail subscriptions: $22.50 for six months or $45 per year, payable in advance. Application to mail at second-class postage rates is pending at Kansas City, MO 64108. C O P Y R I G H T The contents of The Pitch are Copyright 2012 by KC Communications, LLC. No portion may be reproduced in whole or in part by any means without the express written permission of the publisher. The Pitch address: 1701 Main, Kansas City, MO 64108 For The Pitch information, call: 816-561-6061 To report a story, call: 816-218-6915 Editorial fax: 816-756-0502 For classifieds, call: 816-218-6721 For retail advertising, call: 816-218-6702

FA R E T R EAT M E N T What’s harder than finding one of KC’s 500-plus taxis? Driving one. BY BEN PAL OSAARI

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N E T R E S U LTS Cod is in the details when you crave a plate of fish and chips. BY CHARLES FERRUZZA | 25 4

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The Pitch Questionnaire

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O N M S

Occupation: Men’s wear designer

Current neighborhood: The historic Northeast

What movie do you watch at least once a year? It’s a tie: Velvet Goldmine and Auntie Mame.

Who or what is your sidekick? A miniature Schnoodle named Dorian Gray

What local tradition do you take part in every year? AIDS Walk Kansas City

What career would you choose in an alternate reality? Art curator

Celebrity you’d like to ride the Mamba with at Worlds of Fun: H.R. Pufnstuf

What was the last local restaurant you patronized? Café Trio

Favorite person or thing to follow on Twitter: W magazine

Where do you drink? Bistro 303

Person or thing you find really irritating at this moment: The Power & Light District

What’s your favorite charity? AIDS Walk Kansas City Favorite place to spend your paycheck: River Market Antique Mall

MARCH 15-21, 2012

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What subscription do you value most? How to Be a Retronaut daily blog Last book you read: The Dress Doctor by Edith Head

What local phenomenon do you think is overrated? H&M

Favorite day trip: Weston, Missouri

Where do you like to take out-of-town guests? National World War I Museum

What is your most embarrassing dating moment? A story that is too long (and not printable).

Finish this sentence: “Other than the Kauffman Center, Kansas City got it right when …” They built the Sprint Center.

Interesting brush with the law? Falsely accused of stealing a cassette single of “Boom Boom (Let’s Go Back to My Room)” by Paul Lekakis while in high school.

“Kansas City screwed up when it …” Didn’t provide enough parking for the Sprint Center.

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What TV show do you make sure you watch? Gossip Girl takes up a lot of space in my iTunes: David Bowie

Hometown: Savannah, Georgia

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“People might be surprised to know that I …” Am basically a homebody.

“Kansas City needs …” Marriage equality.

Describe a recent triumph: My fashion label, Queen’s Rocket, being accepted to a national trade show.

“If I were in charge …” The color beige would be legally banned in Johnson County. And Crocs. And nylon sweatsuits. And …

The Unicorn Theatre’s production of Hungry, which runs through March 18, features costumes by Adams.

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Nine things to watch for in Sporting Kansas City’s 2012 campaign

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The Sporting Life porting Kansas City put the city (and Major League Soccer) on notice in 2011. Reinvigorated with a new name (no more Wizards) and a sleek new stadium, Sporting rode its newfound momentum to the Western Conference Final. In case you didn’t catch Sporting fever last season, here’s a primer on what to watch for this summer. Sporting’s first home match of 2012 is Saturday, March 17, against the New England Revolution. Fair warning: You might have to trade a kidney for tickets. — BEN PALOSAARI

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Below Retail! Raised Expectations?

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Chicago Fire: Rivalry or Stunt?

Sporting started last season with an abysmal 1-6-3 record. All 10 games were played on the road during construction of Livestrong Sporting Park. The comforts of home proved invaluable; the club reached the Western Conference Final, jockeying it to the top of the local sports heap in terms of standings and expectations.

Last July, Sporting won the rights to 19-year-old Soony Saad. The Michigan Wolverine notched his first MLS goal in 39 minutes of regular-season play. We’re still getting to know him. Luckily, he shares a locker room with a pair of charismatic characters in C.J. Sapong and Aurelien Collin. If he hangs around them, he’ll be just fine.

Sporting’s marketing department tried last season to spark a rivalry between KC and Chicago. Following a Chicago Fire loss, Firehouse Subs offered a free sammie to fans who said, “Put out the Fire.” The deal proved too successful. It’s yet to be seen whether the subs helped foster a unified, primitive hatred of Chicago.

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Bunbury an Olympian?

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Sophomore Star or Slumper?

Sporting striker Teal Bunbury caught the eye of national team coaches last year during his stint with the men’s under-23 team, and he stands a good chance of locking up a spot on this summer’s Olympic squad. KC packed the Power & Light District for World Cup matches in 2010. Bunbury’s inclusion would be worth a repeat.

Graham Zusi earned a reputation last season for scoring from anywhere he pleased. Sporting’s most glorious head of hair (sorry, Chance Myers) blasted goals from 45 and 30 yards. He doesn’t always score when he rockets a shot from near midfield, but we’ll be damned if our eyes aren’t glued to him whenever he has the ball.

It took C.J. Sapong just one minute and 43 seconds to score the first goal of his MLS career. Yes, it’s a record. Sapong also drew national attention for serenading U.S. Women’s National Team goalie Hope Solo. Sapong will have to avoid a sophomore slump if Sporting is to make another serious playoff run.

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Trading midfielder Davy Arnaud, Sporting’s team captain wasn’t quite like sending Old Yeller out back to be put down. But the split did feel like the final transition from the Wizards to Sporting. Arnaud appeared in a team-record 240 matches. The question now: Who will lead this youthcentered team?

Longtime Wizards supporters still gripe about the name change costing the franchise a mascot. Sporting isn’t opposed to fans coming up with an unofficial team name (Sporting Clube de Portugal fans dubbed their team the Lions). If hard-core fans want a mascot name, they’ll have to do it before “Sporting KC” sticks.

The man who ran onto the field in a cow suit during Sporting’s first home game remains a mystery. “Cow Man” took a pass and slotted a goal before security introduced him to the turf. Was he a catalyst for things to come? Sporting went on an 11-game unbeaten streak. Let’s hope he’s not KC’s Curse of the Billy Goat.

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THE ONLY THING HARDER THAN FINDING ONE OF KC’S 500-PLUS TAXIS? DRIVING ONE. BY BEN PALOSAARI | PHOTOGRAPHY BY WILLIAM LOUNSBURY

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ill Zehnder can’t find a cab. On a springlike mid-February afternoon, the Michigan man has flown into Kansas City International Airport for a pheasant-hunting convention. Shuttle vans, buses, limousines and cars course through the sun-drenched passenger-pickup area of Terminal B. But where are the taxis? “You can’t figure it out,” Zehnder says. “They should be right here.” But they never are, and that’s by design. Unlike most major airports, KCI doesn’t allow cabbies to line up outside terminals. And no one is on-site to guide unfamiliar visitors, such as Zehnder, to the courtesy phones that would connect them to a taxicab dispatcher. Several hundred feet from the terminals, isolated from passengers, in the shadow of KCI’s 250-foot-high, air-trafficcontrol tower, is the airport’s taxicab dispatch building. From that height, the orange, yellow, blue and maroon cabs in the parking lot look like spilled jelly beans. The feeling inside the dispatch building is as joyless as the waiting room of a free clinic. Fares are first-come, first-served, so taxi drivers arrive early in the morning to get a slot near the top of the list. They check in with a dispatcher, who sits behind a thick-glass window, the kind you see at gas stations in sketchy neighborhoods. The dispatcher adds the drivers’ three-digit identification numbers to a queue, which is displayed on a flat-screen monitor hanging on a wall. And then drivers wait, sometimes up to 12 hours, for their numbers to blare through a speaker. (When they return from a trip, the process starts over.) Many days, they’re lucky to get two fares. Eighty drivers, almost all immigrants, kill time playing cards or playing checkers with poker chips on faded boards. Others stare at laptop computers. A few sleep, despite the din of dozens of conversations. A fight breaks out on Jerry Springer, which plays on a muted television sitting atop an unlit Pepsi machine. It’s easy to see why Gammachu Mixicha prefers to sit outside, at a stone picnic table. Mixicha, a 34-year-old U.S. citizen who has driven cabs in the city since immigrating from Ethiopia in 2006. He explains why he and a loose collection of about 250 cabbies, called the Kansas City Taxi Cab Drivers Association, are suing the city of Kansas City in federal court to change the way cab permits are issued. He lays out the cabbies’ case for shifting away from a business model in which a few cab companies own all of the cityissued permits and lease them to drivers. He envisions a system in which drivers own their permits. “All we’re asking for is one permit for each individual driver,” Mixicha says as traffic whirs by. The city says that’s not going to happen.

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ine cab companies own the city’s 547 taxi permits. The lawsuit, filed February 1, alleges that this arrangement gives the companies “a fiefdom-like control on the taxicab market.” Cab companies then lease those permits (and sometimes vehicles) to cab drivers for weekly fees, ranging from $160 to $470. The city of Kansas City wants to cut the number of drivers to 500, through attrition and by declining to issue new permits. A city ordinance also requires any operating taxi company to hold at least 10 permits. The drivers argue that this requirement denies individuals and small groups of drivers the opportunity

to run their own cab businesses. They say this gives the nine companies an unfair advantage, forcing drivers to pay whatever fees the permit owners demand. Pay for airport cabbies can be low. The lawsuit alleges that cabbies often spend up to 17 hours a day waiting to hear their numbers called. Most fares are between $40 and $60 (the jackpot fare runs to Overland Park and can bring up to $75). Drivers pay a $3 fee to KCI for each ride they pick up. (Airport officials say the fee pays for the dispatch system and maintenance for the building.) Cab companies also take a share when passengers pay with credit cards. The fee covers charge fees and defrays the cost of charge disputes, which can be expensive and a common occurrence when customers sober up and don’t remember taking a cab. After subtracting gas costs and maintenance, drivers say, they’re lucky to clear about $40 most days. The lawsuit, filed by St. Louis attorney Mark Goodman, seeks an injunction to stop the city from enforcing the ordinance, instituted in 2000. It claims that allowing driver-owned companies to obtain permits or reallocating permits currently owned by other companies would benefit customers, the city and drivers by increasing competition. “The problem is that the [companies are] worried they’re going to lose these drivers that are working as slaves,” Mixicha tells The Pitch. “That’s where the conflict is coming.” More drivers wander over to vent as Mixicha talks about the lawsuit. They cut each other off and talk over one another with their own complaints. Mixicha quiets everyone and says the ideal outcome for the drivers is a co-op that would allow them to compete with the bigger companies. Last October, the drivers took their concerns to the City Council. However, city leaders weren’t interested in changing the regulation. In a letter dated November 3, 2011, council members Melba Curls, then chair of the council’s Taxicab Sub-Committee, and Dick Davis, then vice chair of the Transportation Sub-Committee, dismissed the drivers’ concerns. “We have reached the conclusion that the existing system of regulating taxi permits functions well for the City, the industry and the taxi cab operators and its users,” they wrote. “We do not feel there is a need to make any substantial changes at this time, as we would like to let the market decide issues such as these.” The lawsuit hasn’t changed the city’s position. In a response to the lawsuit, city attorneys deny the drivers’ claims that the ordinance violates the Equal Protection and Due Process clauses of the U.S. Constitution. David Park, director of the Department of Neighborhood and Community Services, which oversees taxi permits, says the quality of cabs was low prior to the city’s permitting system. And there were safety and cleanliness issues. “Nobody could really make a profit because there were so many cabs,” Park tells The Pitch. “When they capped this, the idea was to let that drive the quality and professionalism of the cab. “The cab companies themselves have stepped up and been very aggressive in taking charge and taking control of those complaints and making sure they’re resolved in a positive way,” Park says. Park says not a single permit from a cab company has been revoked due to ordinance violations in his five years on the job. He adds that he has received just one official complaint from a customer in that time. continued on page 8 pitch.com M A R C H 1 5 - 2 1 , 2 0 1 2 T H E P I T C H pitch.com M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X T H E P I T C H 3

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Fare Treatment continued from page 7

He argues that giving out permits to individual drivers wouldn’t ease the cabbies’ problems: “Part of their own lawsuit says they, at times, wait for up to 17 hours at the airport. So double the number of people, does that mean you have to wait a day and a half to get a fare?” Mixicha and the drivers association counter that even if more cabbies flooded the market, they wouldn’t have to pay the overhead of weekly lease fees. For instance, by not paying the commonly charged fee of $260, they would save $13,520 each year. Park suggests that a better strategy for the drivers would be to stop waiting for fares at the airport. “There’s nothing that prevents them from working the downtown,” Park says. “There’s nothing that prevents them from working the casinos. There’s nothing that prevents them from working on the sports venues in town or the Westport or the Plaza or whatever. It takes a little more effort to hustle around and understand the way the community works to get in a spot … to get the consumer. But that’s a choice that they make.” Drivers say they have little choice but to wait for airport fares. Kansas City’s largest cab company, Yellow Cab, run by Kansas City Transportation Group CEO Bill George, has exclusivity contracts with six of Kansas City’s most lucrative spots: Crown Center’s Westin and Sheraton hotels, downtown’s Crowne Plaza and the Hilton President, Riverside’s Argosy Casino, and the Plaza’s InterContinental. “That’s the problem,” Mixicha says. “He controls the whole city.” Although the drivers’ lawsuit doesn’t seek immediate changes to the dispatch system at KCI, airport officials are committed to keeping cabs out of sight. In the mid-1980s through the 1990s, cabs could wait in designated zones of KCI. But airport spokesman Joe McBride says it led to an ugly competition for fares, with cabbies waiting at the most lucrative terminals or sneaking into the baggage areas to solicit fares, essentially cutting in line, irritating both travelers and the drivers who played by the rules.

“It was just not a good situation for our visitors,” McBride says. KCI’s narrow design also puts idling vehicles in close proximity to terminals and airplanes. This makes parked vehicles a security threat. McBride says drivers shouldn’t expect change. “I would think that we’re not going to be supportive of going back to the way it was,” he says.

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ention the lawsuit to Bill George, and the CEO of the Kansas City Transportation Group answers with a nightmarish vision. The smooth-talking transit mogul, whose company holds 300 taxi permits — more than half of what the city licenses — suggests a dystopia where cabbies engage in Thunderdome-style combat for airport fares. He says that’s how it used to be. He recalls a similar lawsuit in the mid-1980s, which he says led to the city deregulating the taxi industry, allowing drivers to obtain their own permits and wait at terminals. Passengers never knew how much they would be charged, and drivers were so desperate for fares that they would fight in front of travelers.

“We scared the hell out of the passengers,” George says. “We pretty much sent a message: Don’t take a cab from the airport because it’s ungodly expensive, and they’ll fight, and the cabs were terrible.” Drivers and taxicab companies had no incentive to improve customer service, because permits were so easy to get. “Because there was no profit motive in the business,” George says, “there was a glut of cabs. Nobody reinvested in their cars, so the cars got older. Nobody upgraded their dispatch systems. Nobody did any marketing. Nobody did anything. And the cab business became horrible.” When the city instituted the current regulations, it set the fares and required cab companies to own 10 permits. George explains the 2000 change: “Originally we wanted [the requirement to be] 25 cabs, and the reason for that is simple: You’re supposed to provide citywide service.” George knows that lone drivers can’t compete with the Kansas City Transportation Group’s Lydia Avenue complex of garages, offices and car wash. But his infrastructure benefits drivers and customers, George says.

George (left) says large companies can better provide citywide service. Many travelers miss KCI’s cab phones (above). In one room of the company’s office building, he shows off a massive flat-screen monitor that displays a map similar to an air-traffic-control display. Every Yellow Cab vehicle in the city is depicted as a colored icon on the map. Green cabs are available for trips. Pink ones are en route to pick up passengers. The turquoise are on trips with passengers. Drivers’ speed and locations are tracked, allowing the company to identify cabbies who speed and run up fares with circuitous routes. The real-time monitoring allows Yellow Cab to send the nearest taxi, shortening wait times for customers and downtime between jobs for drivers, who are directed to nearby fares. This reduces their “deadhead” time, the time they spend returning to fare-rich areas after dropping off passengers in a suburb. George says this multimillion-dollar dispatch system is precisely why the cab industry runs better with the nine companies holding

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Mixicha (above) waits at KCI’s cab-dispatch building; Hama Amin (right) uses it as an office, a waiting room and a dining room. all of the permits. (He says many of his drivers make a decent living; some, he claims, earn $100,000 a year.) “If you don’t have a network, and you’re not tied into a system like this, you’re on your own,” he says. “And you’re sitting there waiting for a trip, hoping someone will call you on your cellphone.” George argues that the drivers are working against their own cause with the lawsuit. In 2009, George says he proposed a compromise between the City Council and the airport cabbies to the city’s Taxicab Sub-Committee: Drivers with oddnumbered permits would work odd-numbered calendar days, and those with even-numbered permits would work even-numbered days. The summary of George’s proposed compromise says 112 cab drivers check in at KCI most days. Those drivers split 205 fares, for an average of 1.83 fares per day. (KCI’s McBride could not confirm if this was still an accurate figure, but he said 200 rides a day is a commonly cited number.) Cutting the number of drivers sitting at the airport in half would earn drivers the same amount of money each week in half the time. “Even though you would work only half as many days, you would get twice as many trips on those days,” George says.

Non-airport days could be spent scouring the city for fares, which has the potential to increase the drivers’ weekly pay. George says the drivers weren’t interested in his plan. “It’s fear,” he says. “The perception is, if we suggest it, then it automatically must be good for us, which is bad for them.” George sounds exasperated at times. He wonders why the drivers won’t consider this plan or lobby the smaller cab companies to join forces and pool resources in order to compete headto-head with Yellow Cab. (Nearly all of Yellow Cab’s 300 permits are in use; George says Yellow could add about 10 drivers.) George is confident that the lawsuit will fail. He angrily disputes claims, such as the lawsuit labeling Yellow Cab’s annual gross revenue as “annual income.” The lawsuit doesn’t account for the company’s overhead (insurance, large water bills, and salaries for mechanics and office employees). “The crime here that’s been committed is that lawyer took the money from those drivers and put that out,” George says. “It’s so easy to tear down because it is factually incorrect.”

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owntown Kansas City is clogged with Big 12 Tournament traffic the morning of Friday, March 9. Ary Hama Amin, president of the Kansas City Taxi Cab Drivers Association, predicts a good weekend for drivers.

He works his immaculate white 2005 Lincoln Town Car between buses and pedestrians and pulls in front of the Hilton President, one of the Yellow-exclusive hotels. He idles a few minutes, long enough for a valet in a red jacket to hop out of a Lexus and give him a dirty look. Two minutes later, a Yellow driver parked at the hotel blasts his horn at Hama Amin, who moves on. Hama Amin, a 30-year-old U.S. citizen from Iraq’s northern Kurdish region, says he makes maybe $17,000 a year working for City Cab. It’s the second-largest cab company in KC, with 125 permits, but its drivers can’t wait at downtown’s poshest, biggest hotels. Exiled by Yellow’s exclusivity deals, drivers such as Hama Amin decamp to the airport or the Northland. They gamble that KCI’s typically longer fares pay better than downtown’s more numerous but cheaper trips. Late on this Friday morning, the driveway of the Westin Crown Center, another Yellowexclusive hotel, is chaotic. A bright-orange Oklahoma State University bus has just cleared the entryway, and dozens of visitors rush around. Hama Amin has pulled up to show a journalist around the forbidden zones, not to find a fare. But he looks tempted when a doorman flags him down. A woman staying at the hotel wants Hama Amin to pick up her friends at KCI and bring them back to the hotel. “They don’t want to take the Yellow?” he asks the doorman.

“She wants the Lincoln.” Hama Amin agrees to pick up the passengers for $50. He is planning a trip with his wife and their 2-year-old son to see Hama Amin’s ailing grandmother in Iraq. He needs the money. The doorman sees an opportunity in the arrangement, too. “Take care of me, now,” he hints. Hama Amin hands him a $5 bill through the car window. More overhead. As he waits for the customer to get cash out of the ATM, Hama Amin says his days behind the wheel are numbered. When he returns from Iraq, he wants to try a different kind of business. Maybe he’ll open a Middle Eastern restaurant, he says. But first he wants to help the next generation of immigrant cabbies earn better wages. “I’m not going to be in this business for long,” he says. “We’re going to have an election soon, and I’m probably not going to be their president.” If the lawsuit fails, he adds, drivers will probably strike. Cash in hand, he drives north again through tournament traffic. It takes him 15 minutes to make it two miles, to a gas station at East Sixth Street and Grand. He puts $40 in the tank. The trip to and from the airport is going to burn $15 of that gas. He slides into the driver’s seat again and heads back to sunny Terminal B, where his passengers are waiting. E-mail ben.palosaari@pitch.com or call 816-218-6783

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T U E S D AY PAGE 12

W E D N E S D AY PAGE 13

W E D N E S D AY PAGE 13

Jazz’s address is still 18th Street and Vine.

We’ll always have Casablanca.

The Nelson-Atkins considers Rodin.

NIGHT + DAY WEEK OF MARCH 15–21

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includes bangers and mash, game sausages, and duchess mashed potatoes. Drink a lot (or a little) and swig $5 Jameson shots all day. DJ Loftus performs at 9:30 p.m. Paddy O’Shay’s (11300 West 135th Street, Overland Park, 913-681-3000) starts the celebrations at 8 a.m. with DJ Jolly. Chow on Irishfood specials (corned beef, fish and chips) and drink $4 16-oz. Guinnesses, $5 Bushmills and Bushmills Irish Honey, $4 16-oz. green Bud Lights and $4 Tullamore Dew. The Pete Carroll Group performs from 3 to 7 p.m. The Heather Stones close out the night. For a complete list of St. Patrick’s Day events, see our guide on page 20. — ABBIE STUTZER

[BOOKS]

YOU MUST REMEMBER THIS

When writer Joshua Foer set out to write about memory and its mastery, he interviewed neurological experts, improve-your-brain gurus and stunning savants. It was an immersive reporting project that deepened when he found himself getting good — really good — at the mental exercises he was studying. In 2006, Foer won the U.S.A. Memory Championship, an outcome that turned his eventual book, the excellent MoonwalkFIND ing With Einstein, into MANY MORE something more than just a fascinating work of pop science. It’s just in paperback, and LISTINGS out Foer’s book tour stops ONLINE AT at 7 p.m. at Linda Hall PITCH.COM Library (5109 Cherry, 816-926-8772). Wanna stump the master? Ask him about the Royals. “I’m a pretty devoted baseball fan, but I’m pretty awful with remembering who played in the World Series in what year,” he admits. After Foer’s talk, he signs copies of the book, available at the event from Rainy Day Books. Tickets are free, but reservations are required; make them at lindahall.org. — SCOTT WILSON

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[CABARET]

PLAY WISTFUL FOR ME

Real-estate developer and urban-core specialist Greg Patterson’s Uptown Arts Bar (3611 Broadway, 816-960-4611) has neither TVs nor a Jäger chiller, but the location does have partners in the Heart of America Shakespeare Festival, the Paul Mesner Puppet Company and the Writers Place. Tonight’s entertainment, French Cabaret: A Wistful Performance of Music, Mime and Cocktails, is a good example of what the two-story midtown spot hopes to feature on a regular basis. “Byrd Productions and Belleville will be putting together a French Cabaret performance every third Friday of the month,” says Beth Byrd, local clown. “Tonight, for most of the show, I will be my flirtatious coquette character, Petite Columbe. I will greet the crowd, flirt with them, and perform some numbers where I play

[FILM]

ST. JACK OF GALWAY AND INISHMORE

Suit up for St. Patrick’s Day (Saturday).

with the band and the audience. This will be adult entertainment.” The show starts at 7 p.m., and tickets cost $10. The bar stays open until 1:30 a.m. For more information, see uptownartsbar.com. — APRIL FLEMING

Tickets run between $6.75 (for shows before 6 p.m.) and $8.50 (for shows after 6 p.m.). Find complete details at tivolikc.com. — BRENT SHEPHERD

S AT U R D AY

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3.17

[FILM]

[ H O L I DAY ]

LES ARTISTES

ST. PATRICK’S DAY ROUNDUP

Salon’s Andrew O’Hehir recently asked, “After The Artist, what’s next for French film?” That loaded question is aimed at the anomaly of American audiences having embraced, in spite of themselves, the perfect storm of a film that was not merely French but also silent and monochromatic. But France is never at a loss for compelling, well-acted, finely produced films, seven of which comprise the latest RendezVous with French Cinema showcase, screening through Tuesday at the Tivoli Cinemas (4050 Pennsylvania, 816-561-5222). Today’s offerings include actor Daniel Auteuil’s directorial debut, The Well-Digger’s Daughter; Mathieu Amalric’s adaptation The Screen Illusion, based on a 17thcentury tragicomedy; Delphine and Muriel Coulin’s debut feature, 17 Girls, about a group of teenagers who make a pregnancy pact; and Laurant Achard’s thriller, The Last Screening.

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Whether you reside in midtown or Olathe, there’s someplace to go green today. Slather some kelly-colored paint onto your face and perch those spring-loaded shamrocks atop your kid’s head — it’s time to put on your party face. The 40th annual Kansas City St. Patrick’s Day Parade (Broadway from 33rd Street to 43rd Street) starts at 11 a.m. and ends around 1 p.m. Gather early, enjoy the sights and head to the bar of your choice. See kcirishparade.com for more information. Or head to Browne’s Irish Marketplace (3300 Pennsylvania, 816-561-0030), where kids can partake in carnival-like festivities, and everyone can eat Irish specialties. 77 South (5041 West 135th Street, Overland Park, 913-742-7727) Start the celebration with an 11 a.m. lunch, including a corned-beef sandwich special, $9. The $15.95 dinner special

Don’t want to wade into the soused, rowdy Westport throng today? Run an end-around a few miles north of the revelry, to the soothing confines of the Durwood Film Vault at the Kansas City Central Library (14 West 10th Street, 816-701-3400), to celebrate our greatest Irish-American film director. The library’s free month-long series “John Ford: Not a Cowboy in Sight” observes the non-Western output of the prolific filmmaker, who excelled at so much more than just oaters and shoot’em-ups. Starring John Wayne and Robert Montgomery as PT boat commanders, the superior WWII drama They Were Expendable screens at 1:30 p.m., and Wayne returns Monday at 6:30 p.m. as a Navy pilot in The Wings of Eagles. In a scheduling gaffe that defies explanation, Ford’s quintessential Irish love story — 1952’s The Quiet Man, in which the Duke romances beautiful, fiery Maureen O’Hara — screens next Saturday. See kclibrary.org for details. — BRENT SHEPHERD

M O N D AY

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3.19

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[LECTURE]

WHAT’S LEFT?

The National Priorities Project takes federal data and analyzes and clarifies the info for curious citizens. One of its websites, costofwar. com, breaks down what different cities specifically (including Kansas City, Missouri) have spent on the Iraq War. As the number continues to climb upward from $1.2 billion, the KC branch of the American continued on page 12

pitch.com MMOANRTCHH X1X–X 5 - 2 1 , 2 0 1 2 t h e p i t c h 11 pitch.com X, 200X T H E P I T C H 1


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[ S U N DAY 3.1 8 ]

SMOOTH TALKER

L

ast call for the lean, mean ice-resurfacing machine — the 39th ice-skating season at the Crown Center Ice Terrace (2450

Grand, 816-274-8411) comes to a close today, sending the Zamboni into hiding until November 2 (the first day of the 2012–13 season). The Ice Terrace is open today from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Regular admission is $6. Adults 60 and older and children 4 and younger are free. Participants can bring their own skates or rent a pair for $3. To mark the end of the season, Brandon Luft, Crown Center’s Ice Terrace lead manager, talked Zamboni with us. THE PITCH: Crowds go wild for the Zamboni at professional hockey games. Do you get the celebrity treatment? LUFT: It seems the Zamboni is the celebrity, not the driver. People cheer for it, and I have even seen people do the wave when the Zamboni comes out. One group this year had a special cheer. People always want to touch the Zamboni and give the driver a high-five. I have fun entertaining the crowd. How does the Zamboni work? It’s actually an ice-resurfacing machine, and Zamboni is the brand name. The machine shaves a small amount of ice (the skated-on, rough ice), then lays down a layer of hot water to replace what is being picked up. Hot water freezes faster because the molecules are already moving. What is the hardest part of your job? Since the outdoor rink is affected by the weather, the high winter temperatures are rough on the ice, and the sun shines on part of the rink at various points of the day. The rain and snow are very damaging to the ice. With the different weather variables, it is definitely a challenge to maintain good ice.

12 t h e p i t c h M A R C H 1 5 - 2 1 , 2 0 1 2 pitch.com 2 T H E P I T C H M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X pitch.com

— NANCY HULL RIGDON

Friends Service Committee is working to keep folks in the know about the human and economic costs of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. The AFSC hosts a public forum called Legacies of the Iraq War/Lessons for U.S.-Iran Policy. It’s an attempt “to educate the public about the dangers of the use of military action while many more productive other policy actions are available,” says Ira Harritt, program coordinator. The speakers include Iraq War veteran Lucky Garcia, who worked firsthand with Iraqi civilians, and Nazgol Bagheri, an Iranian-born UMKC graduate student in urban geography, who discusses the Iranian culture and people. The forum runs from 7 to 8:30 p.m. in Room 301 of UMKC’s Haag Hall (5120 Rockhill Road, 816-235-1000). For more information, call 816-931-5256 or see afsc.org/kansascity. — BERRY ANDERSON

T U E S D AY

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3.20

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[TOURS]

CRADLE OF JAZZ

When she was 14, Haleigh Harrold, development manager at the American Jazz Museum, got a Billie Holiday CD for Christmas. “I played that CD before school, after school, doing homework, reading, all the time. The soundtrack to my teen years was Billie Holiday,” Harrold recalls. Years later, standing in front of a kiosk in the John H. Baker Jazz Film exhibition space at the American Jazz Museum (1616 East 18th Street, 816-474-8463), she rediscovered the music that inspired her. “I’m not sure why I hadn’t thought to YouTube Billie Holiday, but right there at the museum was my first time ever seeing her perform, and I had a really emotional moment watching the singer that introduced me to jazz.” Rediscover our city’s musical legacy during the AJM’s Take Five Tours on the first Thursday and third Tuesday of every month. The free, hourlong tours begin in the Changing Gallery (on display through June 1, Ella: First Lady of Song) and move through the permanent exhibit, the Blue Room and John H. Baker Jazz Film with introductions and meetand-greets from a handful of the AJM’s board members and staff. Afterward, tour participants are invited to attend free performances in the Blue Room. RSVPs are requested via e-mail at takefive@kcjazz.org or by calling 816-474-8463, ext. 238. The tours are limited to 65 people and begin at 6 p.m. — BERRY ANDERSON [POETRY]

POWER OF PASSION

Corinna West has survived multiple suicide attempts and overcome 12 psychological diagnoses and a serious weed habit — doctors gave her other drugs, up to six prescriptions at a time. West takes none of them now and says she’s alive because she found her own medicine. “We all have personal medicine as opposed to pill medicine,” she says. “Personal medicine is what we do, what gives us the will to survive, what makes us get out of bed every morning. That’s our personal power.” She derives strength from poetry, bicycling, judo, and helping others heal themselves. Another way that West spreads her theory of self-healing is by organizing Poetry for Personal Power, a series of spoken-word events during which performers riff on what gets them


TIME FOR A SPRING TUNE UP

through tough times. West emcees two of these interactive performances this week: today at noon at Avila University’s Marian Center (11901 Wornall, 816-501-3660), with Sarah “Miss Conception” Glass, and at 7 p.m. Friday, March 16, at UMKC’s student union (5100 Cherry, 816-235-1406). See poetryforpersonalpower .com for more information. — CRYSTAL K. WIEBE

W E D N E S D AY

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3.21

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[FILM]

WE’LL ALWAYS HAVE PARIS

315 E. 3RD ST. KCO

816-842-BIKE

Jake Turpiano was born in 1989 — the year of Back to the Future Part II, Batman and When Harry Met Sally — but the 23-year-old doesn’t go wild for DeLoreans, Batmobiles and lunchtime faked orgasms. No, 1942’s Casablanca is more his style. “For its time, it was one of the greatest movies. And, quite honestly, it hasn’t had a lot of competition since,” says Turpiano, a member of the film crew at AMC BarryWoods 24. The World War II love story plays at seven area theaters including AMC BarryWoods 24 (8101 Roanridge Road, 816-505-9199) as part of the nationwide Casablanca 70th Anniversary Event, a partnership of NCM Fathom, Turner Classic Movies and Warner Bros. Aside from the feature, audiences are treated to a 15-minute behind-the-scenes look at the timeless classic. Each of two showtimes, at 2 or 7 p.m., is limited to 250 people. Tickets cost $12.50. For a full list of theaters showing the film, see fathomevents.com. — NANCY HULL RIGDON [ART]

AND THE HORSE YOU RODIN ON

The expansive Rodin exhibit, at the NelsonAtkins Museum of Art (4525 Oak, 816-751-1278) through June 3, features 40 of the French Expressionist’s sculpted monoliths, which simultaneously take your breath away and make you want to go to the gym more often. Favorites like The Thinker are spotlighted along with other creepier works, including a series of gigantic disembodied hands. And though the exhibit’s Gates of Hell section doesn’t include Rodin’s titular masterwork (a nearly 20-foot-tall sinencrusted bronze portico), it does contain individual figures from it, including the lurid Torso of Despairing Adolescent. Visitors can use their smartphones in the exhibit to learn more about the pieces, and they can also get their hands on bronze casting materials. Teacher-led classes on how Rodin sculpted, cast, enlarged and reproduced his works are held during weekends through April. The Nelson-Atkins is open today from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission is free. See nelson-atkins.org for more hours and information. — MICAH GUTWEILER Night + Day listings are offered as a free service to Pitch readers and are subject to space restrictions. Submissions should be addressed to Night + Day Editor Berry Anderson by e-mail (calendar@pitch.com), fax (816-756-0502) or mail (The Pitch, 1701 Main, Kansas City, MO 64108). Please include zip code with address. Continuing items must be resubmitted monthly. No submissions are taken by telephone. Items must be received two weeks prior to each issue date. Search our complete listings guide online.

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MARCH 15-21, 2012

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13

pitch.com

MONTH


stage Back to the Nest RESURRECTING RANDLE MCMURPHY AT METROPOLITAN ENSEMBLE THEATRE

T

J AC K C L I F F O R D

he 1975 movie One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest swept the Academy Awards — best picture, director, actor, actress, adapted screenplay. Almost 40 years on, Milos Forman’s successful film remains a resonant pop-culture landmark, even if people sometimes forget exactly why. Metropolitan Ensemble Theatre’s production — timed, perhaps not coincidentally, close to BY Easter — reminds us. Like the movie, the play DEBORAH is based on Ken Kesey’s 1962 HIRSCH novel. Dale Wasserman wrote the stage version, which MET revives here with a spirit that contends just fine with 35 mm recollections. Sharp dialogue and taut scenes are filled with humor, insight, sadness and symbolism — a lot of symbolism. sentenced to serve time, he thinks a mental Besides gender politics and self-realization, hospital will be a piece of cake compared with the story hinges on sin. sacrifice and salvation. the alternative, a work camp. What he doesn’t expect is Nurse Ratched, a Under William Christie’s direction, each cold, angry woman (brought actor in this cohesive ensemto scary manifestation by Jan ble does focused, fine-tuned One Flew Over the Chapman in an understated work, with group actions Cuckoo’s Nest but powerful portrayal) who arranged like notes in a score Through March 25 at runs the ward. Everyone — one that Scott Cordes, Metropolitan Ensemble seems to fear her, including as protagonist Randle McTheatre, 3614 Main, the aides (Kyle Dyck and Murphy, forcefully conducts. 816-569-3226, metkc.org Donovan Kidd), who torIt’s a role perfectly suited ment and help restrain the to Cordes’ talents. Bad boy McMurphy is an extrovert with a penchant for men, but McMurphy isn’t, at first. He bends fighting and an urge for gambling. When he’s rules and lives fully — the way he wants — but

Big Laughs THE MANUTE BOLS OF COMEDY HIGH-STEP INTO TOWN.

T

he digital age has blessed us with great convenience, but it has also raised new, interesting questions. For instance: What’s the proper etiquette for sending another person a picture-text of your own penis? Scale is imporBY tant, explains Chicago comedian Mike Lebovitz, in a D AV I D recent Funny or Die video. H U D N A L L “Why not showcase your privates next to something puny, like a peanut, a pencil or a miniature model of the Empire State Building?” Lebovitz is one of three Chicago stand-ups stopping through town this week as part of the Manute Bols of Comedy tour. Another

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MARCH 15-21, 2012

performer, Joe McAdam, who put the tour together, is a Kansas City native and former Lawrence resident. The Pitch recently spoke with McAdam by phone. The Pitch: You did some comedy in Kansas City before moving to Chicago, right? McAdam: Yeah, I was doing a comedy-duo thing with this guy, Andrew Perry, for a while. Then we were like, “Let’s move to Chicago and get famous!” Because, of course, if you want to get famous, obviously you move to Chicago. [Laughs.] Anyway, yeah, I moved up in 2007 and started doing stand-up, and then he eventually came up, but we only did, like, one show together. And I just kept doing stand-up. You also did some Second City stuff ? You had a talk show? I did the Second City writing program for sketch and comedy writing, yeah. And then two years ago, we started this thing called The Late Live Show, which was a late-night pitch.com

Cordes’ McMurphy shakes things up for Chapman’s Nurse Ratched at the MET.

finally ratchets down his instincts, and even his better nature, to negotiate this war game. Cordes gives an absorbing performance, exuberant and sensitive, in a captivating and thoughtful show. In Kesey’s novel, the story is narrated by Chief Bromden, an American Indian patient who appears catatonic. He’s a large and central figure in the play as well. His internal world comes forth in voice recordings as he’s surrounded by darkness and bathed in light. The staging is dramatic, but Ari Bavel brings Chief comedy show at a Second City theater. But then that got canceled. It’s kind of on hiatus right now. What happened? We were technically doing the show in a Second City theater, but it wasn’t an official Second City show. It’s kind of confusing. But it was a talk show, so we’d try to get celebrity guests. Like, we got Danny Pudi from Community on, for instance. And we’d use the Second City name to try to get people to come on. Anyway, they got mad that we were using their name. They were like, “Get the fuck out.” What’s the impetus for the Manute Bols tour? I basically put it together because I quit my job and thought I should probably do something. And Mike [Lebovitz] has a car and had some dates lined up for shows already. The three of us have worked together on a few different things. C.J. Toledano used to be pitch.com

to better, fuller fruition once his character comes out of his shell, which isn’t cracked by this hospital’s regimens. It takes only his first group-therapy session for McMurphy to see Ratched’s Machiavellian ploys at work. Even the ward’s psychiatrist, Dr. Spivey (Timothy D. Ahlenius), hasn’t the will to fight this woman, who seems to dictate counseling and treatments. No one dares to take her on, except McMurphy, who develops compassion for his fellow inmates and can see that the psychotherapy is used more to subordinate than to heal. Ruckly (Tyler Miller) has been lobotomized and barely exists at all. Martini (Samn Wright) suffers from hallucinations. And the distinctive personalities and personal issues of Billy Bibbit (Dan Hillaker), Scanlon (Matt Leonard), Cheswick (Chris Roady), and the articulate and intelligent Harding (Alan Tilson) are uncovered in riveting, moving (and sometimes funny) scenes as the story unfolds in the hospital ward’s day room. The set, designed by Kidd, is painted an institutional pale-green. From the glassenclosed nurses’ station, Ratched and her assistant, Nurse Flinn (Kenzie West), reinforce their separation from the patients and keep watch. The large window to the outside world is locked, but it’s through that window that the memories of Chief Bromden awaken. Most of the men have committed themselves here. They’re afraid — of women, of themselves, of life. Harding mentions the “burden of sanity.” But the man who was committed by law takes care of them, and they of him. Consider committing yourself to seeing this play — you have a small window, through March 25, to peer into their world. E-mail deborah.hirsch@pitch.com

Manute by Manute: Joe McAdam at work. M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X

THE PITCH

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Backstage

S A B R I N A S TA I R E S

on The Late Live Show, actually, and then he left to go intern for Conan, and then he got hired on at Fallon. But he just moved back to Chicago. The whole thing is kind of an experiment. We’re just doing shows at bars, not comedy clubs, hoping to make enough to cover gas and some food maybe. Who are some other funny Chicago standups whom people might not know about? My favorite is this guy Junior Stopka. He’s toured with Doug Stanhope and is getting to be pretty big locally. He’s a really tall exboxer with long hair, and he looks like the biggest creep you’ve ever seen in your life. He’s hilarious. You’re bringing in a host for the Lawrence and Kansas City dates? Yeah, my buddy Ed Parker, who lives in Lawrence and hosts an open-mic comedy thing at the Jackpot. We used to work together in Lawrence. He’s the only guy I have ever met through work that I actually liked. Where’d you work together? It was for Medicare, doing customer support. That was the worst thing, because it’s like regular customer service, only all the calls you get are from dying old people. We literally had red flags that we would wave so our managers could see if we were on the phone with somebody who was going to kill themselves or something. Somebody once got a call where the person was confessing that they’d kidnapped somebody. It was crazy. I don’t know why they’d call Medicare about that and not the police. But yeah, it was nuts.

Frozen Face Jordyn DeMarco prepares for a run-through of She & Her Productions’ Frozen. Bryony Lavery’s Tony-nominated play stars DeMarco, Ellen DeShon and Danny Grumich. DeMarco plays a psychiatrist trying to figure out the murderer of a young girl. DeShon co-stars as the girl’s mother, and Grumich is the killer. The play, directed by Nino Casisi, finishes its run with 8 p.m. performances March 16 and 17 at the River’s Edge Theater (122 West Fifth Street). Call 816-405-9200 or see sheandherproductions.com.

E-mail david.hudnall@pitch.com

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THE PITCH

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PHILLIP WILKERSON

art

XOXO, SOS

The Spray Booth is full of XOXO.

lies on its side. Tree roots sprout from one end as gray smoke emerges from the other and culminates in an upward-pointing arrow. For Unearthed, at Rockhurst’s Greenlease alon-style exhibitions — in which artworks Gallery, he and fellow Lawrence artist Michael are hung very close together, covering walls Krueger have used materials from natural refrom floor to ceiling — fell out of favor 100 years sources (paper and wood) to remind viewers ago. Contemporary viewers are accustomed just how precious those natural resources are. to seeing art surrounded Cowardin clearly implicates humans in this atby plenty of blankness. So mospheric mess, and Krueger’s colored-pencil BY XOXO Salon Show requires drawings on paper depict the post-apocalyptic observational stamina. The landscapes we might have to endure if CowarTHERESA Spray Booth Gallery’s aptly din’s warnings go unheeded. B E M B N I S T E R named installation of 118 Cowardin’s most cohesive statement here pieces closes in on you, each might be “Left Right Left,” another piece of ebone competing for attention. onized walnut fashioned into Really taking in an individual a soot-blasting chimney. Two XOXO Salon Show work means blocking out the wooden hands extend from Through March 17 others, which isn’t easy bethe wall and support the pipe, at Spray Booth Gallery, cause gallery owner Andrew with potholders as buffers. 130 West 18th Street Lyles has placed everything In “Milk & Honey,” his (inside Volker Bicycles), just inches apart. message doesn’t translate as sprayboothgallery.com The emphasis on quanclearly. A blindfolded pink flatity mostly works, with the mingo with gold-leaf-coated Unearthed outdated salon style forming legs hangs on the wall above Mark Cowardin a kind of comment on the three rootlike sculptures, a and Michael Krueger. post-Web 2.0 era’s relentless mixture of kitsch, precious Through March 17 at sensory stimulation and unmetal and politics that reGreenlease Gallery, yielding data currents. The mains an indecipherable jum1100 Rockhurst Road, 816-501-4407 installation also feels demoble. Elsewhere, “Get a Grip” cratic, with works by Charbends walnut into a circle, lotte Street awardees hanging with a human hand carved next to student art, and a painting that sold for on one end grabbing a tree root on the other. The $5 (Abbe Findley’s 2-inch-square “Woman”) visual continuity between humankind and flora sharing a wall with one going for $1,000 (James is bang-your-head-against-the-wall obvious. Woodfill’s 24-inch-square “Salon Crop”). Krueger’s drawings show psychedelic landAmong the individual gems and inspired scapes, with bare trees and skies composed of combinations of works here are Christina D. acrid reds and yellows. Human figures, if they Prestidge’s “System Down,” a wall-hanging appear at all, are naked and ungroomed. bundle of mylar and monofilament, and the His “Highboy” and “Arts & Crafts Stack” visual echo it finds in Kate Smithson’s “Clump place manmade objects — furniture and pottery Spirit,” an abstract painting on paper. As at any — on rocky plateaus. Why a chest of drawers in other exhibition, then, patience is rewarded. And this spare landscape? Is this all that’s left after soocular fortitude, in this case, more so. ciety implodes? At its most intense and absurdist, Krueger’s work creates more questions than answers. His drawings are more open-ended ark Cowardin’s sculptures read like cease- than Cowardin’s sculptures. Still, both halves and-desist letters fired off to oil and tim- of this clever pairing engage a pertinent topic ber companies. In “Heaven Bound,” he renders with some engaging visuals. smooth-surfaced, charcoal-black walnut into a chimney spouting thick smoke. The smokestack E-mail feedback@pitch.com

THE BUSY GHOST OF SALONS PAST AND THE SPECTER OF A FUTURE WASTELAND

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pitch.com Kansas City Pitch 03-15-12.indd 1

MARCH 15-21, 2012

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12/19/11 2:22 PM


P

GREEN PARTY www.kcgreenparty.com

saturday

march

17th

Featuring

cover band sensation

Sellout!

Westport Rd

Downtown/Westport/Plaza

dj Steve Thorell

Brookside

2p.m.

DAY PARTY STARTS @ 9 A.M.

5 12

6

10

NIGHT RAVE STARTS @ 6 p.M.

18

Johnson County

street party

on westport road between Bank of america and Bistro 303

8

Raytown

rave at 6p.m.

15 16 14 4 7 Westport Rd

9 2

3

13

10 Minute T-Shirts 3631 Broadway KCMO 816-391-4484

2.

40th Annual KC St. Patrick’s Day Parade8. Linwood & Broadway S. to 43rd St. & Broadway 11 am - 1 pm

3.

77 South 5041 W. 135th St. Leawood, KS 77southks.com

33rd ST.

MARCH 17 11:00 AM ~ 1:00 PM

D.

TR POR

ST WE

www.kcirishparade.com 43rd ST.

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MARCH 15-21, 2012

pitch.com

The Brick 1727 McGee St. KCMO 816-623-3410 thebrickkcmo.com

5.

Charlie Hooper’s 12 W. 63rd St. Brookside, MO 816-361-8841 charliehoopers.com

6.

The Daily Limit 523 E. Red Bridge Rd. KCMO 816-942-0400 thedailylimitkc.com

39th ST.

The parade route extends approximately 1 mile beginning at the intersection of Linwood and Broadway and continuing south on Broadway to 43rd Street. There will be rolling street closures in this and adjacent areas from 9:00 am to 3:00 pm for the event and clean up.

P

LINWO

BROADWAY

THIS SATURDAY!

4.

OD

1

1.

th annual

Westport Rd

12 11 17 19

7.

9.

Howl at the Moon 1334 Grand Blvd KCMO 816-471-4695 howlatthemoon.com

13. One Block South/Fuel 7222 West 119th St. Overland Park, KS 913-469-0466 fuelkc.com

The Irish Pub House 6332 Raytown Rd. 816-353-5700 irishpubhouse.com

14. Power & Light District 13th and Grand KCMO powerandlightdistrict.com

Lucky Brewgrille 5401 Johnson Dr. Mission, KS 913-403-8571 luckybrewgrille.com

15. The Quaff 1010 Broadway KCMO

10. Mac’s Place 580 S. 4th Street Edwardsville, KS 913-441-2636 macsplacepub.com

16. R Bar 1617 Genesee KCMO 816-471-1777 rbarkc.com 17. Record Bar 1020 Westport Rd. KCMO 816-753-5207 therecordbar.com

11. Mike Kelly’s 1515 Westport Rd. KCMO 18. Sully’s Bar & Grill 816-931-9417 5436 Johnson Dr. mikekellyswestsider.com Mission, KS 913-403-9777 12. Mike’s Wine & Spirits sullyskc.com 1106 Westport Rd. 816-561-3500 8447 Wornall Rd. KCMO 816-363-3984

19. Westport Flea Market 817 Westport Rd. KCMO 816-931-1986 westportfleamarket.com


pitch.com

MARCH 15-21, 2012

the pitch

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P

St. Patrick’s Day Guide OPEN LATE DAILY

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MARCH 15-21, 2012

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The Quaff: 1010 Broadway, 816-471-1918. DJ Chris, 7 p.m. Tengo Sed Cantina: 1323 Walnut, 816-686-7842. Green beer and Guinness specials 8–10 p.m.

SATURDAY, MARCH 17 Bar Louie: 101 E. 14th St., 816-841-9100. St. Patty’s Day Kegs and Eggs party, beginning at 7 a.m. Ticket includes breakfast buffet, green beer, green T-shirt, and party bus to and from parade route, $20, $25. Beer Kitchen: 435 Westport Rd., 816-389-4180. St. Patrick’s brunch, house-made bloody marys, freshsqueezed mimosas, and more. The rest of the day includes shot specials and food; brunch Sunday, 9 a.m. The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483. Free breakfast and pool at 8 a.m. Drink specials include $3 Guinness, Killians, Jameson and Tullamore Dew Irish Whiskey, $4 car bombs and $5 green pitchers; at 9 p.m., Hawg Stomper, Hossferatu, Dead Deer and Iron Guts Kelly. The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Open at 9 a.m., serving corned beef hash and full breakfast menu; traditional Irish food served all day: corned beef and cabbage, fish and chips, Irish stew, Guinness cake and Irish coffee. The Bunker: 4056 Broadway, 816-561-7407. St. Patrick’s Day specials and a vast selection of St. Patrick’s Day items. Open at 9 a.m. Californos: 4124 Pennsylvania, 816-531-7878. Quick breakfast and Irish lunch buffet at 11 a.m. Live music on the deck from KC Bear Fighters (11 a.m.–2 p.m.) and Jervis Jort (3–6 p.m.), $5 cover. Charlie Hooper’s: 12 W. 63rd St., 816-361-8841. Harp and shots on special. Serving corned beef and cabbage. Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Kansas City Reggae St. Pat’s Bash, 8 p.m., $10. The Daily Limit: 523 E. 111th St., 816-942-0400. All-day celebration featuring two heated tents. Junebug & the Porchlights, 4–8 p.m. in the party tent, food booths with corned beef and cabbage, corned beef and hotdogs, and burgers. Beer and shot booths in front and back. Dark Horse Tavern: 4112 Pennsylvania, 816-931-3663. Pre-parade party at 7 a.m. Very Guinness Power Hours (with biscuits and gravy and Lucky Charms) 8 a.m.– 10 p.m.; the Leprechaun Throwdown Dance Party, 10 a.m.–10 p.m.; 98.9 the Rock broadcasts live all day. The Dubliner: 170 E. 14th St., 816-268-4700. Irish breakfast, starting at 8 a.m.; live entertainment throughout the day, with Eddie Delahunt (9 a.m.), the Shanks performing U2 covers (1 p.m.), the Patrick Lentz Band (6 p.m.), and DJ Steve Serrano (10 p.m.). Fidel’s: 4112 Pennsylvania, 816-561-6505. Buy three, get one free on select cigars and become eligible to win a $60 table-torch lighter, or two $60 cigar cases and two cutters. Firefly Lounge: 4118 Pennsylvania, 816-931-3663. Open immediately after the St. Patrick’s Day parade. Enjoy dancing and DJs all day. The Foundry: 424 Westport Rd., 816-960-0866. Open at 10 a.m. Parking-lot party starts at 10 a.m. Neil McCoy concert begins after the parade, around 1 p.m., $8 cover, and goes till midnight. Fuel: 7300 W. 119th St., 913-451-0444. Specials include $2 green Bud Lights and $3 pulled pork sandwiches; cover band Stolen Winnebagos perform, 8 p.m. The Granada: 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Dumptruck Butterlips, Ashes to Immortality, Tyler Gregory, beginning at 9:30 p.m., free. The Gusto Lounge: 504 Westport Rd., 816-974-8786. 4Star, Westengrl, El Nomada, Sigrah, 9 p.m., free. Harley’s & Horses: 7210 N.E. 43rd St., 816-452-2660. Music beginning at 1 p.m. from Tropical Dreamers, Bohica, Big Deuce, the Breeze, On the Fly, Under the Covers, Supercell, and more; Reubens and corned beef and cabbage, green beer and green shot specials. The Hideout: 6948 N. Oak Tfwy., 816-468-0550. Brother Bagman at 8:30 p.m. Serving corned beef and cabbage for $7.75 all day. Imo’s Pizza: 4037 Mill, 816-931-4667. Open at 11 a.m. for lunch with several specials, including 14-inch large one-topping for $9.99 and large specialty for $15.99. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-832-1085. Kiss Me I’m Rappin’, 10 p.m., $7. KC Live! Block at the Power & Light District: 14th St. and Grand. Shamrocks & Shenanigans Festival, beginning at 11 a.m., with Patrick Lentz Band (1 p.m.), Dolewite

(3 p.m.), Noe Palma (5 p.m.) and Reel Big Fish (8 p.m.). No cover until 11 p.m., open to the public, 21 and older. Kelly’s Westport Inn: 500 Westport Rd., 816-561-5800. St. Patrick’s Day celebration, beginning at 9 a.m., $5. The Kickstand: 10817 E. Truman Rd., Independence, 816-252-2560. Brock Alexander and the Old No. 5s, 8:30 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Kansas City’s shortest parade at 6:45 p.m. The Nace Brothers, 7 p.m., and Chubby Carrier, 9:45 p.m. Lew’s Grill and Bar: 7539 Wornall, 816-444-8080. Start off with a traditional Irish breakfast at 8 a.m. Irish Hooley with Johnathan Ramsey (4–6 p.m.), DJ C-Mac, (9 p.m.–close), two bars (Lew’s and the Well). Mac’s Place: 580 S. Fourth St., Kansas City, Kan., 913-441-2636. Green beer, Jell-O shots and food specials all day. DJ dance party begins at 8 p.m.; Las Vegas trip giveaway. McCoy’s Public House: 4057 Pennsylvania, 816-960-0866. A breakfast buffet starts at 7 a.m. Parking-lot party begins at 10 a.m. Neil McCoy concert after the parade, $8 cover. Party goes until midnight. McFadden’s Sports Saloon: 1330 Grand, 816-471-1330. St. Patty’s Day Breakfast, beginning at 7 a.m. (free for the first 100 guests); green beer, leprechauns, bagpipes, games, music, giveaways and more. Mike Kelly’s Westsider: 1515 Westport Rd., 816-931-9417. Watch “Irish Sessions” (11 a.m.), Eddie Delahunt (1 p.m.), and Allied Saints (5 p.m.); corned beef and cabbage, fish and chips, Irish stew, Irish sausage, and Irish drink specials. Moxie Bar & Grill: 4011 N. Oak Tfwy., 816-455-9600. Open at 11 a.m., close at 3 a.m. Featuring $4 22-oz Guinness drafts, $2 Killian’s pints and $3 22-oz., $5 Irish car bombs, $3 Irish Viagra, and $5.99 Reuben and fries; DJ E-Rock, 10 p.m.–close. The Quaff: 1010 Broadway, 816-471-1918. DJ Chris, 7 p.m. R Bar & Restaurant: 1617 Genessee, 816-471-1777. Open at noon. Beer and bloody mary and Irish entré specials, and Irish entrée specials; Kathleen Kunkler and Frenchie with the Quattro Band, 2–5 p.m.; Phantoms of the Opry, 8–11 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Annual St. Patrick’s Day Destruction Party, 1 p.m., and Irish drink specials. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. St. Patio Show, starting at 3 p.m., $5, with performances from the F Holes, Big Cat KS, the Recessionists, the Sunflower Colonels and more. Late show begins at 10 p.m., with performances from Dry Bonnet, Dads, $3.; drink specials include $2.50 green PBR pints and tall boys, $3 Bud Light aluminum bottles, $3.50 Jameson shots, and $2 green shots. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Open at 9 a.m. Early show with Arm the Poor, Black Prez and BluntRap, $5, after the parade; late show on the patio, 9 p.m., free, with DJs Flashdance Gordon, Mike DiLeo and Trevor Shaw. Sherlock’s Underground Coffeehouse & Pub: 858 S. 291 Hwy., Liberty, 816-429-5262. Doors open at noon, free until 8:30 p.m., $5 after, with Pirate Radio host “Bo” Anderson and his lineup of bar games. Drink specials, bar snacks, party favors and finger foods. Music at 8:30 p.m. with the Scotty Boy Daniel Blues Band Tea Drops: 4111 Pennsylvania, 816-531-9600. St. Patrick’s Day specials, bubble tea, loose-leaf tea, and food. Thirsty Ernie’s Sports Bar and Grill: 1276 W. Foxwood Dr., Raymore, 816-322--2779. The Outtakes, 5–9 p.m., and DJ and dancing, 9 p.m.–close. Uptown Theater: 3700 Broadway, 816-753-8665. The Elders 10th Annual St. Patrick’s Day Hoolie, with the Driscoll School of Irish Dance, beginning at 8 p.m. Ticket prices are $23, $35, $43. Show is all-ages. The Well: 7421 Broadway, 816-361-1700. Open at 8 a.m.; Johnathan Ramsey (1–3 p.m.), Flannigan’s Right Hook (3–5:30 p.m.), the Kelihans (6–8 p.m.), and DJ Ashton Martin (9 p.m.–close). Westport: Westport Road and Pennsylvania. Official after-party of the 40th Annual Kansas City St. Patrick’s Day Parade. Westport Alley: 510 Westport Rd. The St. Pat’s Pub Crawl features Buzzard Beach, the Dark Horse Tavern, Ernie Biggs, and Harry’s Bar and Tables. Bands and DJs all day. The Silas Dogan Band (noon–2 p.m., 6–8 p.m.), the Fall Down Drunks (2–4 p.m.), and DJ Highnoone and Parle (8–11:30 p.m.). For information, call 816-561-2444. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. Kegs and Eggs, 7–10 a.m., all you can eat and drink.


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WESPORT COFFEE HOUSE Free House Coffee with any Specialty Drink KC JUICE .75 Off With Wristband GREEN ROOM BURGERS AND BEER Free Small Fries with Any Entrée JOE’S PIZZA Buy the Slice 2 Slices For $5 JERUSALEM CAFÉ $5 off Hooka TORRE’S PIZZERIA Any specialty Pizza $10 2 Slices For $4 FREAKS ON BROADWAY %10 any tattoo BEER KITCHEN Discounts with your Wristband! JERSEY DOG, HOT DOG CART 2 Jumbo Dogs $5 6:30pm-3am FridaySaturday $1 off any menu item KELLY’S WESTPORT INN $1 Off Cover ERNIE BIGG’S (PIANO BAR) 2 for 1 Cover $4 Sweet Tea Vodka RIOT ROOM $3.50 Wells

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P&L DISTRICT BAR LOUIE $3.50 Beer Specials $2 Fresh Fruit Shot FRAN’S RESTAURANT 5.99 Premium Breakfast $4 Bacardi 360 Vodka Bombs Cocktails Open 24 hours PIZZA BAR $3 Boulevard Wheat Pints MOSAIC No Cover DRUNKEN FISH Appetizers. Sushi rolls. Drinks: Zinn Martini, Asian Marry, and Madam Butterfly. MAKER’S MARK $5 Cocktails MC FADDEN’S SPORT’S $4 UV Vodka Drinks TENGO SED CANTINA $3 Eljimador Margaritas

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St. Patty’s Day

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café Net Results Beer Kitchen 435 Westport Road, 816-389-4180. Hours: 11 a.m.–11 p.m. Monday–Thursday, 11 a.m.–1 a.m. Friday and Saturday. Brunch Saturday and Sunday, 9 a.m.–4 p.m., Sunday dinner, 4–11 p.m. Price: $$ The Gaslight Grill 5020 West 137th Street, Leawood, 913-897-3540. Hours: 5–9 p.m. Monday and Tuesday, 5–10 p.m. Wednesday–Saturday, Sunday brunch 10 a.m.– 2 p.m., Sunday dinner 5–9 p.m. Price: $$–$$$ Captain D’s 6308 Troost, 816-523-0499. Hours: 10:45 a.m.– 10 p.m. Sunday–Thursday, 10:45 a.m.–11 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Price: $–$$ Queen Lizzy’s Fish and Chip Shop 125 East 10th Street, Lawrence, 785-856-5570. Hours: 11:30 a.m.–10 p.m. Tuesday–Saturday. Closed Sunday and Monday. Price: $–$$

W

hen Ray Kroc introduced the McDonald’s Filet-O-Fish sandwich nationwide in 1963, he was just finding a new way to market one of the oldest “fast food” dishes in the world. The English had been buying take-away orders of fried fish and potatoes, often served wrapped in newspapers, since the early 19th century. There’s a reference to the dish in Charles Dickens’ Oliver Twist, published in 1838. Fish and chips have never enjoyed the same iconic status in the United States, and the dish’s popularity has traced a distinctly roller-coaster-like arc in landlocked Kansas City. BY Here, after all, “fresh fish” CHARLES has usually meant catfish or maybe trout. Well into the F E R R U Z Z A 1970s, local menus that offered “seafood” used that suspect phrase as an umbrella description for catches that had been in dry dock for some time: shrimp that went from freezer to deep fryer, maybe a bit of sole thawed and poached. The 1976 Menu Guide of Kansas City doesn’t list a single fish-and-chips dish on any of the 94 restaurant menus reproduced in the book. (Several restaurants, including the American and Jasper’s, did offer frogs’ legs, a delicacy that has definitely fallen out of favor over the last 35 years. You can still order them fried — with french fries — at the Savoy Grill, among a few other places.) That ’70s decade was, however, a boom time for fast-food fish and chips, served with only the most tenuous links to the British staple. The three leading fried-fish purveyors of the era — Long John Silver’s, Arthur Treacher’s Fish & Chips and Captain D’s — were all founded in 1969, at the end of a British-crazed decade (the Beatles, the Rolling Stones, Carnaby Street,

2

THE PITCH

M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X

ANGELA C. BOND

COD IS IN THE DETAILS WHEN WHAT YOU CRAVE IS A PLATE OF FISH AND CHIPS.

Above, Beer Kitchen’s battered cape capensis; at right, Queen Lizzy’s English-proper cod

Twiggy, Vidal Sassoon). By the time compact discs began to replace records and cassettes, many of the chains’ franchises had sunk to a watery grave. A more upscale version of fish and chips later became a fixture on pub menus, not least because it’s a relatively cheap and easy dish to prepare. The breaded fish fillet and the fries can be dumped in the same deep fryer as the mozzarella sticks and chicken fingers and “toasted” ravioli. Sometimes it tastes better than the deep-fried square of flash-frozen, prepackaged breaded pollock offered — with a half-slice of processed American cheese — at McDonald’s. And sometimes not. Either way, it’s not very good for you and isn’t supposed to be. Even the lightest crusts and least greasy mound of fries assault the arteries like a pirate ship. It’s generally agreed that the best fish to use in this dish is flaky, mild-tasting cod. But cod — once a cheaper white fish — has become more expensive, thanks to aggressive overfishing in the Atlantic. So more and more chefs are using alternatives, such as cape capensis (also known as hake), fished off the coast of southwestern Africa. “What’s not to like about it?” says chef Michael Peterson, who likes the fact that cape capensis holds together better in the deep fryer and has more fat than cod. “A higher fat count means a more moist and flaky fried fish,” he says. Peterson won’t take credit for the delicious fried fish served at Beer Kitchen, the Foundry and McCoy’s. The best-seller is the creation pitch.com

of chef Mark Kelpe, and it calls for some kind of house-brewed ale; Beer Kitchen’s batter uses McCoy’s Landing Light lager and also has bits of cilantro, which McCoy’s skips. At the Foundry, the fish has a touch of roasted garlic and parsley. In any of its incarnations, it’s a gloriously light and crunchy fried fish, greatly enhanced by the house-made “chips”: hand-cut Idaho russet-burbank spuds brined overnight in cold salt water and vinegar and never over-fried. Peterson’s malt-vinegar aioli complements fish and chip both. Booze also plays a major role in what may be the most expensive plate of fried fish and chips in the city: the $22 champagne-battered cod at the Gaslight Grill in Leawood. This isn’t just any old cod, mind you. It’s fresh from Georges Bank, a famous Cape Cod fishing area for 400 years. For all the fuss with the fish, though, the fries aren’t cut on-site pitch.com

— they’re just the standard frozen variety. At least the hoity-toity fish can be dipped in a house-made tartar sauce, flavored with chives. An additional $5 at Gaslight Grill lets diners upgrade their fish and chips with a battered diver scallop and a jumbo shrimp, adding up to the ritziest Captain D’s platter ever. Of course, you could always just go to Captain D’s, where $5.29 gets you the Fish ’n Fry Combo. At the faux “New England”-style outpost at 6308 Troost last week, my combo included two skinny battered pollock fillets, each about the width of a Dollar General hair comb; two hush puppies (the most boring and unnecessarily fried doughy balls ever created); and a mound of lukewarm fries, all served on a shiny black-plastic plate. If that’s your bag, ask for it in a bag — to go. The Troost Captain D’s has an ambience best summed up in a single continued on page 26 MARCH 15-21, 2012

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continued from page 25

From top: Gaslight Grill’s Cape Cod cod

word: not. It’s not particularly friendly, not very and Captain D’s fried pollock clean (the place has aged badly over two de“When the fish is gone,” Nicholas said, cades), and not even really a bargain. And don’t get me started about anyplace that requires me “we’re closed.” “During Lent?” I asked. to pump my own condiments into white paper Nicholas looked at me quizzically. “It’s cups. Even Oliver Twist didn’t have to do that. After that, I needed a more traditional, already Lent?” Ninety percent of Poulton’s sales are fish and English-style fish-and-chippery dinner. I figured I’d find it at Matt Poulton’s six-month-old chips, which means that the restaurant closes Queen Lizzy’s Fish and Chips, in Lawrence. immediately after the day’s last cod fillet plops Poulton, a cheery native of Surrey, England, into the fryer. Having eaten the fish and chips, I’m not sure I’d want anything moved to this college town else. The signature dish here with his wife and decided Beer Kitchen is damn good. Poulton batters that what it really needed Fish & chips ................. $14 his generous hunks of cod in a was, he told me, “a proper mixture of egg, flour and Fosfish-and-chip shop.” There Gaslight Grill ter’s Southwick Ale. His fries, are other dishes on the Fish and chips .............. $22 before frying, are hand-cut and menu, including sausage brined in water, vinegar and rolls, sliders and battered Captain D’s what Poulton says is his own chicken strips. Fish ’n Fry combo ..... $5.29 special seasoning mixture. The I walked into the twoQueen Lizzy’s Fish results are outstanding. story restaurant at 7:15 p.m. and Chip Shop Poulton pushed a bowl on a recent Friday, and the Fish-and-chips of the traditional dish called first thing I overheard was dinner .................... $10.50 “mushy peas” at me. I couldn’t Poulton telling Nicholas, the take more than a taste — they bearded, skinny waiter on were too, well, mushy. duty, that only a handful of “This is how the queens in England eat,” he fish orders remained. Without looking at the menu, I buttonholed Nicholas and laid claim to said. The queens around here do it differently, one of the in-demand dinners. Then I sat down but I’d send a footman back to Lawrence for at an uncomfortable window counter, took a more of Lizzy’s fish and chips. sip of water and looked up as he switched off the neon “open” sign. Have a suggestion for a restaurant “I thought the restaurant stayed open until The Pitch should review? 10 tonight,” I said. E-mail charles.ferruzza@pitch.com


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SMOKIN GUNS BBQ & CATERING 1218 Swift Avenue | 816-221-2535 smokingunsbbq.com $6.95 Lunch Special WESTPORT | MIDTOWN | PLAZA THE BROOKSIDER SPORTS BAR & GRILL 6300 Brookside Plaza 816-363-4070 Brooksider Value Meal: 1/4lb. Black Angus Beef burger, w/ or w/o cheese, chips or fries & your choice of any drink just $4.99. GENGHIS KHAN 816-753-3600 All you care to eat Mongolian BBQ Business lunch WESTPORT FLEA MARKET 817 Westport Rd | 816-931-1986 westportfleamarket.com 1/2 Price Burgers & Alcohol Sunday 8pm-Clo WHEAT STATE PIZZA 2820 W. 47th Ave | 913-281-9000 Large Specialty Pizza for $12.99 atering, Delivery, Dine In and Carry Out NORTHLAND MAZATLAN 5525 NW 64th St | 816-746-1225 mazatlankcmo.webstarts.com Freshly made Lunch and Dinner Spedials. Monday through Friday. Happy Hour Every Day!

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MARCH 15-21, 2012

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music

Music Forecast 32 Concerts 35 Nightlife

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Riot Grrrl Reincarnate EMA STOPS THROUGH ON TOUR FOR PAST LIFE MARTYRED SAINTS.

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aw, harrowing, confrontational, but also quite beautiful, Past Life Martyred Saints by EMA was one of the artistic highlights of 2011. Its creator, Erika M. Anderson (formerly of the psych-folk band Gowns), is a 6-foot blonde who grew up in South Dakota, migrated to Los BY Angeles, then started hanging around Portland, Oregon. The D AV I D Pitch recently had a pleasant H U D N A L L conversation with Anderson, made somewhat uncomfortable only by the obviousness of the fact that we have a huge crush on her. The Pitch: So you’re gearing up for another tour right now. How many people are you bringing along? Anderson: Yeah, this will probably be the last headlining tour on this record, I think. We were just discussing that. Probably take some time after this tour to try and write some more stuff. There’s four of us doing the tour. I found myself trying to describe EMA to someone the other day, and I ended up just saying you were kind of like PJ Harvey. Then I felt really lame about it because I was comparing you with another female performer. Do you find that those reductive gender comparisons happen a lot? Of course, yeah, that happens all the time. I don’t know, I guess it’s just funny. People have a hard time — you know, I think PJ Harvey is great. So some of those comparisons are really nice, but I don’t know how accurate they are when it comes to the actual sonics of what I do. And a lot of people — maybe not music journalists but a lot of people — can only name maybe five female rock artists. So it becomes like, Does she sound like Cat Power or PJ Harvey? Were there female musicians or other female artists whom you were exposed to growing up who made you think you could do rock music? Oh, totally: Babes in Toyland, Hole, Bikini Kill, Sleater Kinney, PJ Harvey, Cat Power. All five of the female rock musicians most people can name. [Laughs.] Was there Riot Grrrl in South Dakota? Not really. But I was maybe one of the only — a bunch of boys used to call me Riot Girl. So maybe I was South Dakota’s lone Riot Grrrl for a while. You’re playing bigger venues now, and the 28

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record has been well-reviewed. What do you think helped put you over the top? Well, I mean, I started working with kind of a proper label [Souterrain Transmissions]. It’s still an indie, so it’s not like Warner Bros. or anything, but it helps to have people working with you who aren’t just, you know, mailing things out from their house or whatever. Was there a moment when you felt like you had started to break through with larger audiences? It’s hard for me to think about where I sit as far as how well known I am, you know? It’s hard for me to think about, and I probably try not to think about it too much. But there were a couple things. The first time through New York, we sold out two shows in one day. Selling out shows in New York and London was pretty cool. Will you do the next release on Souterrain? Probably, at least over in Europe. This is the first record they’d released in the U.S., and in some ways, it makes a lot of sense to do global stuff. And I tend to do better in Europe than in the States. Gowns also seemed like maybe it was bigger in Europe. Why do you think that is? pitch.com

Yeah, I don’t know. They’re more into arty shit over there, maybe? I don’t want to diss on America or anything. [Laughs.] Cool. Well, I guess that’s all I’ve got for you. I’ll tell you one thing. The first time I ate a fish burrito was when my friend and I got really drunk at a Rasputina concert in Kansas City. We met this weird goth guy who wore too much Drakkar Noir, and we were pretty wasted and we went to some drive-thru fishtaco and burrito place. Pancho’s? I don’t know, maybe. It was life-changing. I still remember that burrito. It was, like, 10 years ago. So that’s my Kansas City story. EMA, Wednesday, March 21, at the Riot Room.

The Young Elder

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ast week’s private RecordBar performance by the Elders was a trial run of sorts. It not only was a chance for the band’s family and friends to see the six-piece Celtic-rock band away from the usual Guinness-fueled festival atmosphere, but also was an opportunity to pitch.com

EMA: South Dakota’s lone Riot Grrrl

witness the debut of the band’s newest member, Kian Byrne. “I’m about to have a heart attack,” frontman Ian Byrne said. There was no medical emergency — Byrne was talking about the band not having played in months. But the front line of this act is made up of people in their 50s. The Elders remain one of the city’s biggest draws, with a name that’s starting to look a little more literal, a fact made more visible with the addition of Ian Byrne’s 25-year-old son. The Elders’ elders still play fiercely enough to make you worry that they might give young Kian his own heart attack. At this gig, the drummer stayed sweaty and furrow-browed. His mother, WDAF Channel 4 news anchor Kathy Quinn, tells the story of being pregnant with her firstborn son in Ireland while she was selling tickets at one of her husband’s shows. “I could feel Kian keeping the beat while the band played ‘My Sharona,’ ” she says. “Kian is a natural drummer. It’s his way of communicating.” Like her son, Quinn was born into a family steeped in rich musical continued on page 30 M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X

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NOW OPEN

continued from page 28

and cultural traditions. “My mother used to dress me up like a leprechaun and make me play my violin for the camera when I was really little,” Kian recalls. “Kian is a young lad with an old soul,” Ian Byrne says. “He’s been pals with all the members of the band for a very long time. He’s half our age but he’s definitely bringing a new dynamic to the band.” His dad’s band and others: Kian also plays bass in the rocksteady ska band New Riddim and fiddle for the Americana outfit the Grisly Hand. “With Kian being a multi-instrumentalist, it’s going to provide the band more flexibility,” Ian says. “We are very lucky to have Kian in the band with us. I’ve been touring for so long and I’ve been away from my kids. Now I get to take him on the road with me. It’s going to be a blast.” “Irish music has always been a part of my family and life,” Kian says. “Like learning the violin at the age of 3. It’s something I have to do. It’s cool, though — I like it. The Elders definitely aren’t the Pogues, and we don’t do ‘Danny Boy.’ Ever.” Despite his heritage, Kian is more of a PBRin-a-can guy than a Guinness man. “The Irish,” he starts and then trails off for a moment. “They can get funny. It embarrasses me sometimes when it gets too Irish. When you’re not in Ireland, it can get too Irish too quick.” —BERRY ANDERSON

Johnson County’s

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The Elders, Saturday, March 17, from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Beaumont Club’s Back Yard and at 8 p.m. at the Uptown Theater.

12056 W. 135th St. OPKS 913-239-9666

THE B’DINAS Morning Party (self-released) Context: Bluesy girl group (plus one guy) gets vaguely psychedelic on its second EP. Lowlight: The clunky vocals and jam-band-lite aesthetics of “Postman, Please Don’t.” Highlight: The final minute and a half of opener “Five Day Weekend,” which fries itself into a joyously berserk crescendo. Nice touch: The CD is designed to look like a rainbow-sprinkled doughnut. Best lyric: I’ve got 12 brothers, and they’re all named Jake/We rented a speedboat, and went to the lake. Conclusion: More weird psych jams, less hackneyed blues progressions. Listen: music.thebdinas.com

E-mail berry.anderson@pitch.com

C D R E V I E WS the most fun you can have running

K

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ela

y da

Ap

y ru

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Su n

th 18 ANNUAL

a ,K ril 1nsas City, MO to Lawrence lo or r , 2012 o • 44 mile s

NOTHING BY NO ONE Nothing By No One

•Start: Boulevard Brewery

2501 Southwest Blvd. KC MO • 6 am to 10 am Post Race Party: Liberty Hall 644 Massachusetts St. Lawrence, KS • 12 pm to 5 pm

THE COURSE follows relatively traffic free roads and paths near the KAW. TEAMS of 1 to 10 runners share 10 legs each. AGE AND SEX GRADED. At the end, $12 buys a nice DINNER WITH BEER from the free state brewery and Boulevard. START TIMES: solos at 6:00, elite at 10, military teams at 9, six leg special teams at 9:30 All others request a time! PACKET PICKUP CHOICE - Garry Gribble’s Running Sports, Ward Parkway Shopping Center, OR the GGRS store in Lawrence on Massachusetts. PPU IS SATURDAY MARCH 30 NOON TO 6:00. CHARITY DONATION: All runners must donate a minimum of $10 to the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. Teams giving $200 or more eligible for the Generous Division (1 min extra handicap for each $10 given) TEAM CAR MUST DISPLAY TEAM NUMBER., EXTRA CAR FEE $10 SHORT SLEEVE TEES $7, LONG SLEEVE TECH SHIRTS $10, HATS $6

This Race Fills Up Fast, Don’t be Left Out!

AWARDS: 1st scratch & 1st adjusted male & female solo plus clay medallions for solo & pairs. 1st scratch team, 1st adjusted ladies team, 1st adjusted generous team, Dead Last Team. Mike Ott 1st adjusted team, 1st adjusted military team, Jack Boyer Spirit Award, 6 leg adjusted team. A Kansas City Track Club event to benefit the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation.

Volunteers Get Choice of Garment and Eat Free!

sign up on line at www.brewtobrew.com or call 816-228-3842, 816-679-8185

30

THE PITCH

MARCH 15-21, 2012

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T H E G R I S LY H A N D Western Avenue EP (self-released) Context: A four-song EP of backwoods bootstompers from the folk-rock darlings Highlight: The title track, with its buoyant vocal harmonies and Waylon Jennings echoes (“The Wurlitzer Prize,” especially), is the finest song the Grisly Hand has recorded to date. Conclusion: “Black Coffee,” a clattering oldtimey Americana tune, is the only other new song on Western Avenue. Half the EP is, thus, covers: a soulful, twangy version of Radiohead’s “Been Thinking About You” and a faithful tribute to “Still Feeling Blue” by Gram Parsons. More originals, please. Listen: music.thegrislyhand.com 2

THE PITCH

M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X

(self-released) Context: Chris Copp is a rapper who lives in Auburn, Kansas, which is just southwest of Topeka, according to Google Maps; he’s also half of a hip-hop group called the Blos. Copp sings and raps on Nothing By No One, and the other dude in the Blos makes the beats. Vibe: Part eerie electronica, part backpacker rap, part nu-metal melodrama. Nice touch: The bleak, gray, vacant cover corresponds nicely to the name of the project, and to my preconceptions about what life is like in Auburn, Kansas. Conclusion: Legitimately unlike anything I’ve ever heard. If Linkin Park doing a remix of a post-Kid A Radiohead track sounds like something you’re interested in, then hit up Nothing By No One’s Facebook page for a download link. — DAVID HUDNALL E-mail david.hudnall@pitch.com pitch.com


pitch.com

MARCH 15-21, 2012

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music forecast

Clockwise from left: Jane’s Addiction, Chuck Prophet and Sleepy Sun

Kepi Ghoulie, with Kevin Seconds, Long Shadows and Bent Left Something about watching former Groovie Ghoulies frontman Kepi Ghoulie perform inspires a kind of fervent joy. The shows are like celebrations of friendship. And who wouldn’t want to be friends with a guy who paints pictures of bats with swords and sings songs about monsters having parties? Ghoulie leads pop-punk campfire sing-alongs with titles like “The Beast With Five Hands”; you’ll know the words after one go-through of the chorus, so there’s no excuse not to join in. Friday, March 16, at the Replay Lounge (946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676)

Sleepy Sun, with the Soft White Sixties Spine Hits, the forthcoming album from psychedelic Californians Sleepy Sun, marks the band’s first full-length since the departure of vocalist Rachel Fannan. It remains to be seen whether singer Bret Constantino can fully execute without Fannan’s primal howl to harmonize with.

But the band’s trademark fuzzed-out instrumentation remains, so you can count on having your mind pretty well blown by night’s end. Tuesday, March 20, at RecordBar (1020 Westport Road, 816-753-5207)

We Were Promised Jetpacks, with Bad Veins and New Cassettes A tuneful exuberance seems almost intrinsic to much of the rock coming from Scotland, and We Were Promised Jetpacks is no exception. Rather than the twee sounds of fellow countrymen Belle & Sebastian or the emotional indie rock of Frightened Rabbit, the band glories in the wide-open pop favored by the likes of Aztec Camera or Big Country. Tuesday, March 20, at the Riot Room (4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179)

Jane’s Addiction

’90s alt-funk band and the solo exploits of Perry Farrell and Dave Navarro. The bottom line is that they’re at the Uptown Friday, and Navarro will be strutting around the stage wearing ass-hugging pants and no shirt. They’re touring on their most recent release, 2011’s The Great Escape Artist. Friday, March 16, at the Uptown Theater (3700 Broadway, 816-753-8665)

Chuck Prophet, with the Grisly Hand I wasn’t aware of Chuck Prophet until about a month ago, when reviews of his latest album, Temple Beautiful, coincided with some recommendations from friends. How did I miss this dude? He apparently has been making smart, thoroughly American rock records since the mid-’80s. It’s like discovering a whole new Tom Petty or something. Incredible. Tuesday, March 20, at Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club (3402 Main, 816-753-1909)

Jane’s Addiction has reunited? Or something? It’s hard to keep up with the iterations of the

FO R ECAST K EY BY D AV I D H U D N A L L

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...................................Pick of the Week

......................................... Huge Guitars

................................Aging Ungracefully

.................................. Punks Screaming

................................. Shitty Band Name

.................. Great American Songwriter

.........................................Ghoulishness

............................Glaswegian Melodies

........................................... Who Cares?

........................................Weed-Friendly

.......................................I Love the ’90s

........................................ Shirtless Man

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THE PITCH

MARCH 15-21, 2012

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concerts Nightlife listings are offered as a service to Pitch readers and are subject to space restrictions. Contact Clubs Editor Abbie Stutzer by e-mail (abbie.stutzer@pitch .com), fax (816-756-0502) or phone (816-218-6926). Continuing items must be resubmitted monthly.

THIS WEEK THURSDAY, MARCH 15 Galactic: Liberty Hall, 644 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1972. Helicopter Showdown: 8 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Stoney LaRue, Ashley Ray: 8 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456.

FRIDAY, MARCH 16 Darcus: 8:30 p.m. The Blue Room, 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. Jane’s Addiction, Black Box Revelation: Uptown Theater, 3700 Broadway, 816-753-8665. Kevin Seconds, Kepi Ghoulie, Long Shadows, Bent Left: 10 p.m. Replay Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Whitechapel, Miss May I, After the Burial, the Plot in You, Structures: 6:30 p.m. The Beaumont Club, 4050 Pennsylvania, 816-561-2560. Wrecking Ball, Cookie Monsta, Bare, Dieselboy: 7:30 p.m. The Midland, 1228 Main, 816-283-9900.

SATURDAY, MARCH 17 Jason Aldean, Luke Bryan, Lauren Alaina: 7:30 p.m., $26.50, $51.25. Sprint Center, 1407 Grand, 816-283-7300.

SUNDAY, MARCH 1 8 Ott: The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390.

MONDAY, MARCH 19 AU: 10 p.m. Replay Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Talkdemonic, the Mynabirds, Big Harp: 9 p.m. Jackpot Music Hall, 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-832-1085.

TUESDAY, MARCH 20 Prince Rama, Psychic Ills: 9 p.m. Jackpot Music Hall, 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-832-1085. Chuck Prophet and the Mission Express, the Grisly Hand: Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club, 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Sleepy Sun, the Soft White Sixties: 9 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. We Were Promised Jetpacks, Bad Veins, New Cassettes: 8 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Rachael Yamagata, Madi Diaz: The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390.

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 21 Dan Baird and Homemade Sin, Outlaw Jim and the Whiskey Benders: 8 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Communion, Ben Howard, the Staves, Nathaniel Rateliff, Bear’s Den: 9:30 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. EMA: The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Mansions on the Moon: The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Mindless Self Indulgence, Hyro Da Hero, Ventana: 7 p.m. The Beaumont Club, 4050 Pennsylvania, 816-561-2560.

UPCOMING The All-American Rejects: Wed., April 4. The Beaumont Club, 4050 Pennsylvania, 816-561-2560. Bassnectar, VibeSquaD: Thu., April 12, 8 p.m. The Midland, 1228 Main, 816-283-9900.

Beats Antique: Fri., April 6. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Andrew Bird, Eugene Mirman: Fri., March 23. Uptown Theater, 3700 Broadway, 816-753-8665. Borgore: Sun., April 8. Liberty Hall, 644 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1972. Bowling for Soup, Patent Pending, Fresh Man: Wed., April 18. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Buckethead, That 1 Guy, Wolff & Tuba: Fri., April 20. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Jimmy Buffett and the Coral Reefer Band: Sat., April 21. Sprint Center, 1407 Grand, 816-283-7300. Cake: Fri., April 20. Uptown Theater, 3700 Broadway, 816-753-8665. Glen Campbell: Thu., April 26. Uptown Theater, 3700 Broadway, 816-753-8665. Adam Carolla: Fri., March 30, 8 p.m. Uptown Theater, 3700 Broadway, 816-753-8665. Childish Gambino, Danny Brown: Tue., April 3. The Beaumont Club, 4050 Pennsylvania, 816-561-2560. Cults: Sat., April 14. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. David Hasselhoff on Acid, Cherokee Rock Rifle, Waiting for Signal, Humans, Versus the Collective, Opossum Trot: Sat., April 14, 6 p.m. The Beaumont Club, 4050 Pennsylvania, 816-561-2560. Dayglow: world’s largest paint party Sat., March 31. Uptown Theater, 3700 Broadway, 816-753-8665. DrFameus: Tue., April 17, 8 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483. Electric Six, Aficionado, Andy D: Mon., April 2. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483. Experience Hendrix tribute tour: Wed., March 28, 8 p.m. The Midland, 1228 Main, 816-283-9900. Jim Gaffigan: Thu., March 22, 7 & 9:30 p.m. The Midland, 1228 Main, 816-283-9900. Hot Chelle Rae, Electric Touch: Tue., May 1, 7 p.m. The Midland, 1228 Main, 816-283-9900. Leo Kottke: Fri., April 6. Uptown Theater, 3700 Broadway, 816-753-8665. Lady Antebellum: Fri., April 6. Sprint Center, 1407 Grand, 816-283-7300. Lisa Lampanelli: Sat., March 24. Uptown Theater, 3700 Broadway, 816-753-8665. Leftover Salmon: Thu., April 12. Liberty Hall, 644 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1972. Los Lonely Boys: Sun., April 29. VooDoo Lounge, Harrah’s Casino, 1 Riverboat Dr., North Kansas City, 816-472-7777. The Naked and Famous: Tue., April 17. The Midland, 1228 Main, 816-283-9900. Plush: Thu., April 5, 7 p.m. Jackpot Music Hall, 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-832-1085. Portugal. The Man, the Lonely Forest: Mon., April 30, 7 p.m. The Beaumont Club, 4050 Pennsylvania, 816-561-2560. Real Estate, the Twerps: Sat., April 28, 8 p.m., $13, $15. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483. Sabaton, Ancient Creation: Thu., April 19. The Midland, 1228 Main, 816-283-9900. School of Seven Bells, Exitmusic, Clock People: Sun., April 15, 8 p.m., $8, $10. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Snow Patrol: Tue., April 24, 7 p.m. The Beaumont Club, 4050 Pennsylvania, 816-561-2560. Split Lip Rayfield, Bright Light Social Hour, Red Eye Gravy: Sat., April 7, 8 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483. Stoned Coe Picnic: David Allan Coe, Levee Town, Mary Bridget Davies: Fri., April 20. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Paul Thorn and Ruthie Foster: Wed., March 28. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Daniel Tosh: Sun., April 22, 7 & 9:30 p.m. Municipal Auditorium/Music Hall, 301 W. 13th St., 816-513-5000. Treasure Fingers: Fri., April 13. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. White Rabbits: Tue., April 3, 8 p.m. Jackpot Music Hall, 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-832-1085. Woods, MMOSS: Wed., April 25, 8 p.m. Jackpot Music Hall, 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-832-1085. Yonder Mountain String Band: Thu., March 29. Liberty Hall, 644 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1972. Young the Giant, Grouplove: Fri., March 30. The Midland, 1228 Main, 816-283-9900.

MON: RU RAL GRI T WED: 3.1 & KARAOKE 4 INSOM FO NIAC SAT: 3.17 ST PAT’S LKLORE 8PM BRICK BL MON: 3.1 ARNEY STONEDFAST 9AM 2PM 9 KARAO KELLY BLKE W/ EACH FRI: 3.23 NEW RID MAXX POW DIM SAT: 3.25 ER & LIGHT PROJE MILES BCT H, ONNEY

pitch.com MMOANRTCHH X1 X–X 5 - 2 1X, , 2200102 X t ThHe E p Pi It TcChH 35 pitch.com 1


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CZAR 1531 Grand Boulevard KC,MO 816- 221-2244 czarkc.com FUEL 7300 W. 119th St OP,KS 913-451-0444 fuelkc.com KNUCKLEHEADS 2715 Rochester KC,MO 816-483-1456 knuckleheadskc.com THE LEVEE 16 W. 43rd St KC,MO 816-561-5565 thelevee.net LUCKY BREWGRILLE 5401 Johnson Dr Mission, KS 913-403-8571 luckybrewgrille.com

R BAR & RESTAURANT 1617 Genessee Street KC,MO 816-471-1777 rbarkc.com RECORD BAR 1020 Westport Road KC,MO 816-753-5207 therecordbar.com

T H U R S DAY 1 5 EVERY WEDNESDAY Lonnie Ray Blues Band EVERY THURSDAY Live Reggae with AZ One FRIDAY, MARCH 16 Groove Agency -10:00 pm SATURDAY, MARCH 17 Camp Harlow - 5 pm Groove Agency - 10 pm NIGHTLY SPECIALS

FOOD AND DRINK

PATIO & DECK BANQUET & PRIVATE PARTY FACILITY

77 South: 5041 W. 135th St., Leawood, 913-742-7727. DJ Mike Watts.

ACOUSTIC Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Jared Bond, Tim Yorke, Root and Stem, 6 p.m. Sidecar at the Beaumont Club: 4050 Pennsylvania, 816-561-2560. Sidecar Acoustic Nights with Brandon Phillips, Anthony Ladesich, 8 p.m.

JAZZ

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The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. Elderstatesmen of Jazz, 7 p.m. R Bar & Restaurant: 1617 Genessee, 816-471-1777. Open Mic with Brian Ruskin. Take Five Coffee + Bar: 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park, 913-948-5550. The New KC Seven with Kerry Strayer.

WORLD North Kansas City Public Library: 2251 Howell, North Kansas City, 816-221-3360. Kelly, 7 p.m.

WED-FRI: LUNCH @ 11AM TUE: SERVING DINNER FOR MARK LOWERY PRESENTS KITCHEN OPEN FOR HAPPY HOUR/DINNER THUR-SAT

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WHERE TRADITION MEETS FUSION

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Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Grand Marquis. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Jimmie Bratcher, 7 p.m. Mike Kelly’s Westsider: 1515 Westport Rd., 816-9319417. Lonnie Ray Blues Jam. Trouser Mouse: 625 N.W. Mock Ave., Blue Springs, 816220-1222. Scratch Track.

DJ

Dinner Show 8pm & Cocktail Show 10pm

the pitch

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL

Browne’s Irish Market: 3300 Pennsylvania, 816-5610030. Three Dollar Band, 6 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. The 44s, in the Retro Lounge, 7:30 p.m.

now hiring!

Thur 3/22 Fri 3/23 Sat 3/24 Sat 3/31

36

Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. Solid Gold Easy. The Eighth Street Taproom: 801 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-6918. La Guerre, Monster, 1,000,000 Light Years. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785749-7676. The Puritans, the Magentlemen.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS

RIOT ROOM 4048 Broadway KC,MO 816-442-8177 theriotroom.com

77 SOUTH 5041 W. 135th St. Leawood, KS 913-742-7727 77south.net

ROCK/POP/INDIE

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DRUNKEN DISTR ACTIONS/COMEDY/ BAR GAMES Bleachers Bar & Grill: 210 S.W. Greenwich Dr., Lee’s Summit, 816-623-3410. Ladies’ Night. Bulldog: 1715 Main, 816-421-4799. Brodioke, 9 p.m. Buzzard Beach: 4110 Pennsylvania, 816-753-4455. Trivia, Ladies’ Night, 7 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. Aries Spears, 8 p.m. Lucky Brewgrille: 5401 Johnson Dr., Mission, 913-4038571. March Madness, 11 a.m. Michael’s Lakewood Pub: N. 291 Hwy. and Lakewood Blvd., Lee’s Summit, 816-350-7300. DJ Pure, beer pong. Thirsty Ernie’s: 1276 W. Foxwood Dr., Raymore, 816322-2779. Karaoke, 9 p.m.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Double T’s Roadhouse: 1421 Merriam Ln., Kansas City, Kan., 913-432-5555. Blues Jam hosted by RocknRick’s Boogie Leggin’ Blues Band, 7 p.m. Harleys & Horses: 7210 N.E. 43rd St., 816-452-2660. Open Jam with JD Summers featuring Jeremy Butcher and the Bail Jumpers. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 302 S.W. Main, Lee’s Summit, 816525-1871. Jerry’s Jam Night, 9 p.m.

VARIET Y Jerry’s Bait Shop: 302 S.W. Main, Lee’s Summit, 816-525-1871. Gareth Pearson, Ewan Dobson, Craig D’Andrea, Ryan Spendlove, 8 p.m.

F R I DAY 1 6 ROCK/POP/INDIE Aftershock Bar & Grill: 5240 Merriam Dr., Merriam, 913-384-5646. Banzai Awards XXII.

The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785841-5483. Louder Than Bombs. The Brooksider: 6330 Brookside Plz., 816-363-4070. Sellout. Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. Filthy 13, Thee Devotion. Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Eric Sommer, the Allen Wrench Trio, Troy Meiss, 9 p.m. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-7531909. Zsa Zsa Ketzner, Jah Wheel, Shedding Watts, Dr. Wizard, Sri Yantra. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. The Hilary Watts Riot, the Latenight Callers, Dollar Fox, 9 p.m.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. KoolAide & the Exact Change Band. The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. Darcus, 8:30 p.m. Clarette Club: 5400 Martway, Mission, 913-384-0986. JC the New King of Funk. The Hideout: 6948 N. Oak Tfwy., 816-468-0550. The Groove Pilots. MANY MORE Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816531-5556. Valency. Ophelia’s: 201 N. Main, Independence, 816-4614525. Mama Ray. The Riot Room: 4048 ONLINE AT Broadway, 816-442-8179. PITCH.COM Scratch Track, Danny Barnes, Lauren Price. Trouser Mouse: 625 N.W. Mock Ave., Blue Springs, 816220-1222. Doghouse Daddies, the Rumblejetts.

FIND

CLUB LISTINGS

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS Bar West: 7174 Renner Rd., Shawnee, 913-248-9378. The Outlaw Junkies.

DJ The Quaff: 1010 Broadway, 816-471-1918. DJ Chris. Saints Pub + Patio: 9720 Quivira, Lenexa, 913-4923900. DJ Naylor. Thirsty Ernie’s: 1276 W. Foxwood Dr., Raymore, 816322-2779. DJ B. More and dancing.

JAZZ EBT Restaurant: 1310 Carondelet (I-435 and State Line), 816-942-8870. Candace Evans, 6 p.m. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-2211888. The Stan Kessler Quartet.

DRUNKEN DISTR ACTIONS/COMEDY/ BAR GAMES Bleachers Bar & Grill: 210 S.W. Greenwich Dr., Lee’s Summit, 816-623-3410. Karaoke, DJ, drink specials. Cronin’s Bar and Grill: 12227 W. 87th Pkwy., Lenexa, 913-322-1000. Karaoke with Jim Bob, 9 p.m. Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. The Early Girlie Show, 8 p.m.; Ab Fab Fridays on the main floor, 10 p.m. MoJo’s Bar & Grill: 1513 S.W. Hwy. 7, Blue Springs. Happy hour, free pool, 4-6 p.m. Retro Downtown Drinks & Dance: 1518 McGee, 816421-4201. Trivia Riot, 7 p.m.

S AT U R DAY 17 ROCK/POP/INDIE Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. The Dirt Kings, the Yellowbricks, Snake Bite, 9 p.m. Danny’s Bar and Grill: 13350 College Blvd., Lenexa, 913-345-9717. Ruby Shoes. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-7531909. Bohannons, Stonecutters. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 302 S.W. Main, Lee’s Summit, 816525-1871. The Shanks, 9 p.m. Michael’s Lakewood Pub: N. 291 Hwy. and Lakewood Blvd., Lee’s Summit, 816-350-7300. Night Shot.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL The Levee: 16 W. 43rd St., 816-561-2821. The Groove Agency, 10 p.m. Trouser Mouse: 625 N.W. Mock Ave., Blue Springs, 816220-1222. Four Fried Chickens and a Coke, 9 p.m.

DJ The Eighth Street Taproom: 801 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-6918. Gold Label Soul. The Quaff: 1010 Broadway, 816-471-1918. DJ Chris.

ACOUSTIC Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. Famous Seamus and the Travelbongs dinner show, 7 p.m.


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MARCH 15-21, 2012

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37


JAZZ The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. James Ward Band, Angela Ward, 8:30 p.m. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. The Garrett Nordstrom Situation, 7 p.m.

VARIET Y Nica’s 320: 320 Southwest Blvd., 816-471-2900. KC Society of Burlesque, $15; dinner show 8 p.m., and cocktail show 10 p.m..

S U N DAY 1 8 ROCK/POP/INDIE Aftershock Bar & Grill: 5240 Merriam Dr., Merriam, 913-384-5646. Janus, Second Signal, Mason City, Years Past, Astral Fifty, Surefire Method. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785749-7676. Bare Wires, K-Holes, Bezoar, 10 p.m.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Lee McBee and the Confessors. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Dan Bliss. Trouser Mouse: 625 N.W. Mock Ave., Blue Springs, 816220-1222. Salty Dawg.

DJ The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Plastic Plates with Brent Tactic, Mike DiLeo, Marvin Gardens, LC, Bill Pile, Secret Musik, Andrew Sinclair, Avant Garde.

JAZZ The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Mark Lowrey Jazz Trio open jam session, 5 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Jeff Harshbarger presents an Alternative Jazz Series, 7 p.m.

DRUNKEN DISTR ACTIONS/COMEDY/ BAR GAMES Clarette Club: 5400 Martway, Mission, 913-384-0986. Texas Hold ’em, 7 & 10 p.m. Hurricane Allie’s Bar and Grill: 5541 Merriam Dr., Shawnee, 913-217-7665. Double Deuce Poker League, 4 p.m.; Ultimate DJ Karaoke, 8:30 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. Aries Spears, 7 p.m. Saints Pub + Patio: 9720 Quivira, Lenexa, 913-4923900. Free pool. Wallaby’s Grill and Pub: 9562 Lackman, Lenexa, 913541-9255. Texas Hold ’em, 6 & 9 p.m.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Bleachers Bar & Grill: 210 S.W. Greenwich Dr., Lee’s Summit, 816-623-3410. Open Blues and Funk Jam with Syncopation, 6 p.m. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-7491387. Speakeasy Sunday, 10 p.m., $3. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Open Jam with Levee Town, 2 p.m., free.

VARIET Y Californos: 4124 Pennsylvania, 816-531-7878. Battle of the Bands with Grand Marquis, Miguel “Mambo,” 6 p.m.

M O N DAY 1 9 ROCK/POP/INDIE RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Peter Case and Paul Collins, with Summer Twins, 9 p.m.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL The Hideout: 6948 N. Oak Tfwy., 816-468-0550. Blue Monday Trio. The Phoenix Jazz Club: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-2215299. Millie Edwards and Michael Pagan, 7 p.m.

DRUNKEN DISTR ACTIONS/COMEDY/ BAR GAMES Hamburger Mary’s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-8421919. Mary-oke with Chad Slater, 8 p.m. Harleys & Horses: 7210 N.E. 43rd St., 816-452-2660. Magic Mondays with Jason Dean. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-7491387. Karaoke Idol with Tanya McNaughty. Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. MANic Monday on the main floor, 10 p.m., free. Nara: 1617 Main, 816-221-6272. Brodioke, 10 p.m. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-9311986. Texas Hold ’em, 8 p.m.

38 T H E P I T C H 2 THE PITCH

M A R C H 1 5 - 2 1 , 2 0 1 2 pitch.com M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X pitch.com

T U E S DAY 2 0 ROCK/POP/INDIE Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-894-9676. Travelers Guild. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-7497676. Cheap Girls, the Sidekicks, the Dead Girls, 10 p.m.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Miss Major & Her Minor Mood Swings, 6 p.m.

ACOUSTIC The Hideout: 6948 N. Oak Tfwy., 816-468-0550. Jacque Garoutte, 6 p.m. Thirsty Ernie’s: 1276 W. Foxwood Dr., Raymore, 816322-2779. The Outtakes, 7 p.m.

DRUNKEN DISTR ACTIONS/COMEDY/ BAR GAMES The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785841-5483. Heavy Metal Bingo. The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Scrabble Club. Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. Coda Pursuit Team Trivia with Teague Hayes, 7 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. Clash of the Comics, 7:30 p.m. The Roxy: 7230 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-2366211. Karaoke.

EASY LISTENING Finnigan’s Hall: 503 E. 18th Ave., North Kansas City, 816-221-3466. Abel Ramirez Big Band, 7:30 p.m.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Bleachers Bar & Grill: 210 S.W. Greenwich Dr., Lee’s Summit, 816-623-3410. Open Mic Acoustic Jam. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Open Mic Night.

W E D N E S DAY 21 BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Shinetop Jr. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-7531909. Joy Kills Sorrow, Lake Street Dive, 8 p.m. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Billy Ebeling. Mike Kelly’s Westsider: 1515 Westport Rd., 816-9319417. Interstate Astronauts, Don’t Stop Please. Trouser Mouse: 625 N.W. Mock Ave., Blue Springs, 816220-1222. The Bluz Benderz.

DJ Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785749-7676. DJ Approach.

JAZZ Sullivan’s Steakhouse & Saloon: 4501 W. 119th St., Leawood, 913-345-0800. Candace Evans Duo, 6 p.m.

DRUNKEN DISTR ACTIONS/COMEDY/ BAR GAMES Californos: 4124 Pennsylvania, 816-531-7878. The Girlie Show with Daisy Bucket, Loretta Martin, Tajma Stetson, Christa Collins, 8 p.m., $5. Harleys & Horses: 7210 N.E. 43rd St., 816-452-2660. Karaoke, Ladies’ Night. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. Hilarious Hump Day with Marcus Combs, 8 p.m. Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. Dirty Dorothy on the main floor, 10 p.m. Nara: 1617 Main, 816-221-6272. Ladies’ Night. The Union of Westport: 421 Westport Rd. Pop Culture Trivia.

EASY LISTENING Fuel: 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park, 913-451-0444. Colby & Mole.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Bleachers Bar & Grill: 210 S.W. Greenwich Dr., Lee’s Summit, 816-623-3410. Open Blues and Funk Jam with Syncopation, 7 p.m. The Hideout: 6948 N. Oak Tfwy., 816-468-0550. Open blues jam, 6 p.m. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-894-9676. Jam Night, 9 p.m. Tonahill’s 3 of a Kind: 11703 E. 23rd St., Independence, 816-833-5021. Open Jam hosted by Crossthread, 7:30-11 p.m.


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STREET TEAM

Each week, Pitch Street Team cruises around to the hottest clubs, bars and concerts. You name it, we will be there. While we are out, we hand out tons of cool stuff. So look for the Street Team... We will be looking for you!

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FREE ONLINE CLASSIFIEDS FROM THE PITCH

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savage love Out and About Dear Dan: Thank you for your advocacy of monogamishy. (Monogamishness?) When I fell in love with my gloriously kinky and GGG wife several years ago, we were honest about our wide-ranging sexual desires and we negotiated an arrangement that works for us. We encourage each other’s outside crushes — we just want to be present while one of us is banging that outside crush. Your column gave us the tools to talk with other potentially kinky folks. Our question: When one is staying at a hotel, what is the protocol for engaging in sheetstaining activities? Is it better to cover the bed in towels and stain them? Are dirty sheets all in a day’s work BY for the housekeeper, or should we refrain from such activities DAN in hotel rooms? We don’t want S AVA G E to make the housekeeping staff miserable — we always leave a tip for the maid — but we don’t want to refrain from sex just because my wife is on her period. Sheets Tarnished After Intense Nooky Dear STAIN: You’re welcome for monogamishamy. I’m delighted that it helped you two negotiate encounters with “outside crushes.” I trust that you both strive to make those encounters as rewarding for them as for you two. If you’ve booked a hotel room, there’s always the option of bringing your own santorum- and/ or menstrual-blood-colored or -stained towels. But if you don’t bring towels from home? “Mess up the sheets, please,” said the head of housekeeping at the hotel where I was staying when your question arrived. (I won’t name her or the hotel.) “We bleach the holy heck out of those sheets, and it’s easier to get stains out of sheets than towels. And sheets cost less to replace — at least ours do.” HOH adds, “Pull the sheets off and leave them balled up on the floor. No one goes poking in sheets left on the floor. They toss that ball in the cart and send it straight to the laundry.” Where they bleach the hell/blood/santorum out of ’em. And thanks for mentioning that you always leave a tip for the maid. Anyone who can afford a night or two in a hotel can leave a few bucks. Dear Dan: I’m a 25-year-old straight man. One of my best buddies is gay, and I’m in gay bars with him twice a week or so. (We like to drink.) What’s the correct response when I get hit on by men in gay bars? I feel bad saying, “I’m straight,” because I don’t want him to think I’m saying, “You’re disgusting.” Is it wrong to say you have a boyfriend instead of just saying you’re straight? Not Overly Concerned Lost Useless Entity Dear NOCLUE: Guys who either don’t have boyfriends or do have boyfriends but are in monoga42

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MARCH 15-21, 2012

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mish relationships will frequently say, “I have a boyfriend” to get rid of a guy they don’t find attractive. Be honest. Finding out he never had a shot at you because you’re straight is easier than having to wonder what you and your imaginary boyfriend didn’t find attractive. Some gay dudes are annoyed, but most will welcome your presence as proof that — forgive me — it gets better. Straight dudes who are secure enough in their own sexuality to be viewed as a sex object by other men is a sign of progress. For some gay dudes, it’s a small price to pay to be reminded that we live in a less homophobic world. Dear Dan: I have a super-hot, considerate, caring girlfriend with a high libido with whom I share many long-term goals. The problem is, she bugs the shit out of me. She chews with her mouth open, listens to music I dislike, swears at inappropriate times. I’m in my mid-30s and not sure what to do. Second Thoughts Dear ST: We have something in common. I once met a guy who was super-hot and caring and considerate, a guy whose libido matched my own and whose long-term goals aligned with mine, and who just so happened to bug the shit out of me. I married that motherfucker. My husband still bugs the shit out of me sometimes, just as I doubtless bug the shit out of him sometimes. LTRs are about identifying the bugs that some caring and consistent prodding can fix and accepting and finally learning to ignore the bugs that no amount of prodding will ever change. Hot, considerate, caring, similarly libidinous, and shared long-term goals make a package that doesn’t come along every day.

STRAIGHT-RIGHTS WATCH: In 2010, Americans voted Republican hoping that the GOP might know something about creating jobs. Turns out that all the GOP knows how to do is wage war on American women. The GOP’s attack on abortion morphed into an attack on Planned Parenthood that morphed into an attack on access to contraception which finally morphed into an attack on the 98 percent of American women who use or have used contraception. The GOP’s war on choice, contraception, cancer screenings, and women won’t end until the fuckers waging it are driven out of office. Go find a pro-choice Democrat who’s running for office against an anti-choice/anti-woman motherfucker and send that Dem a check or, if you live in his or her district, volunteer for that Democrat. Fight back! Find the Savage Lovecast (my weekly podcast) every Tuesday at thestranger.com/savage. Have a question for Dan Savage? E-mail him at mail@savagelove.net


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43


Research Subjects Do you have ASTHMA? Physicians at the Asthma Clinical Research Center at Truman Medical Center hospital Are currently recruiting for 2 studies for Asthma patients • If you have been diagnosed with ASTHMA or asthma with chronic rhinitis and sinusitis • If you are at least 21 years old • All study related care is provided at no cost for those who take part • Financial compensation for time and travel are also available This Asthma Center is one of 19 prestigious centers of excellence funded by the American Lung Association. Please Call 816-404-5503 to learn more about this research study.

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CONCERTS CONVENTIONS SPORTING EVENTS EvENt StaFF, USHERS, tIckEt takERS

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NOW HIRING Call our Job Hotline (816) 303-1696

Restaurant Supervisor Valet Front Desk Agent Coffe Shop/Barista Banquet Servers

1329 Baltimore

(within The Power & Light District)

Join people around the world who are helping advance medicine by participating in clinical trials. Contact us at www.prastudies.com or call 913.410.2900

Transforming Clinical Trials 44

THE PITCH

MARCH 15-21, 2012

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CCAREER EDUCATION UC O

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MARCH 15-21, 2012

T H3/7/2012 E P I 1:13:31 T C HPM 45


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THE PITCH

MARCH 15-21, 2012

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LivingSpaces

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Real Estate

Rentals

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MARCH 15-21, 2012

THE PITCH

47


1038 W 103rd St. KCMO 816.941.4100

The road to DEBT RELIEF and a fresh start. Accurso and Lett Law Firm

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$24.95/box of 200 smokes

Experienced and Affordable Are you seeking a job? Are you seeking employees? Find your perfect employment match at www.JobsOverEasy.com

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ST. PATRICK'S THE PITCH

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The Pitch 03.15.12  

The Pitch 03.15.12

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