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“Kansas City’s Alternative Alternative Weekly”

The

Pitch

WET STATE!

Throwing Mardi Gras at the Brick. Page 20

F E B RUA RY 1 6 – 2 2 , 2 01 2 | F R E E | VOL . 3 1 NO. 3 3

ONCE THE NATION’S DRIEST STATE, KANSAS COULD BECOME A MICRODISTILLERY MECCA.

Ghost of Carry A. Nation Angered Supernatural Vengeance Forewarned “I’ll git you drunkards yet!” Clinically depressed Kansans imbibe fine local alcoholic spirits.

What do you get when a Shark and a Horse walk into a Kansas bar? By Jonathan Bender TOPEKA, FEB. 15 Brad Dickson sits behind his desk in a T-shirt and shorts, the same outfit he plans to wear when he spends spring break in Panama City Beach, Florida, for the first time next month. It’s only 2 p.m., but the 46-year-old plumber has gone through nearly a gallon of margaritas. The bright-blue shark on his shirt tells people to “GET SHARKFACED.” “I’m a little older than the average spring-break demographic, which my wife won’t let me forget,” Dickson says. But average spring breakers make up the perfect demographic for his other business: Sharkbite Cocktails LLC, an Olathe distillery that has been selling Shark Attack frozen margaritas in a tube since April 2010. Dickson is tan and solidly built. He looks more like a scuba instructor (which he is) than a Johnson County father of three (which he also is). In a beige office park within hailing distance of the Great Mall of the Great

Plains, Dickson walks through a galley kitchen that serves as his cocktail laboratory. A small wooden sign over the sink reads: “Tequila makes women’s clothes come off.” The room’s three filler machines are capable of pushing out 30,000 foot-long foil tubes a day, supplying a product now available in 13 states. He’s trying to nail down his production schedule, knowing that he’ll be on the road for six of the next eight weeks. Dickson’s Sharkbite Cocktails is one of three microdistilleries (the industry term for boutique liquor operations) launched on the Kansas side of the metro area in the past four years. Good Spirits Distilling, which makes Clear 10 Vodka, opened in Olathe in 2009, and Dark Horse Distillery is set to begin selling white whiskey and

vodka in Lenexa this spring. Kansas is riding the tail end of a nationwide trend with craft spirits, according to Bill Owens, president of the American Distilling Institute, a trade and educational organization for craft outfits such as Sharkbite. “We’ve been through a beer renaissance. We’ve seen it with food and wine for sure. Now, spirits is the last industry to go through that renaissance,” Owens says. “And Kansas is a little bit under the radar. There are entrepreneurs in our culture, and they have the DNA in them to distill. I’m pulling people from the professional ranks who want to be producing a real product versus working in an office.” He estimates that there are 397 U.S. microdistilleries, with another three to five opening each month. The fi rst Kansas microdistillery was licensed seven years ago, when Seth Fox launched High Plains Distillery in the backyard of MGP Ingredients, the alcohol giant that contract-distills McCormick’s 360 Vodka and reported more than $76 million in sales last quarter. By comparison, Fox’s Atchison distillery ships to eight states and sold about 25,000 cases in 2010 of his Most Wanted and Fox brands of vodka, gin, whiskey and tequila. There’s an old joke about how easy it is to get a drink in Kansas — you just need to get in your car, drive a few miles and go right across the state line into Missouri. But a lot has changed since Carry Amelia Nation got (CONT. PAGE 6)

Sweeps Bingo is back! Readers Excited, Confused “How do I claim my prize?” KANSAS CITY, FEB. 15 February’s edition of Sweeps Bingo is brought to you with a heavy heart. Kansas City’s best TV investigator, Russ Ptacek, is leaving KSHB Channel 41 for Washington, D.C.’s CBS affiliate, WUSA 9. The reporter’s exit is cause for scuzzy politicians across the metro to clink glasses. (D.C. crooks right now are blissfully unaware of the tornado headed their way.) Watch this space for an exit interview with Ptacek. Meanwhile, sweeps month is under way with exploding appliances and nosy cadaver dogs. Grab your daubers and play along with The Pitch’s Kansas City Sweeps (CONT. PAGE 5)

LEAVENWORTH, FEB. 15 The idea that Kansas is a dry state stems from the state’s decision to be the first in the union to outlaw alcohol, in 1881. Liquor enthusiasts and retailers have been chipping away at the state’s blue laws ever since. Kansans were gifted with beer with an alcohol content of less than 3.2 percent in 1937, four years after the 21st Amendment repealed federal Prohibition. Kansas still hasn’t ratified that amendment, but the state ban was lifted in 1948. Alcoholic Beverage Control, a division of the state’s Department of Revenue, was created that same year to license, regulate and tax liquor sales. “I wouldn’t consider Kansas a dry state,” says Doug Jorgensen, director of the ABC. “People might consider Kansas to be one of the most regulated states, but I don’t have a problem with that.” The legislative landscape, though, may be changing. Sixteen liquorrelated bills are before the Kansas Legislature, and include allowing a new class of license to bring distilleries in line with farm wineries and brewpubs; a new venue license that would change regulations for stadiums and facilities like the Kansas Speedway; and the legalization of full-strength-beer and liquor sales at convenience and grocery stores. In an effort to speed up that change, Dark Horse Distillery has hired lobbyist Phillip Bradley to push Senate Bill 358, which would make it legal to serve free (CONT. PAGE 6)

PI T C H .C OM

ON THE LAMB! Chef Rashid Khalaf’s Shahrazad Meats Overland Park. OVERLAND PARK, FEB. 15 a pretty good storyteller himself. A The apocryphal Persian king Shah- native of Jerusalem, Khalaf has lived ryar had thousands of wives but most of his life in the United States. never kept one longer than 24 hours. The former soccer-playing college The morning after student became a each wedding, accordprofessional cook by ing to the legend of taking kitchen jobs in the Arabian Nights, many Middle EastShahryar had his new ern restaurants in the bride beheaded. By the area, including the old afternoon, he’d found Athena on Broadway a new virgin to marry in the 1980s. That’s that night. where he learned The bodies stopped how to prepare classic piling up when ShahGreek cuisine from the ryar married Schehevenue’s owners, Yanrazade, the daughter nis and Suzi Vantzos. of his court vizier. The Athena, which Her ability to spin one Artist’s Rendering. closed in 1994, was exciting story after another kept her where I met Khalaf. He didn’t teach husband entranced — and her head me anything about cooking, but he firmly on her neck. did give me a full vocabulary of AraChef and restaurateur Rashid bic curse words, many of which were Khalaf has had two wives, and he’s directed at me. (CONT. PAGE 19)

Craig Finn hitches solo into city limits The troubadour’s stop at RecordBar Crowd of middle-aged men rejoices! KANSAS CITY, FEB. 15 The fictional town of Dillon, Texas, has colored my worldview for the past month, as I’ve binge-watched my way through nearly the entire Friday Night Lights television series. I would love to use this space to write about my endless admiration for Coach Taylor, or the many times I’ve cried while watching (mostly scenes with Matt Saracen), or Riggins’ Rigs, or Crucifictorious, or how perfect-looking Minka Kelly is. I mention the show instead because my journey to the final episodes coincided last weekend with the arrival in Kansas City of Craig Finn, who has titled his debut solo album Clear Heart Full Eyes – a transposed reference to FNL. As the leader of the bookish barrock act the (CONT. PAGE 28)

Finn delighted audiences with songsingery and pointed verbal flourishes.

BALLET! The Kansas City Ballet puts every foot onstage for its Romeo and Juliet KANSAS CITY, FEB. 15 Do your feet bleed?” a child asks. William Whitener, artistic director of the Kansas City Ballet, chuckles and repeats the question for the rest of the crowd gathered for this Friday-night open rehearsal of Romeo and Juliet. In response, a ballerina shakes her head, removes one of her slippers and passes it to (CONT. PAGE 16)


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C O N T E N T S VOLUME 31 • NUMBER 33 F E B R UA RY 1 6 – 22 , 20 1 2

E D I T O R I A L Editor Scott Wilson Managing Editor Justin Kendall Music Editor David Hudnall Staff Writers Charles Ferruzza, Ben Palosaari Editorial Operations Manager Deborah Hirsch Proofreader Brent Shepherd Calendar Editor Berry Anderson Clubs Editor Abbie Stutzer Food Blogger, Web Editor Jonathan Bender Contributing Writers Danny Alexander, Theresa Bembnister, Aaron Carnes, Kyle Eustice, April Fleming, Lisa Horn, Ian Hrabe, Megan Metzger, Chris Parker, Nadia Pflaum, Nancy Hull Rigdon, Dan Savage, Brent Shepherd, Nick Spacek, Abbie Stutzer, Crystal K. Wiebe A R T Art Director Ashford Stamper Contributing Photographers Angela C. Bond, William Lounsbury, Forester Michael, Chris Mullins, Lauren Phillips, Sabrina Staires, Matthew Taylor, Brooke Vandever P R O D U C T I O N Production Manager Jaime Albers Senior Multimedia Designer Amber Williams Multimedia Designer Christina Riddle A D V E R T I S I N G Advertising Director Dawn Jordan Retail House Account Manager Eric Persson Senior Classified Multimedia Specialist Steven Suarez Classified Multimedia Specialist Andrew Disper Multimedia Specialists Michelle Acevedo, Erin Carey, Payton Hatfield, Laura Newell Sales Associate Kirin Arnold Director of Marketing & Operations Jason Dockery Advertising Coordinator Keli Sweetland C I R C U L A T I O N Circulation Director Mike Ryan

W E T STAT E Dry state Kansas might just be the next microdistillery mecca. BY JONATHAN BENDER | 6

B U S I N E S S Business Manager Michelle McDowell Systems Administrator Matt Spencer Front Desk Coordinator Christina Riddle Publisher Joel Hornbostel S O U T H C O M M Chief Executive Officer Chris Ferrell Chief Operating Officer Rob Jiranek Director of Accounting Todd Patton Director of Operations Susan Torregrossa Creative Director Heather Pierce Director of Content/Online Development Patrick Rains Director of Digital Products Andy Sperry

ON THE LAMB Shahrazad Café meats Overland Park. BY CHARLES FERRUZZA

N A T I O N A L A D V E R T I S I N G Voice Media Group 888-278-9866, voicemediagroup.com Senior Vice President Sales Susan Belair Senior Vice President Sales Operations Joe Larkin National Sales Director Ronni Gaun B A C K PA G E . C O M Vice President Sales & Marketing Carl Ferrer Business Manager Jess Adams Accountant David Roberts D I S T R I B U T I O N The Pitch distributes 45,000 copies a week and is available free throughout Greater Kansas City, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for $5 each, payable at The Pitch’s office in advance. The Pitch may be distributed only by The Pitch’s authorized independent contractors or authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of The Pitch, take more than one copy of each week’s issue. Mail subscriptions: $22.50 for six months or $45 per year, payable in advance. Application to mail at second-class postage rates is pending at Kansas City, MO 64108. C O P Y R I G H T The contents of The Pitch are Copyright 2012 by KC Communications, LLC. No portion may be reproduced in whole or in part by any means without the express written permission of the publisher. The Pitch address: 1701 Main, Kansas City, MO 64108 For The Pitch information, call: 816-561-6061 To report a story, call: 816-218-6915 Editorial fax: 816-756-0502 For classifieds, call: 816-218-6721 For retail advertising, call: 816-218-6702

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Occupation: Owner of Keynote Companion Inc. (a presentation design company) and an independent associate with HelmsBriscoe (a thirdparty hotel-site selection company)

Current neighborhood: Overland Park Who or what is your sidekick? My daughter, Amelia, 5, and our kitten, Harry Gary What career would you choose in an alternate reality? Talk-show host. My show would be a combination of Fashion Police, Talk Soup and Meet the Press. What was the last local restaurant you patronized? Bo Lings

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the pitch

FEBRUARY 16-22, 2012

“Kansas City needs …” A Bloomingdale’s. What can I say, I lived in D.C. and I’m spoiled.

What’s your favorite charity? Water.org — doing amazing things with microfinance and clean water all over the world. A lot of people don’t realize they are located here in KC.

“People might be surprised to know that I …” Stood in the middle of the Sahara Desert once and took part in a condom-education presentation; had a cat that was a Hallmark model; sucked an ant’s butt in a rain forest in Australia; got lost once and ended up asking for directions where the Last Supper was held; have traveled to a place named Ouagadougou; sold funeral plots as a telemarketer in high school; could go on and on.

Favorite place to spend your paycheck: At a craps table with a hot pair of dice.

What TV show do you make sure you watch? The Daily Show

What local phenomenon do you think is overrated? Fireworks anywhere around the city. I think they are boring. I go see them because it is required as part of my job description as a mom.

take(s) up a lot of space in my iTunes: Barry Manilow. Yes, I’m a fanilow.

Where do you drink? Anywhere they make a great cosmo.

THE

B R O O K E VA N D E V E R

Hometown: Leawood

Where do you like to take out-of-town guests? The Plaza Finish this sentence: “Other than the Kauffman Center, Kansas City got it right when …” It revitalized downtown. Growing up, downtown was empty at 5 p.m. Now when I go down there, things are hopping. I can even hail a cab if I need one. That is a sign that our little city has grown up! “Kansas City screwed up when it …” Approved the eighth-cent sales tax to create a “worldclass zoo.” Let me write in bold, I LOVE ANIMALS, but I had a hard time seeing all the penguin signs all over the neighborhoods when there are so many serious issues facing Kansas City, Missouri. I am a friend of the zoo, I frequent the zoo, and I love the zoo. But I think that money could have been used for education, crime prevention, snow removal, etc. pitch.com

What movie do you watch at least once a year? When it finally comes out, it will be Arrested Development, but for now it is … Juno. What local tradition do you take part in every year? Jiggle Jam Person or thing you find really irritating at this moment: Tossup between the Personhood Amendment and cilantro. They both seem to be everywhere. What subscription do you value most? The Daily Beast and Vanity Fair Last book you read: Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me? by Mindy Kaling What is your most embarrassing dating moment? I once went ice skating on a date, and I was showing off going backward very fast. I went to turn forward and tripped. On my way down, I thought it would be a great idea to not pitch.com

land on my hands, for fear I would break my wrists. I have pretty ample boobs and thought if I landed on my boobs, they would cushion my fall. I hit the ice hard with my chest, and my boobs did not turn out to be the best defense. I knocked the wind out of myself, and the iceskating ref kid skates over and yells, “Ma’am, are you OK?” I pretended to be fine, but I broke my rib. No. 2: I went out on a group date in college to the Edge of Hell. It was my first experience with a haunted house. I am very afraid of the dark. A ghost popped out of the ceiling and scared everyone. I dramatically fell to the floor in sheer terror. While doing so, I peed my pants. I went to a very small college, and that embarrassing moment spread like wildfire around campus, so everyone got to share in my embarrassment. Interesting brush with the law? During college, sitting in my car with friends, drinking beer and listening to the radio. I didn’t realize as a young lady that listening to the radio without the car running would burn the battery out. I was booksmart, not common-sense smart, people! Cop arrives to find us in a dead car with beer cans littered around the car. I convince him that the beer cans were just there when we arrived, and he gives us a ride back to campus. Twenty years later, thank you, officer! Describe a recent triumph: My most recent triumph is declaring to friends and family that I hate goat cheese. I tried to fake it for years because it seems so trendy to like it. I’m finally out of the closet: I hate goat cheese, all types and flavors — and yes, I’ve tried your kind. It will never touch my lips again. I have embraced my uncool status and triumphed over my Johnson County suburban insecurity.

Aimee Patton is one of the 2012 “Midwest Voices” columnists for The Kansas City Star. M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X

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Sweeps Bingo ebruary’s edition of Sweeps Bingo is brought to you with a heavy heart. Kansas City’s best TV investigator, Russ Ptacek, is leaving KSHB Channel 41 for Washington, D.C.’s CBS affiliate, WUSA 9. The reporter’s exit is cause for scuzzy politicians across the metro to clink glasses. (D.C. crooks right now are blissfully unaware of the tornado headed their way.) Watch this space for an exit interview with Ptacek. Meanwhile, sweeps month is under way with exploding appliances and nosy cadaver dogs. Grab your daubers and play along with The Pitch’s Kansas City Sweeps Bingo card. Fill in a line, call out the magic word, then wait for our prize patrol to show up. — JUSTIN KENDALL

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WET STATE

ONCE THE NATION’S DRIEST STATE, KANSAS COULD BECOME A MICRODISTILLERY MECCA. J O N AT H A N B E N D E R | P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y A N G E L A C . B O N D

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rad Dickson sits behind his desk in a T-shirt and shorts, the same outfit he plans to wear when he spends spring break in Panama City Beach, Florida, for the first time next month. It’s only 2 p.m., but the 46-year-old plumber has gone through nearly a gallon of margaritas. The bright-blue shark on his shirt tells people to “GET SHARKFACED.” “I’m a little older than the average spring-break demographic, which my wife won’t let me forget,” Dickson says. But average spring-breakers make up the perfect demographic for his other business: Sharkbite Cocktails LLC, an Olathe distillery that has been selling Shark Attack frozen margaritas in a tube since April 2010. Dickson is tan and solidly built. He looks more like a scuba instructor (which he is) than a Johnson County father of three (which he also is). In a beige office park within hailing distance of the Great Mall of the Great Plains, Dickson walks through a galley kitchen that serves as his cocktail laboratory. A small wooden sign over the sink reads: “Tequila makes women’s clothes come off.” The room’s three filler machines are capable of pushing out 30,000 foot-long foil tubes a day, supplying a product now available in 15 states. He’s trying to nail down his production schedule, knowing that he’ll be on the road for six of the next eight weeks.

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Dickson’s Sharkbite Cocktails is one of three microdistilleries (the industry term for boutique liquor operations) launched on the Kansas side of the metro area in the past four years. Good Spirits Distilling, which makes Clear 10 Vodka, opened in Olathe in 2009, and Dark Horse Distillery is set to begin selling white whiskey and vodka in Lenexa this spring. Kansas is riding the tail end of a nationwide trend with craft spirits, according to Bill Owens, president of the American Distilling Institute, a trade and educational organization for craft outfits such as Sharkbite. “We’ve been through a beer renaissance. We’ve seen it with food and wine for sure. Now, spirits is the last industry to go through that renaissance,” Owens says. “And Kansas is a little bit under the radar. There are entrepreneurs in our culture, and they have the DNA in them to distill. I’m pulling people from the professional ranks who want to be producing a real product versus working in an office.” He estimates that there are 397 U.S. microdistilleries, with another three to five opening each month. The first Kansas microdistillery was licensed seven years ago, when Seth Fox launched High Plains Distillery in the backyard of MGP Ingredients, the alcohol giant that contract-distills McCormick’s 360 Vodka and reported more than $76 million in sales last quarter. By comparison, Fox’s Atchison distillery ships to eight states and

sold about 25,000 cases in 2010 of his Most Wanted and Fox brands of vodka, gin, whiskey and tequila. There’s an old joke about how easy it is to get a drink in Kansas — you just need to get in your car, drive a few miles and go right across the state line into Missouri. But a lot has changed since Carry Amelia Nation got her 6-foot frame behind an ax and started taking it to saloon doors more than a century ago. The idea that Kansas is a dry state stems from the state’s decision to be the first in the union to outlaw alcohol, in 1881. Liquor enthusiasts and retailers have been chipping away at the state’s blue laws ever since. Kansans were gifted with beer with an alcohol content of less than 3.2 percent in 1937, four years after the 21st Amendment repealed federal Prohibition. Kansas still hasn’t ratified that amendment, but the state ban was lifted in 1948. Alcoholic Beverage Control, a division of the state’s Department of Revenue, was created that same year to license, regulate and tax liquor sales. “I wouldn’t consider Kansas a dry state,” says Doug Jorgensen, director of the ABC. “People might consider Kansas to be one of the most regulated states, but I don’t have a problem with that.” The legislative landscape, though, may be changing. Sixteen liquor-related bills are before the Kansas Legislature, and include allowing a new class of license to bring pitch.com

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distilleries in line with farm wineries and brewpubs; a new venue license that would change regulations for stadiums and facilities like the Kansas Speedway; and the legalization of fullstrength-beer and liquor sales at convenience and grocery stores. In an effort to speed up that change, Dark Horse Distillery has hired lobbyist Phillip Bradley to push Senate Bill 358, which would make it legal to serve free samples in Kansas microdistilleries. The rising profile of spirits reminds some of the push that led to brewpubs being legalized in 1987. At the front of that charge was Chuck Magerl, the founder of Free State Brewing Co., which opened in Lawrence two years later. “Distilleries may have an easier time now than 25 years ago, when I was trying to change the state laws,” Magerl says. “And I feel like there is a greater appreciation here and throughout the Midwest for the diversity of flavors and interesting ideas.” Today, Kansas has 20 microbrewery license holders and 44 farm-winery license holders. It has taken 60 years, but Kansas finally may be ready to shed its dry-state reputation.

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he idea had haunted him for months before the word came to him in January 2008: flavorita. “We were in our neighborhood, watching kids with Fla-Vor-Ice pops outside, and one of the moms told me she wished we had something like that for us that doesn’t taste like shit,” Dickson says. Soon after he scrawled flavorita in dry-erase marker on his bathroom mirror, he hired a research assistant to determine what it would take to launch a liquor company. By mid-April, he had concocted a prototype: a frozen margarita in a Go-Gurt yogurt tube, pinched off with a paper clip. Dickson is a serial entrepreneur. Sharkbite is, by his count, the fourth business he has created. He started a Leawood landscaping business while he was in high school. After selling Dickson Lawn Service in 1993 and graduating from Mid-America Nazarene College, with a degree in management and human resources, he found himself working in what he calls a “cement cof-

fin,” a cubicle where he sold software by phone. Next, he helped launch a company that made perforated card inserts for magazines. It was lucrative but unfulfilling. What he loved was the tinkering he did during off hours, projects like the homemademargarita machine that brought together a cooler and a garbage disposal to chew up a 25-pound bag of ice in minutes. “I just thought there was an easier way to make margaritas. This was before QVC,” Dickson says. The mechanically inclined Dickson eventually found a job that suited him. Dickson Plumbing celebrates its 14th anniversary this June, about a month after Brad and his wife, Tawnia, throw their 21st Cinco de Mayo party. It was the plumbing business that kept Shark Attack afloat in the early days. His lead plumber, Josiah Linkous, doubled as his chief Shark Attack employee, helping create a more advanced prototype by working a machine designed for filling spaghetti-sauce containers. In February 2009, Dickson signed a three-year lease on a 3,000-square-foot commercial space

in Olathe with dreams of having the frozen pops on store shelves by the next year. “It was all on faith,” Dickson says. The first test of that faith came when federal regulators required him to purchase his tequila directly from the manufacturer. He estimates that he contacted 700 distilleries in Mexico. A single broker replied. So Dickson did what he does best: He got on a plane and he sold himself. “I thought: This guy could meet me at the airport, hit me on the head with a hammer and rob me blind,” Dickson says. “He showed up in an old, beat-up pickup truck. I only knew two Spanish words — cerveza and baño — but fortunately, he spoke English.” Dickson and his translator convinced the plant’s owner to close the deal. In March 2009, 3,000 bottles arrived from Mexico. Production was supposed to start a month later. But then Dickson received a letter from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office telling him that his trademark application for Sharkbite Cocktails had been denied. Joseph E. Seagram & Sons Inc. already owned a trademark for Sharkbite Rum, granted in 1989.

Dickson (left) and the Garcia family are the new faces of Kansas liquor. “I remember I was sitting in the parking lot and I couldn’t breathe. I was completely numb,” Dickson says. “I had $25,000 in this company and I felt like my whole life had been sucked out of me. But I have this mantra: Keep moving forward.” By April 2009, the bank balance was $7.62. Determined to get his business started, Dickson secured his first investor (private investors now own 40 percent of the company), and the $10,000 infusion kept the lights on as he applied for a new trademark under the name Shark Attack. Dickson says the name refers to the human threat to sharks, not the stuff of scary movies. Since a youth spent watching Jacques Cousteau on TV, he has wanted to swim with — and touch — a great white shark. In January 2010, his trademark was approved. In April of that year, Worldwide Wine and Spirits, in Lenexa, agreed to begin distributing his products, continued on page 8

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buying his entire inventory of 30,000 tubes. They had taken three months to make, with each tube hand-filled and sealed. The plumber was officially in the liquor business. As Dickson tried to keep up with demand, another distillery was just breaking ground, 10 miles north on Interstate 35. Outside a redbrick building, only a few potted topiaries hint that the business within is unlike the rest of this commercial complex’s tenants. Inside, the aroma of fresh-baked bread — courtesy of the boiling grain a few hundred feet away — fills the tiled lobby. Dark Horse Distillery is the brainchild of four siblings: Damian, Patrick, Eric and Mary Garcia. On a January afternoon, they share a sofa facing a wall of windows looking out on the 500-gallon copper still (from Vendome Copper & Brass Works in Louisville, Kentucky) and the stainless-steel fermentation tanks that are the heart of the newest distillery in Kansas. Like Dickson and Dark Horse CEO Kris Hennessy (who has long sold veterinary vaccines), they’ve been lured off surer career tracks by the prospect of making their own spirits. “The Kansas City market was one that hasn’t been tapped,” Eric Garcia says. “We wanted to drink something that was made here. We’ve seen other success stories in Kansas City, and we aspire to bring something here that hasn’t been done yet.”

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Patrick, 34, was the first to walk away from his job. He was working as an investment banker for Charles Schwab. He oversaw the fitting of this 6,500-square-foot warehouse space last winter and began learning the craft alongside Travis Vander Vegte, the company’s other distiller who has been mashing and cooking since last July. “Most of the time, Travis handles the milling, and I handle the distillation, but we trade those duties frequently,” Patrick says. “It’s

“There’s no graduate school for distilling, but it’s not rocket science,” Owens says. “It just takes practice. We’ve been distilling for 6,000 years.” Damian, 35, came on next, as the head of sales and marketing. He left a sales job at Rheuark FSI, where he had worked with clients in the food and beverage industry for 13 years. “Dark Horse symbolized us as a group,” Damian says. “We are starting out at the back of the pack. We’re the underdogs. But we’re ready to run.”

“THE ALCOHOL BUSINESS NEEDED ANOTHER PRE-MIXED MARGARITA LIKE A HOLE IN THE HEAD. THE DIFFERENCE WAS THE PACKAGING AND THE FACT THAT WE MAKE A REAL MARGARITA.” a big change from sitting behind a desk to controlling this thing,” he adds, giving the still a gentle pat. Notes for each batch go on dry-erase boards clipped to the fermentation tanks. Dark Horse is producing 40-50 gallons a day, and Garcia spends seven to eight hours working next to the still — exactly what the American Distilling Institute’s Owens prescribes.

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Eric, 30, left Chicago this past December, after resigning from the state prosecutor’s office. He’s the only one of the family who admits that he has watched Discovery Channel’s Moonshiners as part of his distillery education. And Mary, 23, having recently graduated from the University of Missouri with an English degree, came on this winter to oversee special events and the company’s social-media strategy.

Shark Attack margaritas are packaged at the microdistillery’s Olathe plant. The family has always been close. They grew up in south Kansas City. Their father worked for IBM, and their mother was a bank teller. Family dinners are on Wednesday nights, and their mother watches her grandchildren while the siblings hash out issues with the distillery. The company received its manufacturing license last April, and its first products are due out this spring: Long Shot White Whiskey and Rider Vodka. On the calendar for late summer: rye whiskey and bourbon aged in charred American oak barrels. “This is a new way of doing things,” Eric says. “It’s about what we can do differently.” “There’s touches of the traditional, with the copper still from Kentucky, but we’re aiming for the modern feel of the Northwest,” Damian adds. Three event spaces at the Dark Horse Distillery flow in an L-shape around the distilling room, and there’s a showpiece kitchen with enough stainless steel and granite to star on an HGTV remodeling show. Pendant lights and wrought-iron lanterns hang over supple leather couches and dark-wood tables. The floor-toceiling windows throughout the facility mean that the distillery’s operations are always transparent. On a Tuesday in January, rye is being brewed in the still. The adjacent mash cooker is busy agitating grains — it sounds like a large room fan. The spent grains go to a local farmer


Dark Horse Distillery’s oak barrels and copper still are getting plenty of use. as cattle feed. The racks in the bottling room next door are empty, awaiting the pallets and labels once Dark Horse moves into production. “I just picture going to a bar on a weekend and there’s all those liquors on the shelf. Someday, our liquor is going to be behind that bar,” Patrick says. “Until that day happens, I will still feel like it’s kind of a dream.”

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t’s the excitement of those early days that Dickson sometimes misses, the 20-hour shifts, the quirks of small business, telling callers to hold on while the train passed by right outside. “The alcohol business needed another pre-mixed margarita like a hole in the head,” Dickson says. “The difference was the packaging and the fact that we make a real margarita.” Dickson’s product has just five ingredients: lime juice, cane sugar, filtered water, tequila and orange liqueur (which is now contract-distilled by the neighboring Good Spirits Distilling). The result is a taste that evokes frosty glasses rather than pre-mixed tubs gathering dust in a forgotten aisle of the liquor store. By October 2010, Dickson’s operation needed more room. He settled on the 10,000-square-foot space in Olathe that now houses the manufacturing line, storage room, test kitchen and offices. The company took off in 2011, with sales growing sevenfold, in part because of a contract with Sam’s Club and Wal-Mart. Dickson even entertained a serious buyout offer from what he calls “a major, major corporation.” “If we don’t get another offer and I can come to work in shorts and flip-flops for the next 20 years, that’s fine with me,” Dickson says. “But if somebody bought me out, I’d get a sailboat, and you’d find me all over the world diving.” He pauses for a second. “Then I’d start another company that helps seed small businesses.” By the end of last year, Shark Attack margaritas were in 15 states, a number that Dickson expects to nearly double in 2012. And next month, Dickson launches his second frozen product: a hard lemonade — a clear hard lemonade. “Why do I need to add yellow color if it’s not yellow?” Dickson says. Two additional flavors are planned for this summer.

While Dickson is Kansas’ de facto liquor ambassador to other states, Dark Horse Distillery hopes to attract tourists to the Midwest. Magerl calls that a winning strategy. He believes that the expansion of microdistilleries, like microbreweries, is more about increasing awareness than overcoming opposition. “People thought you could have a large distillation operation or a still in the backwoods — nobody thought there was anything between,” he says. “The concept that there’s a limited urban-hipster demographic that is going to appreciate quality and flavor is rapidly fading as a stereotype. The idea of being stuck in the hinterlands and not having choices is no longer really applicable.” A plumber who now runs a frozen-margarita business, the siblings who left behind successful careers to start a distillery from scratch — Shark Attack and Dark Horse are rewriting their state’s liquor lore, long after Carry Nation came to save Kansans from themselves. And they’re leading the way for other microdistilleries. Regardless of what happens during the latest legislative session in Topeka, Kansas is only going to get wetter.

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It’s a goy: Tommy at White Theatre

Into the wild with snacks

Not behind bars but under glass

NIGHT + DAY WEEK OF FEBRUARY 16–22

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Night at the Folly. The event features 11 area choreographers and acts, including a Björkthemed multimedia production (“Unravel” by Kimberly Holloway) and a dance summoning a tragic accident FIND (“Triangle Factory MANY MORE Fire” by Maggie Osgood Nicholls). “As far as types of pieces presented this LISTINGS being year, it really has a difONLINE AT ferent feel compared PITCH.COM to years past,” Robins says. “You’ll see the best Kansas City has to offer.” The show starts at 8 p.m. Tickets cost $15-$20 and can be purchased at the Folly box office (300 West 12th Street, 816-474-4444) or through Ticketmaster. For information, see cityinmotion.org. — LISA HORN

[THEATER]

ME SO THORNY

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THE CONTINENTAL

Have you met Victor Continental? He’s the Lawrence lothario who can drop panties with the shake of his martini. Played by Jerry Mitchell, Continental returns tonight and Saturday to help stage Literary Canon Fodder at 8 p.m. at the Lawrence Arts Center (940 New Hampshire, in Lawrence, 785-843-2787). The comedy show, written by Will Averill and directed by Continental show partner Jeremy Auman, takes audience members on a vaudeville-inspired journey through the history of literature by performing literary works in under a minute. Sample Homer in rap form, or see what Hemingway looks like as live anime. Call the center or see lawrenceartscenter.org for more info. Tickets cost $7. — APRIL FLEMING

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UNHUMAN AND UNCENSORED

You think improv comedy is tough? Try doing it with someone’s hand up your ass. That’s

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CAROL ROSEGG

What’s your idea of edgy local entertainment? Boylesque? Air-sex competitions? Trolling the KC posts on thedirty.com? Try this instead: the dark cabaret performances of Troupe Somnium. This new group of performance artists claims to stage a mix of sketch comedy, sideshow acts, circus skills and BDSM elements under their fishnets and bowler hats. The group’s season opener, Screw the Roses, “examines the darker side of love, obsession and the heart during a time that we are focused elsewhere,” says creative director Allison Henthorn. “Everyone goes home yearning, if not completely satisfied.” See the one-night-only show at the Fishtank Performance Studio (1715 Wyandotte, 816-809-7110) at 8:30 p.m. Tickets can be purchased for $10 at brownpapertickets.com/event/220376. For more information, search Troupe Somnium on Facebook. — BERRY ANDERSON

Brian Henson works blue in JoCo’s Yardley Hall.

the kind of humor to be expected from the adults-only performance of Stuffed and Unstrung by Henson Alternative at Yardley Hall, at Johnson County Community College (12345 College, Overland Park, 913-469-4445). Brian Henson, the chairman of the Jim Henson Co., first debuted this mix of puppetry, blue comedy and music at the 2006 HBO Comedy Festival in Aspen, Colorado, and has taken it on the road as far as Scotland and Australia. The host of the show, Patrick Bristow, has a long list of TV and movie credits (Seinfeld and So I Married an Axe Murderer), so he can probably wrangle six puppeteers, who stand in full view of the audience. As with typical improv acts, suggestions from the audience are incorporated into the show’s story line. Tickets cost $35, $45 and $80 and are available at jccc.edu/ TheSeries or by calling the Yardley Hall box office. The show starts at 8 p.m. — NADIA PFLAUM [DANCE]

THE MOVES OF TODAY

Since 1985, City in Motion Dance Theater has been a constant in the local arts community, promoting its professional company and dance school as a center for innovation in the Midwest. “To me, modern dance is so appealing to watch because there is a lot of diversity in

[NIGHTLIFE]

interpretations of choreography or ideas. There is an artistry involved in it that I feel pulls the audience in and keeps them guessing,” says Crystal Robins, production director of A Modern

KEEPIN’ IT D.L. D.L. Hughley

DROPPIN’ BEATS

This party-rocking DJ business is harder than it sounds. The Red Bull Thre3Style DJ contest at the Beaumont Club (4050 Pennsylvania, 816-561-2560) pits the continued on page 12 [ F R I DAY 2 .17 ]

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.L. Hughley’s life story could have been written by Horatio Alger. Raised in South Central Los Angeles, Hughley became a member of the Bloods but left the gang after his cousin was shot. He worked his way through office jobs and temping while learning the craft of stand-up comedy, and his years of work resulted in a career-changing appearance in the comedy documentary The Original Kings of Comedy. That catapult led to appearances and starring roles in a number of television shows, including Aaron Sorkin’s ill-fated but wonderful Studio 60 on the Sunset Strip. His routine focuses principally on politics and family life. See him Friday through Sunday at Kansas City Improv (7260 Northwest 87th Street, in Zona Rosa). Tickets cost $33 for the 21-and-older show. Call 816-759-5233 or see improvkc.com for showtimes and more information. — APRIL FLEMING

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city’s best wax-style crowd-pleasers — DJs CEO, B-Stee, Magnum, Sku, Who, Bobby Keys, Brent Tactic and J.T. Quick — against one another for 15 minutes of truth. They must incorporate music from three different genres in their respective sets, and are judged on crowd reaction, song choice and technique. The kicker? The DJs draw numbers to determine performance order, so if a DJ plans his set too far in advance or counts on using the newest, hottest party jams to steal the show, he could be crushed if a competitor spins those songs first. Mash-up master and party-rock arbiter DJ P is the host, and you can bet he’ll have a say in who takes the title. Doors open at 8 p.m. Tickets cost $6 and are available at the door or at beaumontkc.com. This show is 18-andolder only. — NADIA PFLAUM

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FIDDLIN’ ABOUT

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The Who’s Tommy is a stage production based on the Who’s 1969 double album that begat the 1975 Ken Russell film. The psychedelic rock opera is rife with pinball wizardry and a lecherous uncle, but most important, Pete Townshend’s music and lyrics are electrifyingly good. Tommy was adapted for the stage by Townshend and musical-theater vet Des McAnuff in 1993. Since then, there have been scores of productions all over the world, including today’s matinee at the White Theatre, at the Jewish Community Center Campus (5801 West 115th Street, Overland Park, 913-327-8054). See, feel and hear The Who’s Tommy today at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $22 ($11 for students); buy them online at click4tix.com or call the box office. The show runs through February 26. See jcckc.org. — MEGAN METZGER [MUSEUM TOURS]

GOSPEL OF WEALTH

Over seven years and $10 million worth of renovations, the Kansas City Museum’s Corinthian Hall has remained open to the public. Even with the difficult and delicate nature of fully restoring a large house and historic property, plus the irregular funding from the city (because of the economy), museum director Christopher Leitch considers the addition of air conditioning throughout the 70 rooms of the building a huge success. “This increases our capacity as a

Pardon our dust: the Kansas City Museum public institution and as a museum a thousandfold,” he says. Leitch leads a 90-minute hardhat tour of the Gilded Age gem (and lumber baron Robert A. Long’s former home), which includes an ornate salon and library. Also, the museum’s stained-glass windows are on display, including one exposed for the first time in 40 years. See your local tax dollars at work at 12:30 p.m. Tourgoers must be older than 12 and wear closed-toe shoes. RSVP at kansascitymuseum.org or by calling 816-483-8300. Admission is $5. The museum is located in the historic Northeast at 3218 Gladstone Boulevard. — LISA HORN

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[MUSIC]

SONGS OF THE SMOOSH

Musical Theater Heritage’s Musical Mondays are “always a blast and they always sell out,” says executive producer Chad Gerlt. Featuring performances from members of other outfits, such as the Coterie Theatre and American Heartland Theatre, Gerlt says local performers frequently crash the party and bring their best stuff. It’s a type of post-Valentine’s Day show and stars Jerry Jay Cranford, Katie Karel, John Daugharthy, Jessalyn Kincaid and Liz Clark Golson (with musical backup). “You can expect some really big showstoppers, and in the intimate theater space of the Off Center Theatre, you can bet that they will blow the roof off the place,” Gerlt says. Does enthusiasm for local theater get much more exuberant than that? The show starts at 7:30 p.m. and costs $18 (the box office opens at 6:30, and seating begins at 7) at the Off Center Theatre (2450 Grand, third floor of Crown Center, 816-274-8444). For reservations, call 816-221-6987 or see musicaltheaterheritage.com. — BERRY ANDERSON

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EATING OFF THE GRID

The Missouri Department of Conservation’s Cooking Wild in Missouri, by Bernadette Dryden, inspires cooks to savor local game, fish, nuts, fruits and mushrooms. As part of the conservation department’s promotion of the book, the Anita B. Gorman Conservation Discovery Center(4750Troost) continued on page 14


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presents “A Taste of the Season,” a free class. With camping season approaching, the session highlights foil pack (also known as hobo pack) cooking, but with a wild gourmet twist. Attendees try bison meat stuffed with wild mushrooms, hickory nuts and wild greens. “We are here in the middle of the city, far away from anywhere wild,” Pat Whalen, the conservation department’s education specialist, says of the center. “This is a way to introduce wild in the city.” The class runs from 6 to 7:30 p.m. For reservations, which are required by Monday, February 20, call the center at 816-759-7300. — NANCY HULL RIGDON [Q&A]

GOD DOESN’T REALLY HATE FAGS

Released last October, God vs. Gay? The Religious Case for Equality by Huffington Post contributor and scholar-activist Jay Michaelson had The Village Voice’s Michael Musto saying, “I always thought the Bible could be interpreted as a tool of good, not randomly translated to favor hate and oppression. Thank you, God. Looks like I’m about to go down on my knees again.” At 7 p.m., Michaelson speaks at the Kansas City LIKEME Lighthouse (3909 Main, 816-753-7770) about his book, which attempts to dispel the belief that the Bible forbids homosexuality. See kclikemelighthouse.org to get more information on this new LGBT resource center in midtown.The presentation is free and open to the public. The Pitch caught up with Michaelson to talk about his work and where exactly the discrepancies lie in the Good Book. The Pitch: You believe that the core values of Judaism and Christianity demand that LGBT individuals be respected and welcomed. Can you please explain this? Michaelson: While there are a tiny handful of ambiguous and limited verses that talk about same-sex intimacy (not homosexuality, of course — that concept wasn’t invented until the 19th century), they are subject to interpretation. The question is, which interpretation do you choose to take? To give an honest answer to that, you have to ask what fundamental values weigh into this decision. In the book, I go through a dozen or so which compel us to take the narrow reading: values like love, the importance of relationship, justice, honesty, integrity and so on. Overall, the weight of these religious traditions — including a literal reading of the Bible — is clearly on the side of full equality and inclusion. Which passages from the Bible do you believe are the most misquoted? Well, there are really three major misconceptions. First, that the Bible prohibits homosexuality. It doesn’t. Four verses (out of 30,000) limit a few sexual acts, mostly between men, when they are in the context of idolatry or lewdness. Those verses are Leviticus 18:22, Romans 1:26-27, and 1 Corinthians 6:9. Second, that whatever the prohibition is, it’s central to religion. It isn’t. The “sin” in Leviticus is the same as eating a shrimp cocktail. Jesus never mentions homosexuality at all. It’s marginal, subject to interpretation and minor. Third, that the “sin of Sodom” is homosexuality. It isn’t. It’s greed, cruelty and inhospitality (Ezekiel 16:4950, Jeremiah 23:14, Amos 4:1-2). How long did the process take to finally finish this book?

Famous road-trippers Bonnie and Clyde (Wednesday) I’ve been doing this work for 10 years, first on my own journey, and then later as an advocate for sexual and gender minorities in religious communities. The actual writing was easy — it took about six months — because I’d spent a decade doing the hard work behind it. — BERRY ANDERSON

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GANGSTER LEAN

In 1931, Charles Arthur “Pretty Boy” Floyd shot a federal agent in Kansas City. Within four months in 1933, Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow made it through two police shootouts in Joplin and Platte City. Explore our area’s storied criminal past at They’re Not Going to Get Me: Crime in the 1930s at the National Archives (400 West Pershing Road, 816-268-8000). This tidy interactive exhibit features court documents, Department of Justice records, photos and stories of the unsavory and dangerous characters who defined Depression-era crime, and the men who spent their careers trying to outwit them. It’s full of usable tidbits of information (the 1933 “massacre” at Union Station cost five lives) and imagery of what might have been one of America’s most distinctive periods of lawlessness. The exhibit is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday. For more information, see archives.gov/central-plains/kansas-city. — BERRY ANDERSON Night + Day listings are offered as a free service to Pitch readers and are subject to space restrictions. Submissions should be addressed to Night + Day Editor Berry Anderson by e-mail (calendar@pitch.com), fax (816-756-0502) or mail (The Pitch, 1701 Main, Kansas City, MO 64108). Please include zip code with address. Continuing items must be resubmitted monthly. No submissions are taken by telephone. Items must be received two weeks prior to each issue date. Search our complete listings guide online.


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stage Big Feat THE KANSAS CITY BALLET PUTS EVERY FOOT ONSTAGE FOR ITS ROMEO AND JULIET.

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KENNY JOHNSON

o your feet bleed?” a child asks. William Whitener, artistic director of the Kansas City Ballet, chuckles and repeats the question for the rest of the crowd gathered for this Friday-night open rehearsal of Romeo and Juliet. In response, a ballerina shakes her head, removes one of her slippers and passes it to the little girl, who sniffs it. Laughter erupts. “Don’t believe what you saw in Black Swan,” Whitener says. “To dance en pointe requires years of careful tutelage. You don’t just jump into a pair of point shoes and become a dancer.” BY He calls one of the dancC R Y S TA L K . ers over to demonstrate. The reference to Darren WIEBE Aronofsky’s erotic, R-rated 2010 movie is likely lost on the tweens and younger children here on the Kimberly Cowen and Luke Luzicka as the lovers evening of this gloomy February day. It’s hard to imagine their well-dressed parents letting and moving scores ever written for ballet,” them watch a movie in which Natalie Portman Whitener says. “And Prokofiev’s heart and gets it on with Mila Kunis and then morphs soul are clearly stated in this work.” The production requires all 25 of the fullinto a murderous swan. Anyone who did see it, however, may feel a little twinge watching the time dance-company members, plus a few dozen or so lithe bodies springing across the student dancers. “One of the benefits of bringing a successful floor in the lower-level auditorium of the Todd production back into repertory is the dancers Bolender Center for Dance and Creativity. Better to remember The Nutcracker. This can have another shot at the role,” Whitener shouldn’t be a problem for this audience. says. “Several years later, they’ve matured. The people here tonight have been invited And I’m sure there are things they would now because they attended the KC Ballet’s annual like to include in their interpretations.” Angelina Sansone understudied the role of Nutcracker production in 2011. “One of our goals is to introduce people to Juliet in 2008. This time it’s hers — hers and the array of ballet styles that we do,” Whitener Kimberly Cowen’s, too. Cowen returns to the part in half of the performances. (Also, Luke says later in an interview. For Nutcracker fans, the KC Ballet’s version Luzicka reprises his role as Romeo; the other of Shakespeare’s most famous work shouldn’t Romeo is danced by Anthony Krutzkamp.) be much of a stretch. “The story itself is filled “I’m very glad I had some of it in my body left with passion and love and joy and tragedy, over from last time around,” Sansone says. “I’m thrilled and really scared and miscommunication and all excited all at the same time. of the elements that ShakeRomeo and Juliet It’s a challenge in itself to speare dealt with in the tellFebruary 17–26 at the hold the character together ing of this eternal love story,” Kauffman Center for the through three acts.” Whitener says. “You can really Performing Arts, 1601 Sansone joined the KC get your teeth into it.” Broadway, 816-994-7200. Ballet in 2005. This producThis is the second time in Tickets: kcballet.org. tion of Romeo & Juliet marks five years that the company her first time dancing a lead has danced Shakespeare’s tragedy, as choreographed by Ib Andersen role in a full-length ballet with the company. to the music of Sergei Prokofiev. Members of Juliet is a role that the tall, blue-eyed ballerina the Kansas City Symphony provide live ac- has dreamed of since her early days in a tutu. “I have from the beginning been drawn to the companiment at each performance. “Everybody would probably agree that more dramatic parts,” she says. Andersen, who is artistic director for Ballet it is one of the most unique and dramatic 16

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Arizona, was able to spend about a week with the KC company last fall. “I wish we had him a little longer,” Sansone says. But the loose, emotionally driven choreography helps her live the role. “Some choreographers, they might choreograph something on every cue, but he didn’t really make it that specific. There’s a lot of freedom in it,” she says. Translating the fullness of Prokofiev’s music into the dancers’ movements, Andersen incorporates every inch of the stage. The dancers do a lot of running and leaping, as young men cross swords and young lovers chase each other around. “If you have the right emotion,” Sansone says, “the technique just falls into place.” During the February 3 open rehearsal, Mike Alley, marketing director for the KC Ballet, reported that tickets for each of the seven performances of Romeo & Juliet were selling steadily. “The box office is doing extremely well this season,” Whitener agrees. “There are many people who have seen the ballet this year who might not have in the past, and are discovering the beauty of the art form and the excellence of the productions.” The opening of the Kauffman and Bolender centers made 2011 a big year for the ballet, and the momentum hasn’t slowed. The company has a dedicated stage in the Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts. And it celebrated the completion of its own long-awaited Bolender Center by offering 100 free dance classes to the public between April and September. “It’s been an unreal year,” Sansone says. “Dancers don’t get this — two new buildings in our careers? I feel really lucky to be here at this time.” pitch.com

N O W P L AY I N G The Wrestling Season At one point during the Coterie’s new reprise of Laurie Brooks’ celebrated 2000 play, The Wrestling Season, Melanie (played by long-haired, blond Kelly Gibson) pulls a stick of gum out of her bra and offers it to Matt (Tosin Morohunfola). The flirtatious gesture elicits giggles and groans from the audience — mostly from the people old enough to recall the days before sexting. There was a time when the awkward forswearing of innocence didn’t feel quite so dirty. Brooks has revised her work, but it still effectively captures the world of teens and their ill-advised decisions. The Wrestling Season looks at eight kids (four girls and four boys) — sweaty, sometimes tearful and always conflicted — doing their best to navigate the harsh and unpredictable tides of high school social pressures. In 2012, that means ugly text messages, cyberbullying and the ultimate slam book: Facebook. The play centers on the childhood friendship of Matt and Luke (Sam Cordes) that takes a turn when a friendly teammate hug lasts a little too long. Their closeness, meanwhile, has already raised questions between rival wrestlers Jolt (Rufus Burns) and Willy (Francisco Villegas). Rumors fly, epithets are murmured, and Luke finds himself the target of “Stomp a Fag Day.” (“Thirty-six people on Facebook like it,” a character echoes.) Not helping: Jolt’s girlfriend, Heather (Eva Biro), and her easily influenced sidekick, Nicole (Andrea Morales), who twist secondhand gossip into something new to spread. M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X

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J . R O B E R T S C H R A E D E R / C OT E R I E T H E AT R E

The girls have their own problems. Melanie? For Matt (Tosin Morohunfola, left) and She’s not easy but she lets people call her “slut” Luke (Sam Cordes), it’s Wrestling Season. for the attention it brings. And Kori (Meredith Wolfe) laments, “Wouldn’t it be great if every- mate or difficult moments, averting their eyes. At the start, Cathy (Helena Cosentino) is one could just tell everyone how they really feel?” It’s Brooks speaking to her audience — an blissfully unaware that her husband, David answer to the “You think you know me, but you (Doug Dresslaer), is having an affair with don’t” that’s uttered by more than one of these Beth (Alli Tunnell). Does Beth’s husband, kids — but she keeps her characters grappling Brad (Andy Penn), suspect? Brad’s unsettling scene with David along the sidelines at their with their confusion. To keep that struggle front and center, direc- kids’ sports match makes you wonder. The scenes jump from monologues to diator Leigh Miller dresses all the characters in wrestling singlets. A referee oversees the action logues, from lovemaking to confrontation. Breakups can be ugly, and and, at the end of pivotal diapartners ready to move on logue, blows his whistle and The Wrestling Season aren’t always nice. Those makes calls like “Two points!” Through February 19 at left behind must struggle to or “Out of bounds!” He also the Coterie Theatre, 2450 understand. moderates the finale, asking Grand, 816-474-6552, In some cases, the audithe audience to line up the coterietheatre.org ence struggles, too. It’s a characters according to the complicated intersection, severity of their actions — an Orange Flower Water sex and love, that Orange exercise in judgment not far Through February 18 at Flower Water addresses. (At removed from the impulses River’s Edge Theater, one point, Beth asks David if that Brooks is asking us to 122 West Fifth Street, it’s just about the sex. Is it?) consider. But if that conclu816-405-9200, While the play takes on the sion undermines Season, it also sheandherproductions.com pleasure and the pain of resends the audience home with lationships, it doesn’t always an acute reminder of rumormongering’s poisonous effects. Words can stick make clear what’s wrong in the marriages, why like a piece of sweaty gum and leave their bad characters have fallen out of love (or if they ever taste a lot longer. — BERRY ANDERSON were in love), and what has finally driven them to leave spouses and children. At the dress rehearsal I attended, the nonequity cast was hardworking. Penn, as Brad, Orange Flower Water ront and center on the small stage at River’s was particularly affecting, moving from anger Edge Theater rests a double bed, on and to pleading and back, sometimes within the around which two couples — well, three — re- same scene. He makes Brad’s pain apparent in volve. It’s a fitting set to portray the story of two a heartwrenching monologue spoken to Beth. marriages disrupted by an affair. Craig Wright’s 90-minute play starts to feel The four characters in Orange Flower Water long toward the end, and some emotional transi(directed by Doug Ford) experience the love, tions come too abruptly and don’t ring true. Yet anger, lust, disgust, passion, apathy, confusion, I wanted to see what a character’s next decision desperation and hope found in romantic bonds would be. (Here, as in life, choices aren’t usually and their dissolution. If that sounds intense, it is. logical — just like the reasons that couples break This isn’t an easy play, and it isn’t necessarily a up or get together in the first place.) Wright’s cathartic one, but it isn’t without reward. resolution ultimately is too tidy, wounding a play The one-act begins slowly, with each of the that otherwise stays true to its considerable hurt. cast members meandering by the bed, lingering Even so, the small She & Her Productions has over it and the memories it holds. Each actor ambitiously taken on a big subject. Its execution then sits on a chair at the side of the stage. It’s an isn’t completely successful, but it’s a worthwhile, effective setup. They unobtrusively wait for their hopeful endeavor. — DEBORAH HIRSCH scenes, maintaining the mood while observing the action before them — or, during more intiE-mail feedback@pitch.com

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T

ANGELA C. BOND

he apocryphal Persian king Shahryar had thousands of wives but never kept one longer than 24 hours. The morning after each wedding, according to the legend of the Arabian Nights, Shahryar had his new bride beheaded. By the afternoon, he’d found a new virgin to marry that night. The bodies stopped piling up when Shahryar married Scheherazade, the daughter of his court vizier. Her ability to spin one exciting story after another kept her husband entranced — and her head firmly BY on her neck. CHARLES Chef and restaurateur Rashid Khalaf has had two halfway through the meal. “This drink doesn’t F E R R U Z Z A wives, and he’s a pretty good make you woozy, just gassy.” I stuck with hot tea from the beginning storyteller himself. A native of Jerusalem, Khalaf has lived most of his (though there’s a bottled sour-lemon soda served life in the United States. The former soccer- here that’s delicious with baba ghanoush) and playing college student became a professional was glad for the mellowing influence it had on cook by taking kitchen jobs in many Middle my mood. I needed the help — the Shahrazad Eastern restaurants in the area, including Café’s interior hasn’t quite escaped its fast-foodthe old Athena on Broadway in the 1980s. joint past. The fluorescent lighting remains so That’s where he learned how to prepare clas- brutal that every patron in the place appears sic Greek cuisine from the venue’s owners, ready to have a mug shot snapped. “Do yourself Yannis and Suzi Vantzos. The Athena, which a favor,” Carol Ann whispered to Khalaf. “Invest closed in 1994, was where I met Khalaf. He in a dimmer. It’s a miracle worker.” Carol Ann’s theory is that didn’t teach me anything tasteful restaurant lighting about cooking, but he did Shahrazad Market & Café is much more important in give me a full vocabulary of Appetizer combo ....... $9.99 Johnson County than anyArabic curse words, many of Fatouch salad ........... $5.99 where else in the metro. “If which were directed at me. Lamb-chop dinner ...$13.99 a woman is going to invest (Apparently, I wasn’t the Quail dinner............... $9.99 in botox and dermabrasion,” easiest waiter to work with.) Kebab combo ..........$13.99 she says, “she won’t like sitLast year, Khalaf finally ting under lights that make accomplished a dream that he’d spent at least 1,001 nights plotting: a Mid- her look like Aileen Wuornos.” For my part, I thought about borrowing a dle Eastern restaurant, coffee bar and retail store called Shahrazad. “It’s named after the hijab to blot out some of the 1,001 lights. Some of Persian queen,” says Khalaf, who has turned a Shahrazad’s lovely, young female servers wear failed Quizno’s location in south Overland Park the traditional head scarves, and several of the into a cheery bistro. Surprisingly provocative customers I saw there on my three visits had Persian music videos play on a TV monitor them on as well. On the night that I dined with mounted above a shiny cooler packed with my friend Rhiannon, she said she felt conspicuimported beverages, all nonalcoholic. (Khalaf, ous without one. I suggested that she cross the like many of his customers, is a devout Muslim.) dining room and go into the retail side of the My friend Carol Ann slugged down half a operation and see if she could buy one. She bottle of pomegranate-flavored Barbican one left for a minute and came back with a jar of night over a meal of grilled lamb chops and pickles and a bag of Turkish coffee. “They were a tart fatouch salad. The fruit-flavored malt on sale,” she said. Khalaf opened the market side of his business beverage, a product of Dubai-based Aujan Industries, has a slightly beery note but not last March and then the café seven months later. a drop of the devil’s brew. “I think I’d rather A couple of months ago, he created a Moorishhave a cup of hot mint tea,” she told our server style door between the two businesses, which

has helped sales enormously, he says: “People like to shop before, during and after dining.” I’m not that kind of dining patron. I prefer to focus exclusively on eating when I’m sitting at a table — any table. Khalaf makes that easy at Shahrazad because the dishes are presented so attractively. Who would want to look at anything else? Khalaf is particularly proud of the shiny, segmented steel platters that he found in Chicago and uses for his appetizer combo. The menu lists six items on the platter, including the predictable baba ghanoush, hummus, stuffed grape leaves and falafel. But I’ve ordered this starter three times now, and there have never been the same six items on that tray. Variety is the spice of life, I guess. But for some, the spice of life is still inexplicably cilantro, so I’ve learned to ask nicely for falafel instead of the fragrant cilantro-fried potatoes. (A better bet is to pay a slight upcharge and get them both; the potatoes are worth a couple of bites.) The fried chickpea patties are a shade too crispy, but that lets them stand up to tahini sauce, red chili paste and creamy tsatsiki if you fold all of those ingredients into the soft pita that comes with the combo. The starter selection is tasty and diverse enough to create a solid, satisfying meal for vegetarians (the list includes vegetable samosas and a great fava-bean dip). That’s good, because the entrée choices tend to be meaty (all of the flesh is halal): gyro and kifta sandwiches, beef or chicken shawarma, marinated lamb chops (divine) and a good array of grilled kebabs (beef, lamb, kifta, chicken or shrimp). When Khalaf opened his restaurant, he thought he would sell a lot of seafood — this is Johnson County, after all. But he has dropped salmon, scallops and a seafood platter from the menu. “No one was ordering seafood,” he says.

Steel-plated appetizers (left) and fatouch salad

“My clientele is either vegetarian or they want beef and lamb.” I usually want both. The cumin-scented lentil soup is wonderful, and I’ve made a meal out of the fatouch salad (a jumble of chopped crisp cucumbers, radishes, green peppers, tomatoes, red cabbage and bits of deep-fried pita) eaten with a side of soft pita and Shahrazad’s silky hummus. For customers who want to feel as if they’re dining in the court of King Shahryar, Khalaf has introduced big, round platters that he piles with rice and either the kebab combo or a duo of lamb chops and grilled quail. I’ve always thought that the quail requires a lot of work for very little meat, but Carol Ann found Khalaf’s bird delectable. The petite chops, which Khalaf marinates in salt, pepper, garlic and olive oil, were extraordinary — as good as those he used to prepare at the Athena, and maybe even better. It’s a little anticlimactic to have to eat such outstanding chops with pop or tea, but Khalaf says he hasn’t had any complaints. “Most people know, even before they step in the door, that I don’t serve alcohol,” he told me one night with a shrug. “They get used to it.” Traditional Persian desserts are on the menu — baklava, rice pudding, kunafa — but on each of my visits, I ran over to the market side and bought a handful of imported British candy bars. Sometimes, after an exotic meal, nothing sounds better than a Yorkie bar. The wrapper reads: “They’re not for girls.” Neither was Shahryar, but even he might have visited this Shahrazad for a few extra nights. Have a suggestion for a restaurant The Pitch should review? E-mail charles.ferruzza@pitch.com

pitch.com F E B R U A R Y 1 6 - 2 2 , 2 0 1 2 t h e p i t c h 19 pitch.com M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X T H E P I T C H 1


fat city [CHEFS]

Pub Life SHERI PARR ISN’T DONE BUILDING HER BRICK.

J O N AT H A N B E N D E R

T

he stares started in the winter of 2010. Sheri Parr, owner of downtown staple the Brick, would look up from the bar or just outside the kitchen and see someone at a table or a booth looking back at her curiously. “I’m used to people looking at me when they need something,” Parr says — a refill, the check. “But then the staff would tell me: ‘Sheri, they’re looking at you because you were on television.’ ” Parr and her 13-year-old restaurant appeared on the Food Network’s Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives. After that, the gawkers arrived, people eager to see the rock bar and the scratch kitchen. They wanted to try the Oklahoma Dog: a Boulevard-beerBY battered, deep-fried hot dog J O N AT H A N wrapped in bacon. And they found that the Brick wasn’t BENDER about gimmicks. It’s a soulful representation of a woman who’s the first to tell you that she’s not a chef, just someone who happens to have been around great food all her life. Parr was born in Wichita and grew up in Topeka and in Kansas City, Missouri. Her dad was an avid hunter, which meant that she grew up eating dishes like pheasant parmesan. Her maternal grandmother, Louise Graves, ran Vic’s Diner — a 24-hour café that dished up Italian classics and mashed potatoes — with her husband, Vic. “My dad was a fabulous cook. My grandmother was a fabulous cook,” Parr says, then pauses. “My mom was a good cook, too. It was just that my dad did a lot of the cooking. He was from Jersey, and when he got here, he just loved the idea that he could grow it, catch it or kill it.” Parr graduated from Washburn University with a business degree and took a job as a bar-

Parr: bartender, business major, Brick maker

tender and waitress at the Grand Emporium. She spent almost a decade there while figuring out what she wanted to do with that degree. Eventually, she took a year off to look at possible retail spaces and to decompress from life behind the bar. Work leaked back into her life, though, with a one-day-a-week job at YJ’s Snack Bar, and in 1999, she saw that the bar at 1727 McGee — then called the Pub — was for sale. Four days later, she was its new owner. The Pub had been run by two working men, Jim and Joe, who understood for 33 years what other working men wanted: cold beer and a place to sit. A trio of owners had followed Jim and Joe, but none lasted more than a year in the space. “I was pretty fearless,” Parr says. “I just didn’t listen to other people, except my grandmother. She was very, very helpful. She passed away a few years ago, but I used to call her and tell her the lunch specials every day.” She set out to create a comfortable atmosphere, one that brought together artists, musicians and eaters. In 2001, she changed the name to the Brick — to evoke, she says, something

“solid and urban.” Over the past decade, her business has been just that, a reliable enclave for artists, musicians and business-minded downtowners. “I just hope that we can continue to get better,” Parr says. “I want to be the taste and the sound and the art of Kansas City.” At the Brick’s annual Fat Tuesday bash Tuesday, February 21, the restaurant opens at 11 a.m. with a Mardi Gras-centric menu. In anticipation of that event, Parr comes out from behind the bar to answer our questions. The Pitch: What’s your best recent food find? Parr: San Antonio Taqueria in KCK. They have great street tacos and a green sauce that’s amazing. They have a beautiful peach one, but the guy there has told me not to try it. It’s made with habañeros, so it’s probably too spicy for me. What’s your favorite local ingredient? That’s really hard. Oddly Correct Coffee is fabulous. Green Dirt has amazing cheese. We sell a lot of Zim’s Hot Sauce. The staff puts that on hummus. It’s so much fun in the spring and the summer. I try to make it to BadSeed and also the City Market then. What are you experimenting with? Crawfish pies. It’s a lot like chicken potpie.

It’s creamy, with veggies — this nice, creamy roux in a nice puff pastry. It’s all about Mardi Gras here. I love New Orleans for its culture, music and spirit. What’s your guilty pleasure? Christopher Elbow. I can identify all of them just by looking at them. And, unfortunately, they’re so close to here. [Laughs.] The salted turtle, though, that’s the one. They’re amazing. What’s always in your kitchen? Tomatoes — I always have canned tomatoes. I don’t cook that much at home. I’m rarely at home, but I do cook on Sundays. With tomatoes, I can make a soup or a sauce. I tend to lean Italian. That’s my comfort food. Where do you like to eat out? YJ’s. I love having breakfast there. They have the best breakfast sandwich. I love the Jerusalem Café. Their red-pepper hummus, gyro and pita are delicious. And the Aladdin Café — they have a great Greek salad with shrimp. What recipe in town would you steal? The green sauce at the San Antonio Taqueria. I’ve almost got it figured out. I think it’s jalapeños without seeds and avocado purée, but I don’t understand how it stays so beautifully green. Why don’t the avocados turn brown? What’s one book that every chef should read? The Food Lover’s Companion [by Sharon Tyler Herbst and Ron Herbst]. I was looking something up the other day that I was calling a torte, but I just wanted to make sure it was indeed a torte. I’m not very good at describing things on menus. That’s an art. I was at the Green Goddess in New Orleans, and they have the most beautifully written cocktail menu. The way they described this tequila, it was like climbing up a mountain. It was beautiful, like poetry. That’s a skill. What’s your dream drinking-eating destination? The Virgin Islands — the island of Tortola — where I can sit in a shack and have conch salad and coconut water while doing nothing. Solid and urban at pitch.com/fatcity

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music

Streetside 28 Music Forecast 30 Concerts 32 Nightlife

34

Special Guest KANSAS CITY NATIVE AMBER PAPINI IS FEELING SOME NATIONAL LOVE WITH HER BAND, HOSPITALITY.

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the pitch

KYLE DEAN REINFORD

T

he latest release from Merge Records — arguably the most admired and influential indie-rock label in the United States, maybe in the world — is the self-titled debut LP from a Brooklyn trio called Hospitality. The album is full of cheery-sounding guitar-pop songs with a melancholy streak, and it has a fresh and casual way of evoking the feelings of being a 20-something urbanite. The band’s charms can largely BY be credited to its singer, songD AV I D writer and guitarist, Amber Papini, who was raised in KanH U D N A L L sas City. (Older readers might remember Papini’s father, the late Rano Papini, who had a long tenure as the house pianist at the American Restaurant.) The Pitch recently spoke with Amber Papini about how everything has come together. The Pitch: So you grew up in KC. How long did you live here? Papini: Yeah, I lived in Kansas City until I was 25. I grew up in, I guess you’d call it Armour Hills, 70th and Main area. Were you playing in bands and going to shows around town? My dad was always playing music in the house, like Cole Porter or Gershwin, and we’d sing around the piano a lot. Those kinds of sounds have been in my ears all my life. And I played piano, took lessons. Then my sister got a guitar for her birthday, and suddenly there was this guitar in the house, and I kind of stole it from her and adopted it and taught myself how to play. Probably when I was around 13. I just was really fascinated with it, and it was more immediate and easy for me than piano. I started writing songs around then. Then, in my later teens, I became a really curious music lover and started hanging out at Recycled Sounds and Streetside and places like that, going to the Bottleneck and Liberty Hall, going to all-ages shows downtown. Were you performing at any of those shows or just watching? No, never performing. I was really shy about playing and writing songs. Nobody really knew I was doing it. I only showed a few people a song or two back then. I didn’t pursue music really at all until after I left Kansas City and started working in theater. I wrote some music for plays, did some sound design. And I started to get some compliments and encouragement from colleagues, so I kept

FEBRUARY 16-22, 2012

writing songs. When I moved to New York, I had a job at a bank and a job as a secretary, and I would try to write as many songs as I could in my spare time. A lot of the songs on this record came out of that. Did you write all the songs on the debut? Yes, but Nathan [Michel, drums] also writes songs — he’s made some kind of electronic, avant-garde records in the past. And he’s been writing more songs for us, and we’re playing some of them live lately. How’d you get hooked up with Merge? This guy, Scott Jacobson, heard one of our songs — I think it was “Betty Wang” — on a mix that a blog did. And he contacted us back in 2009, and we started e-mailing back and forth. He’s a comedy writer and a really talented guy, and he’d directed a Superchunk video in the past. So after we recorded and mixed the record in 2011, we sent it to Scott, and he was really into it. And he volunteered to contact different labels. And Merge liked it. Are Mac and Laura [Merge founders] as great as they seem? Yeah, they’re just really down-to-earth, nice people. Mac came up from North Carolina for our release show; we’ve been down there a couple times. It’s a wonderful group of people at Merge. There’s definitely a reason they have such a great reputation and such longevity. It’s just a really solid company. pitch.com

How did you get Alia Shawkat [Maeby Fünke, from Arrested Development] to be in the video for “Friends of Friends”? That was Scott, too. He directed it, and the whole thing was his idea and creation. He got all the actors together for it. You’ll be touring for the record. Do you have a job? We all have jobs, although I recently quit mine due to the tour. The tour right now isn’t that big, but we’re sort of accumulating more and more dates. At a certain point, I just had to make the choice. Will the expanded tour include a stop around here? We’ve done the Upper Midwest tour before, but, yeah, I still haven’t played in KC or Lawrence yet. Hopefully it’ll work out with these new dates. I’m sure we’ll make it out there.

Soul Proprietorships

A

in’t no shame in playing cover songs — the crowds want to hear the hits — but most musicians hope to create something to call their own. So it is that the much-loved seven-piece soul cover band the Good Foot releases its first original recording this week. “Bad Way” is onehalf of a split 7-inch with Hearts of Darkness. And it’s a totally droned-out sludgecore dirge. pitch.com

Amber Papini has a new skyline.

Juuuuuust kidding. The song (written by guitarist Tim Braun) sounds like a classic Motown cut, all brassy and upbeat, driven by singer Julia Haile’s powerful voice. “When you’re doing covers, all the thoughts are there for you already, and when you do them for so long, you tend to mimic the emotions of the original singer,” Haile says. “With original stuff, we can put our own emotions into it. We’re starting from scratch and trying to build our own feeling: What does the Good Foot have to say? What do we want to talk about? It’s been really fun.” The single officially sees the light of day Saturday, February 18, at Carnivale du Soul, an all-ages, Mardi Gras-themed party at 8 p.m. at the Uptown Theater (3700 Broadway, 816-753-8665). Also on hand are Voler Aerial Fabrics; DJs Fat Sal, Superwolf and Joc Max; and Hearts of Darkness. (“It’s always been a good match when we’ve played with Hearts of Darkness,” Haile says.) Cost is $15 in advance or $20 day of show. Funk, soul, purples, yellows, greens, and whatever it is that they put into hurricane drinks will spill out onto Broadway. Not an evening to be missed. E-mail david.hudnall@pitch.com or call 816-218-6774 M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X

THE PITCH

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FEBRUARY 16-22, 2012

the pitch

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streetside

THREADZ BY HEADZ FOR THE HEADS

CLOTHING - JEWELRY ACCESSORIES - ART 1607 Westport Rd. KCMO 816-442-8400 Mon - Thurs 12-9pm • Fri - Sat 12-10pm • Sun 12-6pm

Can’t Lose CRAIG FINN’S CLEAR HEART FULL EYES TOUR STOPS AT RECORDBAR; BINGE-DRINKING IN MIDTOWN

Mon - Thurs 12-9pm • Fri - Sat 12-10pm • Sun 12-6pm

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FEBRUARY 16-22, 2012

pitch.com

T

he fictional town of Dillon, Texas, has colored my worldview for the past month, as I’ve binge-watched my way through nearly the entire Friday Night Lights television series. I would love to use this space to write about my endless admiration for Coach Taylor, or the many times I’ve cried while watching (mostly scenes with BY Matt Saracen), or Riggins’ Rigs, or Crucifictorious, or how D AV I D perfect-looking Minka Kelly H U D N A L L is. I mention the show instead because my journey to the final episodes coincided last weekend with the arrival in Kansas City of Craig Finn, who has titled his debut solo album Clear Heart Full Eyes — a transposed reference to FNL. As the leader of the bookish bar-rock act the Hold Steady, Craig Finn emerged in the ’00s as one of the most gifted lyricists in rock, a poet-preacher chronicling the seedy edges of modern Midwestern life. The characters in his story-songs are loners, losers and lapsed Catholics — people who hang around, go nowhere, get dumped, party too much, get busted. Finn recorded Clear Heart with a band assembled in Austin, Texas, and it sounds very much like a Hold Steady record, minus the classic-rock crunch, plus some pedal steels and acoustic guitars. Finn is not just a musical hero of mine but a literary one, too, and the prospect of seeing him up close at a place like RecordBar on a Saturday night was all kinds of thrilling. The plan was to take it easy Friday night and conserve energy for the show Saturday. But then I started drinking and ended up at RecordBar Friday night, also. I caught three local bands I’ve been meaning to check out: the Sawyers (dusty alt-country), John Velghe and the Prodigal Sons (upbeat

Not pictured: the spirit of Tim Riggins

roots-pop), and Katy and Go-Go (a guitar-drums blues duo; Go-Go’s kick drum had a picture of his own face on it). All put on fine shows, and someday soon I will write about them in more depth. Unfortunately, a point came where I sidled up to the bar, and the words “Overholt in a glass” flew out of my mouth, and then that happened again, and then I was at Buzzard Beach, and then it was the next day, and I was groaning and hurting and cold. Like a character in one of Finn’s songs, I sought relief in the disease. Around 7 p.m., I hauled my sore bones up to Harling’s, where I battled my bourbon hangover with Irish whiskey. Over time, my hands stopped shaking. Soon, I was half-drunk again. On to the show! It was fantastic. The band — a five-piece, including Finn — had played only, like, six shows, but the musicians were vibrant and tight. Finn gave a shout-out to RecordBar owner Steve Tulipana, whom he said he has known for years. He sometimes did a VH1 Storytellers type of thing, where he’d tell us what the song was about before playing it. (“No Future” — which goes Bed sheets for curtains/The devil’s a person/I met him at the Riverside Perkins — is about an actual Perkins restaurant in the Twin Cities where people would hang out after the bars closed, and this makes me love the song even more.) He closed the set with “Not Much Left of Us,” a tender song that makes my heart hurt: When I walked by the park, you were holding his hand/ Dropped it like it was hot to the touch/There’s not much left of us. The band exited the stage, and the lights went dark-red, which seemed to leave open the possibility of an encore. But encores are awkward at small clubs like RecordBar, and eventually the bright-yellow lights came up. The band hung around after the show, though, and if you wanted to talk to Craig Finn, you could have. Not a bad Saturday night in the Midwest. E-mail david.hudnall@pitch.com or call 816-218-6774


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FEBRUARY 15 Martin Zellar and The Hardways (of the Gear Daddies) w/ Charlie Parr FEBRUARY 16 Mike McClure Band w/ Country Road 5 FEBRUARY 17 Outlaw Jim Band Sarah & the Tall Boys Chris Thomas King in Retro Room FEBRUARY 18 Stacie Collins Shannon & the Rhythm Kings Brother Bagman John Dee Graham in the Retro Room Chili Cook Off FEBRUARY 19 Myra Taylor Birthday Bash Blues & Jazz Open Jam FEBRUARY 21 KCBS Mardi Gras Party Billy Ebeling Band FEBRUARY 28 Hugh Cornwell Glenn Matlock Clem Burke 816-483-1456 2715 Rochester KCMO Free Shuttle in the Downtown Area TICKETS NOW ON SALE AT knuckleheadsKC.COM pitch.com

FEBRUARY 16-22, 2012

the pitch

29


music forecast EVERY WEDNESDAY Lonnie Ray Blues Band EVERY THURSDAY Live Reggae with AZ One FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 17 Groove Agency -10:00 pm SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 18 Camp Harlow - 5 pm The Magnetics - 10 pm NIGHTLY SPECIALS

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Pokey LaFarge and the South City Three, with Betse Ellis A transposed version of this bill occurred back in December at Liberty Hall, when Betse Ellis’ band, the Wilders, was the headliner. At this more intimate Davey’s show, it’s LaFarge and company’s opportunity to shine. The St. Louis act has a rising national reputation in the ragtime-Dixieland-folk scene and is fresh off an appearance on Jools Holland’s BBC New Year’s Eve music show, Hootenanny. Thursday, February 16, at Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club (3402 Main, 816-753-1909), $10

EXPERIENCE THE

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SAT 2/17 SUN 2/18 MON 2/19 TUE 2/20 WED 2/21 THUR 2/22 FRI 2/23 SAT 2/24 WHERE

ROOM NICA’S 320 LATEFONIODGHT

Sons of Brasil 7 & 9:30pm KC Burlesque Society 7 & 9pm The Brew @ 7pm Fat Tuesday Cajun Celebration Ernst James (Zydeco Band) Julia Othmer 7pm Joe Cartwright 6&8pm Alma Flameca 7-11 (two seatings)

Michael Jackson the Immortal World Tour by Cirque du Soleil The last decades of Michael Jackson’s existence were basically a surreal circus of luxury and insanity, so it seems fitting that Cirque du Soleil would attempt a mega-production based on his life and work. That circus comes to town for two nights this week. Expect a lavish visual smorgasbord of acrobatics, aerials, B-boy dancing, a light show and pyrotechnics,

TRADITION MEETS FUSION

320 SOUTHWEST BLVD. KCMO, 64108 816-471-2900 • WWW.NICAS320.COM 30

THE PITCH

FEBRUARY 16-22, 2012

complete with a live band playing hits set to MJ’s original recorded vocals. Tuesday, February 21, and Wednesday, February 22, at Sprint Center (1407 Grand, 816-949-7000), $50–$175

Making Movies Social Club Making Movies recently announced that its sophomore album will be produced by Steve Berlin, a member of the band’s Latin-rock godfathers Los Lobos. To celebrate (and help pay for it), Making Movies is playing an unplugged show at Czar with a couple of special guests: trumpeter Hermon Mehari and St. Louis world-pop singer-songwriter Javier Mendoza. The 7 p.m. set sold out quickly, so a second performance, at 10 p.m., has been added. Thursday, February 16, at Czar (1531 Grand, 816-421-0300), $10

Stephen Malkmus and the Jicks

idea (’90s alt-rock slacker heroes, unite!) that I figured would yield some stylish but ultimately bland music. I was wrong. The record is a smart blend of Pavement’s signature crinkled rock ’n droll and Malkmus’ more recent penchant for melody and loose jams. I’ll take it over Terror Twilight any day of the week. Sunday, February 19, at the Granada (1020 Massachusetts, Larwrence, 785-842-1390), $15

Leukemia & Lymphoma Society Benefit Now in its third year, this fundraiser for LLS seeks to raise awareness of blood cancer and push forward efforts to find a cure. On the bill: Think.Like.Computers (whose drummer is a Hodgkin lymphoma survivor celebrating six years in remission), Echoes From Airplanes, Vehicle, Man Bear, and Dream Wolf. The show starts early, at 7 p.m., and runs all night. Saturday, February 18, at RecordBar (1020 Westport Road, 753-5207), $10

Stephen Malkmus enlisted Beck to produce last year’s Mirror Traffic — a cool-sounding

FORECAST KEY BY D AV I D H U D N A L L ...................................Pick of the Week

........................................ Worthy Cause

.......................... Songs Involving Trains

.................................... So Many Beards

............. What’s the Deal With Cancer?

....................................... Missouri Pride

................................................. Wryness

........................ Enormous White Gloves

................................... The King Is Dead

...................................................Collabs

.......................... Old-Timey Instruments

................................ Long Live the King

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FEBRUARY 16-22, 2012

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2/13/12 4:48 PM


karlabauer.com

concerts Nightlife listings are offered as a service to Pitch readers and are subject to space restrictions. Contact Clubs Editor Abbie Stutzer by e-mail (abbie.stutzer@pitch .com), fax (816-756-0502) or phone (816-218-6926). Continuing items must be resubmitted monthly.

THIS WEEK THURSDAY, FEB. 16

2012 “It’s Time for You to Shine!” Music Artist Seminar Award Winning Independent Music Artist Karla Bauer Will Teach You How to Create And Market Your Music World Wide

SCAN TO HEAR KARLA’S MUSIC

Praying for Snow?!

SUNDAY, FEB. 19 D.R.U.G.S., Hit the Lights, Like Moths to Flames, Sparks the Rescue: The Beaumont Club, 4050 Pennsylvania, 816-561-2560. D.L. Hughley: 7 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater, 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. Stephen Malkmus and the Jicks, Nurses: 7 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390.

hihihihih

MONDAY, FEB. 20

snowandcompany.com

Excision, Liquid Stranger, Lucky Date: The Midland, 1228 Main, 816-283-9900. The Jealous Sound, Anakin: 8 p.m., $10-$12. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179.

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FEBRUARY 16-22, 2012

Bass Capades: Mardi Gras Masquerade featuring Freddy Todd, Oblivion, Evil Bastards: 8 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. D.L. Hughley: 8 & 10:30 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater, 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. Jadakiss, Rich the Factor: The Midland, 1228 Main, 816-283-9900. Chris Thomas King: 9 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. LoCash Cowboys, Burford, Lucas Cook: The Beaumont Club, 4050 Pennsylvania, 816-561-2560. Stephen Lynch: Sold-out. VooDoo Lounge, Harrah’s Casino, 1 Riverboat Dr., North Kansas City, 816-472-7777. Winter Jam 2012 featuring Skillet, Sanctus Real, Peter Furler, Kari Jobe, Building 429: Sprint Center, 1407 Grand, 816-283-7300.

Carnivale du Soul with Hearts of Darkness, the Good Foot, DJ Fat Sal, Voler Aerial Fabrics, Superwolf, Joc Max: 8 p.m. Uptown Theater, 3700 Broadway, 816-753-8665. D.L. Hughley: 7 & 10 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater, 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. JamBaroque: Celtic roots, baroque improvisation 8 p.m. All Saints Episcopal Church, 9201 Wornall, 816-363-2450. Leslie & the LY’s, Pennyhawk, Ramona and the Swimsuits: The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Leukemia & Lymphoma Society Benefit featuring Dream Wolf, Think.Like.Computers, Manbear, Echoes from Airplanes, Vehicle: 6 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Strange Arrangement, Making Movies, the Atlantic: The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483.

Made from scratch High end spirits Unique frozen cocktails

THE PITCH

FRIDAY, FEB. 17

SATURDAY, FEB. 1 8

Artful frozen CoCktAils

32

Aer, Matt Easton, Myle High Society: The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. The Features, Sleazebeats, Lazy: 9 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Pokey LaFarge and the South City Three, Betse Ellis: 8:30 p.m. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club, 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Making Movies, Hermon Mehari, Javier Mendoza: 7 & 10 p.m., cover at door. Czar, 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Mike McClure Band, Country Road 5: 8 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Mutemath, Canon Blue: The Beaumont Club, 4050 Pennsylvania, 816-561-2560.

TUESDAY, FEB. 21 Michael Jackson the Immortal World Tour by Cirque du Soleil: 8 p.m., $50-$175. Sprint Center, 1407 Grand, 816-283-7300. Mark Lowrey Presents: 8 p.m., $3. Czar, 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300.

pitch.com

UV Hippo, James & the Devil, Ozzy Backus: The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483. Ying Yang Twins: 8:30 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390.

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 22 Elephant Revival: The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483. The Hackensaw Boys, Lydia Loveless: 8 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Michael Jackson the Immortal World Tour by Cirque du Soleil: 8 p.m., $50-$175. Sprint Center, 1407 Grand, 816-283-7300. The Tontons: The Eighth Street Taproom, 801 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-6918.

UPCOMING Trace Adkins: Fri., March 9. The Midland, 1228 Main, 816-283-9900. Blind Pilot: Sat., March 3. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. The Chieftains: Wed., March 7. Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts, 1601 Broadway, 816-994-7200. Corrosion of Conformity, Torche, Valient Thorr: Fri., March 9, 7 p.m. The Beaumont Club, 4050 Pennsylvania, 816-561-2560. Cursive, Ume: Fri., March 2, 9 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Drake: Thu., March 1, 8 p.m. Sprint Center, 1407 Grand, 816-283-7300. Every Avenue: Thu., Feb. 23. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. The Fresh Beat Band: Fri., Feb. 24, 5 p.m. The Midland, 1228 Main, 816-283-9900. Hate Eternal, Goatwhore, Fallujah, Troglodyte, Gornography: Wed., Feb. 29, 6:30 p.m., $14. The Beaumont Club, 4050 Pennsylvania, 816-561-2560. The Head & the Heart, Drew Grove & the Pastors’ Wives: Sun., March 4. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Katie Herzig: Mon., March 5. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Junius, O’Brother: Sun., Feb. 26, 8 p.m. Jackpot Music Hall, 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-832-1085. Madonna: Tue., Oct. 30. MANY MORE Sprint Center, 1407 Grand, 816-283-7300. Pretty Good Dance Moves, Second Hand King: Thu., Feb. 23, 9 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd., 816ONLINE AT 753-5207. PITCH.COM Punch Brothers: Sat., March 3. Liberty Hall, 644 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1972. Puscifer: Tue., March 6. Municipal Auditorium/Music Hall, 301 W. 13th St., Complex), 816-513-5000. Reptar: Thu., March 8. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483. Reverend Horton Heat, Larry and His Flask, the Goddamn Gallows: Sat., Feb. 25. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483. Rusko, Nmzee: Wed., Feb. 29. Liberty Hall, 644 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1972. SOJA, the Movement, Kids These Days: Thu., Feb. 23. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483. George Strait, Martina McBride: Sat., Feb. 25. Sprint Center, 1407 Grand, 816-283-7300. Symphony X, Iced Earth, Warbringer: Sun., Feb. 26. The Midland, 1228 Main, 816-283-9900. Josh Turner: Thu., March 1, 6 p.m. Uptown Theater, 3700 Broadway, 816-753-8665. The Ultimate Doo-Wop Show: Fri., March 2. The Midland, 1228 Main, 816-283-9900. VNV Nation, Straftanz: Thu., March 1. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Ron White: Sat., March 10, 7 & 9:30 p.m. The Midland, 1228 Main, 816-283-9900. Whitehorse: Fri., March 9. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Yacht: Fri., March 2, 9 p.m. Jackpot Music Hall, 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-832-1085. Zola Jesus, Talk Normal: Fri., Feb. 24. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390.

FIND

CONCERT LISTINGS


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FEBRUARY 16-22, 2012

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nightlife

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ROCK/POP/INDIE The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. third seven.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Levee Town. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Grand Marquis, 9 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Jimmie Bratcher, 7 p.m. Mike Kelly’s Westsider: 1515 Westport Rd., 816-9319417. Lonnie Ray Blues Jam. The Phoenix Jazz Club: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-2215299. Rob Foster and Chris Lewis. Trouser Mouse: 625 N.W. Mock Ave., Blue Springs, 816220-1222. Salty Dog.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS Browne’s Irish Market: 3300 Pennsylvania, 816-5610030. Three Dollar Band, 6 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785749-7676. John Statz, Dollar Fox, the Silver Maggies.

DJ The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785841-5483. Team Bear Club. Dark Horse Tavern: 4112 Pennsylvania, 816-931-3663. DJ Beatbroker. Saints Pub + Patio: 9720 Quivira, Lenexa, 913-4923900. DJ Brad Sager.

HIP-HOP Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-7491387. Chirpin’! Hip-Hop at the Jazz featuring Ryan Forest, Dom & Cody, Antimosity, Buffalo Soul.

ACOUSTIC

COMING SOON!

The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Brent Windler, Ryan Wallace, Scotty Hollywood.

Johnson County’s

JAZZ

NEWEST

The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. Horace Washington. Jazz: 1859 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913328-0003. Billy Ebeling. Take Five Coffee + Bar: 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park, 913-948-5550. The New KC Seven featuring Kerry Strayer.

MUSIC

HOT SPOT

WORLD The Hideout: 6948 N. Oak Tfwy., 816-468-0550. Salsa night. The Levee: 16 W. 43rd St., 816-561-2821. Live Reggae with AZ One.

{formerly The Buzzz}

LIVE MUSIC

DRUNKEN DISTR ACTIONS/COMEDY/ BAR GAMES

STARTING FEB 12TH 2DAVE HAYES ND6PM OPEN JAM EVERYBA SUNDAY

Bulldog: 1715 Main, 816-421-4799. Brodioke, 9 p.m. Buzzard Beach: 4110 Pennsylvania, 816-753-4455. Trivia, Ladies’ Night, 7 p.m. Ernie Biggs Dueling Piano Bar: 4115 Mill, 816-5612444. “You Sing It” Live Band Karaoke. Hamburger Mary’s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-842-1919. Charity Bingo with Valerie Versace, 8 p.m., $1 per game. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. Sandman the Hypnotist. MoJo’s Bar & Grill: 1513 S.W. Hwy. 7, Blue Springs. Pool and dart leagues; happy hour, free pool, 4-6 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Trivia Clash, 7 p.m., $5. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-9311986. Trivia, 9 p.m.

WED 2/15 ROCK PAPER SCISSORS 8-11PM FRI 2/17 RHYCHUS REBORN 8-11PM SAT 2/18 LEVEE TOWN 8-11PM SUN 2/19 DAVE HAYES BAND OPEN JAM 2-6PM MON 2/20 DAVID PANICO SOARING SAX MAN 8-11PM TUE 2/21 DAVE HAYES BAND OPEN JAM 8-11PM

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Vi Tran and Katie Gilchrist’s Weekly Jam, 10 p.m. Harleys & Horses: 7210 N.E. 43rd St., 816-452-2660. Open Jam with JD Summers featuring Jeremy Butcher and the Bail Jumpers. The Indie on Main: 1228 Main, 816-283-9900. Open Mic, Low Dough Beer Night, 8 p.m. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 302 S.W. Main, Lee’s Summit, 816525-1871. Jerry’s Jam Night, 9 p.m.

12056 W. 135th St. OPKS 913-239-9666 34

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F R I DAY 17 ROCK/POP/INDIE Aftershock Bar & Grill: 5240 Merriam Dr., Merriam, 913-384-5646. Astral Fifty, Asleep at Sea, Kaydanye, Hero, Shockrome. The Brooksider: 6330 Brookside Plz., 816-363-4070. Rock Cove. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-7531909. All Eyes Closed, Crybaby Ranch, Mad Kings, the Dirt Kings, 8:30 p.m. Harleys & Horses: 7210 N.E. 43rd St., 816-452-2660. Under the Covers. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-894-9676. Red Guitar. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 302 S.W. Main, Lee’s Summit, 816525-1871. Johnny Rampage. The Well: 7421 Broadway, 816-361-1700. The Magnetics.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL Clarette Club: 5400 Martway, Mission, 913-384-0986. Ernest James Zydeco. Fat Fish Blue: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-3474. Funk Syndicate. The Hideout: 6948 N. Oak Tfwy., 816-468-0550. Levee Town. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Dan Bliss and Kasey Rausch. The Phoenix Jazz Club: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-2215299. Dan Doran Band, 9 p.m. Thirsty Ernie’s: 1276 W. Foxwood Dr., Raymore, 816322-2779. The Outtakes. Trouser Mouse: 625 N.W. Mock Ave., Blue Springs, 816220-1222. The Nace Brothers.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS Bar West: 7174 Renner Rd., Shawnee, 913-248-9378. The Outlaw Junkies. The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. John Statz, Dollar Fox, 6 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Outlaw Jim and the Whiskey Benders, Sarah and the Tallboys, 8 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785749-7676. The Blackbird Revue, 6 p.m.; The F Holes, E 100, 10 p.m.

DJ Mosaic Lounge: 1331 Walnut, 816-679-0076. Mosaic Fridays: hosted by Joe Perez featuring DJ Mike Scott.

HIP-HOP Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. The Fresh Tunes, Dope Vibes Tour with Brooks, DJ Travis Read, Ir NeKo, J Stylez, Cuddy Mac, Jet Moran, and more. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Illphonics, Clay Hughes & the What, 9 p.m.

ACOUSTIC Mike Kelly’s Westsider: 1515 Westport Rd., 816-9319417. Eddie Delahunt.

JAZZ B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Mike Smith & Kings of Sax. The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. Indigo Hour, 5:30 p.m. Great Day Café: 7921 Santa Fe Dr., Overland Park, MANY MORE 913-642-9090. Cat DaddyO’s, Wicked Mirage, 7 p.m. Jazz: 1859 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-328-0003. Brian Ruskin Trio. ONLINE AT Lucky Brewgrille: 5401 PITCH.COM Johnson Dr., Mission, 913403-8571. Ron Carlson Trio with Kathleen Holeman, 7 p.m. Nica’s 320: 320 Southwest Blvd., 816-471-2900. The Sons of Brasil, 8 p.m. R Bar & Restaurant: 1617 Genessee, 816-471-1777. Grand Marquis. Take Five Coffee + Bar: 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park, 913-948-5550. Alma Flamenca featuring Jarrod Stephenson. Thai Place: 9359 W. 87th St., Overland Park, 913-6495420. Jerry Hahn.

FIND

CLUB LISTINGS

DRUNKEN DISTR ACTIONS/COMEDY/ BAR GAMES Bleachers Bar & Grill: 210 S.W. Greenwich Dr., Lee’s Summit, 816-623-3410. Karaoke, DJ, drink specials. The Indie on Main: 1228 Main, 816-283-9900. Ladies’ Night, Low Dough lady specials, 10 p.m.


VARIET Y Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-7491387. After Dark Burlesque. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. MidCoast Takeover SXSW Benefit with Cherokee Rock Rifle, Maps for Travelers, We Are Voices, the Atlantic.

S AT U R DAY 1 8 ROCK/POP/INDIE Aftershock Bar & Grill: 5240 Merriam Dr., Merriam, 913384-5646. Black Ribbon Sky, the Devil’s Marmalade, Uncountable Kings, An Endless Chapter, Burning Tide. The Brooksider: 6330 Brookside Plz., 816-363-4070. Sellout. Danny’s Bar and Grill: 13350 College Blvd., Lenexa, 913-345-9717. California Voodoo. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-832-1085. Sobriquet, Ford the River, Oils. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 302 S.W. Main, Lee’s Summit, 816525-1871. Nervous Rex. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Jon Dee Graham, in the Retro Lounge, 9:30 p.m. The Levee: 16 W. 43rd St., 816-561-2821. The Magnetics, 10 p.m.; Camp Harlow, 5 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785749-7676. Winter Formal with the Kinetiks, Universe Contest, DJ Darren Keen, 10 p.m.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Mama Ray Jazz Meets Blues Jam, 2 p.m.; Ernest James Zydeco, 9 p.m. The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Full Bloods, Richard the Lionhearted. Dynamite Saloon: 721 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785856-2739. Mojo National Band. Fat Fish Blue: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-3474. Linda Shell and the Blues Thang. Trouser Mouse: 625 N.W. Mock Ave., Blue Springs, 816220-1222. Indigenous, the Rumblejetts.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-7531909. Le Grand, Adam Lee and the Dead Horse Sound Company, Calamity Cubes, Carrie Nation and the Speakeasy, Jason & the Haymakers, 8 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Stacie Collins, Shannon and the Rhythm Kings, on the main stage, 10:30 p.m. R Bar & Restaurant: 1617 Genessee, 816-471-1777. Phantoms of the Opry.

DJ The Beaumont Club: 4050 Pennsylvania, 816-561-2560. Red Bull Thre3Style featuring Bobby Keys, Brent Tactic, Magnum, CEO, SKU, B-Stee, Who and JT Quick. Thirsty Ernie’s: 1276 W. Foxwood Dr., Raymore, 816322-2779. DJ B. The Well: 7421 Broadway, 816-361-1700. DJ C-Mac.

JAZZ Jazz: 1859 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913328-0003. Mark Valentine and the Ticklers. Take Five Coffee + Bar: 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park, 913-948-5550. Everette DeVan Trio.

DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS/COMEDY/ BAR GAMES Californos: 4124 Pennsylvania, 816-531-7878. Mardi Gras Massacre(ade). MoJo’s Bar & Grill: 1513 S.W. Hwy. 7, Blue Springs. Happy hour, free pool, 1-4 p.m. Power & Light District: 14th Street and Main, 816-8421045. Mardi Gras Festival. The Red Balloon: 10325 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-962-2330. Karaoke, 8 p.m., free. Sidecar at the Beaumont Club: 4050 Pennsylvania, 816561-2560. 13th Annual Barstool Open, 10:30 a.m. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-9311986. Deelightful karaoke, 9 p.m.

Great Day Café: 7921 Santa Fe Dr., Overland Park, 913642-9090. Up Our Sleeves, 7 p.m.

FOLK Mike Kelly’s Westsider: 1515 Westport Rd., 816-9319417. Buttermilk Boys.

VARIET Y Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-7491387. SUNU 2nd annual Masquerade Ball.

S U N DAY 1 9 BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Pat Recob & the Confessors. Trouser Mouse: 625 N.W. Mock Ave., Blue Springs, 816220-1222. The Clementines.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS Jazz: 1859 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913328-0003. Jay EuDaly, 3 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. The Nace Brothers, Living Room Session, 8 p.m.

DJ The Gusto Lounge: 504 Westport Rd., 816-974-8786. Death Before Dubstep. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785749-7676. DJ G Train, 10 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Pastor Jochen, REv McD Deacon Earl Breeze, Bishop Bill Spektor, Archdiocese Dobson.

HIP-HOP Jerry’s Bait Shop: 302 S.W. Main, Lee’s Summit, 816525-1871. 13irthMark.

JAZZ RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Jazz Discharge, 7 p.m.

DRUNKEN DISTR ACTIONS/COMEDY/ BAR GAMES The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785841-5483. Smackdown Trivia and Karaoke, $5. The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Mermaid Brunch. Clarette Club: 5400 Martway, Mission, 913-384-0986. Texas Hold ’em, 7 & 10 p.m. Fuel: 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park, 913-451-0444. SIN. Hurricane Allie’s Bar and Grill: 5541 Merriam Dr., Shawnee, 913-217-7665. Double Deuce Poker League, 4 p.m.; Ultimate DJ Karaoke, 8:30 p.m. Jake’s Place Bar and Grill: 12001 Johnson Dr., Shawnee, 913-962-5253. Free pool, 3 p.m. JR’s Place: 20238 W. 151st St., Olathe, 913-254-1307. Karaoke with Mad Mike, 9:30 p.m. Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. Dirty Dorothy, 10 p.m.; Show Stopper Karaoke, 12:30 a.m. Tengo Sed Cantina: 1323 Walnut, 816-686-7842. Salute to Our Armed Forces. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-9311986. Texas Hold ’em, 3 & 6 p.m.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Bleachers Bar & Grill: 210 S.W. Greenwich Dr., Lee’s Summit, 816-623-3410. Open Blues and Funk Jam with Syncopation, 6 p.m. The Eighth Street Taproom: 801 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-6918. Taproom Poetry Series. The Hideout: 6948 N. Oak Tfwy., 816-468-0550. Open blues jam, 7 p.m. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-7491387. Speakeasy Sunday, 10 p.m., $3. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Open Jam with Levee Town, 2 p.m., free. R.G.’s Lounge: 9100 E. 35th St., Independence, 816-358-5777. Jam Night hosted by Dennis Nickell, Scotty Yates, Rick Eidson, and Jan Lamb, 5 p.m.

SUNDAY FEBRUARY 19

METAL/PUNK Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-832-1085. Wrath and Ruin, Melting Point of Bronze, Confined in Flesh.

EASY LISTENING

P PRESENTS

Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. Early Girlie Show, 8 p.m.; Ab Fab Fridays on the main floor, 10 p.m. The Red Balloon: 10325 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-962-2330. Karaoke, 8 p.m., free. Retro Downtown Drinks & Dance: 1518 McGee, 816421-4201. Trivia Riot, 7 p.m. Tengo Sed Cantina: 1323 Walnut, 816-686-7842. Jersey Shore Meets Tengo.

YING YANG TWINS FAT TUESDAY

W/ NURSES

EVERY AVENUE 2/23

ZOLA JESUS

W/WHITE WIDOW

2/24

2/29 ARCHNEMESIS + NADIS WARRIORS

VARIET Y VooDoo Lounge: Harrah’s Casino, 1 Riverboat Dr., North Kansas City, 816-472-7777. Cover Wars.

M O N DAY 2 0 ROCK/POP/INDIE Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. 3 Son Green, Marbin, Yam Band.

WADE BOWEN 3/2

BLIND PILOT 3/3 pitch.com

ASHER ROTH 3/8 FEBRUARY 16-22, 2012

RANDY ROGERS BAND 3/10 THE PITCH

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BLUES/FUNK/SOUL The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785841-5483. 4onthefloor. The Hideout: 6948 N. Oak Tfwy., 816-468-0550. Blue Monday Trio.

JAZZ Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Jazzbo, no cover.

DRUNKEN DISTR ACTIONS/COMEDY/ BAR GAMES The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Karaoke with Nanci Pants; Rural Grit Happy Hour, 6 p.m. Clarette Club: 5400 Martway, Mission, 913-384-0986. Texas Hold ’em, 7 & 10 p.m. Harleys & Horses: 7210 N.E. 43rd St., 816-452-2660. Magic Mondays with Jason Dean. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Karaoke Idol with Tanya McNaughty. Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. MANic Monday on the main floor, 10 p.m., free. Nara: 1617 Main, 816-221-6272. Brodioke, 10 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Sonic Spectrum Music Trivia, 7 p.m., $5.

FOLK RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Attic Wolves, Anna Vogelzang, Rebecca Hart, 9 p.m.

VARIET Y Californos: 4124 Pennsylvania, 816-531-7878. Opera Supper, 6-9 p.m.

T U E S DAY 21 BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Fat Trampled Under Fat Tuesday. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Grand Marquis, 9 p.m. Jazz: 1859 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913328-0003. Dan Bliss, noon. Rich Berry, 3:30 p.m.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS Jazz: 1859 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913328-0003. Brendan MacNaughton, 7 p.m.

JAZZ Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Phase II, 5 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. KCBS Mardi Gras Party with Billy Ebeling & the Late for Dinner Band.

DANCE Madrigall: 1627 Oak, 816-472-4400. 2 Step Tuesday, Ladies are free. Tacos available. Featuring KC Elite 2 Steppers, and Grown & Sexy Sliders.

DRUNKEN DISTR ACTIONS/COMEDY/ BAR GAMES The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Fat Tuesday; Scrabble Club, 7 p.m. Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. Coda Pursuit Team Trivia with Teague Hayes, 7 p.m. Flying Saucer: 101 E. 13th St., 816-221-1900. Trivia Bowl, 7:30 & 10 p.m., free. The Hideout: 6948 N. Oak Tfwy., 816-468-0550. Fat Tuesday with Outlaw Jim and the Whiskey Benders. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. Clash of the Comics, 7:30 p.m. Johnny’s Tavern: 13410 W. 62nd Terr., Shawnee, 913-962-5777. Bingo Boogie Nights, 9 p.m. Johnny’s Tavern: 11316 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-851-5165. Texas Hold ’em. Mike Kelly’s Westsider: 1515 Westport Rd., 816-931-9417. Critter’s Fat Tye Dye Tuesday. The Roxy: 7230 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-236-6211. Karaoke. Saints Pub + Patio: 9720 Quivira, Lenexa, 913-492-3900. Karaoke, 9 p.m. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. Chess Club, 7 p.m.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Bleachers Bar & Grill: 210 S.W. Greenwich Dr., Lee’s Summit, 816-623-3410. Open Mic Acoustic Jam. The Phoenix Jazz Club: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-2215299. Open Jam with Everette DeVan, 7 p.m.

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Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Open Mic Night.

SINGER-SONGWRITER Harleys & Horses: 7210 N.E. 43rd St., 816-452-2660. Scott Ford Songwriter Showcase, 7 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Scott Kelly, Eugene Robertson, Sounding the Deep, 9 p.m.

W E D N E S DAY 2 2 ROCK/POP/INDIE RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Bob Walkenhorst, 7 p.m.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Shinetop Jr. The Levee: 16 W. 43rd St., 816-561-2821. The Lonnie Ray Blues Band. The Phoenix Jazz Club: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-2215299. Piano time with T.J. Erhardt. Trouser Mouse: 625 N.W. Mock Ave., Blue Springs, 816220-1222. Levee Town.

DJ Buzzard Beach: 4110 Pennsylvania, 816-753-4455. Live DJ, midnight. Saints Pub + Patio: 9720 Quivira, Lenexa, 913-4923900. DJ Pure.

ACOUSTIC Mike Kelly’s Westsider: 1515 Westport Rd., 816-9319417. Brian Ruskin Acoustic Showcase.

DRUNKEN DISTR ACTIONS/COMEDY/ BAR GAMES Beer Kitchen: 435 Westport Rd., 816-389-4180. Brodioke. Danny’s Bar and Grill: 13350 College Blvd., Lenexa, 913-345-9717. Trivia and karaoke with DJ Smooth, 8 p.m. Hamburger Mary’s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-8421919. Charity Bingo with Valerie Versace, 8 p.m., $1 per game. Harleys & Horses: 7210 N.E. 43rd St., 816-452-2660. Karaoke, Ladies’ Night. Hurricane Allie’s Bar and Grill: 5541 Merriam Dr., Shawnee, 913-217-7665. MANY MORE Ultimate DJ Karaoke, 8:30 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. Hump Day featuring Benji ONLINE AT Brown, 8 p.m. PITCH.COM The Indie on Main: 1228 Main, 816-283-9900. Karaoke, 9:30 p.m. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 302 S.W. Main, Lee’s Summit, 816-525-1871. Club Jerry’s, reverse happy hour, 9 p.m.-12 a.m. Nara: 1617 Main, 816-221-6272. Ladies’ Night. Outabounds Sports Bar & Grill: 3601 Broadway, 816214-8732. Karaoke with DJ Chad, 9 p.m. The Red Balloon: 10325 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-962-2330. Karaoke, 8 p.m., free. The Roxy: 7230 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-2366211. Karaoke. Tonahill’s South: 10817 E. Truman Rd., Independence, 816-252-2560. Ladies’ Night with DJ Thorny, 6 p.m.1:30 a.m. The Union of Westport: 421 Westport Rd. Pop Culture Trivia. Wilde’s Chateau 24: 2412 Iowa, Lawrence, 785-8561514. Pride Night, 8 p.m.

FIND

CLUB LISTINGS

EASY LISTENING Fuel: 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park, 913-451-0444. Colby & Mole.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Bleachers Bar & Grill: 210 S.W. Greenwich Dr., Lee’s Summit, 816-623-3410. Open Blues and Funk Jam with Syncopation, 7 p.m. The Hideout: 6948 N. Oak Tfwy., 816-468-0550. Open blues jam, 6 p.m. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-7491387. Acoustic Open Mic with Tyler Gregory. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-894-9676. Jam Night, 9 p.m. Tonahill’s 3 of a Kind: 11703 E. 23rd St., Independence, 816-833-5021. Open Jam hosted by Crossthread, 7:30-11 p.m.


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FEBRUARY 16-22, 2012

THE PITCH

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savage love Q&A at UAA I headed north last week to do Savage Love Live — a rapid-fire, slightly tipsy Q&A session — at the University of Alaska Anchorage. It was my third visit to UAA and it was a blast. All of the questions in this week’s column were submitted to me by UAA students and staffers. Dear Dan: Should I go ahead and divorce my fantastic wife of 23 years now because gay marriage is going to destroy it eventually anyway? Tony From Wasilla Dear TFW: You might as well do it now, if only to beat the rush. Just in the last couple of weeks, the 9th Circuit ruled that California’s Prop 8 is unBY constitutional, the governor of Washington State signed marDAN riage equality into law, and S AVA G E marriage equality campaigns made huge strides in Maryland and Maine. Pretty soon, all the lawyers who specialize in “traditional divorce” are going to be booked solid as traditional marriages buckle under the strain of all of this equality nonsense. Wait too long to get divorced, and you may not be able to get divorced at all. Find a lawyer now! Dear Dan: I am with a girl who is a female ejaculator. It’s pretty cool, but the quantity of ejaculate is way too much. Am I getting peed on here? Tidal Wave Dear TW: You’re not getting peed on. (Science says: female ejaculate ≠ urine.) But don’t take my word for it: Ask your girlfriend to piss on you sometime, and see if you can’t tell the difference. Dear Dan: I know about your “price of admission” theory. What else do you have to offer by way of advice for a healthy, lasting relationship? Annoyed With Him Dear AWH: Selective, self-induced short- and long-term memory loss. You have to learn to shrug off minor and sometimes not-so-minor annoyances — maybe even a betrayal or two over the decades — because an ability to forgive and truly forget is necessary for the survival of any long-term relationship. If you’re having a hard time getting there, speak to your doctor about medical marijuana. Dear Dan: I’m a lesbian, and my friend who is a bi male keeps asking me to peg him. How should I deal with this? Not Into Boys Dear NIB: If it doesn’t bother you, laugh it off. If it does bother you, slap him down. 38

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Dear Dan: How do you tell a more-than-a-friend that his hygiene is an issue? The New Girlfriend Dear TNG: “Hey, big boy, you stink. Jump in the shower — there’s a blow job in it for you.” Dear Dan: Advice for beginning buttsexers? We’re having trouble getting started. Hole New World Dear HNW: Start with rimming, during or immediately after a shower, move on to fingers, small toys, and finally dick. Take your time! Work up to buttsex over a week or two, not in a single evening. Lots of lube, penetration should be slow and very controlled, breathe, medical marijuana. Dear Dan: I can’t brag to my friends, but I need to brag publicly and anonymously: I had a threesome for the first time, and it was AWESOME. Highly recommended! Fun Unicorn Completes Kinksters Dear FUCK: Another perceived-to-be-monogamous couple that actually isn’t monogamous! Welcome to the monogamish club! Dear Dan: My husband wants to be spanked. This is beyond my comfort zone. What can I do to get over this apprehension? Practice on the dogs and cats? Can’t Go There Dear CGT: A woman who spanks her dogs and cats goes to actual jail, but a woman who spanks her husband goes to GGG heaven. But if you simply can’t get over your apprehension, outsource those spankings to your friendly local professional dominant. Dear Dan: My best guy friend had sex with me. Does that mean he loves me? Holding Out Hope Dear HOH: Don’t be ridiculous. People have sex with people they don’t love all the time. It isn’t proof that your guy friend doesn’t love you, of course, but it’s not proof that he does. Dear Dan: I recently broke off a relationship after my female partner demanded that I get a circumcision. I told her I would get one if she did. She told me I was a sexist asshole. I don’t see where she gets off asking me to mutilate myself if she won’t. Am I wrong? Uncut About Anchorage Dear UAA: You weren’t wrong to refuse to cut yourself for her, but you were wrong to equate “female circumcision” with male circumcision. A woman who’s been “circumcised” — a woman who has been subjected to genital mutilation — has had her clit cut off. The male equivalent

would be the removal of the head of the cock, not the foreskin. Dear Dan: With all the stress of jobs, relationships, kids, etc., what’s your advice for romance and great sex when you’re overwhelmed by life? Jack and Jill Dear JAJ: My advice is to give up on great sex. Not forever, but for now. Make time for some good-not-great, low-stakes, low-pressure, undemanding mutual masturbation sessions. Lie down together and get off while dirty talking about the truly great marathon sex sessions you’re gonna have once your stress levels drop. Then do it! Dear Dan: You have heard that an ordinance to protect LGBT people from being evicted or fired will be up for a vote in Anchorage soon. Well, I am a bi woman in a het relationship who works in an office where the environment is akin to the Fellowship of the Bros. Recently, I attended a pride event where a coworker saw me act in a very non-hetero way. I’m afraid this person will out me and I will be harassed at best and fired at worst. What can I do? Unsafe at Work Dear UAW: Not much, sadly. LGBT people are not protected under the City of Anchorage’s antidiscrimination statutes. There have been three attempts to add protections for LGBT people to the law; all three failed after “Christian” activists protested, lied, demagogued, bullied mayors, and lied some more. One Anchorage—a coalition of progressive organizations—gathered enough signatures to put a equal rights initiative on the ballot in Anchorage. The vote is April 3, and passing Proposition 5 will make it illegal to discriminate against LGBT people in housing, public accommodation, employment, and credit.

HEY, LGBT SUPPORTERS: We scored some big victories in the last two weeks. But as we race toward marriage equality in California, Washington State, Maryland, and New Jersey (don’t be such a fucking coward, Christie!), we should remember that there are LGBT people living in cities, counties, and states without any civil rights protections for queers. I hate to guilt folks into making political donations two weeks in a row—last week, Planned Parenthood, this week, One Anchorage—but One Anchorage could use our help. The haters are planning a big advertising campaign to block equality for LGBT people in Anchorage. One Anchorage needs to get on the air and counter the hate and lies. Donate here: oneanchorage.com. Find the Savage Lovecast (my weekly podcast) every Tuesday at thestranger.com/savage. Have a question for Dan Savage? E-mail him at mail@savagelove.net pitch.com

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FEBRUARY 16-22, 2012

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39


Classified

Employment

FREE ONLINE ADS & PHOTOS AT KC.BACKPAGE.COM TO PLACE YOUR AD TODAY, CALL 816.218.6721

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FEBRUARY 16-22, 2012

Physicians at the Asthma Clinical Research Center at Truman Medical Center hospital Are currently recruiting for 2 studies for Asthma patients • If you have been diagnosed with ASTHMA or asthma with chronic rhinitis and sinusitis • If you are at least 21 years old • All study related care is provided at no cost for those who take part • Financial compensation for time and travel are also available

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This Asthma Center is one of 19 prestigious centers of excellence funded by the American Lung Association. Please Call 816-404-5503 to learn more about this research study.

5525 Legal Services $99 DIVORCE $99 Simple, Uncontested + Filing Fee. Don Davis. 816-531-1330 ACCURSO & LETT LAW FIRM Experienced & Affordable Traffic Law, Criminal Defense, Family Law, DWI Defense, Bankruptcy, Restraining Orders. 100 Grand, KCMO 816-587-4LAW 19105 Overbrook, Leawood, KS - 913-402-6069 AccursoandLett.com KCDefenseLawyer.com ENTERTAINMENT LAWYER for MMA Fighters, Musicians, Actors, Film, Models (KC, MO & Surrounding Area) Previous experience in NYC entertainment industry and management At an affordable rate, I will represent you in matters such as: Writing/Reviewing Contracts; Negotiating; Intellectual Property matters and General legal matters. Law Office of J.P. Tongson 816-265-1513 ARREST RECORDS EXPUNGED! Don't let a mistake follow you for life! Stop hiding from your past that effects your future job, car lease, or college app. Juvenile & Adult, City, State, & Federal. 316-390-4049 DoItYourselfExpungements.com

Law Offices of David M. Lurie DWI, SOLICITATION, TRAFFIC DEFENSE, INTERNET-BASED CRIMES 816-221-5900 http://www.the-law.com Macey Bankruptcy Law Voted Best Attorney in KC by Pitch Readers. Only $100 down, we have helped over 100,000 clients eliminate millions in debt. FREE CONSULTATION. ATTY: Craig Horvath, 816-8766366, 1125 Grand Blvd, Suite 916, KCMO. MaceyBankruptcyLaw.com 5537 Adoptions *ADOPTING YOUR newborn is lifes greatest treasure. Endless love, security, happiness awaits your precious baby. Expenses paid. Maryann & Matt. 888-2257173

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$30/HOUR STUDIO TIME Prepay Only BRAND NEW STUDIO! Credit/Debit Available Call Dan Smith 816-214-6088 ENTERTAINMENT LAWYER for MMA Fighters, Musicians, Actors, Film, Models (KC, MO & Surrounding Area) Previous experience in NYC entertainment industry and management At an affordable rate, I will represent you in matters such as: Writing/Reviewing Contracts; Negotiating; Intellectual Property matters and General legal matters. Law Office of J.P. Tongson 816-265-1513 5625 Plug The Band

FEMALE BACKUP SINGERS WANTED! FOR: Multi Award Winning Rock Cover Band MUST BE: Attractive, Energetic and have Strong Vocal Ability Mixed with Outstanding Stage Presence. CALL 913-963-1952

5810 Health & Wellness: General Auto Insurance STARTING @ $40 SR22,, non-owners Life & Health Insurance MO: 816-531-1000 KS: 913-239-0900 www.KCinsurance.com 5103 Auditions / Show Biz FILM SEEKS CAST- open casting call for feature film Sunday, February 19th at Epperson Auditorium (4415 Warwick Blvd.) 1:00pm 5:00pm. More info at www.kickmemovie.com 5105 Career / Training / Schools

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AMERICAN FOOD & VENDING CORPORATION, a national provider of dining and catering services is growing in Kansas City. Bring your energy and enthusiasm to help us create great dining experiences every day! F/T and P/T hours are available at several of our great account locations. A great hourly rate and all uniforms are provided. To apply for these positions, please respond with a resume to the addresses that appear with the job locations: Short Order Cook 4PM-12AM; Claycomo Cook, cashier and customer service mwilliams@afvjobs.com

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FEBRUARY 16-22, 2012

12-10103_CON_ad_MOMKC-PW_Green8_4x5_4c_[01].indd 1

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Real Estate

SEDERSON

MANAGEMENT COMPANY www.sederson.com (816) 531-2555

1502 W 47th

1 BR 1 BA $525

TO PLACE YOUR AD TODAY, CALL 816.218.6721

Hardwood floors, Appliances, AC, Coin laundry, Storage ONE MONTH 4448 Jefferson FREE! 2 BR $525 Central Air, Appliances, Balcony, Lawn Care Provided, MONTH 5811 Maple ONEFREE! 1 BR 1 BA $475 Central Air, New Carpet, Appliances, Parking

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THE PITCH

FEBRUARY 16-22, 2012

Rentals

FREE ONLINE ADS & PHOTOS AT KC.BACKPAGE.COM

pitch.com

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5317 Apartments For Rent MO-VALENTINE $400-$850 816-753-5576 CALL TODAY! Rent Studios, 1 & 2 BR Apartments & 3 Bedroom HOMES. Colliers International, EHO MO-WESTPORT $400-$525 816-545-4227 CALL FOR MOVE-IN SPECIAL. 3 to choose from. Spacious, redecorated 1 bedroom apartments. Furnished or unfurnished. New Stove, Refrigerator, Counter Tops & Cabinets. Porch/Balcony. Convenient location. 1/2 block to Max Bus Line. Heat/Water paid. Secured, Natural wood work,Hardwood Floors Cable Ready. Off Street Parking. NO PETS! CALL TODAY MO-WESTPORT/PLAZA $500/MTH 816-561-9528 Winter Special- Large 2 Bedroom, Central Heat, Balcony, Private Parking, Garbage disposal. 3943 Roanoke and 3821 Central Call for details KCMO $375-$425 816-912-2505 A Must See! All Utilities paid, Newly Remodeled, spacious studios $375, 1 BR $425. 622 Hardesty, KCMO. 816-912-2505 PUBLISHER’S NOTICE: All real estate advertised herein is subject to Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to adverise, “any preferences, limitation, or discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or intention to make any such preference, limitation, or dicriminaiton. We will not knowing accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on a equal opportunity basis.

5320 Houses For Rent KS- Turner Area $675 816-254-7200 Pet friendly 2 bedroom house, hardwood floors, full basement, 2 car garage with opener, appliances, pets welcome, patio for BBQ's; rs-kc.com KDCX8 KS-KANSAS CITY $695 816-531-2555 4608 Booth, 2 Bedroom, appliances, central air, bsmt, parking.

NorthlaNd Village

MO- Hyde Park $800 913-962-6683 Character filled 3 bed/2 bath house, character filled hardwood floors, toasty fireplace, living room, appliances, pets are welcome! rs-kc.com KDCXX MO- Rockhurst Area $900 816-254-7200 Sleek and sharp 2 bedroom house, toasty fireplace, full basement, 2 car garage with opener, fenced yard, appliances pets welcome! rs-kc.com KDCXY MO- Waldo Area $600 913-962-6683 Character filled and budget friendly; 3 bedroom house, warm and inviting living room, spacious floorplan throughout, pets OK; $600 rs-kc.com KDCX2

MO-SOUTH KANSAS CITY $645 816-761-2382 2 Bedroom, 2 bath house for rent. 7901 Oldham Rd. All appliances including W/D. MO-WESTPORT $1095 816-531-2555 4420 Jarboe, 3 bedroom, 3 bath, central air, dishwasher, laundry hookups

KS- KU Med Area $600 816-254-7200 Stretch out and relax here; 2 bedroom house, oversized living room for lazy weekends, garage with opener, safely fenced yard, pets OK; rs-kc.com KDCX6

MO - DOWNTOWN 816-421-4343 One-of-a-kind spaces in a variety of historic fully restored buildings throughout Downtown, Crossroads, Westside, and West Bottoms. Commercial, residential, office, loft, art studios, and live/work spaces.

KS- Prairie Village $950 816-254-7200 Charming 3 bedroom house in a great neighborhood, garage with opener, safely fenced for pets and kids, appliances, pets welcome! rs-kc.com KDCYC KS- Shawnee Area $725 913-962-6683 Reasonably priced 2 bedroom house, light filled main living area with dining & living room, fenced yard, W/D hookups, pets OK! rs-kc.com KDCYA

•Lease out your property? • Sell your Property? • Find a place to rent? • Find a place to buy?

$100 deposit oN 1&2 Bedrooms

Know Someone Who Does?

$525 / up Large 1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apts and Townhomes

WE DO IT ALL!!!

Fireplace, Washer/Dryer Hook-ups, Storage Space, Pool.

I-35 & Antioch • (816) 454-5830

Stonewall Court Apts 1-Bdrms starting at $395 central air, secure entry, on site laundry, on bus line, close to shopping, nice apts, Sections 8 welcome $100 Deposit (816) 231-2874 M-F 8-5 office hours

Boveri Realty Group Sales - 816.333.4545 Leasing - 816.333.4040 MoveDowntownKC.com

Last Chance / Fresh Start Leasing

5367 Office Space For Rent

KS- Overland Park $800 913-962-6683 Newly updated 2 bedroom house, custom tile features, living room & dining room, garage, fenced yard with deck, appliances, pets OK! rs-kc.com KDCYB

Do you need to...

& 3 Bedroom Apartments Starting @ $425

MO- 93rd & Wornall $1100 913-962-6683 No application fee; 3 bed/2 bath house, stretch out and relax in the living room, garage, loaded with appliances, large yard; rs-kc.com KDCX3

KS- 47th & Mission $800 913-962-6683 Recently remodeled 3 bedroom house, classy hardwood floors, spacious living room, 2 car garage, appliances, no application fee! rs-kc.com KDCX7

KS- Olathe $800 816-254-7200 Large two story floorplan; 2 bedroom house with 1.5 bathrooms, toasty fireplace for romantic evenings, full basement, pets OK; rs-kc.com KDCX5

WilloWind ApArtments

3927 Willow Ave • KCMO 64113 816.358.6764

KCMO- 39th St. $1000 816-254-7200 Newly remodeled & huge! 4 bed/2 bath house, basement, garage, appliances including dishwasher, fireplace, deck for BBQ's, pets OK! rs-kc.com KDCXZ

KS- Lenexa Area $1195 913-962-6683 Get a lot for your money; 4 bed/2 bath house, dining room and living room, garage with opener, fenced yard, appliances, pets OK! rs-kc.com KDCYD

StudioS, 1&2 BedroomS • All utilities included • Off Street Parking • Laundry Facilities 816-531-3111 • Huge Windows 1111 W. 39th St. • High Ceilings KCMO

MO- 70th & Gregory $1200 913-962-6683 Loaded with updates; 3 bed/2 bath house, basement, 2 car garage, safely fenced yard, appliances including dishwasher and more! rs-kc.com KDCX1

5320 Houses For Rent

KCMO $650 816-786-4385 3 bed, 1 bath. 7504 E 112th St., KCMO. $650/mo. Close to HWY 71 & Blue Ridge Blvd. Central air, one car garage, fenced yard. Will accept pets & Section 8. 816-786-4385

Stylish Apartments in Historic Midtown Building

1, 2

MO-CROWN CENTER $595 816-531-2555 2516 Holmes, One plus bedroom, hardwoods, dishwasher, granite countertops

KCK- 53rd St. $800 816-254-7200 Get more for your money here; 3 bedroom house, family room and living room, plush carpeting, fireplace, patio for BBQ's, pets OK! rs-kc.com KDCX9

the

Downtown Area

Holiday Apartments

BRING THIS AD IN FOR $20 UTILITIES $110/WEEK OFF YOUR $100/DEPOSIT* Month to Month Rent FIRST 2 Laundry facilities - on-site PAID! WEEKS * Restrictions apply Call (816) 221-1721 -Se Habla Espanol ALL

COMING MARCH 22

LS

Rental & Real Estate Guide

LivingSpaces special advertising supplement pitch.com

FEBRUARY 16-22, 2012

THE PITCH

43


• R E A D E R S’ C H

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R E A D E R S’ C

816.218.6759

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Voted Best Attorney in KC by Pitch Readers Get started with only $100 down. We have successfully helped over 100,000 clients eliminate millions in debt.

Johnson County’s Premier Hookah Bar

ATTY: Megan Leimkuehler FREE CONSULTATION 816-875-6366 | 1125 Grand Blvd. Suite 916, KC MO www.MaceyBankruptcyLaw.com

10909 Shawnee Mission Pkwy, Shawnee KS, 913-248-4437 18+

INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL BARTENDING ✱VALENTINES DAY SPECIAL✱

Marriage & Family Visas Green Cards/Work Permits

Free consultations-Law Office of Joseph W. Alfred 913-538-6720 www.lojwa.com

Mention this ad & receive up to $200 off regular tuition for qualified candidates. Reg. tuition $795 Two week program-Job placement assistance FT, PT, Parties, Weddings,Always in demand! Call 816-753-3900 TODAY !!!

ARREST RECORDS EXPUNGED!

U-PICK IT SELF SERVICE AUTO PARTS

Don't let a mistake follow you for life! Stop hiding from your past that effects your future job, car lease, or college app. Juvenile & Adult, City, State, & Federal. 316-390-4049 - DoItYourselfExpungements.com

$$ Paying Top Dollar $$ For Junk Cars & Trucks Missouri: 816-241-7548 Kansas: 913-321-1000

Auto Insurance Starting @ $40.00 SR22-Non-owner / MO: 816-531-1000 / KS: 913-239-0900 **www.DeMastersInsurance.com**

CASH PAID FOR JUNK/UNWANTED

99.7% Toxin Free w/n an hour Ad_Kansas CP 090212 We can help you pass Coopers 3617 Broadway, KCMO Ad_Kansas CP 090212.ai 1 2/14/12 816.931.7222

www.MoneyMakingClub.org $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ $12,000 + / month Attainable. 8:58 AM (913) 526-5150

VEHICHLES. Call J.G.S. Auto Wrecking For Quote. 913-321-2716 ot Toll free 1-877-320-2716

Simple, Uncontested + Filing Fee. Don Davis. 816-531-1330 C

Practice emphasizing DWI defense. Experienced, knowledgeable attorney will take the time to listen and inform. Free initial phone consultation.

M

Dominique is a Leo from the Bay Area. She loves hiking, jet skiing and all things water related. She is wearing the Chiffon Oversized Button-Up, Stripe Fisherman’s Pullover and the Dark Wash High-Waist Jean.

Y

CM

Retail Locations: CY

Country Club Plaza 447 W. 47th St. (Across from Scooter’s Coffeehouse) Phone: (816) 561-1533

CMY

K

Quality built, low cost transmission. Quality Auto Service. Free towing. Northland Auto: 816-781-1100

HOTEL ROOMS

A-1 Motel 816-765-6300 Capital Inn 816-765-4331

6101 E. 87th St./Hillcrest Rd. ,HBO,Phone, Banq. Hall $39.95 Day/ $159 Week/ $499 Month + Tax

Green Smoke 816-585-6800

America's Best Selling E-Cig/Free Trials 307 S 7 Hwy Blue Springs Ward Pky Ctr 14300 E 40 Hwy Indep Flea Mart D6

CLUBEROTICAKC.COM #1 Lifestyle House Party

Every Fri. & Sat. Issue Date February 16th POKER IN HIS LIMO KansasPARTY City, WITH Missouri $200 per night. Call for details.

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Electric Service Upgrade www.sjelectricalcontractorsllc.com Call Steve 816-217-9448

DOWNTOWN AREA STUDIO APT $110/WEEK Min.

$100 Deposit, All Utilities Paid, Laundry Facilities. On Metro Bus Line as of 10/3/11. Holiday Apts, 115 W. Harlem Rd, KCMO 816-221-1721 Se Hable Espanol

816-587-4LAW(4529) MISSOURI FEBRUARY 16-22, 2012

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CUSTOM BLENDED TO YOUR TASTE

Make 200 smokes in approximately 8 minutes! traderjackstabacco.com

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Real Estate & Bankruptcy Reasonable rates! Evening & Weekend appt. Susan Bratcher 816-453-2240 www.bratcherlaw.biz

DOWNTOWN AREA STUDIO APT $110/WEEK Min.

$100 Deposit, All Utilities Paid, Laundry Facilities. On Metro Bus Line as of 10/3/11. Holiday Apts, 115 W. Harlem Rd, KCMO 816-221-1721 Se Hable Espanol

FILM SEEKS CAST- open casting call for feature film Sunday, February 19th at Epperson Auditorium (4415 Warwick Blvd.) 1:00pm - 5:00pm. More info at www.kickmemovie.com

SPEEDING, DWI, POSSESSION, ASSAULT I provide efficient legal services & close personal attn for clients For a free consult Call: The Law Office of J.P. Tongson (816) 265-1513 CASH PAID FOR JUNK/UNWANTED

Marriage & Family Visas Green Cards/Work Permits

$99 DIVORCE $99 Law Offices of David M. Lurie

DWI, SOLICITATION, TRAFFIC DEFENSE, INTERNET-BASED CRIMES816-221-5900

pitch.com

Simple, Uncontested + Filing Fee. Don Davis. 816-531-1330

HOTEL ROOMS

A-1 Motel 816-765-6300 Capital Inn 816-765-4331

http://www.the-law.com

6101 E. 87th St./Hillcrest Rd. ,HBO,Phone, Banq. Hall $39.95 Day/ $159 Week/ $499 Month + Tax

CASH FOR CARS

INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL BARTENDING ✱VALENTINES DAY SPECIAL✱

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Cash Paid ! www.abcautorecycling.com 913-271-9406

BANKRUPTCY • FAMILY LAW • TRAFFIC • DWI DEFENSE

EXPERIENCED

THE PITCH

AMERICAN GROWN TOBACCO

Free consultations-Law Office of Joseph W. Alfred 913-538-6720 www.lojwa.com

ACCURSO & LETT LAW FIRM

44

$24.95/box of 200 smokes

VEHICHLES. Call J.G.S. Auto Wrecking For Quote. 913-321-2716 ot Toll free 1-877-320-2716

MY

THE LAW OFFICE OF DENISE KIRBY 816-221-3691

Mon-Sat 10-8 Sun 12-5

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AFFORDABLE

913-402-6069

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KANSAS

Mention this ad & receive up to $200 off regular tuition for qualified candidates. Reg. tuition $795 Two week program-Job placement assistance FT, PT, Parties, Weddings,Always in demand! Call 816-753-3900 TODAY !!!

The Pitch 02.16.2012  

The Pitch 02.16.2012

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