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MAY 8-14, 2014 | FREE | VOL. 33 NO. 45 | PITCH.COM

WHAT HAPPENED IN OKL AHOMA’S DEATH CHAMBER SHOULDN’T HAPPEN IN MISSOURI’S. BY

STEVE VOCKRODT


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m ay 8 -14 , 2 014 | v ol . 3 3 no. 4 5 E d i t o r i a l

Editor Scott Wilson Managing Editor Justin Kendall Music Editor Natalie Gallagher Staff Writers Charles Ferruzza, David Hudnall, Steve Vockrodt Editorial Operations Manager Deborah Hirsch Events Editor Berry Anderson Proofreader Brent Shepherd Contributing Writers Tracy Abeln, Krystin Arneson, Jen Chen, Liz Cook, April Fleming, Larry Kopitnik, Angela Lutz, Dan Savage, Nick Spacek

ridin’ dirty Lyft likes the ride-share model, doesn’t like sharing the regulatory burden. b y dav i d h u d n a l l

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a r t

Gun Molls have taken charge of

Funeral for Brother John The Mystery Train

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n a t i o n a l

Missouri shrouds its sometimes unconstitutional executions in secrecy.

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FRIDAY, MAY 9TH

f r om par i s w i th love

o n t h e c ov e r

CD RELEASE PARTY AT VOODOO

24 5 6 9 13 15 17 18 22 28 38

Questionnaire streetside feature agenda film Café fat City musiC d a i ly l i s t i n g s savage love

mean w hi l e at pi tch.com

photo by kelly kurt brown, design by jeremy luther

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No, the BALTiMORE HOTEL was not on this site. Why do Missouri lawmakers want to copy the KANSAS TAx-CuT DiSASTER? uBuNTu CAFé — carryout soul food — now open on Troost.


Questionnaire

Tricia Bushnell

Legal director, the Midwest Innocence Project

YOUR LOGO HERE

Hometown: Ventura, California Current neighborhood: Volker What I do (in 140 characters): I represent folks

who are convicted of crimes they say they did not commit and prove their innocence. I tell the untold stories.

What’s your addiction? Barbells and youngadult fiction. Also, Twitter.

What’s your game? Roller derby. It’s a true

sport. Offense and defense played at the same time? In the same direction? Kansas City has some of the best in the country. Go watch the Kansas City Roller Warriors, if you haven’t already.

What’s your drink? Decaf coffee, unless it’s one Where’s dinner? Probably at my house or

my office. If I can get out, though, then I try to take it easy at some local celiac-friendly favorites like the Green Room, Eden Alley or Beer Kitchen. The more important questions: “Where’s brunch?” and “Where’s dessert?” Tell me your secrets, Kansas Citians.

More

Q&As

W hat ’s on your KC postcard? Pictures of

our amazing coffee, beer and chocolate. And maybe a steak. t a ine I mean, really, who Onl .com doesn’t love these pitch things? I’d want to visit.

Finish this sentence: “Kansas City got it right when …” It “stole” the Folk Alliance Confer-

ence. If you didn’t go this year, you should. Powerful talent + intimate venues + perfect sound mixing + no wait through an opening act = a concertgoer’s dream.

“Kansas City screwed up when …” It became

acceptable to use “east of Troost” as a euphemism for race. The terminology doesn’t fool anyone. And it doesn’t change the fact that the folks who live there are just people like me and everyone else. The difference is that no one is using geographic terms to gloss over and forget me.

“Kansas City needs …” Better public transportation and a renewed commitment to community. We’re a vast city with diverse populations and diverse interests; until we connect people, we cannot connect ideas.

s a b r i n a s ta i r e s

of those days; then bourbon, neat.

“In five years, I’ll be …” A little older and a

little more tired, but probably doing exactly the same thing. There’s a lot of injustice in the world.

“I always laugh at …” Dogs wearing booties and

bad puns. They are my bad-mood kryptonite.

“I’ve been known to binge-watch …” British television shows, Korean soap operas, and incredibly depressing documentaries. The Inbetweeners, Secret Garden and Into the Abyss are some of my faves. “I can’t stop listening to …” The Ignition (Remix)

Pandora station; Della Mae; and the Chvrches cover of Janelle Monáe’s “Tightrope.”

“I just read …” A bunch of legal opinions, briefs, my Feedly and e-mail. Always e-mail. I did manage to sneak in Max Barry’s Lexicon and Mike Mullin’s Ashfall for fun. The best advice I ever got: “You’re all right. The world’s messed up.” My grandfather used to say this to me when I’d fall down as a kid. I find it’s applicable in most situations. Worst advice: To calm down/not take things

so seriously. I’d say there isn’t enough outrage. Some things are very serious and demand both our attention and our action.

My sidekick: My dog. I think she has more friends than I do. My dating triumph/tragedy: Google Fiber and

Netflix

My brush with fame: I was once stuck overnight at an airport hotel in Chicago because of weather and saw both Don King and the New York Jets at the hotel bar. I also got Muhammad Ali’s autograph when I was a kid. My 140-character soapbox: Care less about

what others think about you and more about why you think certain things about others. Do good. Assume wisdom. Fear no man.

What was the last thing you had to apologize for? Arriving late. Being loud. Forgetting

a birthday. Misspeaking. You know, all of the regular things that come with being a human.

Who’s sorry now? Me, for not being a better-

quality human.

My recent triumph: Getting the headings

and page numbering to work in Word on a filing day. Why is this always so hard? Someone needs to invent a deadline-proof wordprocessing program.

pitch.com

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StreetSide

Ridin’ diRty

O

n April 24, the ride-sharing company Lyft expanded into 24 new markets, including Kansas City. Millennials cheered. The establishment jeered. Petitions have been signed, lawsuits filed. Lots of drama. But what is Lyft? “Your friend with a car,” says the company’s marketing materials. If your friend were a San Francisco–based transportation service backed by millions and millions of dollars, reachable via app, and signified by fuzzy pink mustaches affixed to each car’s front grill. To get a ride, you download the Lyft app to your smartphone, then create a Lyft account by logging in through Facebook and supplying your credit-card information. When you’re ready to roll, you open the app and hit “Request Lyft.” The app knows your location and sends you the nearest Lyft driver to shuttle you to your next destination. (Lyft drivers use their own vehicles. To be a Lyft driver, you apply through its website; no training necessary.) You’re charged through the app, eliminating the need for a cash or credit-card exchange. That sounds pretty convenient. In fact, local governments say, it’s too convenient. Lyft has not registered its drivers and drivers’ vehicles in most of the markets the company has entered. Because it is not in compliance with local ordinances, KC’s Lyft is operating illegally — a snafu the company is temporarily sidestepping by saying all of its rides are free through May 8. That hasn’t kept Kansas City’s Regulated Industries Division from sending Lyft a letter outlining which city ordinances the company is violating. The city’s police force has been instructed to issue citations to Lyft drivers (whose pink mustaches make them easy to spot); six were handed out over the first weekend of operation. Even Mayor Sly

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James, who rarely misses an opportunity to stroke new business (particularly from the tech sector, which the app-driven Lyft certainly calls home), is talking tough. “To my knowledge, Lyft made no attempt to contact the city in advance to check into our laws,” James wrote in an April 28 Twitter screed. “I think that is like someone walking into your house off the street and sitting down to eat dinner at your table without an invitation or at least an introduction. … Our ordinances are there for lots of reasons having to do with passenger safety, consistent service/fees, prior litigation etc. … If Lyft wants to comply with the law, they are welcome.” Lyft’s KC experience is similar to the company’s reception elsewhere around the country. In St. Louis, a judge has ordered Lyft to stop operating in the city and county. Officials in Madison, Wisconsin, and Pittsburgh have conducted undercover stings of Lyft drivers. In all 24 of its new markets, Lyft is offering the same two-week grace period of free rides. Because no money is being exchanged, laws technically aren’t being broken. In Nebraska, for example, where Lyft has a presence in Omaha and Lincoln, the Nebraska Public Service Commission has warned Lyft (and its ride-share competitor, Uber) to cease advertising for drivers and has threatened to impound Lyft cars if they are found to have charged for rides. Meanwhile, members of the Omaha Chamber of Commerce are urging the state to find a solution that will allow companies like Lyft to operate in the city. Lyft hasn’t had trouble everywhere, though. Last year, California became the first state to legalize ride-share services, calling them “transportation network companies.” There, Lyft is required to have licensing from the California Public Utility Commis-

pitch.com

Lyft likes the ride-share model, doesn’t

By

like sharing the regulatory burden.

D av iD HuDn a l l

sion, a minimum $1 million–per-incident insurance policy, regular vehicle inspections, and criminal background checks for its operators. That’s not far from what the company would have to do in order to run within Kansas City’s ordinances. Here, Lyft drivers would need to acquire commercial insurance and commercial driver’s licenses, and Lyft would have to pay permit fees (roughly $300 annually per vehicle). Councilman Russ Johnson tells The Pitch that city staff members have already been working with other ride-sharing companies (presumably Uber, which has been advertising locally on social media), and that those companies’ “approach has been much more responsible in terms of the due diligence they are following as they enter the KC market.” Johnson adds, “City staff reached out to Lyft before it even launched with an offer to help it get licensed, but the company never responded to several attempts to communicate with them.” So why doesn’t Lyft just comply? One possible answer: arrogance. After a reply acknowledging The Pitch’s interview request, Lyft did not respond to follow-up e-mails asking this and other questions. A representative told the Kansas City Business Journal, when that paper presumably asked some intelligent questions, that “Lyft’s peer-to-peer ridesharing model does not fit existing regulations for taxis and limos.” The tech culture in San Francisco and Silicon Valley — Lyft’s home culture — is notorious for its disdain for the inefficiencies of government. Companies like Lyft, which has $250 million in venture capital from hedge funds and Chinese e-commerce businesses, are run by young people who believe that they are changing the world. The

genius of their ideas and the money backing them, they figure, are force enough to get government behind them, not the other way around. Sometimes they are right. Another simple reason that Lyft has so far avoided pesky paperwork: the costs associated with compliance, which would eat into Lyft’s profits. Insurance is one of any livery company’s biggest expenses. Not having to take out full liability policies represents a huge competitive advantage for companies like Lyft as they go up against traditional taxis. Local taxi companies are well aware of that advantage. Bill George, president of the Kansas City Transportation Group — which owns Yellow Cab, the biggest cab company in town — says he doesn’t have a problem with new competition or even with Lyft’s business model. “The technology is amazing,” George says. “We offer the same product, actually. Ours is called zTrip. The difference is, it’s in total compliance with the city’s ordinances.” But, he says, “What would happen if some popular corporate restaurant came to town and said, ‘I don’t need a business license, your laws are antiquated, they don’t apply to me’? Nobody would tolerate that. And yet that’s exactly what they’ve [Lyft has] done. So all we’re saying is, ‘Get your permits, get your licenses, get commercially insured.’ If a local livery company with a fleet of 10 vehicles can do it, why can’t a California startup with $250 million in backing do it, too?” That is a pretty good point. And so far, Lyft hasn’t done much to dispel the impression that behind the cute mustache is a faceless, big-money enterprise designed to pick up local revenue without obeying local laws. Would a friend act like that?

E-mail david.hudnall@pitch.com


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MISSOURI SHROUDS ITS EXECUTIONS IN SECRECY. IT’S TIME TO END THE STATE’S DEATH PENALTY.

R

ussell Bucklew bleeds from his eyes. Blood seeps without warning from his ears, nose and mouth as well. Bucklew suffers from cavernous hemangioma — meaning clusters of blood vessels in his head are weak and prone to rupturing. The Potosi Correctional Center isn’t the best place for someone with Bucklew’s condition. Cold days in his cell aggravate the disease, which also impairs his speech and causes severe headaches, among other symptoms. Stress worsens the bleeding. And living on Missouri’s death row comes with a very specific kind of stress. Bucklew is scheduled for execution on May 21. He has been in custody since March 22, 1996, the day after he shot Michael Sanders in a Cape Girardeau County, Missouri, trailer home. Bucklew suspected that Sanders was having an affair with Stephanie Ray, Bucklew’s girlfriend until their Valentine’s Day breakup that year. Bucklew’s attorneys over the years have couched Sanders’ shooting as a crime of passion, but Bucklew had threatened Sanders’ life weeks before the crime.

After shooting Sanders in the chest (a coroner later testified that he didn’t die right away but instead bled out), Bucklew kidnapped Ray and raped her. Like the other men Missouri has executed over the past several months, Bucklew isn’t innocent. His isn’t the kind of crime that generates public sympathy. Unlike others waiting for a lethal injection from Missouri, however, Bucklew has a medical condition that calls into question whether the state can execute him without causing unconstitutional suffering. His lawyers argue that pushing the state’s usual deadly cocktail into his weak veins could cause them to collapse. In such a circumstance, the drugs may not quickly reach their targeted vital organs. Instead, the chemicals would seep into his tissue, making for a prolonged and painful execution. “We find the situation terrifying,” says Cheryl Pilate, a Kansas City lawyer who represents Bucklew. “The thing that is so incredible to me is, to my knowledge, not a single thing has been done to attempt to minimize the risks to Mr. Bucklew.” The Pitch contacted the Missouri Department of Corrections’ deputy attorney, Matthew Briesacher,

and its director, George Lombardi, to ask if they had considered Bucklew’s condition while preparing for the May 21 execution. Neither addressed the question. Silence from the Missouri Department of Corrections and other state agencies involved in capital punishment has become the norm. Missouri law requires government agencies to fulfill open-records requests as soon as possible, but the Department of Corrections has not produced lethal-injection records sought by this publication as far back as February. It has blocked death-row inmates’ access to information about how they will die. And state officials have made a concerted effort to prevent the release of any information about how Missouri conducts executions. Concern about Bucklew’s medical condition isn’t a legal Hail Mary to delay his execution. Two physicians who have reviewed Bucklew’s medical charts have questioned whether the state can bring about a rapid and painless death through lethal injection. Bucklew's attorneys are trying to secure funding from the courts to have physicians examine their continued on page 10

BY

STEVE VOCKRODT pitch.com

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C

layton Lockett’s execution started the way Dean Sanderford expected. Sanderford, a defense attorney for Lockett who had never before seen an execution, joined several reporters, Oklahoma Department of Corrections officials and other witnesses to view the death of 38-year-old Lockett, convicted in the 1999 murder of Stephanie Neiman. Around 6:30 p.m., Lockett was given midazolam, a short-acting sedative designed to render him unconscious. Midazolam was one of three drugs Oklahoma was using in an untested cocktail of drugs. The same drug was used in an apparently botched execution earlier this year in Ohio. (In January, Dennis McGuire was killed using an untested two-drug combination; witnesses reported signs of distress before he died.) Charles Tullius, an anesthesiologist at Coastal Carolina Hospital in South Carolina, says the midazolam dose that Lockett received was about 10 times the amount he would administer for a therapeutic procedure such as a colonoscopy. “He looked like a guy falling asleep,” Sanderford tells The Pitch. “It reminded me of … light sleep where you’re kind of aware of what was going on but you’re still dreaming.” Once the prison warden announced that Lockett was receiving two other drugs that would kill him, Sanderford says Lockett began to twitch and seemed to be coming out of his chemically induced slumber. Twitches quickly

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Fallin and others in the Oklahoma Legislature had heeded warnings about the state’s untested execution protocol. The Oklahoma Supreme Court in April ordered a stay of Lockett’s execution while the courts sorted out concerns over how Oklahoma was planning its April 29 double execution, the first such event since 2000. The order prompted a furious reaction from Fallin, who questioned whether the state’s highest court had the authority to stay an execution. Mike Christian, a tough-guy Oklahoma state representative, was so keen on going ahead with the executions that he moved to impeach Oklahoma Supreme Court justices. Those justices lifted their stay on April 23, leading to the debacle in Oklahoma’s death chamber six days later. The execution was ugly enough that the pro-death-penalty Obama administration issued a rebuke.

M k e l ly k u r t b r o w n

continued from page 9 client more closely to get a better sense of the risks that a lethal injection might pose. They estimate that such an exam would cost $7,500, which is less than what the Missouri Department of Corrections has paid pharmacies to obtain execution drugs in the past. Hemangiomas or not, the possibility that Bucklew will meet a grim end in Bonne Terre this month seems all the more likely in the wake of Oklahoma’s bungled April 29 execution — one carried out on a man whose veins were healthy. Missouri’s capital-punishment method is intimately entwined with Oklahoma’s. The two states have accelerated the pace of their executions at a time when other states have begun to consider abolishing the death penalty. Each state is led by a governor eager to keep the gears moving on his or her state’s death machine, outrunning courts that question just how the executions are carried out. Both states cling to secrecy to protect those methods, despite evidence suggesting that inmates are at risk for painful, unconstitutional deaths. Both states share a history of botching executions. And both states, for these reasons, should stop executing prisoners.

Clayton Lockett died painfully in this room.

gave way to bucking and thrashing against the restraints that kept Lockett pinned to a gurney. Sanderford says Lockett was trying to speak, though he couldn’t understand what his client was saying. Other media reports suggest that Lockett was saying, “Oh, man.” One thing seemed clear: Lockett was awake and suffering. At that point, corrections officials lowered a curtain to prevent witnesses from seeing what happened next. “The curtain drops, and I would say there were seven or eight DOC employees in the witnessing room,” Sanderford recalls. “I can tell you they looked as horror-struck as anyone else did. … They’re constantly calling one DOC guy out and another guy out, running back and forth, clearly not having any idea about what was going on and panicking about what was going on.” Twenty-five minutes after the curtain fell, and 45 minutes after the execution began, Lockett was pronounced dead. The prison warden told witnesses that the execution had been halted. Charles Warner’s execution, scheduled for later that evening, was postponed. “I think even more than what I saw, what haunts me more about it is knowing there was a 25-minute period where no one knew what was going on, and we have every reason to believe it was getting worse and worse and worse,” Sanderford says. “I just can’t stop thinking about that.” Prison officials say Lockett suffered a major heart attack. Sanderford says he has since heard from anesthesiologists who believe

pitch.com

that explanation is dubious, both because the diagnosis was made so quickly and because they believe Lockett more likely suffocated to death from a paralytic drug he had received as part of the execution cocktail. Tullius suspects that the line delivering the drugs missed Lockett’s vein. “It wouldn’t matter what they used — if the IV wasn’t in the vein, this wasn’t going to work,” Tullius says. “That’s been a problem consistently with these executions because various medical associations and nursing associations are not in favor of us — physicians and nurses — doing the IV [for an execution]. So you have amateurs putting in the IV.” Tullius also doubts that Lockett, at age 38, had a heart attack. “Sometimes people drop dead running a marathon and they appear very healthy,” Tullius says. “In this instance, it was so fast, there wouldn’t even really be time for a heart attack to develop.” It’s unknown whether prison officials attempted to revive Lockett or provide any kind of medical assistance once the execution was stopped. His body was sent to a medical examiner in Dallas for an autopsy. Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin called for an independent investigation into Lockett’s execution. But that “independent” investigation will be led by Oklahoma Public Safety Commissioner Michael Thompson — whom Fallin hired and can fire. “His [Lockett’s] lawyers in Oklahoma are trying to arrange for a second, independent autopsy,” Sanderson says. The inquest could have been prevented if

issouri Assistant Attorney General Michael Spillane told a federal judge that the Oklahoma Supreme Court’s backpedaling was relevant to ongoing proceedings with Missouri’s executions. On April 25, he entered a filing with U.S. District Judge Beth Phillips, suggesting that she note how Oklahoma’s Supreme Court had balked at staying an execution. It was just the latest example of Missouri officials’ partners-in-crime attitude toward executions here and in Oklahoma. Missouri was getting its execution drugs from a compounding pharmacy in Tulsa, Oklahoma. The Pitch in January named the Apothecary Shoppe as the likely supplier of pentobarbital for the executions of Joseph Paul Franklin, Allen Nicklasson and Herbert Smulls. Attorneys for condemned Kansas City murderer Michael Taylor then sued the Apothecary Shoppe (also suspected of trying to supply Oklahoma, Louisiana and Georgia with its execution drugs), which settled the lawsuit and agreed not to supply drugs to Missouri. But the settlement spoke only to the Taylor execution. It’s not known whether the Apothecary Shoppe has supplied drugs for subsequent executions. Meanwhile, Missouri quickly found another source of drugs for the Taylor execution. Lawyers for condemned prisoners are no closer to knowing the new supplier’s identity or just what drugs are being used. In addition to not responding to records requests about information pertaining to the supplier, the Missouri Attorney General’s Office is trying to silence questions from inmates’ lawyers. On April 2, the Attorney General’s Office asked that Phillips prevent death-row inmates’ lawyers from asking the pharmacist involved in Missouri executions whether he or she holds educational or professional credentials, has pharmacy licenses, tests the drug that will be used, and operates a federally inspected facility. With such restrictions, a deposition is useless.


That’s the same type of secrecy that Oklahoma deployed to carry out Lockett’s execution. “I think what happened last night [April 29] was inevitable when you are using people of unknown training or skill level to carry these procedures out,” says Pilate, the lawyer representing Bucklew. “Being unclear about your protocol and doing all this behind a wall of secrecy, what happened was utterly inevitable. We’re not the least bit surprised.” Oklahoma, like Missouri, has a law that forbids anyone from publicly identifying any member of an execution team. Missouri’s law came up after the St. Louis Post-Dispatch discovered that the physician who had assisted in more than 50 executions admitted to routinely making errors in administering the drug cocktails. The doctor also had been sued many times for malpractice. Competent doctors typically don’t have trouble making money. Physicians dogged by malpractice lawsuits are more willing to accept payment for assisting an execution — a role objected to by the American Medical Association and nearly all medical ethicists. That disconnect underscores a problem with Missouri’s highly secretive execution protocol: While state officials say it protects those who participate, it can also effectively shield incapable and clumsy practitioners. “Their incompetence is the issue,” says Sean O’Brien, a University of Missouri–Kansas City School of Law professor and death-penalty expert. “The chemicals they use are part of the formula, but their inability to use them is the other part of the formula. They don’t know what they’re doing.” The Missouri law shielding the identity of executioners wasn’t designed to cover the supplier of lethal-injection drugs. Jolie Justus, a Missouri state senator from Kansas City, was involved in the negotiations for the 2007 law. “We were trying to protect the individual doctors and Department of Corrections folks who were performing the death-penalty procedure because of potential

O k l a h O m a D e pa r t m e n t O f C O r r e C t i O n s

clayton Lockett

backlash in their communities,” Justus tells The Pitch. “This was never intended to block the suppliers of the drugs or the drugs that were used.” Justus was troubled when Department of Corrections Director George Lombardi stretched the definition of that law by fiat to cover drug suppliers. She also says the state’s overall execution secrecy is extreme. She has introduced a bill that would set up a death-penalty commission, which would independently explore how to carry out executions, rather than leaving them up to the Department of Corrections, as is the custom now. “Regardless of what happened in 2007 or what’s happening right now, Missourians deserve to have transparency with regards to this procedure,” Justus says. The bill passed the Senate Judiciary Committee, but it has probably stalled with two weeks left in the session. Reform-minded lawmakers aren’t eager to call much attention to it, not least because of the awkward company it keeps alongside other measures introduced this term: draconian calls to truncate appeals and kill inmates with firing squads. Such ideas could have gotten lumped into Justus’ bill. And Justus’ law would surely have been vetoed by Gov. Jay Nixon, an unabashed death-penalty supporter.

Davis’ bloody 1999 electrocution became a death knell for the electric chair. But Missouri leaders have a long, ugly history of ignoring lethal injection’s long, ugly history. Emmitt Foster’s time on Missouri’s gurney, for example, was drawn out well beyond what was intended. He took a half-hour to die in 1995. Lombardi, then the spokesman for the Missouri Department of Corrections, told media at the time that Foster’s drug use had led to the collapse of the vein used for the deadly IV. The truth was something else: The execution staff had strapped Foster too tightly to the gurney — so tightly that the drugs stopped circulating. After Foster convulsed for several minutes, prison staff loosened the straps. He died after several more minutes. It’s likely that states, one by one, will abolish the death penalty. “What happened in Oklahoma inches us a little bit closer,” UMKC’s O’Brien says. “It remains to be seen whether it’s the tipping point on the lethal-injection issue.” Eighteen states now outlaw the death penalty, with Maryland the most recent to jettison the measure last year. New Hampshire is on the brink of getting rid of capital punishment. Colorado and Montana are following course. Any movement toward abolition in Missouri will be far slower. The 8th Circuit

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“Their incompeTence is The issue. They don’T know whaT They’re doing.” Nixon’s office seems untroubled by the problems that have arisen in Oklahoma and by the potential that Bucklew’s execution could similarly implode. “The governor continues to support the ultimate punishment imposed by juries and courts for the most merciless and violent crimes,” Nixon spokesman Scott Holste tells The Pitch in an e-mail.

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eath-penalty proponents tend to rationalize their stance by going biblical: eye-for-an-eye punishments. It’s an abstract notion that cloaks highly political motivations — “Elect me because I’m tough on crime” — in a rigid idea of justice. But no credible evidence suggests that capital punishment deters violent crime. And the “ultimate punishment” now comes, in Missouri, veiled in unjust secrecy. In Oklahoma, the checks and balances between the state’s judicial and legislative branches broke down last month due to political zeal. The breakdown contributed to a gruesome failure by corrections officials. Lockett’s execution should be a watershed moment for lethal injection, just as Allen Lee

Court of Appeals, which hears inmate appeals once they go past the U.S. District Court level, is one of the most conservative benches in the country, and one that is loath to overturn capital-punishment cases. The U.S. Supreme Court is divided on the issue. At least three of its nine justices have shown themselves to be skeptical of the execution-protocol secrecy. Justice Stephen Breyer recently sided with the minority on a Missouri execution that reached the highest court, but Justice Antonin Scalia, a conservative, has complained that executions meander too long through the court system. O’Brien believes that, once enough states have gotten rid of the death penalty, the U.S. Supreme Court may declare it unconstitutional. Absent some last-minute intervention by the courts, Bucklew probably will be dead by the time any such decision is possible. And his attorneys fear that he faces an execution as painful — as unconstitutional — as the one in Oklahoma last week. “These are uncontrolled experiments on human subjects,” Pilate says, “which is supposed to be illegal.”

E-mail steve.vockrodt@pitch.com

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he idea of Jim Jarmusch making a vampire movie seems like cause for alarm. He is one of the few American directors so independent that he owns most of his own films — not the kind of guy given to jumping onto the Twilight bandwagon. But Jarmusch isn’t really interested in vampires. Oh, he goes through the motions: To the limited extent that Only Lovers Left Alive has a story, it mostly involves efforts to obtain human blood (preferably without violence). Other aspects of the standard vampire mythology get name-checked, too, but that’s just so much empty fog. What fascinates Jarmusch is immortality, or at least longevity. How would we behave if we lived for centuries, free to do pretty much anything we wanted? What sort of aesthetes and collectors might we become? Adam (Tom Hiddleston) and Eve (Tilda Swinton), as their names suggest, have been around for a long, long time. As the movie begins, Adam lives in Detroit, occupying a decaying mansion, while Eve is holed up in Tangier, keeping company with Christopher Marlowe (John Hurt) — the Christopher Marlowe. Despite this geographical separation, which has gone on for years, Adam and Eve remain in love, and keep in constant touch with each other via the latest technology (though Adam’s version of that tech is defiantly analog-derived). And their shared passion extends t o humankind’s greatest achievements from the past: vintage guitars, architectural marvels, Latin taxonomy, obscure blues 45s. In Jarmusch’s version of the vampire realm, the undead’s primary function is to appreciate the things

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Tilda Swinton is forever. we humans take for granted. Adam and Eve aren’t monsters — they’re curators. For about an hour, Only Lovers Left Alive stays blissfully plot-free. Eve jets to Detroit, and she and Adam roll around the city at night to admire its dilapidated beauty (with a reverent ooooh for the house where Jack White grew up). It’s a kind of nocturnal companion to the scene in Manhattan in which Woody Allen’s alter ego lists all of the things that make life worth living. Rapture piles upon rapture until the movie seems as if it might burst from an excess of feeling. Eventually, a story does emerge, kicked off by the belated arrival of Eve’s troublemaking sister, Ava (Mia Wasikowska), who’s much younger than the other two vampires and hasn’t yet learned to control her appetites. The second half of the film has its own pleasures and concludes on a lovely grace note, but the introduction of a narrative into what until then has been rambling and unhurried transforms Only Lovers Left Alive from a gorgeous requiem for the human race into a series of amusing but comparatively frivolous riffs. Even this lesser half ranks firmly among the year’s best films so far, giving its three terrific actors plenty of opportunities to draw both metaphorical and literal blood. It’s disappointing only because Jarmusch had seemed so tantalizingly close to achieving something unprecedented, something almost unbearably moving.

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CAfé

AsiA, Minor

At Saki, some OK sushi,

By

etcetera, etcetera, etcetera.

Ch a r l e s F e r ru z z a

Saki • 5225 Northwest 64th Street, 816-584-8888 • Hours: 11 a.m.–10 p.m. Monday–Thursday, 11 a.m.–10:30 p.m. Friday–Saturday, 11 a.m.–9:30 p.m. Sunday • Price: $$

he two-month old Saki restaurant in the Northland does for Asian cuisine what Costco does for retail: It offers an extensive inventory at modest prices. No free samples, though. The restaurant’s full name is Saki Asian Sushi Hibachi, a mouthful as unwieldy as the melting-pot menu. No one is going to call the place the definitive venue for the cuisines of China, Japan, Korea, Vietnam or Thailand, but Saki does serve up those nations’ dinnertime greatest hits — with, of course, the expected Americanized choices (crab wontons, sweetand-sour chicken). A United Nations approach to casual dining isn’t a new trend; the Cheesecake Factory and Noodles and Co. — to name just two — have long offered dishes from so many different ports of call that the menus are practically as obnoxious as another reprise of “It’s a Small World.” And yet, it is a small world at Saki, which is located, without irony, next to an outpost of the International House of Pancakes. If these two restaurants combined their marketing budgets, they could advertise this culinary cul-de-sac on 64th Street as an EPCOT for economy-minded epicures. There are good things on Saki’s menu, including a very fine blue crab roll, described on the extensive sushi list as containing “real blue crab meat.” Translation: All the other crab dishes on this menu are made with the fake stuff. That includes the plump purses of fried wone Mor tons stuffed with cream cheese and nearly microscopic shreds of artificial t a e in Onl .com crab, and a New Orleans pitch roll that blends real crawfish with ersatz crab. Not that it helps to get crabby about this; I don’t think I’ve ever tasted a crab Rangoon made with real crab, unless it got in there by accident. Another traditional crustacean creation, banh tom — the Vietnamese delicacy of fried battered shrimp and sweet-potato sticks — is modified at Saki so that there’s no shrimp, just the sweet potatoes. It’s tasty enough (and, as you’d hope, cheaper than the banh tom at Vietnamese restaurants), but I don’t understand the point of dumbing down this classic starter. Shrimp and grilled beef turn up in the Vietnamese spring rolls and, unexpectedly, shrimp and chicken both appear in this venue’s hot-and-sour soup, which is frequently a pork-only affair in most local Asian restaurants. Saki serves hibachi-grill dishes, too, but

Café

angela c. bond

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sweet sauces, but for couples or groups sharing entrées, these provide a respectable counterpoint to the punchier curry offerings here. I liked the excellent Panang curry I they’re prepared in the kitchen rather than sampled, which came in a spicy coconut-milk with a communal teppanyaki grill. (You’ll have sauce (once I’d asked to have it spicy; the to go to an actual Japanese steakhouse for that default heat level is in the insipid range, and kind of dinner theater. You go on ahead; I’ll see you never.) Those entrées, sold at roughly you really have to insist). The marinated Korean BBQ short ribs the same price point as they would be at a might have been delicious if hibachi-only joint, include the beef hadn’t been sliced a house salad and a cup of Saki to the thickness of a greetthat watery broth passing itCowboy roll ................ $12.95 ing card (though even then it self off as onion soup. If you Crab wonton ................$6.25 was a little on the chewy side). must indulge in this corner of Korean BBQ The bits of beef (“grilled fillet Saki’s Asian marketplace, it’s short ribs ................. $14.95 mignon,” swears the menu) worth requesting a substituPanang curry with shrimp................$11.95 tucked into the Cowboy tion of miso soup instead, Vietnamese pho ..........$8.95 sushi roll — along with cuwhich here comes loaded cumber, cream cheese and avwith seaweed and tofu cubes ocado — were far more tender. That familiar hibachi-style The overcooked beef slices in my fragrant salad — chopped iceberg lettuce and ginger bowl of pho were rubbery, too, and the little dressing — can be ordered without committing meatballs were more decorative than satisfyto one of the grilled meat dishes, but you’re far better off ordering the blend of sliced cucum- ing. Still, it was a big, comforting serving of a Vietnamese favorite, served with all the right ber and fresh orange segments that come in condiments: sprigs of fresh basil, bean sprouts, a vinegary chili sauce. Oddly, it might be the wedges of lime, slices of jalapeño. best cucumber salad in town. The Bangkok fried rice is first-rate if, again, Chinese choices (orange peel, General Tso’s, honey sesame) are heavy on sticky, you ask that the kitchen prepare it very spicy.

Sushi rolls, hibachi-grilled meats and Vietnamese pho share a menu at Saki.

(Otherwise it’s merely a jumble of fried rice with tomatoes.) Saki’s version of pad Thai isn’t going to take any thunder away from the better-known Thai restaurants in the city, but it has a distinct charm, and the vegetable-andtofu option is delicious. The service at Saki is cheerful and attentive, and there’s a full bar for diners who require a chilled glass of sauvignon blanc with their massaman curry. Fortune cookies are brought out with the bill, but there are a couple of actual desserts. One of the servers insisted that I try her new favorite, a thick, soft chocolate brownie topped with a scoop of vanilla ice cream. It’s as all-American as Saki’s fried chicken wings (which are served with ranch dressing), but this is a multicultural restaurant, and American culture counts. That goes for the rest of North America, too. On that night, the other dessert on the menu was fried ice cream — a holdover, perhaps, from this venue’s previous tenant, Mazatlan Mexican Restaurant. At least in the Northland, it really is a small world after all.

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FAT C I T Y

Home Cooking

Slap’s BBQ wants to make

By

Strawberry Hill squeal.

Ch a r l e s F e r ru z z a

rothers Mike and Joe Pearce of the Squeal Like a Pig BBQ team were sworn to secrecy by the producers of Destination America’s BBQ Pitmasters. The brothers have known for weeks that they won the show’s regional competition, but confidentiality agreements kept them silent until the program was broadcast April 26. (The Pearces move on to the semifinal round in late May with a $50,000 grand prize on the line.) And now another secret is out. In June, the two of them and longtime competition team partner Brandon Whipple (who wasn’t on the TV show; the producers limit all teams to two members) will open their first restaurant, Slap’s BBQ, at 553 Central in Kansas City, Kansas. Slap’s is the acronym for the team’s name, which Joe Pearce says was “great for a team name but not so catchy for a restaurant.” Maybe not, but the Pearces have been doing a boom business selling T-shirts with the team logo for more than a year. Slap’s future Strawberry Hill home is sheathed in red metal siding. It was occupied by Sophie’s Deli for three decades and, more recently, by the short-lived Millie’s Café. This neighborhood holds a deep significance for the Pearce brothers. “Our grandmother used to live down the street,” Mike Pearce says. “My grandfather was arrested near here for transporting moonshine during Prohibition.” That grandfather, “Hobo Mike” Gravino, is something of a legend in these parts. While

angela c. bond

B

serving a six-month sentence for the liquor charge, Hobo Mike’s younger brother Rocco showed up to visit him in jail. They switched clothes, and the brother stayed behind to serve out Mike’s sentence. “Our grandfather came back to Strawberry Hill to get married,” Mike Pearce says. In a few days, two 500-gallon tanks — formerly propane tanks refitted as smokers — will arrive at this location and get set up on the side of the building for burning hickory, oak and pecan woods.

Local barbecue competitors, from left: Mike Pearce, Brandon Whipple and Joe Pearce “We plan to be smoking between 250 and 500 pounds a meat a day when we get going,” says Mike Pearce, who plans to serve brisket, burnt ends, turkey, chicken, pork, ribs and sausage in the 35-seat dining room or for carryout. There’s still work to be done inside the building. The red linoleum tiles need to be ripped out, and the concrete flooring under-

Back on the Farm Boulevard releases Saison-Brett.

B

oulevard has shaken up this year’s Smokestack release schedule. We’ll have to wait for Love Child No. 4. But there’s ample reward for that patience: the award-winning Saison-Brett. Last week, we picked up our complimentary 750-ml bottle of the farmhouse ale (38 IBUs and 8.5 percent alcohol by volume), a Belgian-style saison dry-hopped with Amarillo hops and bottle-conditioned with a variety of yeasts (notably a wild strain of Brettanomyces). Boulevard has bottle-aged the brew for three months, but the Brett’s character gets

Out now: Boulevard Saison-Brett 18

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neath sanded, shellacked and polished. The drop ceiling is also coming out. The red and silver walls need to be repainted, and beer coolers will be installed. Slap’s BBQ has applied for a beer-only license and plans to sell Boulevard bottles and a few other local beers. The menu hasn’t been completed yet, but the Slap’s team has plenty of ideas. “We’ll have two kinds of beans, spicy and regular,” Joe Pearce says. “Using our sauces, of course, which will also be for sale. We know we’ll have a gourmet mac and cheese. The rest we’ll try as specials in the beginning. We want to find out what our public wants.” Joe Pearce is already a full-time Slap’s BBQ employee. Mike Pearce and Whipple have given notice at their day jobs with a local mortgage-servicing company and will be working full time at the restaurant by the end of May. “We think this is going to be a great location for us,” Mike Pearce says. “The community wants us here. We’ve gotten so much positive feedback.” When Slap’s BBQ opens in June, the plan is to be open seven days a week, serving from 11 a.m. until 7 or 8 p.m. “This is going to be a workingman’s barbecue,” Joe Pearce says. “Nothing too fancy, not even for dessert. We might have smoked brownies.” “Cobbler,” Whipple says. “Povitica,” Mike Pearce says. Or maybe all three.

E-mail charles.ferruzza@pitch.com

only more pronounced if you lock it away in your cellar. We couldn’t wait, so we popped the cork. The floral, fruity aroma came across immediately. It’s hard to keep your nose out of the glass. “That is wicked,” one drinker said at first taste. “I could finish off a whole bottle,” said another. “I thought it’d be funkier,” someone concluded. That last note led everyone at the beer table (every office needs one) to look down at his or her cup and remember that these were indeed plastic tumblers, not proper glassware. (We'd packed away all of our glassware, but more on that later.) If you want funk (and other nuances, such as the lemony flavors here), get a glass. And if you have a glass, get some Saison-Brett. — Justin Kendall


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fat c i t y By

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chris mullins

Pour Man

Simeon Bricker milks his latte-art

Y

ou don’t want to drink a Simeon Bricker latte. Not that there’s anything wrong with it. The man knows his coffee. It’s just that you don’t feel quite right disturbing the foam on top — frothed milk that, when it comes from Bricker’s pitcher, is art. It’s not the kind of art that appreciates, but Bricker’s handiwork has still earned him serious notice. On April 24, he won the inaugural U.S. Latte Art Championship in Seattle. Next week, he’s off to Melbourne, Australia, to compete onstage at the World Latte Art Championship. For three days, starting May 15, he'll pour art that includes a from-theashes phoenix — a design that seems to be becoming his competitive signature. Bricker, who works for the Roasterie as a quality controller and barista trainer, studied art at the University of Missouri–Kansas City.

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He still likes to work in less ephemeral media, dabbling in photography and videography, but hot milk is his big medium right now, and that means a short exhibition time. After about two minutes, the espresso and milk have reacted together to blight the five-tiered tulips and other patterns he has etched over the liquid with a thin metal wand. At first, latte art was a way to stave off sameness at his first barista gig. He got good fast, though, and a couple of years ago found himself competing in latte throwdowns around town, casual gatherings at which artistic baristas would square off cup-to-cup after hours. The contests got bigger, and so has Bricker’s training regimen. Once he’s finished for the day at the Roasterie’s plant, he stays in the closed café to practice his pours until he has gone through a gallon or two of

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milk. That’s 36-48 lattes. “There’s no real way to practice except for just pouring the lattes,” he says. At competitions, artists run the whole cup, starting by pulling the shot of espresso that forms the base of the latte. It’s how the espresso and milk work together that determines just how much hold the foam has for the art. “A low-quality milk will have less protein in it, so the foam could be more runny,” Bricker says. “A good, high-quality milk is really important.” So he has become an expert on dairy (ask him anything about local brands), and he says he expects to use “a really good milk” in Australia. But even after all of the hours spent training and all the support he says KC’s barista community has offered him, Bricker knows

Bricker at work it’s a different game onstage. A shaky hand, a pitcher tipped a degree too far, and it’s over. As he worked out a few designs for The Pitch’s photographer, Bricker maintained a competitor’s intense focus. When he pours, the world stops. Bricker says he doesn’t consider himself the best latte artist domestically. But it’s not up to him anymore. “If you’re a world latteartist champion, no one can take that from you,” he says. “It’s exciting to know I’m competing in that realm, and humbling knowing it’s going to be a very difficult competition. I’m just looking forward to going and doing the best I can.”

E-mail feedback@pitch.com


fat c i t y

Off tO the Races

By

D av iD HuDn a l l

BUY LOCAL HALF OFF

Westport’s Julep debuts in time for the Kentucky Derby.

.com

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AT CRICKET WIRELESS AMPHITHEATER

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fternoon drinking, horses, gambling — there is much to love about the Kentucky Derby and its accompanying celebrations. Last Saturday, the most appropriate local establishment to take in the race seemed especially obvious: Julep Cocktail Club, the just-opened, low-country-themed whiskey bar in Westport. I saw bonnets of various colors, a headpiece that I am told is called a fascinator, some lightcolored suits, and some straw hats. Bartenders in vests served up three kinds of juleps: the Vintage (Pierre Ferrand 1840 Cognac, sugar, mint); the Traditional (Buffalo Trace, sugar, mint); and the Modern (El Dorado eight-year rum, Falernum, bitters). California Chrome came in a length and three-quarters ahead. A woman in a flapper dress flashed what appeared to be several $100 bills. “I think we went through 6 pounds of mint on Saturday,” says Beau Williams, who coowns Julep with his wife, Keely Edgington. “It’s been a bit of a whirlwind in here ever since we opened.” Williams is one of the creative forces behind the cocktail lounge Manifesto, which he managed until recently, and he designed the drink menu at Westport Cafe and Bar. As at those places, the drinks at Julep are smart. The faux-Southern-aristocrat quotient won’t be nearly as high the rest of the year (though a similar celebration is on the way for the Preakness), yet Julep seems sure to draw big crowds regardless of the occasion. It’s an excellent bar that’s already operating at a pretty high level. Like Port Fonda — with which it shares an address, 4141 Pennsylvania — Julep’s exterior resembles a dentist’s office more than it does a drinking-and-dining destination. Port Fonda has combated this (as has Ça Va, a block down) by affixing artsy decals to its windows. Julep has installed an understated, classy little sign above its door that simply reads “WHISKEY.” Inside, things get more opulent, and more permanent-seeming. “We wanted to make sure the bar was built in a way where it would still be here in 50 years,” Williams says. And in some ways, the place looks as though it’s been here that long already. The plantation-chic decor reflects, Williams says, a hodgepodge of design tones: art deco, the 1920s, Spanish and French, modern and classic. Gold chandeliers shaped like upside-down wedding cakes hang above the bar. Festoon lights dangle. But the bar is the real show-stopper, with something like 300 bottles of liquor (200 of them whiskey) taking up five 20-foot rows of wood shelving that stretch nearly to the high

Derby day at Julep ceiling. It’s a dizzying sight; Williams calls it “the beast.” The food menu, designed by John Brogan (a right-hand man of sorts to Rye and Bluestem’s Colby Garrelts), is inspired by the low-country cuisine of Charleston, South Carolina. It’s mostly snacks: deviled eggs, pimento cheese, a charcuterie board. Among the more substantial dishes is the Gulf shrimp po’boy. But cocktails are the draw, and I can vouch for several of them. I especially dig the Monarch (Rittenhouse Rye 100, Cocchi Vermouth di Torino, Luxardo, Olive Heights Braeburn Belle bitters, $11) and the Soft Conspiracy (Great King Street Scotch, Aperol, Pierre Ferrand Dry Curaçao, $11). A few people have told me that Julep’s juleps are on the sweet side. I took a few sips from my companion’s Vintage julep and found the drink heavenly — perhaps it’s best in smaller doses. Julep doesn’t serve draft beer and stocks only Boulevard bottles ($5–$6). Yes, the bar sells scotch that costs $125 a glass, but you can get $2 cans of Hamm’s and PBR, too. There are also shot-and-beer deals, like the Ozark Justice (a can of Coors banquet beer and a shot of Slow & Low Rock and Rye, $7). Julep is a little like Harry’s Bar & Tables (or even Harry’s Country Club) in that regard: classy but not snooty, comfortable, a place for adults. Williams says that’s been the plan all along. “I really like that we have a guy with a wadded-up $5 bill ordering an Old Style at one end of the bar and a guy paying with a black AmEx on the other,” he says. “That’s the kind of eclectic crowd we wanted when we first started talking about this bar, and so far, that’s what we’re getting.”

E-mail david.hudnall@pitch.com

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music

Passion Fruit

The Clementines’ Nicole Springer tries to find her eternal sunshine.

By

Natalie GallaGher

N

zach bauman

icole Springer is on edge. During an afternoon meeting at Westside Local to discuss the Clementines’ upcoming EP, Someday/Over, Springer gingerly asks me if it’s too early for hard alcohol. I assure her that she is in safe and similar company. She orders a “much needed” vodka and Diet Coke. She admits that she’s not comfortable being interviewed and laughs nervously as I place my recorder in front of her. Then again, it’s a little surprising that Springer hasn’t been the focus of more interviews before now. Springer is petite. Wispy red curls frame her face. She talks with a built-in humility that is in direct opposition to her bombastic, show-halting vocal style. Although Springer admits to being “one of the most insecure people in the world,” you’d never guess it from the way she sounds on record and fronting her band. Springer started the Clementines in 2011 with Tim Jenkins (guitar and mandolin). For a time, the Clementines were an acoustic duo. But as Springer and Jenkins pieced together their sound, they found other players to fill in the spaces: bassist Travis Earnshaw and drummer Aaron Derington, get tired of each other, and things end, and replacing Stephanie Williams, who left in you don’t always get a second chance. In the film, even though at the end they [the two late 2013 to become the full-time drummer lead characters] know that the relationship for Katy Guillen and the Girls. is probably not going to work, they want to Last May, the Clementines released a self-titled full-length that showcased the try again. I think that’s beautiful.” She goes on: “I don’t want to be a denew lineup’s catchy, powerful alt rock. The pressing songwriter. Even if you’re talkalbum hummed with promise, anchored by ing about losing love, the way you do it, Springer’s voice, a heavy jazz influence and you can have a different energy to it. And the intuitive ease of Americana. I think love is the greatest inspiration for But Springer says the f ive songs on any musician — having it or the loss of it. I Someday/Over were more carefully condon’t think there’s anything more imporstructed than the band’s previous releases. tant than that.” Jangly, up-tempo tracks “In Yesterday” Springer pauses, laughs a little and and “Afraid” are at odds with Springer’s shrugs her shoulders, seemingly embarsolemn ref lections on the complications rassed by her proclamaof romance. It’s honest, tion. “I’m a romantic,” she square-shouldered writsays, half-apologizing. ing. And if an open-diary the Clementines with Katy Guillen and the Girls, A few nights earlier, format sounds too sacchaand the B’Dinas at a practice session, she rine, don’t worry: Jenkins Friday, May 9, wailed into a microphone is ever-ready with compeat VooDoo Lounge during the stirring and eletent electric-guitar riffs. gant “Misery.” She snarled The dichotomy of huthe verses and transitioned ma n relat ion sh ips is a popular theme for Springer, who explains easily into gospelworthy range. (Springer started singing as a teenager in a church her fascination by recounting how she came to name her band: for Clementine, Kate choir.) Even in the Clementines’ cramped basement-level practice room, it’s clear that Winslet’s character in Eternal Sunshine of Springer is a natural frontwoman. the Spotless Mind, Springer’s favorite movie. “Any confidence I have is when I sing,” “I like the way it’s told,” Springer says of the film. “It’s very unique and it’s kind of Springer says. “It’s the after-I’m-singing where I analyze and pick things apart: ‘Was sad — exactly how relationships are. People 22

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that good? Was that bad? Did everybody hate it? Why am I doing this?’ I ask myself a million questions, but when I’m singing, when I’m in the heat of it, none of that matters.” Springer laughs again, but there is more bite to her tone. I ask if it’s difficult to be so open with her songs in front of strangers when they are clearly precious and personal to her. “My songs are like children — they’re that important to me,” she says. “I just want to protect them. Sometimes I miss just playing them for one or two people at my house and not having anyone else know about them. It’s intimate, writing a song. There have been times when I wanted to quit so bad. I just could not face the vulnerability of writing a song and performing it for someone, and I’ve had to overcome a lot of that.” Even if Springer hasn’t totally gotten past her insecurities, she does a solid enough job faking it onstage. In that respect, she says, there can be no compromise. “Being the frontperson in the band, a lot rests on you,” she says. “You’re telling the story, you’re interpreting the song for people. I sing my heart out, and sometimes I don’t have a voice the next day, but I don’t want to hold anything back. This is what I live for, and I may never ever be famous or make any money doing this, but if I’m going on that stage for 45 minutes, you bet-

Springer: “This is what I live for.” ter believe I’m going to give it everything I have — even if it’s just for five people who aren’t even looking at us.”

E-mail natalie.gallagher@pitch.com

J a z z B e at Molly HaMMEr, at takE FivE CoFFEE + Bar

With a gentle sultriness and long, powerful notes, singer Molly Hammer commands the stage and quiets a noisy room. You might not expect someone who started in musical theater by playing Patsy Cline to find her way to jazz, but when Hammer starts to sing, under her signature shock of vibrant red hair, she owns jazz standards and the music of the American songbook like few other singers. The room is hers. On Friday night, when this voice meets the living-room intimacy of Take Five Coffee + Bar, Leawood may not survive. — Larry Kopitnik Molly Hammer at Take Five Coffee + Bar, 8–10 p.m. Friday, May 9 (5336 West 151st Street, Leawood, 913-948-5550), $5 cover.


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WHERE THE BEST MUSICIANS IN THE WORLD PLAY

KNUCKLEHEADS F re e S h u tt le in S u rr o u n d in g A reth e a

MAY:

the blasters

A blend of Blues, Rockabilly, early Rock and Roll

SATURDAY, MAY 10TH

PETE & JAKES HOT ROD SHOP 40TH ANNIVERSARY WITH

BART WALKER & OLD 5’S

13: Scott Ford’s CD Release 14: Bobby Bare Jr. & Seth Walker 15: Roger Clyne & The Peacemakers 16: The Legendary Johnny Rivers 17: The Rainmakers & The Nace Brothers

For more info & tickets: knuckleheadshonkytonk.com 2715 Rochester, KCMO the pitch

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By

stamped on Our Journey.

Natalie GallaGher

ince the release of its lauded 2009 debut album, Diverse has become one of Kansas City’s big-deal jazz ensembles. It could hardly have failed to be. Trumpeter Hermon Mehari, drummer Ryan Lee and bassist Ben Leifer are industrious, skilled musicians, all of whom frequently work with other local jazz groups. In the years since Diverse formed, the trio has toured Europe, enjoyed residencies in Paris and cultivated an international following. Now, the trio has assembled another batch of fluid, imaginative compositions. Its new album, Our Journey, also includes guest spots from acclaimed Parisian jazz pianist Tony Tixier and alto saxophonist Logan Richardson. Ahead of the Friday, May 9, release party for Our Journey, at the Blue Room, we dialed up Mehari and Lee to discuss the evolution of their group and how collaborations influence their music. The Pitch: How did you come to collaborate with Tony Tixier? Mehari: We went to Paris in 2010 as a unit — Why is it called Our Journey? me, Ben and Ryan — and our deal was to spend a month there as a residency, and to network Mehari: A couple reasons, the most obviand gauge the Paris scene and grow our musious is that the song called “Our Journey” — it cian base and our fanbase. We spent a month took us forever to come up with our name, there, and that’s exactly what happened. and the reason I wrote that song was to reflect I’ve returned to Paris five or six times since kind of the growing experiences that Ryan 2010, and on my second trip there, I ended up and I had had together throughout these travplaying a gig with Tony. And the next time els and these tours. The song itself covered Diverse went to Paris, we played with Tony. The some of our relationship, and as we were comchemistry was great, and we brought him over ing up with an album name, the album was here once to play for about kind of a product of these a week. It seemed obvious experiences and these jourDiverse that we should record with neys and fights and good with Tony Tixier him. And we also got to retimes — the stuff that made Friday, May 9, cord with Logan Richardson, us what we are at this point. at the Blue Room who is originally from KC. So we went with that. He was in New York for 10 Tell me about the Paris jazz years, and now he lives in scene. What is it like, and how Paris. He’s a really well-known alto-sax player, does it compare with the Kansas City jazz scene? and one of our favorite artists. Lee: It’s very cool. Paris is more like New What was the recording process like? York to me, actually — not as big, but it works Mehari: In Diverse, we’ve always all con- in a similar way. The difference is that Kansas City is more community-based — we know tributed music. Ryan, me, Ben — we’ll each more of the people in our audience. We have bring music. Basically, the songs on this a regular crowd. Our fanbase is more like album are the songs that we were doing in between the time from our first album to the family to us. There’s not a draw between the recording of this album. By the time our first audience and the artist. In Europe, it’s a little cutthroat. There’s so much talent in Europe, album came out, in 2009, we were already it’s ridiculous. There are a lot of killer artists doing new songs. Most of these songs have and not that many places to play, but there’s grown and matured over the years. Lee: We felt the need to document our- also such a huge opportunity to be creative. And in Kansas City, there’s a support system selves as we went along doing all this stuff. It just made sense to join forces with Logan and — it’s a really unique place to be. A lot has changed for Diverse since you all Tony. A lot of the new stuff that we were writing had their vibe and their style written all came together in 2008 and since the release of over it, and we wanted them to bring it alive. the debut. What are some of the highlights?

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Daphne Bengoa

FRIDAY, MAY 9TH

24

From Paris With Love

Diverse gets its passport

S

7: The Crayons 8: Matt Andersen & Old Salt Union 9: Jimmie Bratcher’s 60th Birthday Party

816-483-1456

music

Mehari (right): “We’ve had to become really malleable.” Mehari: One of the first major things that is different now — and that we’ve always had to deal with, really — is personnel changes. While Ben, Ryan and I are the core of the band, we started with a sax player who stopped playing music and a key player who left to do his own thing. Lee: We went through a lot of ups and downs as a band. When we started that group, everybody was in school, and now we’re not, so we’ve got a whole new perspective. It’s changed a lot. Mehari: Over the years, we’ve had to become really malleable. We’ve done pop shows. We’ve covered Michael Jackson and Prince. Diverse has worked with all these different styles, and that’s influenced how we approach our own music. What is the most important part of this album for you? Was there anything that surprised you in making it? Mehari: It’s just kind of surreal. It’s called Our Journey, and this chapter of Diverse kind of started in 2010 when we went to Paris. And when we were recording this album and putting it together, it felt kind of crazy. Who knew that Diverse would be here, recording with a Parisian piano player and Logan Richardson, one of our favorite artists? This is actually what we’re doing now. Absolutely surreal. E-mail natalie.gallagher@pitch.com


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ND ENING !! A R G -OP END RE WEEK

Music

Music Forecast

By

n ata l ie G a l l a Ghe r

Slayer

KC GROOVE THERAPY FRIDAY, MAY 9

Slayer is bringing a raging storm of blood and doom to the Uptown Theater Tuesday night. Consider this your PSA: Avoid that section of Broadway if your ears are sensitive and you can’t stomach speed rhythms and doomsday lyrics. For those with stronger constitutions, this weeknight show is particularly worthy. Gary Holt, guitarist for opening act Exodus and onetime Slayer band member, fills in for guitarist Jeff Hanneman, who died a year ago. The set list is reportedly classic tracks from the early Slayer catalog, so there’s a lot to look forward to here. Bonus: Suicidal Tendencies is opening. Tuesday, May 13, the Uptown Theater (3700 Broadway, 816-753-8665)

Lyle Lovett

REDLINE CHEMISTRY SATURDAY, MAY 10

INTERNATIONAL SUNDAY NIGHTS with NATTY RANKZ & MITCH DARLIN

TUESDAY NIGHTS KARAOKE with JULIE & CANDI

The longevity of Lyle Lovett’s expansive career — 11 full-length studio albums and various film and TV roles over more than three decades — is due to the artist’s most dominant feature: character. Lovett has never compromised his eclectic leanings. His albums can be as much western swing as orchestra. Though Lovett filled 2012’s Release Me with cover songs from the likes of Townes Van Zandt and Chuck Berry, the fourtime Grammy winner creatively reimagined them as though they were his own. Experience Lovett Friday at the Uptown. Friday, May 9, the Uptown Theater (3700 Broadway, 816-753-8665)

The Dandy Warhols

Four years ago, I interviewed Courtney TaylorTaylor while he was touring in support of the Dandy Warhols’ 10th album and “best of” compilation, The Capitol Years 1995–2007. Our conversation then was like most of the Warhols’ catalog: vastly entertaining and wildly tangential. We talked about books and eating organic (the Warhols are from Portland, Oregon), and Taylor-Taylor gave a vivid account of the best Bordeaux he had ever drunk. After 20 years, the band has

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Water Liars began in 2011 as a songwriting partnership between guitarist Justin Peter Kinkel-Schuster and drummer Andrew Bryant. The Mississippi–via–St. Louis band’s debut record, Phantom Limb, was a shaky promise of tender-footed talent; the nine folky tracks sounded more like bedroom demos than fully realized songs. Then 2013’s Wyoming hammered out a few of Kinkel-Schuster and Bryant’s ideas — mainly the trials and tribulations of folk-rock artistry — and left in some purposeful sonic wrinkles. In February, the band released a self-titled full-length album

f o r e c a s t

C’MON BACK the pitch

little left to prove. In March, the Warhols released a live album, Thirteen Tales From Urban Bohemia: Live at the Wonder. This recording is the live-show experience of the band’s seminal third album and a wonderful slice of 1990s nostalgia. The Warhols’ show Friday night at the Riot Room is an excellent excuse for a trip down memory lane if you can get a ticket. (The show is sold out.) Friday, May 9, the Riot Room (4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179)

Water Liars

HEN 7230 W 75th St K I T C N!!! is OPE 913.236.6211 calendarwiz.com/theroxy /roxybar.overlandpark 26

Queens of the Stone Age

pitch.com

that managed to finally shake off some of the heaviness that the duo had been carrying around. It’s a satisfying record from a band whose sound has grown quite a bit in the last three years. Tuesday, May 13, Czar (1531 Grand, 816-421-0300)

Queens of the Stone Age

Queens of the Stone Age make a type of music I’ve categorized as “scumbag rock.” Maybe that has something to do with my distaste for the off-color character of ex-bassist Nick Oliveri (famously fired from the band in 2004 and arrested most recently in 2011 on charges of domestic abuse, following a standoff with a SWAT team) and the macho-rock lyrics that QOTSA gets off on. Still, the band’s 2013 album, …Like Clockwork, is an impressive and heavy affair, with guest appearances by Trent Reznor, Jake Shears and Elton John, of all people. Let the Queens have their swinging egos — the live show should be worth it. Tuesday, May 13, Starlight Theatre (4600 Starlight Road, 816-363-7827)

K e Y

Pick of the Week

 Worth the Weeknight

Macho Macho Men

Folk Rock

 Country

Wear Your Earplugs

Count the Grammys

Bring Back the ’90s

Psych Pop

Anger Management

 Not Actual Queens

 So Metal


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AGENDA

continued from page 13

Thursday | 5.8 |

MIKE BIRBIGLIA

ART EXHIBITS & EVENTS

L I T E R A R Y/ S P O K E N W O R D

Color and Line: Masterworks on Paper

| Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, 4525 Oak, nelson-atkins.org

Doug Dorst discusses his literary mystery S. | 6:30 p.m. Kansas City Central Library, 14 W. 10th St., kclibrary.org

Edgar Degas Pastels | Nelson-Atkins Museum, 4525 Oak

COMEDY

dy/nas/ty • Ebony G. Patterson | Nerman

Will C., Randy Burgard, Scott Shaffer, Taylor Thompson | 7 p.m. Kanza Hall, 7300 W. 119th St.,

Museum of Contemporary Art, 12345 College Blvd., Overland Park, nermanmuseum.org

Overland Park

The Dan Band | 7 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massa-

End-of-semester student exhibition and sale

chusetts, Lawrence

Broadway

Band 13, Chasing Fire, Red Velvet Crush | 8:30 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

BRIAN FRIEDMAN

Arara Azul | 8 p.m. Broadway Jazz Club, 3601

ESDAY

5.14

WE D N MUSIC

| Friday-Sunday, Kansas City Art Institute, 4415 Warwick

History & Hope: Celebrating the Civil Rights Movement | Nelson-Atkins Museum, 4525 Oak

n sleep o Don’t lia. Birbig

Home, Land: Paintings by Joshua Gann | 6 p.m. Friday, Kiosk Gallery, 3951 Broadway

Mike Birbiglia | 7 p.m. Wednesday, at the Midland, 1228 Main, midlandkc.com

B Vibe | 9 p.m. Green Lady Lounge, 1809 Grand Eboni & the Ivories | 7 p.m. The Blue Room, 1616 E. 18th St.

KC Cabaret: Fringe Edition | 9:30 p.m., Uptown

Arts Bar, 3611 Broadway

Four Arm Shiver, Plug Uglies, Going Rogue | 8 p.m. Czar, 1531 Grand

COMEDY

Lisa Lampanelli | 8 p.m. The Midland, 1228 Main

Monzie Leo and the Big Sky, Ray Fitzgerald, Queens Noose | 9 p.m. Frank’s North Star Tavern,

508 Locust, Lawrence

Katt Williams | 8 p.m. Municipal Auditorium/Music Hall, 301 W. 13th St.

Middle Twin, Psychic Heat, Forrester | Jackpot Music Hall, 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Old Salt Union | 8:30 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon,

2715 Rochester

Hope House’s Margarita Ball | 8 p.m. Club 1000,

1000 Broadway, hopehouse.net

Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence

NASCAR Camping World Truck Series | 10 a.m. Kansas Speedway, 400 Speedway Blvd., KCK

NIGHTLIFE MUSIC

2014 NFL Draft Party Hosted by Time Warner Cable | 7-11 p.m. Arrowhead Stadium Super Happy Fun Time Burlesque | 10 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

XO Blackwater with Steve Gardels | 10 p.m.

MiniBar, 3810 Broadway

Jason Beers, Al Scorch and the Lost Boys | 9 p.m. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club, 3402 Main

Kansas City Ballet presents Cinderella |

7:30 p.m. Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts, 1601 Broadway, kcballet.org

El Dub: One Man Reggae Funk | 10 p.m. Frank’s North Star Tavern, 508 Locust, Lawrence

Roads of Arabia: Archaeology and History of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia | Nelson-

Eboni Fondren Quartet | 9 p.m. Broadway Jazz Club,

3601 Broadway

Millage Gilbert’s Down Home Blues Band |

Atkins Museum, 4525 Oak

Second Friday Troost Art Hop | 6-10 p.m. Vibe Tribe Studio, 5504 Troost. troostarthop.com

Grand Marquis | 7 p.m. The Kill Devil Club, 61 E.

Spectrum Art Fantastic 3 | 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Sunday, Bartle Hall, 301 W. 13th St. spectrumfantasticartlive.com

Kid Twist | 11 p.m. Czar, 1531 Grand

The Starr Miniature Collection: Masterworks in Miniature | Nelson-Atkins Museum,

9 p.m. B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ, 1205 E. 85th St.

14th St.

Lyle Lovett and His Acoustic Group | 7 p.m.

Uptown Theater, 3700 Broadway

Lowercasekansas, Barsup | 8 p.m. The Bottleneck,

4525 Oak

This American Life | Fridays and Saturdays, Kemper East, 200 E. 44th St.

737 New Hampshire, Lawrence

NIGHTLIFE

Plug In Babies: a tribute to Muse | 9 p.m. Czar,

Spencer Brown | Jackpot Music Hall, 943 Massa-

Sellout | Jazzhaus, 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Lawrence

Starhaven Rounders | 7 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 West-

Deschutes Brewery’s Beer-lesque: Tastings and Tassels | 8-11 p.m. Lagniappe: Nica’s Cajun Cuisine,

C.J. Calhoun, Andrew Ashby, Spencer Brown | 6 p.m. Replay Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence

PERFORMING ARTS

Room, 1616 E. 18th St.

Penn Valley Park Plein Air Fest Gala | 7-10 p.m. Saturday, Buttonwood Art Space, $20/$25, 3013 Main

The Blasters, Piñata Protest | 9 p.m. Knuckleheads

Saloon, 2715 Rochester

chusetts, Lawrence

Friday | 5.9 |

4525 Oak

Diverse CD-release show | 8:30 p.m. The Blue

COMMUNITY BENEFITS

SPORTS & REC

Jon Wayne & the Pain, 3 Son Green | 7 p.m. The

County Road 5 | Fuel, 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park

In the Looking Glass: Recent Daguerreotype Acquisitions | Nelson-Atkins Museum,

The Clementines CD-release show with the B’Dinas | 8 p.m. VooDoo Lounge, Harrah’s Casino, 1

Riverboat Dr., North Kansas City

1531 Grand

port Rd.

3 Son Green | 9 p.m. Californos, 4124 Pennsylvania Traindodge, Simple Lines, Yardsss & Krist Krueger | 10 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

Atomic Prom with Dean Monkey & the Dropouts, the Natural Highlights, DJ Modrey Hepburn | 10 p.m. Replay Lounge, 946 Massachusetts,

320 Southwest Blvd.

Girl 2 Girl Social | 6 p.m. Uptown Arts Bar, 3611

Broadway

continued on page 30 28

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TheaTer Dates and times vary. Card Table Theatre’s Seller Door | Lawrence

DAILY MENU

Arts Center, 940 New Hampshire, Lawrence, lawrenceartscenter.org

HAPPY HOUR

First Lady? by De De Deville | Fishtank

SPECIALS

MONDAY-FRIDAY

UPCOMING LIVE MUSIC:

Kyle Sexton Band 5/9/2014 - 9:00pm Fab Four Five 5/10/2014 - 9:00pm

susan G. Komen Pink Promise Brunch | 9 a.m.1 p.m. Overland Park Convention Center, 6000 College Blvd., Overland Park

A Little Night Music | Spinning Tree Theatre, at Off Center Theatre, Crown Center, 2450 Grand, spinningtreetheatre.com

303 W. 10th St., qualityhillplayhouse.com

816.960.4560 Mon-Fri 4p-3am Sat-Sun 12pm-3am

| 9 a.m. Sporting Park, 1 Sporting Way, KCK, kvc.org FA i r s & F e s T i vA L s

LoLA spring showcase | 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday, Star Bar at Pachamamas, 800 New Hampshire, Lawrence

Schoolhouse Rock: Live | The Coterie Theatre,

Crown Center, 2450 Grand, coterietheatre.org

Penrose Lane (within City Center North), Lenexa

wings over weston | 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Weston Bend State Park, 16600 Hwy. 45 North, Weston, ingsoverweston.com sPorTs & reC

Steel Magnolias | Metropolitan Ensemble Theatre, 3614 Main, metkc.org

Water by the Spoonful | Unicorn Theatre, 3828 Main, unicorntheatre.org

White Sangria | 7:30 p.m. Just Off Broadway

Theatre, 3051 Central

SERVING FOOD TILL 3AM

Chiefs Finish on the 50 5k | 9 a.m., $40/$45, Ar-

rowhead Stadium

Dine-in Theater: sporting KC away game | 3 p.m. Alamo Drafthouse, 1400 Main

FooD & DrinK

Cheese Appreciation: Comparing Milk Types | continued from page 28 Glam Bam Thank You Mam with DJ Jizzifer |

FEATURED DE AL

10 p.m. MiniBar, 3810 Broadway

Young Friends of Art Happy Hour | 6-8 p.m. Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, 4525 Oak

Saturday | 5.10 |

$40 CERTIFICATE

FOR $20

PerForMinG ArTs

.com

“A first-class wine list and excellent desserts make this intimate bistro a real find.” — Charles Ferruzza

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3 p.m. Green Dirt Farm, 19915 Mount Bethel Rd., Weston

village Crawfish Festival, benefiting Head Start of Shawnee Mission | 6-11 p.m., $45-$55, St. Pius Church, 55th St. and Woodson, Mission, crawdaddies.org MusiC

Angela Hagenbach, Megan Birdsall | 6 p.m. Broadway Jazz Club, 3601 Broadway

Kansas City Ballet presents Cinderella |

Garry Lincoln | The Dubliner, 170 E. 14th St.

The John scofield organic Trio | 8 p.m. Folly

Luni Coleone, 2Anormal, Triple sick and Young Loc, F.o.C., Money Gritterz, ill nino, Queen Mazine | 9 p.m. Czar, 1531 Grand

7:30 p.m. Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts, 1601 Broadway, kcballet.org

Theater, 300 W. 12th St.

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walk Me Home 5k, benefiting KVC Health Systems

No Dogs Allowed | Theatre for Young America,

fri 5.9: JAYKE ORVIS & THE BROKEN BAND,

the pitch

Association | 9 a.m. Donnell’s Motorcycles, 17851 E. Hwy. 40, Independence, kcvjmc.org

Lenexa Art Fair | 10 a.m. Saturday, 87th Street and

APPEARING LIVE THIS WEEK

30

Kansas City vintage Japanese Motorcycle show and swap, benefiting the Muscular Dystrophy

Mystery Train: Funeral for Brother John | The Golden Ox, 1600 Genessee, kcmysterytrain.com

H&R Block City Stage Theater, Union Station, 30 W. Pershing Rd., tya.org

THE DRUNKEN CUDDLE, SMOKESTACK RELICS sat 5.10: LAURA LISBETH DINNER SHOW, LOU SHIELDS, SUPER G, DEAD VEN sun 5.11: MOTHER’S DAY BACKSLIDER’S BRUNCH, LIVE GOSPEL, ALL YOU CAN EAT BRUNCH, & MIDTOWN’S BEST BLOODY MARY BAR

Pkwy., KCK, race4dvprevention.org

A Little More Alive | Kansas City Repertory Theatre, Copaken Stage, 13th St. and Walnut, kcrep.org

Musical of Musicals | Quality Hill Playhouse,

4112

race4 Domestic violence Prevention 5k run/ walk | 8 a.m. Nebraska Furniture Mart, 1601 Village W.

sprint Family Fun Days: super Heroes | 11 a.m.3 p.m. Power & Light District, 14th St. and Main

Theatre, James C. Olson Performing Arts Center, 4949 Cherry, umkctheatre.org

Pennsylvania Ave

Mommy Dearest, benefit for restart | 7 p.m.

Uptown Arts Bar, 3611 Broadway

Performance Studio, 1715 Wyandotte, fishtanktheater.blogspot.com

Love’s Labour’s Lost | Starting Friday, UMKC

SERVING FOOD TILL 4AM

CoMMuniTY evenTs

L i T e r A r Y/ s P o K e n w o r D

Jim Heiman discusses and signs his book Voices in Bronze and Stone | 1 p.m. National World War I Mu-

seum, Liberty Memorial, 100 W. 26th St., theworldwar.org

Christina Perri, Birdy | 7 p.m. The Granada, 1020

Massachusetts, Lawrence

The rhythm Buster, Maw | 9 p.m. Frank’s North Star Tavern, 508 Locust, Lawrence continued on page 32


Live Music Live Music 7 nights 7 nights a week

a week

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City O FR N S A ID L E AY

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SLASH FEATURING MYLES KENNEDY & THE CONSPIRATORS

GREAT WHITE AND SLAUGHTER August 16, 2014

July 26, 2014

MARIA THE MEXICAN ME LIKE BEES May 23, 2014

May 31, 2014

COLLECTIVE SOUL June 8, 2014

UPCOMING SHOWS: 5/9 5/10 5/16 5/17

The Clementines CD Release Project Backstage KC Up and Coming Throwdown Flirt Friday F.A.M.E. 1-800-745-3000

§ VooDooKC.com

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Subject to change or cancellation. Phone and online orders are subject to service fees. Must be 21 years or older to gamble, obtain a Total Rewards ® card or enter VooDoo ®. ©2014, Caesars License Company, LLC.

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5/6/14 4:01 PM


RUTH REICHL

WE D N

ESDAY

5.15

ious A Del ic er ved . s s i n o ve l

Each week, Pitch Street Team cruises around to the hottest clubs, bars and concerts. You name it, we will be there. While we are out, we hand out tons of cool stuff. So look for the Street Team... We will be looking for you!

First Frid ents itach y Prs oom in theTChre P R t io R ssfro@ ads Riff Roaf

The Pitch PLrsoop r Ba rdts Riff Raff @ @Rrecoen iot Room

Ruth Reichl | 11:30 a.m., $55, Webster House, 1644 Wyandotte, rainydaybooks.com

continued from page 30 Sellout | Jazzhaus, 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Twiste d Xm @ Indie as First Friday in the CrossroaXds mas

d Twiste die @ In

Upcoming Events

dgaerriors lteorlleBrriW KCAR rium ie d l In @ipa Audito unisic Tw @M ted Xmas @ Indie

5.9 - The Clementines CD Release Party @ VooDoo 5.9 - Lyle Lovett and his Acoustic Group @ Uptown Theater 5.13 - Ledisi @ The Midland

Sharp Weapons, Nervous Wreck, Tycho Brahe, Braddock | 8 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

Foundation 627 Big Band | 9 p.m. Green Lady

4112 Pennsylvania

Lou Shields, Super G, Dead Ven | Westport Saloon,

Jeff Harshbarger presents an Alternative Jazz Series: Funky Fresh Trio | 8 p.m. RecordBar, 1020

Steddy P & DJ Mahf, Stik Figa & D/Will, Dom Chronicles, Marty Notes | 9 p.m. RecordBar, 1020

Morning Parade | 7:30 p.m. Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

Lounge, 1809 Grand

Westport Rd.

Westport Rd.

The Bart Walker Band, the Old No. 5s | 7 p.m.

Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester

The Zeros | Fuel, 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park

Sunday | 5.11 | PERFORMING ARTS

Kansas City Ballet presents Cinderella | 2 p.m. Kauffman Center, 1601 Broadway, kcballet.org

See more on the “promotions” link at p

The Fade Aways | 8-11 p.m. Westport Flea Market,

817 Westport Rd.

The Lawrence Community Orchestra’s Inaugural Concert | 4 p.m. Theatre Lawrence, 1501 New

Hampshire, Lawrence, lawrenceorchestra.org

MUSEUM EXHIBITS & EVENTS Citizen Soldiers on the Prairie | Johnson County Museum of History, 6305 Lackman Rd., Shawnee, jocomuseum.org Convergence: Jazz, Film, Dance and the Visual Arts | American Jazz Museum, 1616 E. 18th St., , americanjazzmuseum.org

Cowtown: History of the Kansas City Stockyards | Kansas City Central Library, 14 W. 10th St., kclibrary.org

The Land Divided, the World United: Building the Panama Canal | Linda Hall Library, 5109 Cherry

FOOD & DRINK

Cheese Appreciation: Comparing Milk Types | 3 p.m. Green Dirt Farm, 19915 Mount Bethel Rd., Weston

Memorial , 100 W. 26th St., theworldwar.org

Jazz brunch | 11 a.m.-1 p.m. The Majestic Restaurant,

Outstanding Women of Missouri | Fort Osage

MUSIC

The Discovery of King Tut | Union Station, 30 W. Pershing Rd., unionstation.org/tut

931 Broadway

The Cold Hard Cash Show, the Velvet Elvis ’56 | 7 p.m., The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence 32

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On the Brink: A Month That Changed the World | National World War I Museum, Liberty

Education Center, 107 Osage St., Sibley

continued on page 34


TH

Y7 WED. MARACK T SCRATCH

TH

Y8 THU. MAVE EA JOSH GL

AY 11 M SUN. M WOOLA PATRICK TH 4 1 Y A M WED.ATRICK IMMING RYAN P TH 5 1 Y Y THU. AMBA ERNATH TH

CHAD

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33


farmers markets BadSeed | 4-9 p.m. Friday, 1909 McGee

P SUMMER GUIDE

P p CALL

816.561.6061 OR VISIT

GOLF TOURNAMENT

JUNE 5, 2014

NighTliFE

Brookside Farmers Market | 8 a.m.1 p.m. Saturday, Border Star Montessori, 6321 Wornall,brooksidefarmersmarket.com

Neo-Soul lounge | The Blue Room, 1616 E. 18th St.

City Market | 6 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday, 8 a.m.-

4048 Broadway

3 p.m. Sunday, 20 E. Fifth St.

Cottin’s hardware Store | 4-6:30 p.m. Thurs-

day, back parking lot of 1832 Massachusetts, Lawrence, cottinshardware.com/farmersmarket

deSoto Farmers Market | 8 a.m.-noon Sat-

urday, St. Andrew’s United Methodist Church, 1004 Rock Rd., De Soto

downtown overland park Farmers Market

| 7:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturdays, 6:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Wednesdays, on Marty between 79th and 80th streets

gladstone Farmers Market | 7 a.m.-noon

Saturday, 2-6 p.m. Wednesday, Gladstone Hy-Vee, 7117 N. Prospect

4 - SOME INCLUDES:

SPONSOR

Who gives a Karaoke | 10 p.m. The Riot Room,

Monday | 5.12 | l i T E r a r y/ S p o K E N W o r d

Blue Monday poetry and open mic | 8-10 p.m. Uptown Arts Bar, 3611 Broadway

a Celebration of Women publication party | 5:30 p.m. Unity Temple, 707 W. 47th St.

downtown lee’s Summit Farmers Market | 7 a.m. Wednesday and Saturday, Second St. and Douglas

PUTTING & CHIPPING PROCEEDS BENEFITTING:

continued from page 32 Til Willis & Erratic Cowboy, Salvador Francisco | 6 p.m. Replay Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence

• Free Lunch • Straightest Drive contest • Closest to the Pin contest • Longest Drive contest • Free goodie bag with promos • Free dinner & drinks • Win prizes from P

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MuSiC

Bob Bowman & roger Wilder | 10 p.m. Green Lady

Lounge, 1809 Grand

More

EvEnts

O

e nlin

pitch.co

at

m

hellogoodbye, Vacationer | 8 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

Jayson Kayne | 8 p.m. Fuel, 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park

grand Court Farmers Market | 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday, Grand Court Retirement Center, 501 W. 107th St.

Mark lowrey Trio | 6 p.m. The Majestic, 931

independence Farmers & Craft Market |

Saloon, 4112 Pennsylvania

5 a.m.-1 p.m. Wednesday and Saturday, the corner of Truman and Main, Historic Independence Square, 210 W. Truman Rd.

KC organics and Natural Market | 8 a.m.12:30 p.m. Saturday, Minor Park, Holmes at Red Bridge Road lawrence Farmers Market | 8 a.m.-noon Saturday, 4-6 p.m. Tuesday, 824 New Hampshire

liberty Farmers Market | 7 a.m.-noon Wednes-

Broadway

open Mic with Brody Buster | 7-11 p.m. Westport

rambler’s Songwriter roundup with gary Cloud | 7 p.m. Davey’s Uptown, 3402 Main

Tuesday | 5.13 | lECTurE

National geographic live: paul Sereno — the dinosaur hunter | 7:30 p.m. Kauffman Center, 1601 Broadway

day, Feldmans Farm & Home, 1332 W. Kansas

Merriam Farmers Market | 7 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday, 4-7 p.m. Wednesday, Merriam Marketplace, 5740 Merriam Dr.

Food & driNK

american Craft Beer Week dinner | 6:3010:45 p.m., $65, Rye, 10551 Mission, Leawood SporTS & rEC

olathe Farmers Market | 7:30 a.m. Saturday

and Wednesday, Black Bob Park, 14500 W. 151st St. (Field 1)

royals vs. Colorado rockies | 7:10 p.m. Kauffman

parkville Farmers Market | 7 a.m.-noon Saturday, 2-5 p.m. Wednesday, English Landing Park, First St. and Main

MuSiC

Waldo Farmers Market | 3-7 p.m. Wednesday,

Habitat for Humanity ReStore, 303 W. 79th St.

Stadium

El Barrio Band | 7 p.m. Danny’s Big Easy, 1601 E. 18th St.

Bram’s B-3 Bombers | 9 p.m. Green Lady Lounge,

1809 Grand

continued on page 36 34

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pitch.com


WELCOME BACK TO WHERE IT ALL BEGAN!

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35


There’s a NEW game in town!

JENNIPHER WALTERS MOND

AY

5.12

KC’S ONLY FM SPORTS STATION! SPORTS RADIO 102.5 THE FAN LINEUP:

5AM-8AM: Tiki Barber, Brandon & Dana

8AM-11AM: John Feinstein 11AM-2PM: Jim Rome 2PM-5PM: Doug Gottlieb 5PM-9PM: Chris Moore & Brian Jones 9PM-1AM: Scott Ferrall 1AM-5AM: D.A. - Damon Amendolara

DREW ERTLE

p oms u Fit bott

Jennipher Walters, half of Fit Bottomed Girls and co-author of The Anti-Diet, leads a workout and book-signing event | 7-8:30 p.m. Monday, at Athleta Kansas City, 429 West 47th Street, RSVP at

816-753-7557, info at fitbottomedgirls.com.

continued from page 34 Scott Ford CD-release show | 8:30 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester

Brandon Hudspeth Duo | 7 p.m. B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ, 1205 E. 85th St.

SPORTS & REC

Royals vs. Colorado Rockies | 1:10 p.m. Kauffman

Stadium

Sporting KC vs. Philadelphia Union | 7:30 p.m.

Ledisi with the Robert Glasper Experiment | 7:30 p.m. The Midland, 1228 Main

Sporting Park, 1 Sporting Way, KCK MUSIC

Louis Logic, Steven Cooper, Coolzey, Melo, Landes, Lost Analog, Loogey | 8 p.m. The Riot

Room, 4048 Broadway

Old Salt Union, Monzie Leo & the Big Sky |

8 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence

Open Blues Jam with the Coyote Bill Boogie Band | 9 p.m. Westport Saloon, 4112 Pennsylvania Queens of the Stone Age | 7 p.m. Starlight Theatre,

4600 Starlight Rd.

Slayer, Suicidal Tendencies, Exodus | 6:30 p.m.

Uptown Theater, 3700 Broadway

Dance Gavin Dance, Capture the Crown, Palisades, Bleach Blonde, To Speak in Whispers | 6 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts,

Lawrence

TJ Erhardt | 7 p.m. B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ, 1205 E. 85th St. A Giant Dog, All Blood | 9 p.m. MiniBar, 3810 Broadway

Hermon Mehari Trio | 6 p.m. The Majestic, 931 Broadway

Robert Leo Newton, the Hungry Sevens, the Green Music Brothers, Scott Schumann |

Troubadour Tuesdays with Erik Voeks and David George | 7 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

8:30 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

Water Liars, Gardienne, Adriana Nikole | 8 p.m.

Leawood

Czar, 1531 Grand

Wednesday | 5.14 | PERFORMING ARTS

Cirque du Soleil’s Varekai | 7:30 p.m. Sprint Center,

Drew Six | 6-9 p.m. Cactus Grill, 11849 Roe,

Seth Walker & Bobby Bare Jr. | 8 p.m. Knuckleheads

Saloon, 2715 Rochester

War Master, Vomit Assault | 8 p.m. Davey’s Uptown, 3402 Main

1407 Grand

COMEDY

Kyle Kinane, Dave Ross, Martin Plant | 10 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

36

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pitch.com

E-mail submissions to calendar@pitch.com or enter submissions at pitch.com, where you can search our complete listings guide.


1

ey Go to pitch.com/readersurv

2

Answer some questions

3

Be entered to these amazing prizes!

win one of

Mongolian Grill

$100 gift card to Genghis Khan

$100 gift card to Hereford House or Pierpoints

iPad Mini

Contest begins at 12:01 am [ct] 11/27/13, ends at 12:01 am [ct] 5/29/14. By filling out this survey, you’ll be filling us in on details about who you are, how you spend your time and what you like and dislike. We’ll then use the information you provide to serve you better resulting in more personalized content on our website and in our newspaper. Go to pitch.com/readersurvey now to start letting your voice be heard, as well as your chance to score a sweet prize. pitch.com

m ay 8 - 1 4 , 2 0 1 4

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37


S ava g e L o v e

Boundary disputes out of an eight-year relationship. She was my first girlfriend. I don’t want to be in another monogamous relationship. I want to have a couple of sex buddies or, preferably, a couple of friends with benefits. In the last 18 months, I have had three FWB “arrangements” with different girls. The problem is, about two or three months in, each girl developed serious like/love feelings and began talking about a future together and how they want to be with me exclusively. Each time, I had to reiterate my feelings about not getting into a relationship and wound up feeling like an asshole. I care about these women and don’t want to hurt their feelings, but I told them the situation from the start. Am I a bad person? Or are FWB arrangements impossible?

Fiancé Lusts After [Trans Women] Hottie Dear FLATWH: You would be foolish to waste

your time wondering whether your fiancé wants to have sex with trans women because it’s clear that your fiancé wants to have sex with trans women. The question you should concern yourself with is this: Can your fiancé be trusted to honor the monogamous commitment he’s (presumably) about to make to you, or is he going to cheat on you with other trans and/or cis women? If you trust that he’ll honor the commitment he makes to you, then his taste in porn and his fantasies about other partners — trans or not — are irrelevant.

Fears Wilting Boundaries

Dear Dan: The sitch: Tend bar with a hot girl who has a boyfriend. Hit on her anyway because I’m that guy. She says I can fuck her but only if her boyfriend gets to watch and eat her out after. I don’t want anything to do with that scene. I was down for some traditional cheating, not this kinky shit. But I’d still like to fuck this girl. Any advice?

m ay 8 - 1 4 , 2 0 1 4

Partner Against Nighties That Intrigue Eager Spouse

My boyfriend and I have been together for two years. We were long-distance for the first year and a half. When we were long-distance, he complained that it was hard to have a relationship over the phone. Now that we are in the same city, he says he feels like our relationship has gone “stale” and he feels “trapped.” I’m sick of his complaining. Does he want to be with me or not? What is he really trying to say?

Confusing Lad Is Nagging Girl Dear CLING: “I’m intolerable, and you should

Dear BBB: Nope.

Dear Dan: My question concerns my fiancé. He is

Wants Real Orgasms the pitch

Dear Dan: I’m in a heterosexual relationship.

Dear WRO: You’re having real orgasms. When

break up with me.”

I’ve only ever been able to orgasm if I self-induce while alone or if I’m on top during sex with a guy and my clit is being rubbed on the guy’s abdomen. (This works best with bigger guys.) When there is no abdomen rubbing my clit, I fake it. I can squeeze so it feels as if I’m coming, but I’m not. Do you have any suggestions? 38

your clit is fully engaged — using your hands or toys when alone, rubbing against the abdomen of a big guy during intercourse — you get off. Some women’s clits are fully engaged during intercourse without any extra effort (they can come “just” from fucking), but they’re in the minority. If climaxing during intercourse is important to you, you’ll have to sleep with big guys exclusively, rub your own clit during sex, or instruct skinny dudes to rub your clit for you.

Dear Dan: I’m a married straight man. My wife and I have been married for five years. I thought she was GGG and open to new things, so six months ago, I brought up my desire to wear lingerie. She didn’t react well. We struggled a bit but gradually got back to normal, with me just not mentioning it again. My birthday is in May, so I proposed a weekend of indulgence of my fetish as a present. I thought that would be easy to accommodate. I was wrong and got totally and uncomfortably denied. I’m at a loss for what to do. I don’t want to destroy a marriage over a small sexual interest, but I don’t want to be locked into vanilla sex forever.

Blue-Balled Baller

Dear Dan: I’m a 28-year-old straight female.

pitch.com

D a n S ava ge

women. My worry is that he wants to have sex with [trans women]. Is this a legitimate worry? He doesn’t watch gay porn. I just want to make sure of everything if we are going to be married.

Dear Dan: I’m a 26-year-old lesbian 18 months

Dear FWB: Friends-with-benefits arrangements may not be committed relationships, but they are relationships. They’re ongoing sexual relationships, and people have been known to develop like/love feelings for folks they’re fucking on a regular basis. So if “getting into a relationship” is something you want to avoid, and you don’t want anyone developing feelings, you should have one-night stands and/or NSA sex instead. (Those are also relationships, in my opinion, but they’re extremely shortterm ones, and people rarely develop serious like/love feelings in a single sex session.) On to your questions: You are not a bad person. FWB are not impossible — there are a lot of successful FWB arrangements — and a desire for exclusivity or a future together is not proof that someone entered into the arrangement under false pretenses. And reiterating your disinterest in a committed relationship isn’t assholery.

By

35 years old. Between the ages of 20 and 30, he was in and out of jail. He has admitted to me that while in prison, he had sex with a [trans woman]. I know he loves having sex with [cis] women, but I found out that he watches [a porn genre that features trans women who have penises]. He says he is just looking, but I know he masturbates to this [porn genre]. To be fair, he watches tons of porn featuring [cis] women. A lot. He loves watching [cis] women and having sex with [cis]

Dear PANTIES: Someone can be “open to new things” without being “open to everything.” So your wife might be up for exploring other sexual kinks, positions and circumstances, but seeing you in panties could be a “libido killer,” a term coined by Emily “Dear Prudence” Yoffe. If that’s the case, she may never come around. But if it’s not a libido killer, if it’s just something she hasn’t had time to wrap her head around, your best course of action is to drop the subject for now. Let the wife see that your interest isn’t all-consuming and you still enjoy vanilla sex in gender-conforming underpants, and indulging this particular kink may come to seem less threatening. Dear Dan: Where can straight women find men who won’t make odd sexual requests? Dumped One Again Dear DOA: Graveyards. Have a question for Dan Savage? E-mail him at mail@savagelove.net


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INTERNS WANTED P p

If you have an interest in marketing, advertising, design, event planning and/or media, we may have an opportunity that will fit your internship needs. To qualify you must currently be enrolled in college and able to receive college credit. You also must be able to handle multiple projects at once and have related computer knowledge. The Pitch is currently accepting applications for interns for the Summer & Fall semesters in the departments listed. Feel free to send us an email letting us know why you would like to intern with us.

Marketing / Business jason.dockery@pitch.com

Sales / Business erin.carey@pitch.com

Graphic Design / Advertising christina.riddle@pitch.com

Graphic Design / Editorial Layout jeremy.luther@pitch.com

1701 Main St • KCMO • Crossroads District

816.561.6061 40

the pitch

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pitch.com

licensed massage Alexis LMT private Studio

10am - 7pm • 7 days a week clean, healthy environment hot showers available

$60/60 min. $80/90 min. Call for appT.

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NEW LIFE MASSAGE PROFESSIONAL MASSAGE

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Do You Have Type 2 Diabetes? KCUMB’s Center for Community and Clinical Research is currently recruiting participants for a 12-month outpatient study of an investigational longacting insulin for Type 2 Diabetes. There is no placebo medication with this study. Compensation is available for time and travel, along with study-related insulin and blood-sugar testing supplies.

To learn more abouT This sTudy, please conTacT

International Clinical Research Institute: (913) 317-5300

Participants must: • Have Type 2 Diabetes • Be at least 18 years of age • Be taking Levemir (insulin detemir), Lantus (insulin glargine) or NPH insulin with or without oral antidiabetic medication in the last six months • Be available for outpatient and telephone visits

Please call 816-654-7654 for more information.

1750 Independence Ave. • Kansas City, MO 64106 • www.kcumb.edu/Tri

To learn more abouT This sTudy, please conTacT

International Clinical Research Institute: ( 913 ) 317-5300 42

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APTS/JOBS/STUFF

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816.218.6702 816.218.6759

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We are a debt relief agency. We help people file for bankruptcy relief under the Bankruptcy Code. The choice of a lawyer is an important decision and should not be based solely on advertisement.

Attorney since 1976: 913-345-4100, KS/MO. Injuries, workers comp, criminal, divorce, DUI, traffic, and more. Low fees, Call Greg Bangs.

KC'S AUCTION KINGS! THURSDAY NIGHT AUCTIONS

Furniture, antiques, collectibles, art, artifacts, oddities, autos, retro/vintage, gold/silver, jewelry, militaria, vinyl, music & more.

1801 Guinotte KCMO 64120 816.960.4664 www.atakc.com

SPEEDING DWI CRIMINAL SOLICITATION Call Tim Tompkins Today KCTrafficlawyer.com 913-707-4357 816-729-2606

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Alternative Lifestyle Parties

Every Friday & Saturday Night 8pm-5am

Simple, Uncontested + Filing Fee. Don Davis. 816-531-1330

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Are you looking for A new plAce

At the Door

First 50 guests win awesome door prizes!

tOP 3 reAsOns yOu shOuld be here… 1. All new 2. everyone else Is 3. because We said so

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AUTO & SR22 INSURANCE Renters, Homeowners, Motorcycle, Business MO & KS DeMasters Ins. LLC 816-531-1000 www.KCinsurance.com

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College & Quivira 913.498.8875 Members of

DWI-TRAFFIC-CRIMINAL

DUI-TRAFFIC-SPEEDING! Kansas & Missouri Reasonable rates! Susan Bratcher

www.bratcherlaw.biz

SPEEDING, DWI, POSSESSION, ASSAULT FREE CONSULTATION Call: The Law Office of J.P. Tongson (816) 265-1513

THE LAW OFFICE OF DENISE KIRBY 816-221-3691

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AFFORDABLE ATTORNEY

Experienced, knowledgeable attorney will take the time to listen and inform.

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Doug Breyfogle

Over 20 years of experience Licensed in Missouri and Kansas

Call Christopher Smith Workers' Compensation attorney. Licensed in Missouri and Kansas. (816) 756-5800. No recovery - no fee.

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May 22nd, 2014 6pm-8pm

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INJURED AT WORK?

$99 DIVORCE $99

Hot Tub, Dance Area w/pole, Live DJ, Pool Table

99.7% Toxin Free w/n an hour We can help you pass Coopers 3617 Broadway, KCMO 816.931.7222

WE SCOOP DOG POOP ! 816-665-6020 nomoredogpoop.com

Looking for an Experienced Attorney? FREE CONSULTATION!

THE LAW OFFICE OF DENISE KIRBY 816-221-3691

HOTEL ROOMS Scared? Anxious? Confused?

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DWI, Solicitation, Traffic, Internet Crimes, Hit & Run, Power & Light Violations. 816-221-5900 - www.The-Law.com David Lurie Attorney

A-1 Motel 816-765-6300 Capital Inn 816-765-4331 6101 E. 87th St./Hillcrest Rd. HBO,Phone,Banq. Hall

$37.06 Day/ $149 Week/ $499 Month + Tax

The Pitch: May 8, 2014  

The Pitch, May 8-14, 2014. Kansas City's alternative weekly. Featuring "Not OK: What happened in Oklahoma's death chamber shouldn't happen...

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