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January 30–February 5, 2014 | Free | Vol. 33 no. 31 | pitch.com

Can you get a kangaroo tattoo on troost? Was eleCtriC Park kansas City’s biggest blaze? and What Was eleCtriC Park? The Answering MAchine knows. PAge 9


January 30-February 5, 2014 | Vol. 33 no. 31 E d i t o r i a l

Editor Scott Wilson Managing Editor Justin Kendall Music Editor Natalie Gallagher Staff Writers Charles Ferruzza, David Hudnall, Steve Vockrodt Editorial Operations Manager Deborah Hirsch Events Editor Berry Anderson Proofreader Brent Shepherd Contributing Writers Tracy Abeln, Nathan Clay Barbarick, Liz Cook, Adrianne DeWeese, April Fleming, Larry Kopitnik, Angela Lutz, Ben Palosaari, Dan Savage, Nick Spacek, Abbie Stutzer

Th e answ er i ng Mach i ne Looking for answers to Kansas City’s nagging questions rattling around our brains. b y b e n pa l o s a a r i

a r t

Art Director Ashford Stamper Contributing Photographers Angela C. Bond, Barrett Emke, Chris Mullins, Lauren Phillips, Sabrina Staires, Brooke Vandever

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P r o d u c t i o n

Production Manager Christina Riddle Multimedia Designer Vu Radley

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Sales Manager Erin Carey Senior Classified Multimedia Specialist Steven Suarez Multimedia Specialists Collin Click, Sharon Donat, Becky Losey Director of Marketing and Operations Jason Dockery Digital Marketing Manager Keli Sweetland Digital Marketing Specialist Lisa Kelly Sales and Marketing Assistant Anna Brescia

c i r c u l a t i o n

Circulation Director Mike Ryan

B u s i n E s s

Accounts Receivable Jodi Waldsmith Publisher Joel Hornbostel

s o u t h c o m m

Chief Executive Officer Chris Ferrell Chief Financial Officer Patrick Min Chief Marketing Officer Susan Torregrossa Chief Technology Officer Matt Locke Chief Operating Officer/Group Publisher Eric Norwood Director of Digital Sales and Marketing David Walker Controller Todd Patton Creative Director Heather Pierce Director of Content/Online Development Patrick Rains

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Cucina della Ragazza squeezes a lot of flavor into a tiny Westport storefront. by charles ferruzz a

VMG Advertising 888-278-9866, vmgadvertising.com Senior Vice President of Sales Susan Belair Senior Vice President of Sales Operations Joe Larkin

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Tr i ppy TaLks Austin psych-rock legends Roky Erickson and the Black Angels are coming to Lawrence.

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Questionnaire

Kyle RogeRs and James Flexman F

My sidekick Rogers: My brother, @DrewWRogers. We live

together and go pretty much everywhere together. Luckily, he likes to drive because I like to text/tweet/Knoda. Flexman: My newest sidekick is my 2-monthold daughter, Aria.  

My dating triumph/tragedy Rogers: That’s classified. Flexman: My wife, Kallie. And because of

the triumph, we’re lucky enough to have our daughter.

My brush with fame Rogers: Tweeted @Ochocinco in a chain of

Kyle Rogers (left) and James Flexman

Twitter handle Rogers: @KyleR Flexman: @PacmanJames

both Julian and Collection. I’m looking forward to checking out the Belfry. Flexman: Stroud’s

“I always laugh at …” Rogers: The sneezing panda. Flexman: It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia

Hometown Rogers: Kansas City Flexman: Kansas City

What’s on your KC postcard? Rogers: Union Station, the Kauffman Center,

“I’ve been known to binge-watch …” Rogers: House of Cards, Game of Thrones, The

Current neighborhood Rogers: Waldo, walking distance from Lew’s, Remedy and Shot Stop Flexman: Prairie Village

What I do (in 140 characters) Rogers: Dream up ways people can interact

with predictions and spread the word about Knoda to as many as possible. Flexman: I’m an entrepreneur. Every day is different. It’s never boring and always challenging. But I love it.

What’s your addiction? Rogers: Knoda, Twitter and sports Flexman: Oreos. I like them … a lot. What’s your game? Rogers: Soccer Flexman: Golf. I rarely get to play, but I love it. What’s your drink? Rogers: Boulevard Wheat or a smooth gin and

tonic

Flexman: I’m really into wine right now. Where’s dinner? Rogers: Any of Celina Tio’s restaurants. I love

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of Knoda

Flexman: I’m sure I’ve gotten plenty of bad advice in life, but nothing too atrocious comes to mind.  

S a b r i n a S ta i r e S

uture NBA players Nick Collison, Kirk Hinrich and Drew Gooden were just freshmen at the University of Kansas. Kyle Rogers knew that Roy Williams had something special in the three men. “When these guys are seniors, KU is going to win a national championship,” Rogers recalls telling his mother. Rogers, 27, was almost right. The Jayhawks made it to the 2003 NCAA championship game but lost to Syracuse. “She had no remembrance of me saying that to her,” says Rogers, who wondered how he could prove it. About a decade later, Rogers believes that he has found it with Knoda, an app in which users give predictions and others vote for or against them. He and partner James Flexman, 31, quit their jobs with Sporting Innovations last year and started working full time on the app, which hit the iPhone App Store November 29. Users can also make their predictions online at knoda.com. (Knoda’s Android release is slated for March.)

CEO and COO, respectively,

18th and Vine, Sporting Park, Oklahoma Joe’s, Knoda Tower (circa 2020) Flexman: Oklahoma Joe’s gas station  

Finish this sentence: “Kansas City got it right when …” Rogers: City leadership and private sector got together to revitalize downtown. All of today’s momentum stems from that. Flexman: Downtown got revitalized.

Walking Dead Flexman: Football

“I can’t stop listening to …” Rogers: “Counting Stars” by OneRepublic,

“Pompeii” by Bastille, “Do I Wanna Know?” by Arctic Monkeys Flexman: The 1975  

“I just read …” Rogers: What the Dog Saw by Malcolm

vated. Baseball should be downtown. Flexman: Downtown didn’t get a new Royals stadium.  

Gladwell, The Everything Store by Brad Stone, Hatching Twitter by Nick Bilton Flexman: The Racketeer by John Grisham. Need to take a break from nonfiction business/ startup books from time to time.  

“Kansas City needs …” Rogers: To drop the inferiority complex and

The best advice I ever got Rogers: Never underestimate the power of

“Kansas City screwed up when …” Rogers: They let Kauffman Stadium be reno-

start being proud of what we have and who we are. And In-N-Out. Flexman: Flying Burrito. Ten times better than Chipotle but the closest one is in Arkansas.

dry underwear. Thanks, @MossyOakScott (Dad). Flexman: To surround myself with people smarter than me.

“In five years, I’ll be …” Rogers: Sitting in Knoda offices downtown

Worst advice Rogers: You have to go to college to be suc-

debating the costs and benefits of going public. Flexman: Still building cool apps/websites.  

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cessful. Not sure anyone explicitly said that to me, but you’re certainly led to believe that. College has value. It can be useful, but it’s not the only way.

events that concluded with him trying out/ training with Sporting KC. Flexman: Met Britney Spears at Disney World when I was in high school.  

My 140-character soapbox Rogers: Education is messed up in USA. It’s

too standardized and generic. Should be more analysis, less testing. Maybe someday Flex and I will tackle it. Flexman: Just a quick thanks to the KC community. Too many to name, but everyone has been incredibly supportive throughout the journey so far.  

What was the last thing you had to apologize for? Rogers: Cussing in front of my mom and

grandma. Oops. Flexman: Screaming in terror and subsequently waking up my wife after opening my 2-month-old daughter’s diaper this morning.  

Who’s sorry now? Rogers: Still me. You should have seen Gram-

mie’s face! Flexman: Still me. But not for waking her up. More for having witnessed it. Comes with the territory, though.  

My recent triumph Rogers: Working with Flex to get Knoda off the

ground and raise money to go full time. We still have a long way to go, but just getting started is an accomplishment. Flexman: Getting Knoda to this point. Much, much more to be done, but happy to have the initial product to the market and a supertalented team in place.


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I

n the early part of the last decade, the Kansas Jayhawks played women’s softball on a hardscrabble Lawrence field that looked better suited to an adult beer league than to an NCAA program. The batter’s box faced into the wind, making it hard for sluggers to smack a ball deep into the outfield. Jayhawk Field, as it was known before 2004, was outdated, as were most University of Kansas athletic facilities at the time. Women’s softball is a money-loser, and back then it was a low priority for a KU athletics department hard-pressed to reverse the fortunes of its moribund football program. Without private help, Jayhawk softball would continue playing on one of the worst fields in the Big 12. Along came Cheryl Womack. In 2002, the Mission Hills businesswoman, who graduated from KU in 1975, pledged $2 million toward replacing Jayhawk Field. Two years later, the 800-seat Arrocha Ballpark opened. It’s named after Womack’s father, Demostenes Arrocha, who came to Kansas City, Kansas, from Panama and raised Womack and her 10 siblings there. Womack made her softball pledge the same year that she sold a business she had launched in the early 1980s. The National Association of Independent Truckers fetched $35 million in 2002, including $25 million in cash. The buyer was Sirva Inc., of Illinois. Federal prosecutors now say Womack didn’t pay income taxes on that NAIT sale and has since deployed a number of schemes to dodge other taxes. Indicted in December, she is scheduled for a court hearing January 29. The softball field was among the biggest and most visible contributions to Jayhawk sports from Womack, who would go on to become one of the program’s major boosters. Jim Marchiony, a spokesman for KU athletics, confirms to The Pitch that Womack is a contributor to the Williams Education Fund, a fundraising arm of the university’s sports programs. Womack’s $2 million contribution, plus donations to the university, have helped her make ties with the school’s most prominent figures. She also has helped KU men’s basketball coach Bill Self and former point guard Mario Chalmers with their charities. But she hasn’t always liked the return on her investment. She took Williams Education Fund director Rodney Jones’ son on her private jet to San Antonio to see the 2008 Final Four, knowing that doing favors for Jones could help her get better tickets to KU basketball games. But that assist to Jones didn’t pan out; he was indicted for embezzling from the athletics department, and

Womack’s name is losing value. Womack’s Allen Fieldhouse seats got worse. Womack openly complained about the ticket-theft scandal that engulfed Jones and sent him and others to prison. “What I was looking for as a large donor was someone to tell me how things will be handled going forward and what we can expect,” Womack told The Kansas City Star in 2010. “Instead, we’re being told that the donors were never harmed. How can they say that? We did not have good tickets. I feel like I’m a crumb who’s just been pushed under the rug.” Now Womack has her own worries. Womack hired two local lawyers last week to represent her in federal court. They replace the New York lawyer who initially handled her indictment but couldn’t persuade a judge to let Womack fly to the Cayman Islands to kick-start a trash-to-energy project, which she wanted to launch there by March. Womack said she wanted to spend New Year’s Eve on the island, known for its sunny beaches and loose tax laws, because she hoped to party with officials there who could help get her project going. She also has a condo there, as well as bank accounts that prosecutors believe helped her dodge taxes. Osbourne Bodden, minister of a branch of the Cayman Islands bureaucracy that would oversee a project like the one Womack proposed, expressed surprise to a Caribbean news service about Womack’s claims. “We have no agreements or commitments to anyone in advance of this process being completed openly and transparently,” Bodden told the Caymanian Compass. “And we have no meetings or dinners for New Year’s with anyone but our families.”

E-mail steve.vockrodt@pitch.com


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The

Answering

Machine

Looking for answers to Kansas City’s nagging questions rattling around our brains.

By Ben Palosaari

O

ne of the joys — and frustrations — of living in a major American city is that we never know everything about it. Knowledge holes linger no matter how many times we drive the streets or use the civic furniture. We’re going to try to fill in those gaps.

In 2012, we answered several questions in our introductory “Answering Machine.” So now we know why Missouri was called “the Puke State”; how much it costs to operate the fountains every year; and what Western Auto was before it was a fixture of KC’s skyline. Our second “Answering Machine”

issue is here to provide more KC trivia answers. Mountains on the Kansas flag? A kangaroo for a mascot? (Really, UMKC?) And what exactly was Electric Park? As we keep finding out, there’s always more to learn no matter how well we think we know our city.

Why are there mountains in the Kansas state seal?

Why are flags of other countries on lampposts along Grand downtown?

Sure, Kansas has one famous hill: Mount Oread, home to the University of Kansas. But three geographers made international news in 2003 when they published a study saying the Sunflower State (or, “that place you have to drive through on your way to Denver”) is flatter than a pancake. How flat is it? If 1.0 represents perfect flatness, Kansas is .997, edging flapjacks that register a .957 flatness. So why do mountains make a cameo in the background of the state’s seal along with a buffalo and a farmer? The reason likely dates back to the original boundaries of the Kansas Territory, which stretched deep into what is now Colorado and included the Rocky Mountains. The state’s official description of the seal hedges a bit: “Perhaps the mountain-like hills on the seal were inspired by the Rocky Mountains.” Science doesn’t lie; the state is flat. So we’re inclined to believe this theory.

Spend enough time downtown, and there’s a decent chance you’ll become well-versed in the national flags of North and South America. You might be able to instantly recognize the 16-armed sun in the center of the Argentinian flag, or the two stars representing the two islands of St. Kitts and Nevis on that federation’s red, black and green flag. But why is one of our downtown arteries a tribute to the Americas’ other 34 nations? They represent the voting members of the Organization of American States, a regional solidarity group formed in the 1940s. Originally, the OAS’s purpose was to support the countries’ economic interests. In 2008, the Pan American Association of Kansas City, a group that promotes Kansas City to other parts of the Americas and educates Kansas City about Central and South American nations, convinced the City Council to shell out $45,000 for the flags. They run between Second and 28th streets, and the Downtown Council is responsible for maintaining them. continued on page 10

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The Answering Machine continued from page 9

Seriously, how did UMKC end up with a kangaroo mascot? University athletic programs around the country have a long history of strange and quirky mascots. Syracuse University’s is a big anthropomorphic orange named Otto. Stanford has a friggin’ tree (although, technically, it’s unofficial) running around the sidelines at games. And the University of Missouri–Kansas City has … a kangaroo. According to UMKC’s athletics department, the marsupial became a symbol of UMKC in 1936, when the school was called Kansas City University. KCU didn’t even have sports teams at the time, but editors of the student newspaper decided that the university’s debate team needed a mascot. Around the same time, the Kansas City Zoo bought two baby kangaroos, which garnered a lot of local press. Then, in 1937, a student political party used a logo with a kangaroo named Kasey, and Walt Disney later drew Kasey for a university comedy magazine called The Kangaroo (including a cover illustration with Mickey Mouse). Years later, The Kangaroo became the school’s yearbook, and the animal became a permanent part of KCU’s culture. The current, modern-looking and aggressive logos were adopted in 2004. How rare are the schools using kangaroos as mascots? According to the UMKC athletics department, only two other universities — State University of New York at Canton and Austin College in Sherman, Texas — call themselves the Kangaroos.

Mickey meets Kasey.

Why isn’t Kansas City the county seat of Jackson County? In neighborhoods around Kansas City, there seems It seems counterintuitive that Jackson County’s biggest city isn’t the to be a tattoo parlor on nearly every other corner. county seat. But this one is pretty simple. Independence was founded before Kansas City and was the most important city in Jackson County Does the city have a higher than normal number of in the county’s early days. Independence, established in 1827, was the ink shops? launching point for the Oregon, Santa Fe and California trails. Kansas City wasn’t founded until 1838. Fun fact about the county seat: A tiny part of it is in Cass County. What a world!

Independence in 1909

What was Electric Park? Long before Kansas Citians made annual pilgrimages to Worlds of Fun, there was Electric Park. The amusement park opened in 1907 at 47th Street and the Paseo (after moving from an original location in the East Bottoms, where it opened in 1899). Built by Joseph Heim, then president of Heim Brewery, the park marketed itself as Kansas City’s Coney Island and was known for lighting displays that were reported to contain 100,000 light bulbs. The park featured a lagoon, swimming pools, a flume ride, a train running around the perimeter, and an arcade. It also hosted concerts. According to the book Walt Disney’s Missouri, Walt Disney visited the park as a child and later incorporated several of these amenities into his theme parks. The book notes that one of Electric Park’s most popular shows was called the Living Sanctuary: “Every hour after 9 p.m., young women appeared on a platform rising out of a fountain, posing while being washed in multi-colored lights.” The park burned to the ground in 1925 and wasn’t rebuilt. 10

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If you search for “tattoo parlors in Kansas City” on Yelp — this century’s semi-trustworthy source for all service-industry info — more than 20 results show up. Some are in the burbs, but most are within city limits. Is that an abnormal amount? An unscientific study done by totalbeauty. com found that Kansas City is into ink, with the ninth-most tattoo businesses per capita and six tattooists for every 100,000 residents. Mike Martin, president of the Kansas City–based Alliance of Professional Tattooists, knows that we are fond of tats around here, but there aren’t any statistics about the industry. “It would be impossible to keep track,” he says. But Kansas Citians wouldn’t be wrong to wonder if parlors are proliferating locally. “It’s growing everywhere,” he says.


What’s up with the swastikas in the tiles on the Plaza? In 1997, legendary advice columnist Anne Landers vowed to never answer another question about how toilet-paper rolls should hang — over or under — on the wall. But, in 2002, in her last column, she reminded readers that civilized humans put it over. In Kansas City, ugh, our epic TP question is whether Nazi propaganda appears on walls in our beloved Country Club Plaza. We’ve addressed this issue in the past, and we’re tired of hearing about it. Yes, Plaza designer J.C. Nichols was a baldheaded, bespectacled, avowed anti-Semite. Really. Don’t let Kansas City revisionist history cloud your view. J.C.

Nichols designed neighborhoods, including those around the Plaza, that were famous for banning Jews and African-Americans from buying homes. It took a U.S. Supreme Court ruling to outlaw Nichols’ famed real-estate covenants. (Shelley v. Kraemer. Look it up.) Like Landers, we’re vowing that this is the last time we’re spilling ink on the so-called Plaza swastikas. Once and for all: There are no Nazi-inspired swastikas on the Plaza. People often point to tiles in front of the district’s P.F. Chang’s as proof that Nichols’ hate was built into the Plaza infrastructure. It’s not. In 2007, we reported correctly and definitively

that the design of the swastika-like tiles on the Plaza is steeped in Southwest history. Historians say the logo originated in India and Hinduism thousands of years ago, and not with Nazis. Albuquerque, New Mexico, is so sick of answering questions about the swastikas (identical to those on the Plaza) appearing around that city that it has dedicated a Web page to explain the symbol’s 6,000year history. Please, Pitch readers, drop this one. We beg you. Nichols hated Jews, but the Plaza and P.F. Chang’s do not. P.S. Hang TP over, not under.

Is it true that a phone booth is the only commercial enterprise in Mission Hills, Kansas? Just for the pure hilarious absurdity of this question, we wish it were true. Like, so, so bad. If we could have verified this, we would have been just tickled that this tony, gilded suburb was devoid of businesses. It’s close to true, though. A couple of outposts of commerce are in this posh, 2-square-mile community designed by J.C. Nichols. Specifically, there are Indian Hills Country Club and Kansas City Country Club. Otherwise, we found three home-based businesses. The Northeast Johnson County Chamber of Commerce, which includes Mission Hills in its coverage area, lists only two members within the city: the city offices and state Rep. Barbara Bollier. So it’s more than a phone booth but just barely.

Who are these people we’ve named so many of our streets — and short parts of streets — after? In Kansas City, we have named streets after people whom most residents know nothing about. Or, at least, stretches of streets. Who the hell are these people? A few examples:

Troost

The avenue long considered to be Kansas City’s racial dividing line is named for Dutchman Benoist Troost. (Don’t ask us how to pronounce Benoist, please. We couldn’t find an answer to that question.) Troost (1786-1859) lived a pretty cool life. He was born in Bois-le-Duc, a walled city in the Duchy of Brabant in the Netherlands. He did a spell of medical stuff with Napoleon’s army, then moved to Kansas City in its formative years, becoming an important founding-father

type. Find his grave at Mount St. Mary Cemetery and his oil-on-canvas portrait by George Caleb Bingham at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art. Worth the trip.

Strang Line Road

Strang Line Road was named after railroad magnate William B. Strang Jr., one of Overland Park’s most important founders. Strang came to town after Mission and Prairie Village had been founded, and he laid the groundwork for Overland Park with subdivisions in 1905. Strang wanted rail transit between the burgeoning outlying towns and subdivisions and the big city. His rail enterprise was called the Strang Line. It disappeared in 1940, according to historical groups.

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Wornall

This long, commercially vibrant stretch of road is named for John Wornall, who had a hell of a successful farm near Westport. Wornall’s family moved to the Kansas City area from Kentucky in the 1820s. The John Wornall House is a privately maintained historic site and is known for being haunted by the ghosts of Civil War soldiers. It’s so famous that it has been on TV! Speaking of the Civil War, Wornall was a slaveholder and was known in Jackson County for being a founding member of the pro-slavery, pro-Confederacy Westport Minute Men. Dude did not like African-Americans or their rights. continued on page 13

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The Answering Machine

What is the “quality” in Quality Hill?

continued from page 11

This downtown neighborhood is the longest continuously occupied part of the metro. For most of Kansas City’s early days, Quality Hill was considered the swankiest part of town, with mansion-lined streets and upscale businesses. The story goes that the area was dubbed “Quality Hill” in the 1880s when developer Kersey Coates platted subdivisions in the area that became popular with wealthy people moving to town from the East. The neighborhood was a favorite of political boss Tom Pendergast, who placed a statue of his brother Jim in Case Park. It was also relatively diverse for the time, and the YMCA on Washington Street used to be a Jewish gentlemen’s club called the Progress Club. Quality Hill took a serious dive in the 1960s, and homeowners fled for trendy neighborhoods on the rise, like the Country Club Plaza. The neighborhood became lousy with abandoned mansions, burned-out structures and flophouses. That version of Quality Hill would be unrecognizable to new transplants to the city. In the late 1980s and early aughts, developers revitalized the area with apartments and condos built out of the neighborhood’s iconic reddish brick.

For the love of God, why are Missouri courts closed May 8?

Life Magazine

Because Missourians are sappy sentimentalists. In the Show-Me State, May 8 is Truman Day, a state holiday in honor of former President Harry S. Truman’s birthday. Yes, just because the 33rd U.S. president was born here, all state and county business must grind to a halt on his birthday — or the closest business day if Truman Day lands on a weekend — even though Truman has been dead 42 years. And it’s a paid holiday for the state’s roughly 60,000 employees. Gov. Jay Nixon has been a vocal opponent of the silly holiday, and in 2010, the General Assembly considered repealing it but failed to do so. That year, the state spent $1.5 million in overtime for essential state services that need to be staffed during holidays. In other words: Truman defeats logic!

What’s the story with the gigantic Hereford steer overlooking Interstate 35 near downtown?

It’s impossible to miss the giant brown-and-white steer gazing over Interstate 35 toward the city’s middling skyline. It’s the kind of kitschy, weirdo touch that reminds us why we love Kansas City. Alternatively, it’s a massive, illuminated testament to this burg’s cowtown past. We looked into the origins of the 19-foot-long steer, and it was worth the effort, gang! The faux beast used to be part of the American Hereford Association’s headquarters in Quality Hill. The Kansas City Parks and Recreation department says President Dwight Eisenhower attended the dedication of the headquarters and the unveiling of the huge bovine in 1953. But when HNTB Architects moved into the building in 1997, the firm decided that a 5,500-pound fiberglass behemoth (roughly twice the weight of a real Hereford bull) didn’t fit its décor. In 2002, HNTB handed the statue over to the city, and it was placed in Mulkey Square Park at 13th Street and Summit, where the city’s noble spirit animal now watches over us as we moove around town.

Yep! Missouri (along with Connecticut and Illinois) celebrates Washington’s and Lincoln’s birthdays separately, rather than just Presidents Day like most self-respecting states. Yes, Missourians just love celebrating presidential holidays by not working.

Where did runaway slaves slip out of Missouri and into free-state Kansas? During Missouri’s period as a slave state, many in servitude fled to Kansas. Most of those slaves crossed at the confluence of the Missouri and Kansas rivers to settlements like Quindaro, near the riverbanks. To this day, Kansans like to slap themselves on the back for being on the right side of history in the 1800s. Slavery and Civil War history even permeate the MU-KU rivalry. But Kansans really don’t have much of a reason to feel so high and mighty. The Kansas Historical Foundation says most white Kansans opposed slavery out of economic concern rather than moral or religious reasons. In an article on the foundation’s website, it explains that white Kansans “did not want to compete with slaveholders for land, and feared slavery would drive down wages for everyone. Some even favored excluding Blacks from the territory entirely.” Keep that factoid in your back pocket the next time your Kansan friends start ranting about being a free state.

John Steuart Curry

Are there any other state-holiday quirks?

The worst fire in Kansas City history was … ? In terms of deaths, the worst was the burning of the Coates House Hotel in Quality Hill on January 28, 1978. Over the course of a couple of decades, the hotel had shifted from one of the city’s most luxurious places to stay — it hosted a few presidents, according to some stories — to a flophouse with about 140 residents, most of whom paid cheap weekly rent. Twenty people died in the blaze that raged from 4 to 8 a.m. It was 5 degrees the morning of the fire, and fire-department ladder trucks froze while being raised. According to an Associated Press news story from that day: “At least four of the victims plunged to their deaths from upper stories of the sixfloor building to the pavement below.” One witness of the fire told the AP, “People were hanging out the windows, screaming for help.” Now there are offices on the site of the hotel at 1005 Broadway.

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WEEK OF JANUARY 30-FEBRUARY 5, 2014

NIGHT LIGHTS Brendan Meara’s short film “Dielectric” (from which this image is taken) is among the works David Rhoads has selected for Thursday’s one-night-only Sculpties. It’s the latest in a monthly series of experimental film and video exhibitions put on by a collective called SPECTRA. Joining Meara’s piece are works by Robert Chase Heishman and Megan Schvaneveldt, Jordan Johnson and Bonnie Lane. Sculpties goes from 7 to 9 p.m. at the H&R Block Artspace at the Kansas City Art Institute, 16 East 43rd Street.

Daily listings on page 30 pitch.com

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S ta g e

Bumpy Flight

The Unicorn’s Grounded

By

doesn’t quite have it all.

De bor a h hir s ch

Stage

Don Ipock

ilot projects a rock star’s hubris and feels herself “a god” when she flies fast and high on military missions. Boom! she exclaims in Grounded, a one-woman show at the Unicorn Theatre. The floor of this production’s round stage spins, and Pilot appears to wind up and take off. This is me! This is me! she repeats, the words foreshadowing later, darker developments. High in the sky and high on herself, she seems to get off on dropping ordnance. Boom! It’s an elite club, that of the fighter pilot, and it’s mostly made up of men. Pilot (Carla Noack) is one of the guys — until she meets a civilian in a Wyoming bar while on leave and her e r Mo bravado turns him on. Soon after their tryst comes morning sickat e n i Onl .com ness during bombing pitch runs. Knowing she must be grounded, she reports the pregnancy-test results to her commanding officer and heads stateside. She was born to fly — her plane “cradles” her — but Pilot knows she was also born to be a mother. Playwright George Brant’s exploration of the working woman facing domestic life plays with a different set of conflicting roles: wartime fighter vs. mother. Reassigned to the Nevada desert, Pilot trains to fly drone missions. Staring at a gray screen instead of soaring into blue sky, she feels like part of a “typing pool.” Only the occasional order to unleash a drone’s weaponry breaks the monotony of hours and days of surveillance, even as it transforms her into a different kind of god, one who keeps a close watch on the carnage she wreaks. Pilot engages in battle by day yet returns home to her family at night (shifts effectively abetted by Alex Perry’s lighting design). The distinction between warrior and wife blurs, and the flight suit that first attracted that civilian has instead become an emblem of her work: war (costume design by Shannon Smith-Regnier). Noack’s Pilot doesn’t just drive this play but personifies Brant’s story about the place of technology in modern warfare and daily life. A one-act monologue directed by Cynthia Levin, this solo work is an affecting piece. At times, Noack delivers her lines as though reciting poetry. The stage is bare, but she fills the space, making Pilot’s thoughts and fears palpable. The Unicorn has reconfigured the Jerome Stage as in-the-round (set design by Gary Mosby), with two walkways extending into seats. Pilot is never far away, and this intimacy with the audience mirrors the closeness of her war.

cynthIa LevIn

P

Noack flies into the gray yonder (above), and the Rep stages a retro Romeo and Juliet. But Grounded feels a little contrived, with an underlying, perhaps unintended message: that women may want to be like men or equal to them but ultimately can’t because motherhood defines them, by its nature making them too caring and by necessity stalling their careers. This perspective — a woman in the cross hairs of wartime morality — fascinates, and we are moved by this actor’s portrayal. But Brant’s setup also feels too made-to-order, and it isn’t clear whether Pilot stands in for all the workers operating our surveillance state, or just the women.

O, Happy Dagger The Rep cuts to the heart of Romeo and Juliet.

W

e all know the story. Boy meets girl. Boy loses girl. Boy and girl commit ritual suicide. Romeo and Juliet is Shakespeare’s mostperformed cautionary tale, a spectacle of adolescent angst that no new generation can resist modernizing (as in Baz Luhrmann’s slick 1996 love letter to handguns and Hawaiian shirts). So kudos to director Eric Rosen for staging the Kansas City Repertory Theatre’s production of the tragedy in a revolutionary new way: keeping it in Verona in the midst of the Italian Renaissance. Rosen stays true to the source, and this Romeo and Juliet feels like a consciously crafted effort to restore a classic. The throwback treatment starts before the Prologue is

elevates the Rep’s R&J to lavish new heights. under way, as actors perform a fight call and mill about the stage in full view of the audi- Fight director John Wilson choreographs ence. It’s a gentle reminder that metatheater gritty sequences of nail-biting swordplay, and Victor En Yu Tan’s versatile lights create didn’t start with Brecht; Shakespeare’s works ominous silhouettes and shadows against are rife with glib self-references, and the Rep’s sometimes blazing colors. The costumes are preshow throat-clearing helps ease us into the just as rich, with excellent work by designers impending “two hours’ traffic of our stage.” The opening and closing speeches are per- Lauren Gaston and Lindsay W. Davis. Jack Magaw’s scenic design, however, is the formed by Theodore Swetz, and the UMKC Theatre professor gives a fine, confident per- technical star of the show, providing a series formance as Friar Lawrence. The language of stately meditations on the arch. Magaw presents a hurdle for some of the Rep’s other relies heavily on the fly system to whisk enormous set pieces on and off. It performers, however, and takes precision to time these clarity seems occasionally Grounded complex cues, and producsacrificed to momentum. Through February 9 tion stage manager Mary R. As the lovers, Courtney at the Unicorn Theatre, Honour is nearly unerring Salvage and Jamie Dufault 3828 Main, 816-531-7529, unicorntheatre.org in her calling of the show. are competent, capturing (Rep powers-that-be: Buy the stubborn pride and this woman a drink.) volatile passions of youth. Romeo and Juliet The final crypt scene Salvage’s Juliet is even a Through February 9 unites these design elelittle weird, and her physical at the Kansas City Repertory ments into a striking blend energy and comic timing in Theatre, 4949 Cherry, of sorrow and stagecraft. Act 1 are sharp. The second 816-235-2700, kcrep.org The full cast sways in the half of the play is tougher shadows around Juliet, and on both actors, though; grief here receives a less nuanced treatment than the walls seem to swell and subside as though breathing. The shuttered lights frame only the lust or levity. lovers and the cavernous proscenium arch, Cheryl Weaver, as Lady Capulet, makes lending the scene a memorable starkness. that character’s impassioned speech following If the tableau falters, it does so only in the Tybalt’s death one of the production’s most inclusion of the slain Mercutio and Tybalt, affecting. As Capulet, David Castellani fortistalking the scene as specters. (We get it: It’s fies another memorable scene during a cruel spat with his daughter. Zachary Andrews is a like they’re still all around us.) But we can excuse the cliché as another reminder among swaggering Mercutio, and Antonio Glass plays many truisms evident in Rosen and the Rep’s the Prince with a comic-tinged resignation that successful Shakespeare reanimation: “Violent mirrors our own frustrations. Lord, what fools delights have violent ends.” these nobles be. —Liz Cook The full ensemble is solid, but it’s the breathtaking behind-the-scenes work that E-mail feedback@pitch.com

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film

Do Panic

Screenland Armour gets weird this weekend.

By

A bbie S t u t z er

PA RT Y

T

he second-annual Panic Fest is all about weirdo fare: nerdy sci-fi, gory horror, cult thrills — and, for Screenland Armour co-owner Adam Roberts, one of the event’s masterminds, one big shock: He says he’s surprised that Panic Fest is back at all. Roberts and Brent Miller, his brother-in-law and business partner, ran into more than a few obstacles during their first year of theater ownership. They had few industry contacts, and even they say their programming included crap they didn’t want to see. “The first movie I ever got was that terrible Liam Neeson movie where he finds people — the second one,” Roberts says. “I immediately started different programming. I brought in seven or eight horror films.” His taste in creature features turned out to be excellent, but Armour wasn’t reaching the too. There are features that haven’t yet come genre’s KC audience. “In my mind, if you show to KC, including Raze and 24 Exposures, and a really good movie, everyone is going to come Slaughter Movie House hosts a stellar batch and see a really good movie,” he says. “The fact of short films Saturday. The hungry can eat is, that’s not true.” a movie brunch at 11 a.m. Saturday, choosing But a monthly rotation of classic horror between the spattery The Driller Killer or Mel films eventually drew the right horror hounds Brooks’ Star Wars parody, Spaceballs. Also on — among them, Jill Sixx Gevargizian (Slaughtap: Q&As and vendors. ter Movie House, Call Girl) and Tim Canton Among the local premieres this weekend is (Downright Creepy). With these new allies, writer-director Adrián García Bogliano’s Here Armour started to book some enticing thrillers. Comes the Devil, which puts a relatively new A screening of The Shining finally sold some spin on the ol' possession story line, and Big tickets, and Canton and Roberts — aided by Bad Wolves, which adroitly straddles the line Jason Chaffee, who was running the Crossroads between funny and creepy — give or take some Screenland — started thinking about a festival. sphincter-clenching scenes of torture. One step forward, two steps back. Roberts doesn’t mind a little mutilation. Roberts still lacked a robust set of indusHe says of Wolves: “Maybe I am a bit more detry contacts, and the first Panic’s timing was ranged than I thought because it really had me way off. “Most of the film fests are Decemlaughing at how sadistic and ber through March, ending ridiculous the story got — inwith South by Southwest,” Panic Fest cluding the torture scenes. Roberts says. Armour’s was January 31–February 2 It makes absolute sense that in April, a month when “no at Screenland Armour Quentin Tarantino called it one wants to commit to (408 Armour, North Kansas his favorite film of 2013.” showing anything.” A wish City), panicfilmfest.com Then there’s Thanatolist of titles was made. Few morphose, a Canadian-made, wishes were granted. low-budget feast of necrosis and psychodrama. “The first year was the worst experience,” Roberts says. “I am surprised that we even did “When the director [Éric Falardeau] said he it again because it was so awful to put together. would show it at our film festival, I got giddy because the trailer promised Cronenberg No one gave a shit about us.” Sometime in 2013, though, plenty of peo- meets Lynch by way of French Canadians,” ple started giving a shit about Screenland Roberts says. “It definitely makes good on its promise. This is one like Cannibal Holocaust or Armour. Business has improved, and more contacts have been made. And for this week- Pinup Dolls on Ice — you want to see it with a crowd to watch people squirm. For the budget, end’s second fest, Canton and Roberts were Falardeau killed it.” able to set the lineup (and double the number Roberts says of the fest’s overall lineup: “We of movies) before the new year. actually had an overabundance,” Roberts says. The retro parts of the bill include horrorexploitation deep cuts, such as Cannibal Holo- “It was nice to be able to actually choose things and say no to some things.” caust and Dario Argento’s Deep Red, and Joss That doesn’t necessarily mean great movWhedon’s Serenity gets some big-screen time,

DON’ T BE LEFT OUT OF THE

ST. PATRICK’S DAY

Big Bad Wolves ies. Better than great movies is what Panic Fest throws up on the big screen: an idiosyncratic, personal array of Roberts’ and his collaborators’ favorite flicks. “I think it’s just probably because there’s T&A in the movies,” Roberts says of the cinema taste he developed at the dawn of puberty. “In sixth grade, I got really deep into some slasher movies. I jumped really hard into Italian horror movies.” The Argento classic Suspiria remains a touchstone: “It’s weird and horribly dubbed and has the most awesome Goblin soundtrack.” (He’s not wrong about that progrock act’s much-loved, much-mocked score.) There were other stops along the way. Roberts says, “I remember watching The Wicker Man when I was, like, in eighth grade and probably didn’t understand anything that was happening, but I remember it was really nerve-racking and weird to watch. From there, I jumped to The Beyond and Zombie.” Roberts wrote some original scripts of his own and, at 15, penned a feature, which he arranged to make for a limited budget. The project fell through, but not long after that, he met Todd Sheets and got hands-on experience on the director’s Catacombs set. When he was 16, Roberts made a low-budget movie ($500–$800, he says) about a flesheating virus. He used equipment donated by a few seasoned filmmakers he’d met by then, and at least one location was easy to get. “I covered my mom’s basement in blood,” he says. “When I grew up, it was me, by myself, with a VHS tape of April Fool’s Day,” he says with a laugh. “And now I can make people watch April Fool’s Day in a theater.”

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CAfé

LittLe itaLy

Cucina della Ragazza squeezes a lot of flavor into a tiny Westport storefront.

By

Ch a r l e s F e r ru z z a

Cucina della Ragazza • 301 Westport Road, 816-960-4744 • Hours: 11 a�m�–7 p�m� Monday–Wednesday, 11 a�m�–10 p�m� Thursday–Friday, 9 a�m�–10 p�m� Saturday, closed Sunday • Price: $–$$

S

ome private homes in the metro have dining rooms bigger than the one inside the five-table Cucina della Ragazza. But not many restaurants feel more like a person’s home than this new Italian deli and café in Westport. You could say this month-old venue — the name roughly translates as “kitchen of the young girl” — is the dining room, recreation room and hangout of owner Laura Norris, who navigates the space with a dancer’s grace and the nervous energy of a fussy Italian mother. She watches every plate that comes out of the kitchen, sees every cocktail poured at the bar, notes every face of a potential regular. She may already have a few. Norris had envisioned her specialità gastronomiche as a casual place to pick up sandwiches or salads during the lunch hour, drink a glass of wine after work, or get together with friends for dinner. e Mor But those f ive tables are already going for a t premium on weekends, a e in Onl .com when it’s reservationspitch only and every stool at the bar is taken before 5 p.m. I stopped by at that hour on a Saturday (two stools became available when a couple left to see a movie), and before an hour had passed, every possible place to sit was spoken for — including the raised hearth for the gas-powered fireplace. Most of the folks on the eight bar stools were groupies genuflecting before celebrity bartender Missy Koonce. Until she begins rehearsing a show in March, the actress and former co-owner of the late Bar Natasha is Norris’ guest mixologist on Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights. Koonce is a whirlwind in the cramped space behind the bar. That Saturday, I saw her keep a very funny monologue going as she muddled fresh mint and lemon in a cocktail shaker to concoct a martini of her own invention. “It’s for me,” announced the woman sitting to my left, whom I recognized as a successful home renovator. Koonce was about to pour the martini into a glass when the businesswoman let her iPhone land hard on the bar. “I’m getting all these texts, and I’m not interested in any of those people,” she said. Why stare into a smartphone when you can watch the people around you? Cucina della Ragazza’s tables are squeezed into the narrow corridor between the bar and that stone fireplace (which Norris discovered hidden behind panels of drywall after signing the lease last summer). The room imposes a

AngelA C. Bond

Café

cently of Remedy) have created two menus, lunch and dinner, that overlap slightly. Summers has a real talent for soups; the sausage artichoke zuppa I tasted at lunch was boldly certain intimacy among diners, and it can be seasoned but comforting, and a luscious claustrophobic at first. But even at its loudsquash soup (made with vegetable stock) was est and most packed, the restaurant has a too rich to finish in one sitting. congenial vibe that trumps such irritants. Summers’ grilled, lemon-brined pork chop, And the food mostly works. moist and thick next to a slab of cheesy russetThere are just three starters — called spuntiand-sweet-potato gratin, is nos, a kind of Italian tapas one of the best dishes on the — all of them tasty. I like the Cucina della Ragazza entrée list. Also well considbrawny half-pound meatball Meatball Grande ������������������ $7 ered is the eggplant parmethat comes in a cast-iron pan. Grilled pork chop ����������������$17 san, coated in a hearty sugo And the bresaola, a sheath of Eggplant parmesan ������������$12 that’s subtly distinct from cured beef tightly wrapped Fettuccine with shrimp �����$14 Roasted-beet salad �������������$11 the tomato sauce made for around a few leaves of spicy Cheesecake �������������������������� $5 the meatball. Neither sauce is fresh arugula, is a welcome sweet, and each is made with sight. (It’s not a common a different variety of tomato. appetizer around here.) The After that exceptional eggplant, I was disthird, crostini spread with pastes of white bean appointed by a bowl of fettuccine with shrimp. or arugula and walnut, is unexciting. A space The gummy pasta was served without a hint that favors bar patrons deserves a good antipasto plate. (Norris says she plans to add one, of sauce, and the fat prawns lolling on top of it, still in their shells, were pretty but unpleasher mother’s version, in the spring.) antly aromatic. Norris and chef Nick Summers (most re-

The tiny Cucina dishes out big meals at lunch and dinner�

pitch.com

I retreated to an order of creamy polenta, served with chicken saltimbocca. The polenta was light and deftly seasoned, but the bird was dry. The fettuccine in tomato sugo, with slices of hot Scimeca’s sausage, was delicious. Meatless options here are even more scant than empty chairs, but the roasted-beet salad — the crunchy purple roots tossed with arugula, pungent gorgonzola and walnuts with a springy lemon vinaigrette — is good. There are only two dessert choices so far, both made in the tiny kitchen. I found the cheesecake dense, and the pebble-sized amaretti cookies needed to be dunked in hot coffee to reveal their limited appeal. But lingering over dessert or some house-made limoncello in a restaurant with five tables is asking for the malocchio, the evil eye. The folks working here are anything but pushy about turning Norris’ tables, but look around and you’ll see someone who wants your seat.

Have a suggestion for a restaurant The Pitch should review? E-mail charles.ferruzza@pitch.com

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n unexpected guest was at the three-dayold Baked in Kansas City bakery and café last week: former Napoleon Bakery pastry chef Guillaume Hanriot, who was there with his wife, Ingrid, and their newborn, Pauline. The Hanriots purchased the Parkville bistro Café des Amis last year, after running the restaurant for six years. “I was the pastry chef here when Larry Schanzer still owned it,” Guillaume Hanriot told me, as he handled one of the delicate macarons created by Baked in Kansas City’s pastry chef, Nicolette Foster. “I took a tour of the kitchen to see what had changed.” A lot has changed since Frank Sebree, owner of the Majestic Restaurant, overhauled the brick building at 706 Westport Road to create a combination bakery and full-service restaurant. That morning, the pastry cases were f illed w ith Foster’s work: f laky croissants, includ-

A look inside the plain croissant

Breakfast • Lunch • Catering • Gifts Baskets

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A

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A sugary almond croissant is a featured breakfast pastry at Baked. ing a luscious, sugarcoated almond version and a pain au chocolat that needed a touch more chocolate; three versions of tart-shaped coffeecakes; sweet and savory scones; and plump sausage rolls encased in a sheath of light pastry. The latter were very tasty but dominated by a strong, stoneground mustard. The square, thickly iced cinnamon rolls were more Midwestern than French — that is, as fat as Don Hall’s overstuffed wallet but not as rich.

E-mail charles.ferruzza@pitch.com


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Need an occasion to eat a pastry? Here are five.

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BREWER

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ou’re already teetering on the brink of giving up resolutions, which seemed so solid just weeks ago, when you walk into the bakery. But really, what’s the point of subjecting yourself to zumba, sugar-free lattes and kale smoothies if you don’t let loose once in a while? In fact, the end of January is a good time to risk a little decadence with one of these diet killers. 1. When you want to eat your feelings: Key lime pie from Upper Crust Pie Bakery (7943 Santa Fe, Overland Park). Going to Upper Crust feels like visiting that friend who believes most problems can be solved with cookies. It has a chic, feminine vibe, with red chandeliers and a sign in the bathroom that advises, “Keep calm and find your Mr. Darcy.” The pies are ready for their Pinterest close-ups, with lattice-top crusts bursting with berries and gorgeously peaked-and-browned meringues. The Key lime is rich, creamy and tart, and has a perfectly flaky crust. After eating it, I didn’t need to be told to keep calm, but I did want someone to show me to the break room, so I could take a quick nap.

2. When you have a one-track mind:

caramel-pecan roll and cherry Danish from Boulevard Bakery & Pastries (2815 Independence Avenue). Located beside a laundromat, this tiny bakery just works the oven, plain and simple. That means no coffee, and even the name is abbreviated on the bakery’s storefront sign. But the caramel-pecan roll needs no flair. It tastes like homemade pie, with a gooey, sugary glaze and chopped nuts on top. And the soft, sweet Danish doesn’t skimp on the cherry filling. Get there early in the day — these pastries are popular, and the best stuff goes quickly.

3. When you don’t mind accidentally spilling coffee on your white pants: cinnamon-sugar

muffin from Clock Tower Bakery (7911 Santa Fe, Overland Park). Remember that kid who couldn’t keep food in his mouth? One day he’d have crusted Lucky Charms on his shirt, and the next it was chocolate on his chin. Well, the muffin I ate at Clock Tower Bakery turned me into the grown-woman, business-casual version of that kid. I devoured it for lunch with a cup of coffee, and my fervor for the semisweet dough (generously dusted with cinnamon and sugar) led to the inadvertent deployment of some stray drops. I felt enough love for the muffin that I didn’t mind the prospect of a stain-removal project —

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4. When you got laid a second time:

brioche from Bloom Baking Co. (15 East Third Street). This bustling City Market bakery has mastered the craft of bread making. If you need proof, you can usually find one of the owners out front Saturday mornings handing samples to farmers-market crowds. Bloom’s display case is full of fruit tarts and quiche and other well-made staples, but the star of the show is the brioche, fluffy and delicately sweet. Holding a bite in your mouth like it’s a Jolly Rancher isn’t weird: You savor this bread’s nuances. And you’ll want some on hand, to make last night’s date this morning’s French toast.

Sunday February 16, 2014 10:00AM- 4:00 PM Overland Park Convention Center

5. When you’re ready to eat without shame:

Salty Carmella from Cupcake A La Mode (4639 Wornall). Be warned: It is pink inside Cupcake A La Mode — the kind of all-encompassing, neon pinkness that infiltrates the brain’s pleasure center and makes it demand all the frosting. I was going to eat only a few bites of this cupcake and save the rest for later, but the decadent icing and gooey, salted-caramel center prevented me from following through with that sound decision. Less than a minute later, I was hunched over an empty cupcake wrapper, my knuckles glistening with sugar. I’ll go to yoga in the morning — it will be fine.

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january 30 -february 5, 2014

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23


KNUCKLEHEADS F re e S h u tt le in S u rr o u n d in g A reth e a

JANUARY:

29: Outlaw Jim & The Whiskey Benders 30: Shinetop Jr’s Impromptu Sessions

THURSDAY, JAN. 30 JASON BOLAND & THE STRAGGLERS

31: Jeff Bergen’s Elvis Show 31: Jason Eady CD Release

FEBRUARY: 1: Greg Brown & Bo Ramsey

5: The Crayons 6: Nikki Hill 7: Bob Schneider

8: Gary Nicholson & Nick Nixon

TUESDAY, FEB. 11 JOHN CORBETT

For more info & tickets: knuckleheadshonkytonk.com 2715 Rochester, KCMO

816-483-1456

24

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music

Go outside

Free of a major label, Tim Ellis’ debut as Outsides is a summertime escape.

By

N ata l ie G a l l a Ghe r

T

im Ellis was trapped two years ago. He had a record deal with Warner Bros. but found himself lost in the shuffle as the major label acquired and merged its properties. Warner Bros. bounced Ellis from label to label and forbade him from playing live shows to test new material that he’d been writing. Last April, Warner Bros. finally dropped Ellis. At long last, the shackles were off. A month later, under the moniker Outsides, Ellis released “Seesaw” into the fuzzy white noise of the Internet. He wondered if people would notice. Did they ever. The song was snapped up by hype-heavy music blogs and tucked into the regular rotation of KEXP 90.3 in Seattle. The opportunity that had seemed so promising with his Warner Bros. deal was finally happening, except Ellis was doing it by himself from his Kansas City apartment. The irony isn’t lost on Ellis. He sips black coffee in a booth at the Brick and laughs, flashing white teeth framed by dimples. “‘Seesaw’ was a demo,” he says. “But it had been so long since I had put something out because, for so long, I couldn’t put anything out. So I cleaned it up a bit, took a chance and just threw it out there.” It’s easy to see why the track has caused Ellis: “I wrote what I liked.” a stir (along with another song, “Pastures”) since its November release. “Seesaw” is like Where Sk ybox embedded quirks a nd a spoonful of raw sugar in a granulated pop twists — a vaudevillian flavor on one track, computerlike bleeps on another — Outsides world. Synths boom and soar alongside Ellis’ is more distilled and concentrated. silvery voice, destined for car stereos, sweaty “The reason that I’m so excited about this dance floors and packed concert halls. After being silenced by his record label, project in particular is because I feel like it’s closer to me,” Ellis says. “When I was in SkyEllis seems to have come out of nowhere with box and I was writing the material, I was still his synth-pop cocaine. But the suave-looking 30-year-old with a pompadour and a vintage writing parts with the mindset of, ‘He might leather jacket had a previous life as the front- not like this song if I don’t include these sorts of things or if it’s too this direction or too man of Skybox. Formed in 2005, Skybox enjoyed moder- that direction.’ “You sort of write for other people someate commercial success and helped establish Ellis’ music career while he was living in times. With this project, I wrote what I liked and I wrote parts that I Tempe, Arizona. His tenure wanted to write, and as with Skybox lasted through Outsides directly from my head as I a relocation to Chicago, unSaturday, February 1, possibly could.” til the release of the band’s at Czar W hen E l l i s relea ses second full-length album his self-titled debut EP as in 2010. Skybox’s members Outsides on February 1, he’s likely to garner disbanded and scattered, with Ellis moving comparisons with Passion Pit and MGMT. back to his native Kansas City. But the four songs on Outsides are more than “Towards the end of Skybox, I was really high-fructose anthems. wanting to do some of my own stuff,” Ellis Ellis’ bright synths compose the driving says. “I had so many things in my head that force in his music. But he reinforces them I had been dying to just put down on tape.” with elements from other instruments: Ellis’ new sound, with an emphasis on electric guitar riffs rather than regurgitated upbeat, hook-heavy songs, bears some samples, man-made drumbeats instead of surface-level similarities to his old band.

january 30 -february 5, 2014

Barrett emke

WHERE THE BEST MUSICIANS IN THE WORLD PLAY

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drum machines. “Secret Places” starts as a pseudo-acoustic lullaby. These are subtle odes, Ellis says, to an unlikely influence. “My dad was a producer and started as a folk musician, and then started making electronic music,” Ellis says. “You wouldn’t necessarily think of [that] when you listen to my stuff, but Americana and folk music is one of the bigger influences on my writing. It’s also helped me focus a lot on lyrics — with some pop music, that’s sort of a side thought, and for me, one of the more important things is the structure of the lyrics.” Ellis’ words are (mostly) wistful. “Pastures,” “Secret Places” and the 1980s-style “In a Dream” may sound like summer and the outdoors. But Ellis wrote them in his “dungeonlike” Kansas City apartment, recalling lost times and brighter days. “I was just working in my bedroom and writing and recording, and it felt like I was in a basement — there was concrete everywhere in the apartment: a concrete floor, concrete up halfway on the brick wall,” Ellis says. “Whenever I could get outside of the apartment and just walk around, getting out and feeling the fresh air, that’s sort of the feeling that I wanted my music to give people — the freedom of that emotion.”

E-mail natalie.gallagher@pitch.com


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music

Trippy Talks

Austin psych-rock legends Roky Erickson and the Black Angels are coming to Lawrence.

By

N at h a N Cl ay B a r B a r iCk

DAILY MENU

SPECIALS

HAPPY HOUR

MONDAY-FRIDAY

UPCOMING LIVE MUSIC: Jeff Hadden Acoustic 1/30/2014 - 8:00pm Flannigan’s Right Hook 1/31/2014 - 9:00pm Steven Roth 2/1/2014 - 9:00pm

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LIVE MUSIC DAILY! BOB REEDER THE BRODY BUSTER ONE MAN BAND The Fog/Damon Bailey Trio Jake Stanton/Bad Math Band

BOB REEDER HAPPY HOUR 4 - 8PM $2 $2 $3 $4

PIZZA BY THE SLICE COORS LIGHT BLVD WHEAT TANK 7

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thursday jan. 30: THE KY GENTLEMEN

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saturday feb. 1:

INTERSTATE ASTRONAUTS • THE CULPRITS every sunday backsliders brunch at 1pm

ALL YOU CAN EAT • BLOODY MARY BAR • SERVING FOOD TILL 3AM •

O

ver the decades, Roky Erickson has played in several bands, most notably the 13th Floor Elevators, widely viewed as a prime genetic force in American psychedelic and garage-rock music. When talking to Erickson, it’s easy to forget his legend. The 66-year-old’s answers are as sincere as they are oblique. He has a tendency to ignore questions and answer with whatever is floating around in his head. A phone conversation with Erickson, from his Austin home, is much like listening to his recorded works: melodic, cerebral and surreal. The Pitch: Your son plays in your backing band, the Hounds of Baskerville. What’s it like playing with him? Erickson: It just seems like they always have to draw out the set so long and everything. See, their music is real loud, you know. These spiral of answers, so Angels’ lead signer, Alex people peeled up onstage when we were out there. And they jumped into the audience! It’s Maas, helped shed some light. We called him at his Austin home. really tough. Very strange brand of humor, you know what I mean? The Pitch: On your new album, Indigo  What do you make of other people covering Meadow, a lot of songs refer to war and gun your songs? violence. These seem like important themes. Oh, I like to hear them. I really do. We have Maas: Since the early stages of our band, we a computer here, and it gives us messages, like were always kind of writing about things that when somebody’s going to be playing our song are important to us. Selfishly, at the end of the or something like that. There’s one group, one day, we’re trying to be pleased by our music of them goes “If You Have Ghosts, You Have because if we aren’t satisfied, how can anyone Everything,” you know? And else be. That’s the approach that one is real nice. It’s by we take. Our music has alRoky Erickson, with some band out of some other ways been about things the Black Angels country or something. we care about, whether it’s Friday, January 31, One classic song of yours, a sappy love song or how at the Granada “You’re Gonna Miss Me,” was someone feels when they written about 50 years ago. get back from the war. Boy, that’s a good one! I don’t know, I just I understand you have a Roky Erickson cover wrote it. I’m glad you still think about it. As album that you’re selling on tour? we move from house to house, we make sure Back in 2007, we were invited to listen to that we carry this information with us. Not some of Roky’s material and get in the studio like AIDS or HIV, but something good, you and make a record with him. The idea was know. [Laughs.] kind of to take these Roky Erickson songs and Do you have any plans to slow down? make them sound more like 13th Floor ElevaThat’s the thing when I tell you about tor songs. That project kind of lost steam, but some of the ideas I had when I didn’t play and we have some songs from those sessions that everything. Well, I did have faith in what’s we put on a split 7-inch that we’re going to be going on, in relying on people’s judgment taking with us on tour. to handle what’s going on for me. In other It was really difficult to learn the material words, it’s just kind of a thought in the air or from Erickson’s catalog for a lot of reasons. something — I don’t know what it is — but it’s Roky’s attention span in the studio was, like, nothing bad! Nothing bad. 20 minutes. We never fully made it through a set before we went on tour with Roky. It was almost like training for a marathon: You run like half a marathon, but you don’t run the Angels in Austin whole thing until the day of. I make it sound pening for Roky Erickson is Austin psychlike pulling teeth, but it was a great experience. rock ringleader the Black Angels. This is What kind of influence has playing with Roky the second time the Black Angels have suphad on your music? ported Erickson on tour, the first being in 2008. For me, the biggest thing I took from it was A conversation with Erickson is a screwball

O 816.960.4560 4112 Pennsylvania Ave 26

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Mon-Fri 4p-3am Sat-Sun 12pm-3am

westportsaloon.com

january 30 -february 5, 2014

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Erickson: mind on his music. even more validation and confirmation that music was therapeutic. … Before we started a practice session, it would be hard to communicate with him. You’d ask him a question, and the answer wouldn’t be congruent with the question. You could tell that his mind was in other places. But after we played music for 30 or 45 minutes, Roky became very clear. You could look into his eyes and tell that he was with you in conversation. The music entered his mind and got his mind working in that direction. — Natalie Gallagher

e-mail natalie.gallagher@pitch.com

J a z z B e at MegAn BirdsAll, At the BroAdwAy JAzz CluB

Megan Birdsall, a singer who swings standards with a matchless sensibility and a wonderful voice, has assembled a diverse and gifted cast of characters to join her Friday night at the Broadway Jazz Club. Guitarist Rod Fleeman’s Kansas City gigs range from the Kansas City Jazz Orchestra to blues jams at the Phoenix. Bassist Ben Leifer is one of the young musicians dominating local jazz today. Drummer Tim Cambron performs less frequently these days, making this opportunity to hear him a treat. And for decades, pianist Paul Smith has backed some of KC’s best jazz singers. — Larry Kopitnik Megan Birdsall, 9 p.m.–1 a.m. Friday, January 31, at the Broadway Jazz Club (3601 Broadway, 816-298-6316), $5 cover.


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Music

Music Forecast

By

n ata l ie G a l l a Ghe r

1515 WESTPORT RD. • 816-931-9417

Latenight Callers, Kentucky Knife Fight

WIFI NOW AVAILABLE!

CHECK OUT THE NEW ALL DAY HAPPY HOUR

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happy hural grit sat 2/1 our 6-9 // karaok e @ 10pm akkilles ,m fri 2/7 loose park at shoare band, first fr ida sat 2/8 catie millery, , art by ce nowhere , sil ramics Wed 2/12 haunted maeVser maggies tro the pl sydneyeWase please me, rig fri 2/14 & the guilty bht, chris meck irds s h a d e so sat 2/15 blessed f Jade broke, d the saWy ead Voices, ers

Call me latenight!

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WED. 3/6 THURS. 3/7 WWW.THERECORDBAR.COM 816-753-5207 LIQUORBUDDIES CAVEMANCOMPUTER WED. 1/29 FIELD MAGIC DAY DREAMS HOTDOG SKELETONS VEHICLES MAX JUSTUS/THE FRI. 3/8 SAT.FOG 3/9 1020 WESTPORT RD

THURS. 1/30 DECO AUTO/SCHWERVON 6PM DOODADS 7PM WIRES 10PM CHEROKEE 10PM SOFT REEDS STIFF MIDDLE FINGERS/DEAD VEN ROCK RIFLE NOISEFM BAD1/31 IDEAS 6PM THE FRI. DOO DADS GENTLEMANSAVAGE APPROPRIATE GRAMMAR ANDREAPERDUE 10PM THE LATENIGHT CALLERS KENTUCKY KNIFE FIGHT/KNIFECRIME SUN. 3/10 MON. 3/11 8PM DESERT NOISES SAT. 2/1 4-6PM CLOSED-PRIVATE PARTY ALA TURKA MELISMA TICS 7PM THE NATION OF LOVE SHOWCASE CD RELEASE SO COW B’DINAS/FUTURE KINGS/VIOET & THE PARTY (IRELAND) UNDERCURRENTS/RUTH ACUFF/ZOYA TUES. 3/12 WED. 3/13 SUN. 2/2 JEFF HARSHBARGER MIDWEST GOTNEXT OFF WITH THEIR HEADSJOSH PRESENTS QUINLEN TWO4ONE TEENAGEBOTTLEROCKET DOMCHRONICLES MON. 2/3 NIGHT RIOTS/THE GALLERY MASKEDINTRUDER PETER SENSAY TOO LATE FOR SATELLITES KILL NOISEBOYS STEDDYP TUES. 2/4 JD WILKES & THE UPCOMING DIRT DAUBERS/ BETSE ELLIS 3/14 EXPENDABLES 4/8 FU MANCHU WED. 2/5 KARAOKE W/ BRIE 3/18 DARWIN DEEZE 4/16 BABY MOWGLIS

3/19 LYDIA LOVELESS BLACK MT. THURS. 2/6 HOT4/23 CAUTION 4/3 THAO& TGDSD 4/30 DEVIL MAKE 3

If you’ve never seen the Latenight Callers, you should know that the local quartet has sexy on speed dial. Lead singer Julie Berndsen is a vampy force with a voice to match her pinupgirl look. On the band’s debut full-length, Songs for Stolen Moments, Berndsen slinks and slithers through gothic synths and drumbeats like a starlet of film noir. On the other hand, Kentucky Knife Fight is far less treacherous than the name implies. The St. Louis band blends rowdy barroom blues with rowdier rock and roll. Jason Holler’s singing is just gruff enough to stand out against all the shrieking guitars. Local rockers Knife Crime open. Friday, January 31, RecordBar (1020 Westport Road, 816-753-5207)

Jason Eady, with Courtney Patton

With his 2012 full-length, AM Country Heaven, Jason Eady seems to be single-handedly trying to save Top 40 country music. In the album’s title track, Eady attacks the clichés of “modern country” and blasts them with the good-oldcowboy wisdom of Waylon and Willie. January 21, the Mississippi-born Texas transplant released Daylight & Dark, an album that’s more introspective than confrontational. It’s a little too early to tell where he stands with FM country-music now, but his show at Knuckleheads could shed some light. Fellow Texan Courtney Patton shares Eady’s ability to make new country that’s as easy on the ears as the music that inspired it. Friday, January 31, Knuckleheads (2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456)

The Sluts

Kristoffer Dover has a genteel way of explaining how his band, the Sluts, took its name. Three years ago, when Dover and Ryan Wise were fumbling through notes in a friend’s garage, they admittedly were “very successful philanderers.” The name of their duo seemed “honest and awesome,” Dover says. Now the Sluts are celebrating the release of Virile, their first full-length album. A nine-track collection

WEEKLY

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OPENDAILY SUN. 12PM-12AM MON.TUES.SAT. 4PM-1:30AM

WED-FRI 12PM-1:30AM KITCHEN OPEN LATE

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of grungy, headbanging atrocities, Virile lyrically is a sordid trip through a few of Dover and Wise’s more salacious experiences, masked by fuzzy guitar, gruff singing and aggressive drumming. The Sluts remain a band best experienced live in all their unsanctioned glory. You can raise a glass or slam a shot and not feel a lick of guilt for the skeletons in your own closet. Saturday, February 1, the Riot Room (4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179)

MewithoutYou

In 2001, long before hashtags were a thing, people were squishing words together without hitting the space bar — like MewithoutYou. For years, MewithoutYou existed and flourished between the post-hardcore and Christian alt-rock worlds. But the band’s latest album, 2012’s Ten Stories, bears little similarity to the music it created a decade ago. Sounding a little like Murder By Death meets a broken-music-box jingle, Ten Stories is an album driven by story line and best understood in context. Lead singer and lyricist Aaron Weiss has encoded his songs with enough historical and philosophical refer-

f o r e c a s t

ences to give an “Intro to College Writing” class a semester-long headache. Tuesday, February 4, the Riot Room (4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179)

Andrew Ripp, Judah & the Lion

Andrew Ripp wants to be a pop star. That much is clear on his latest full-length, the Charlie Peacock–produced Won’t Let Go. (It’s also obvious given his Bieber-like hair swoop and leather jacket.) The Illinois native is not a bad singer. His songs are catchy, and he seems to be on the path to wherever it is he wants to go. So if you see him at the Bottleneck, maybe you’ll have an “I remember when” moment with your kids 20 years from now. The real star of the evening may be Nashville’s Judah & the Lion. Despite its Mumford tendencies, Judah & the Lion delivers the sort of rough-edged Americana that makes you feel at home. Frontman Judah Akers was raised on gospel and church music, and you can hear plenty of those influences in his all-together-now choruses. Wednesday, February 5, the Bottleneck (737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483)

K e Y

Pick of the Week

Bring on the Country

Albums That Need Encyclopedias

 Locally Sourced

 Cowboy Hats

Sounds Like Mumfy

 Calling All Vamps

Grunge

Hair Like Bieber

No Knives Involved

 Put a Hashtag on It

 Worth the Weeknight

WWW.THERECORDBAR.COMFOR FULL SCHEDULE

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AgendA

continued from page 15

Thursday | 1.30 |

oscar-nominated shorts

trL Live with dJs madeline and Asia | 10 p.m.

MiniBar, 3810 Broadway

Performing Arts

Friday | 1.31 |

An evening with Composer John Corigliano | 6:30-8 p.m., free, tickets required, Nelson-Atkins

Performing Arts

LiterAry events

Ballet memphis presents Wizard of Oz | 8 p.m. Yardley Hall at JCCC, 12345 College Blvd., Overland Park

Museum of Art, 4525 Oak, nelson-atkins.org

midwest Poets series: Janice n. Harrington | 7 p.m. Mabee Theater in Sedgwick Hall, Rockhurst

flippin’ Channels in the estrogen Zone | 10 p.m.

Comedy

international superstars of magic & Comedy |

Frank’s North Star Tavern, 508 Locust, Lawrence, echosibley.com

University, 54th St. and Troost

7:30 p.m. Liberty Performing Arts Center, 1600 S. Withers Rd., Liberty

Christina Pazsitzky | 7:30 p.m. Improv Comedy Club

and Dinner Theater, 7260 N.W. 87th St.

Kansas City symphony: festival of rhythm |

Bobby slayton | 8 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club, 1867

Village West Pkwy., KCK

8 p.m. Kauffman Center, 1601 Broadway, kcsymphony.org

2014 oscar shorts: Live Action and Animated | Opening Friday at the Tivoli, 4050 Pennsylvania, tivolikc.com

fitne s s Cr Aw L

Learn & Burn | 5:30 p.m. Brass Boxing & Fitness, 7110

Boombox, ramona | 8 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737 New

Justin Andrew murray, Adam Case | 8 p.m. Czar,

sPorts & reC

Coolzey, Baiowolf, new suede | 10 p.m. Replay Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence

granger smith, earl dibbles Jr., dirty Bourbon Band | 7 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts,

dead ven, stiff middle fingers, deco Auto, schwervon | 10 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

matt snook | PBR Big Sky Bar, 111 E. 13th St.

Wyandotte, fitnesscrawl.com

the 2014 national silver gloves Amateur Boxing tournament | 6 p.m. Hilton Garden Inn, 19677 E.

Jackson Dr., Independence, ringside.com musiC

Arara Azul | 8 p.m. Broadway Jazz Club, 3601 Broadway Awkward side Hug | Jazzhaus, 926-1/2 Massachu-

setts, Lawrence

Hampshire, Lawrence

miguel mambo deLeon and Carte Blanc | 7 p.m. Blue Room, 1616 E. 18th St.

ensilage, Attic salt, mJP | 8 p.m. The Riot Room,

Pennsylvania

the Zevals, Hush machine, narkalark with dJ modrey Hepburn | 10 p.m. The Eighth Street Taproom,

801 New Hampshire, Lawrence

Lawrence Creates makerspace | 5:30-9:30 p.m.

Celebrating Picasso: Through the Lens of David Douglas Duncan | Through Sun-

meet me at the museum tour | 2-3 p.m. Saturday, Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art, 4420 Warwick Blvd.

Chinese new year Celebration | 6-10 p.m. Fri-

final friday Art walk | Massachusetts between

oBJet ~ pop-up boutique and Tea Time zine showcase | Paragraph Gallery, 23 E. 12th St.

Seventh and 11th streets, downtown Lawrence

Gorgeous & Outrageous: The Art of Tony Naponic | Leedy-Voulkos Art Center, 2012 Balti-

more, leedy-voulkos.com

History & Hope: Celebrating the Civil Rights Movement | Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, 4525 Oak 30

512 E. Ninth St., Lawrence

The Neighborhood: New Work by Stephanie Bloss | Kiosk Gallery, 3951 Broadway

day, Windhorse Tattoo & Gallery. 1717 Wyandotte

the pitch

Club and Dinner Theater, 7260 N.W. 87th St.

Bobby slayton | 7:45 & 9:45 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club, 1867 Village West Pkwy., KCK young, Hot & gay Comedy tour with Heather turman & Jordan Pease | 7:45 & 10 p.m. Stanford’s on Broadway, 3700 Broadway

exPos

Aids walk kickoff party | 5:30 p.m. Californos, 4124 Pennsylvania, aidswalkkansascity.org

Kansas City royals fan fest | 2-9 p.m. Bartle Hall,

301 W. 13th St.

C u Lt u r A L e v e n t s

William S. Burroughs. Creative Observer | Law-

day, Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, 4525 Oak, nelson-atkins.org

Comedy

nigHtLife

art exhibits & events rence Arts Center, 940 New Hampshire, Lawrence

Theater, 300 W. 12th St.

Christina Pazsitzky | 7:30 & 9:45 p.m. Improv Comedy

Lawrence

4048 Broadway

the Ky gentlemen | 10 p.m. Westport Saloon, 4112

Jason Boland & the stragglers, thieving Birds & matt Poss | 8:30 p.m. Knuckleheads, 2715 Rochester

1531 Grand

garrick ohlsson, pianist in recital | 8 p.m. Folly

Reality and Fantasy: Land, Town and Sea |

Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, 4525 Oak

Sculpties presented by SPECTRA: A Nomadic Platform for Experimental Film and Video |

7-9 p.m. Thursday, H&R Block Artspace, 16 E. 43rd St. (at Kansas City Art Institute)

january 30 -february 5, 2014

pitch.com

Stages of Conversion: Santero Shrines of Gene Emerson Friedman | Thornhill

Art Gallery, Avila University, 11901 Wornall, avila.edu/viscom/gallery

thieves guild drink and draw: Baroque-en Hearts Club | 7 p.m. Monday, Fatso’s Public House and Stage, 1016 Massachusetts, Lawrence

We Are Not This Body — A Solo Exhibition by Scott Dickson | PLUG Projects, 1613 Genessee,

plugprojects.com

We Now Pronounce You: Redefining Marriage in the 21st Century | UMKC Gallery of

Chinese new year: year of the Horse Celebration | 5 p.m., Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, 4525 Oak food & drinK

Alton Brown | 8 p.m. The Midland, 1228 Main friday farmers market at Badseed | 4-9 p.m.,

1909 McGee

fitne s s Cr Aw L

Bouldering 101 | 5 p.m. Cave Bouldering Gym, 3150 Mercier, Ste. 641A, fitnesscrawl.com sPorts & reC

Art, 5015 Holmes, Room 203, info.umkc.edu/art

Critical mass: a slow-paced group bicycle ride |

Meet at 6:30 p.m., Sun Fresh Market, 4001 Mill

Crown Center ice terrace | 10 a.m.-11 p.m., $6 ($3 skate rental), 2450 Grand continued on page 32


pitch.com

january 30 -february 5, 2014

the pitch

31


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Afflicted: Daughters of Salem | The

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All Sinatra | Quality Hill Playhouse, 303 W.

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$3.75 $7.50 $3.75 $3.75

Brother John’s Motown Review | 9 p.m. The Kill Devil Club, 61 E. 14th St.

The Doo Dads | 6 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd. Jason Eady with Courtney Patton | 9 p.m. Knuck-

leheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester

An Adult Evening of Shel Silverstein | 8 p.m. Friday-Sunday, H&R Block City Stage Theater, 30 W. Pershing Rd. (Union Station)

Phoenix, 302 W. Eighth St.

Fat Pig | Opening Wednesday, The Living

Massachusetts, Lawrence

Room, 1818 McGee, thelivingroomkc.com

Grounded | Unicorn Theatre, 3828 Main, unicorntheatre.org

C.S. Lewis’ The Great Divorce | 4 & 7:30 p.m., $25-$59, Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts, 1601 Broadway MET Script-in-Hand Series: The Odd Couple | 2 p.m. Sunday, Kansas City Central

Library, 14 W. 10th St., metkc.org

Romeo and Juliet | Kansas City Repertory

Theatre, 4949 Cherry, kcrep.org

MUSeUM exhibiTS & evenTS Citizen Soldiers on the Prairie | Johnson

County Museum of History, 6305 Lackman Rd., Shawnee, jocomuseum.org

Convergence: Jazz, Film, Dance and the Visual Arts | American Jazz Museum, 1616 E. 18th St.

Eboni Fondren & Mo’ Better Band | 9 p.m. The

Fullbloods, My Oh My | 6 p.m. Replay Lounge, 946

Grand Marquis | The Chesterfield, 1400 Main HonkySuckle, Let’s use Teamwork, Tokengrass | Westport Saloon, 4112 Pennsylvania James Isaac Group | 8 p.m. Take Five Coffee + Bar, 5336 W. 151st St., Leawood

The Latenight Callers, Kentucky Knife Fight, Knife Crime | 10 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd. Lost Wax | Fuel, 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park Mimosa | 8 p.m. Liberty Hall, 644 Massachusetts,

Lawrence

Moreland and Arbuckle | 9 p.m. B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ, 1205 E. 85th St.

Nine Forty Live with Matt Pryor | 8 p.m. Lawrence Arts Center, 940 New Hampshire, Lawrence Phaze II | Jazz, 1823 W. 39th St. Rap Band, Middle Twin, Lion Spirits, Narkalark | 9 p.m. Fatso’s Public House and Stage, 1016 Massachu-

Missouri Mavericks vs. Denver Cutthroats |

synerGy fiTness sTuDiO, 4 Interval Cross Training Workouts for $13.50 nexT level fiTness, Two Person Training Sessions for $22.50 missiOn bOwl: $30 deal for $15 The PiTCh, Pitch Passport for $45 ambassaDOr hOTel, Bed & Breakfast Package for $125 synerGy fiTness sTuDiO, One Month of Cross Training for $29 sCreenlanD armOur, Movie Tickets + Popcorn for $10

The Black Angels, Roky Erickson, Golden Animals | 7 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence

10th St., qualityhillplayhouse.com

rental), 117th St. and Nall, Leawood

LIVING

the pitch

Dates and times vary.

continued from page 30 The Ice at Park Place | 11 a.m.-10 p.m., $7 ($3 skate

Pinkie COuTure: $50 color service for $25 7Th heaven: $50 deal for $25

32

TheaTer

setts, Lawrence

Wild Men of KC | 8:30 p.m. Blue Room, 1616 E. 18th St. Winter Jam Tour Spectacular | 7 p.m. Sprint Center,

7:05 p.m. Independence Events Center, 19100 E. Valley View Pkwy., Independence

1407 Grand

The 2014 National Silver Gloves Amateur Boxing Tournament | 1 p.m., 6 p.m., Hilton Garden Inn, 19677

neck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence

Wood & Wire, 40 Watt Dream | 8 p.m. The Bottle-

E. Jackson Dr., Independence, ringside.com MuSIC

NIGHTLIFE

DJ Apollo Beats | 9 p.m. Mestizo, 5270 W. 116th Pl., Leawood

The Abnorm, Ir Neko, Huey P. Nuisance, TWO4ONE, DJ PMS | 10 p.m. Replay Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Adam Evolving, the End Is Red, Echo Collider, Seventh Day | 8:30 p.m. Riot Room, 4048 Broadway Trey Anastasio Band | 7 p.m. Uptown Theater, 3700 Broadway

Megan Birdsall | 9 p.m. Broadway Jazz Club, 3601

Broadway

DJ Sike | MiniBar, 3810 Broadway An Evening with Ruby | 8 p.m. Missie B’s, 805 W. 39th St. Flirt Friday | 9 p.m. VooDoo Lounge, Harrah’s Casino, 1 Riverboat Dr., North Kansas City

Taproom Throwdown #5 with DJs G Train, Proof, Kimbarely Legal and Johnny Quest | 10 p.m. Eighth Street Taproom, 801 New Hampshire, Lawrence


J. RobeRt SchRaedeR/couRteSy of the coteRie

Afflicted: dAughters of sAlem

Afflicted: Daughters of Salem | From left: Alisha Espinosa, Emily Phillips, Nicole Greenberg, Emily

Saturday | 2.1 | Performing Arts

exPos

Kansas City royals fan fest | 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Bartle Hall, 301 W. 13th St.

Anubhavam: traditional indian dance performed by the nartan Dance troupe | 5:30 p.m. Performing Arts Center, 7250 State Avenue, KCK

Ballet memphis presents Wizard of Oz | 8 p.m.

Yardley Hall at JCCC, 12345 College Blvd., Overland Park

Cellist Colin Carr | 7:30 p.m. Graham Tyler Memorial Chapel, 8700 N.W. River Park Dr., Parkville

flippin’ Channels in the estrogen Zone | 7:30 p.m. Lawrence Arts Center, 940 New Hampshire, Lawrence Kansas City symphony: festival of rhythm |

8 p.m. Kauffman Center, 1601 Broadway, kcsymphony.org

SH T W OW O S

Shackelford,Jessica Jensen and Hannah Thompson , the Coterie Theatre, 2450 Grand, Crown Center, thecoterie.org

THE BLUE CORNER

CHIPPENDALES

February 7, 2014

February 15, 2014

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Boot Camp | 9 a.m. Next Level Fitness, 4013 Sterling, Independence, fitnesscrawl.com

intro to self-Defense | 6 p.m. Leonardo Pecanha Nova Uniao, 1737 Oak, fitnesscrawl.com sPorts & reC

missouri mavericks vs. Quad City mallards |

7:05 p.m. Independence Events Center, 19100 E. Valley View Pkwy., Independence

the 2014 national silver gloves Amateur Boxing tournament | 1:30 p.m., Hilton Garden Inn, 19677 E.

DAVE AUDE

AARON LEWIS

February 22, 2014

February 19, 2014

Jackson Dr., Independence, ringside.com

ComeDy

the Bearded men | 8 p.m. Kick Comedy Theater, 4010

Pennsylvania. kcimprov.com

UmKC vs. grand Canyon men’s basketball | 7:05 p.m. Municipal Auditorium/MusicHall,301 W.13th St. sHoPPing

Christina Pazsitzky | 7 & 9:45 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater, 7260 N.W. 87th St.

liberty Belle | 9 a.m.-6 p.m., 1320 W. 13th St.

Bobby slayton | 7:45 & 9:45 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy

rag and Bone | 9 a.m.-6 p.m., 1412 W. 12th St.

Club, 1867 Village West Pkwy., KCK

CommUnity events

young, Hot & gay Comedy tour with Heather turman & Jordan Pease | 7:45 & 10 p.m. Stanford’s

souper Bowl saturday | 11 a.m. Lawrence Arts Center,

History

mUsiC

on Broadway, 3700 Broadway

James H. Johnston discusses his book From Slave Ship to Harvard: Yarrow Mamout and the History of an African-American Family | 2-4 p.m.

Black Archives of Mid-America, 1722 E. 17th Terr., blackarchives.org

UPCOMING SHOWS: 1/31

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Magic 107.3 KC Groove Party

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Cold Nights, Hot Country featuring Whiskey Myers

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the B’dinas, the future Kings, violet and the Undercurrents, ruth Acuff, Zorya | 7 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd. continued on page 34

pitch.com 96114_4.776x9.8125_Ad_V1.indd 1

january 30 -february 5, 2014

the pitch

33

1/28/14 10:17 AM


continued from page 33 Deborah Brown | 8:30 p.m. Blue Room, 1616 E. 18th St.

Prairie Winds Festival | 1 p.m. Lied Center of Kansas,

Greg Brown featuring Bo Ramsey | 9 p.m. Knuck-

SPORTS & REC

leheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester

Brody Buster Band | 9 p.m. B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ, 1205 E. 85th St.

1600 Stewart Dr., Lawrence

The Kickoff 5k | 9 a.m. Arrowhead Stadium WWE Live | 1 p.m. Sprint Center, 1407 Grand

Cadillac Flambe | 9 p.m. The Phoenix, 302 W. Eighth St. Federation of Horsepower, the Quivers, Black on Black | 10 p.m. Replay Lounge, 946 Massachusetts,

Lawrence

SHOPPING

Liberty Belle | 11 a.m.-4 p.m., 1320 W. 13th St. Rag and Bone | 11 a.m.-5 p.m., 1412 W. 12th St.

Eboni Fondren Quartet, Sherry & Mike | 5:30 p.m.

Green Lady Lounge, 1809 Grand

Angela Hagenbach Trio | 7 p.m. Chaz, 325 Ward Pkwy. Interstate Astronauts, the Culprits | Westport Saloon, 4112 Pennsylvania

Norm Liggins | 8 p.m. Danny’s

More

EvEnts

On

Big Easy, 1601 E. 18th St.

at line

pitch.co

m

Mark Lowrey | The Kill Devil

No Coast Radio Benefit | 8:30

Nuthatch-47, the Waspmen, the Expassionates | 6:30 p.m. Coda, 1744 Broadway The Old No. 5’s | 8:30 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester

Czar, 1531 Grand

5336 W. 151st St., Leawood

HIT ALL OF THESE

SUGAR RUSH • BACON & BOURBON FESTIVAL • TASTE OF KC • PITCH MUSIC AWARDS

Monday | 2.3 | FITNE S S CR AW L

Absolute Beginner Ballet Class | 7 p.m. KC Ballet School, 500 W. Pershing Rd., fitnesscrawl.com FOOD & DRINK

CCVI Food Fight 5 | 6-10 p.m. Foundation, 1221 Union (at Foundation Architectural Reclamation), ccvifoodfight.org MuSIC

Bob Bowman & Roger Wilder jam | 10 p.m. Green

Lady Lounge, 1809 Grand

Brother John’s Motivational R&B/Soul Showcase | 7 p.m., free. The Uptown Arts Bar, 3611

Night Riots, the Gallery, Too Late for Satellites | 10 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

New Hampshire, Lawrence

Til Willis & Erratic Cowboy, This Evil | Frank’s

Brian Steever | 7 p.m. Blue Room, 1616 E. 18th St.

North Star Tavern, 508 Locust, Lawrence

Magic 107.3 Saturday Groove Party | 7 p.m. Voo-

Doo Lounge, Harrah’s Casino, 1 Riverboat Dr., North Kansas City

Sunday | 2.2 |

CALL 816.561.6061 FOR MORE INFO

Don Warner Duo | 10 a.m. Chaz, 325 Ward Pkwy.

Waka Winter Classic | 8 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737

DJ Thundercutz | 10 p.m. MiniBar, 3810 Broadway

WE KNOW TIMES ARE TOUGH SO WE’RE MAKING OUR EVENTS MORE AFFORDABLE FOR YOU!

Westport Rd.

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NIGHTLIFE

s

Josh Quinlan Quartet | 8 p.m. RecordBar, 1020

The Sluts, Drew Black and Dirty Electric, Capture the Flag, Alien Jones | 8:30 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

EVENTS

1809 Grand

Outsides, Parts of Speech, Redder Moon | 7 p.m.

Josh Quinlan Quartet | 8 p.m. Take Five Coffee + Bar,

PASSPORTS

Stan Kessler Quartet | 10 p.m. Green Lady Lounge,

Club, 61 E. 14th St.

p.m. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club, 3402 Main

GIVE THE GIFT OF 4 PARTIES IN 2014!

MuSIC

NIGHTLIFE

Karaoke | 10:30 p.m. The Brick, 1727 McGee Sonic Spectrum Music Trivia | 7 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

Trivia with Matt Larson | 8 p.m. Bulldog, 1715 Main

Tuesday | 2.4 | COMEDy

PERFORMING ARTS

Kansas City Symphony: Festival of Rhythm | 2 p.m. Kauffman Center, 1601 Broadway, kcsymphony.org

The young, Hot and Gay Tour | 7:30 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater, 7260 N.W. 87th St. continued on page 36

34

the pitch

january 30 -february 5, 2014

pitch.com


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the pitch

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BILL COSBY

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LIVE MUSIC EVERY FRIDAY NIGHT 8-12PM Jan. 31 - Thin Ice

Feb. 7 - Velvet Jackson

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Bill Cosby | 5 & 8 p.m. The Midland, 1228 Main continued from page 34

El Barrio Band | 7 p.m. Danny’s Big Easy, 1601 E. 18th St.

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Busker’s Banquet | 9 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar,

New Hampshire, Lawrence

Dopapod, 3 Son Green | 8 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737

4th Annual Clash of the Comics | 7:30 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater, 7260 N.W. 87th St.

Everyone Is Not a Rapper: An MC Battle with Steven Cooper | 8 p.m. Czar, 1531 Grand

Erik Griffin | 8 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club, 1867 Village West Pkwy., KCK

MewithoutYou, Clairaudients, Pioneer | 8 p.m.

Devin Henderson’s Mind Madness | 7:30 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater, 7260 N.W. 87th St.

Rehab, Angel’s Cut | 7 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Mas-

MUSIC

Billy Ebeling | 7 p.m. Jazz, 1823 W. 39th St.

NIGHTLIFE

infected

Go Red for Women party | 6 p.m. RA Sushi, 11638

MUSHROOM

Ash, Leawood

@MIDLAND

Tap Room Trivia | 8-10 p.m. Waldo Pizza, 7433

Organ Jazz Trio with Ken Lovern | 9 p.m. Green

Wednesday | 2.5 |

FEBRUARY

sachusetts, Lawrence

Leslie and the Lys, Dean and the Delilahs, Boone County Comedy Troupe | 8 p.m. The Riot Room,

Broadway

FRIDAY

Hopsin, DJ Hoppa | 7 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Mas-

Rex Hobart’s Honky Tonk Supper Club | 7 p.m.

RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

4048 Broadway

Lady Lounge, 1809 Grand

Andrew Ripp, Judah & the Lion, Jacob Crawford | 7 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence

PERFORMING ARTS

HEAR THEM BEFORE YOU SEE THEM

//FREE MUSIC PLAYER ON THE MUSIC HOME PAGE OF PITCH.COM the pitch

Retta | 7 p.m. Liberty Hall, 644 Massachusetts, Lawrence

J.D. Wilkes and the Dirt Daubers, Betse Ellis |

10 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

36

sissippi, Lawrence, spencerart.ku.edu COMEDY

sachusetts, Lawrence

7

William Burroughs at 100: An Offbeat Literary Tribute | 5:30 p.m. Spencer Museum of Art, 1301 Mis-

3611 Broadway

The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

http://www.pitch.com/kansascity/NewsletterInfoRegistration/Page

LITERARY EVENTS

MUSIC

january 30 -february 5, 2014

pitch.com

Dracula with Michael Pink and Devon Carney |

The Turntable Matinee with the Cowtown Playboys | 7 p.m. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club, 3402 Main

Gil Shaham, violinist | 7:30 p.m. Folly Theater, 300

E-mail submissions to calendar@pitch.com or enter submissions at pitch.com, where you

6 p.m. Kansas City Central Library, 14 W. 10th St.

W. 12th St., folltheater.org

can search our complete listings guide.


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a “woman of a certain age” who started reading your column to broaden my horizons. As a result, some curiosities peeped their heads over the boundaries of my once happily repressed existence. I summoned the courage to join an online BDSM dating site. I got a response almost immediately from a man who decided to fill me in on how things worked. He proceeded to tell me my name would henceforth be Sub, advised me that he was to be addressed as His Majesty King Something, and ordered me to phone him. This was too much, too fast, and too weird. I gave him what I thought was a plausible excuse for my decision not to proceed to avoid hurting his feelings. He wouldn’t take no for an answer. I tried blocking him, but he seemed to have several identities on the same site. I deactivated my account. So now I’m wondering where to seek other options — preferably that are safer and not so ritualistically restrictive.

By

D a n S ava ge

had lots of fun exploring. But I’m a natural sub, and my girlfriend asked to switch and for me to dominate her. I’ve tried to do this half a dozen times, but she tells me it isn’t working. She says it’s not about my actions but about my “tone.” Hearing this kills my lady boner. It’s gotten to the point where I’m wondering if I should bother. I want to please her, but I feel guilty and depressed because I can’t seem to return the pleasure she gave me when our roles were reversed.

Giving Up on BDSM

Fear of Flying

Dear GUOB: Either your technique and style are both lousy — maybe every fiber of your being is (subconsciously) screaming “I hate this role” during a scene — or your girlfriend is one of those BDSM switches who has a difficult time submitting to someone she knows, loves, wakes up next to every morning, gets into arguments with about bills, etc. It might be better if she subbed for someone else while continuing to dominate you.

Dear FOF: “The kink community — is not a uto-

Dear Dan: I’m married to a man who is into

pia of ultimate sexual enlightenment,” said Mollena Williams, a kinky author, activist and blogger. “The kink community is a microcosm of the broader society.” Creepy assholes like His Majesty King Something will seek out younger and/or less experienced subs like you because older and/or more experienced subs are more likely to tell him to fuck off without sparing his feelings. “Block the trolls,” Williams said. “Seek out the awesome folks who are also hanging out at sites like FetLife.com, ALT.com, iTaboo.com, and BDSMfriendbook.com. A kink-friendly profile on a nonkink site is another option.” You also have offline options. “She can find local events by checking out Caryl’s BDSM Page (drkdesyre.com) or by joining FetLife and searching events in her area,” Williams said. “She can attend munches, which are nonsexual social meet and greets, and classes are good places to meet people who are experienced.” This doesn’t offer 100 percent protection from creeps, “but it’s a great way to get feedback, recommendations and ever-important warnings. Dating in the kink world is no different. Always meet on an equal footing first. Get to know potential partners and then decide if you’ve got enough in common to proceed.” Get a copy of Playing Well with Others: Your Field Guide to Discovering, Exploring and Navigating the Kink, Leather and BDSM Communities by Mollena Williams and Lee Harrington.

Dear Dan: I’m a 30-year-old bi girl and have

been with my girlfriend for nearly 10 years. We discovered a love of BDSM together, and we’ve

BDSM. I’m happy to do lighter stuff, but I’m not interested in squeezing into an uncomfortable corset and using a flogger on him. It doesn’t turn me on. So I gave him permission to visit a pro. The pressure was off me, he was getting what he needed, our relationship and sex life improved. But I had no idea how much pros cost! He has been seeing a pro twice a month and spends $200-plus on each visit! I expected him to go a few times a year and spend $100 a pop. We’re supposed to be saving to buy a home! I asked him to cut back and see someone cheaper, and he became angry and defensive. I know he reads your column. What is a reasonable number of times to see a pro? What is a reasonable rate?

He Spent More Than I Thought Dear HSMTIT: Two hundred dollars a session ($200 an hour) isn’t an unreasonable rate. But unless money is no object and/or you’re single, blowing $400-plus a month on visits to a pro dom is unreasonable and unfair. There aren’t many pro doms who work for $100 an hour, or many partners as understanding as you. Your husband should think about cutting way the fuck back, getting a second job or winning the lottery. But you say all those sessions with a professional have improved your relationship and your sex life. If your husband were spending $100 a week to see a shrink and you were seeing those kinds of results, would you object? The Savage Lovecast is at savagelovecast.com.

Have a question for Dan Savage? E-mail him at mail@savagelove.net


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pitch.com/virtualjobfair 40

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january 30 -february 5, 2014

pitch.com

NEW LIFE MASSAGE PROFESSIONAL MASSAGE

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Must be eligible to work in the US for any employer. We are an Equal Opportunity Employer that values diversity in the workplace. pitch.com

january 30 -february 5, 2014

the pitch

41


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the pitch

january 30 -february 5, 2014

pitch.com


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january 30 -february 5, 2014

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The Pitch: January 30, 2014