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SEPTEMBER 26–OCTOBER 2, 2013 | FREE | VOL. 33 NO. 13 | PITCH.COM


SEP TEMBER 26–OC T OBER 2, 2013 | VOL. 33 NO. 13 E D I T O R I A L

Editor Scott Wilson Managing Editor Justin Kendall Music Editor Natalie Gallagher Staff Writers Charles Ferruzza, David Hudnall, Steve Vockrodt Editorial Operations Manager Deborah Hirsch Events Editor Berry Anderson Proofreader Brent Shepherd Contributing Writers Tracy Abeln, Jonathan Bender, Liz Cook, Adrianne DeWeese, April Fleming, Saby Reyes-Kulkarni, Nancy Hull Rigdon, Larry Kopitnik, Angela Lutz, Dan Lybarger, Dan Savage, Lucas Wetzel

TH E BI G AS K UMKC wants the Missouri Legislature to go halfsies on a $90 million downtown campus. B Y S T E V E VO C K R O D T

A R T

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Art Director Ashford Stamper Contributing Photographers Angela C. Bond, Barrett Emke, Chris Mullins, Lauren Phillips, Sabrina Staires, Brooke Vandever Intern Christina Larkins

I NDI GO -GO

P R O D U C T I O N

Production Manager Christina Riddle Multimedia Designer Vu Radley

A D V E R T I S I N G

Sales Manager Erin Carey Senior Classified Multimedia Specialist Steven Suarez Multimedia Specialists Collin Click, Sharon Donat, Katee Mejia, Page Olson Director of Marketing & Operations Jason Dockery Digital Marketing Manager Keli Sweetland

C I R C U L A T I O N

Circulation Director Mike Ryan

B U S I N E S S

Accounts Receivable Jodi Waldsmith Publisher Joel Hornbostel

S O U T H C O M M

Chief Executive Officer Chris Ferrell Chief Financial Officer Patrick Min Chief Marketing Officer Susan Torregrossa Chief Technology Officer Matt Locke Business Manager Eric Norwood Director of Digital Sales & Marketing David Walker Controller Todd Patton Creative Director Heather Pierce Director of Content/Online Development Patrick Rains

N A T I O N A L

As Baldwin KC opens on the Plaza, success washes over denim hero Matt Baldwin. BY NANCY HULL RIGDON

A D V E R T I S I N G

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VMG Advertising 888-278-9866, vmgadvertising.com Senior Vice President of Sales Susan Belair Senior Vice President of Sales Operations Joe Larkin

D I S T R I B U T I O N

The Pitch distributes 45,000 copies a week and is available free throughout Greater Kansas City, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for $5 each, payable at The Pitch’s office in advance. The Pitch may be distributed only by The Pitch’s authorized independent contractors or authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of The Pitch, take more than one copy of each week’s issue. Mail subscriptions: $22.50 for six months or $45 per year, payable in advance. Application to mail at second-class postage rates is pending at Kansas City, MO 64108.

CRITICAL THEORY Bill Shapiro marks 35 years of Cyprus Avenue on KCUR. B Y N ATA L I E G A L L AG H E R

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C O P Y R I G H T

The contents of The Pitch are Copyright 2013 by KC Communications, LLC. No portion may be reproduced in whole or in part by any means without the express written permission of the publisher. The Pitch address: 1701 Main, Kansas City, MO 64108 For information or to leave a story tip, call: 816-561-6061 Editorial fax: 816-756-0502 For classifieds, call: 816-218-6759 For retail advertising, call: 816-218-6702

ON T HE C OVE R

4 5 7 13 15 17 19 21 22 28 38

QUESTIONNAIRE NEWS FEATURE AGENDA STAGE FILM CAFÉ FAT CITY MUSIC D A I LY L I S T I N G S SAVAGE LOVE

MEANW H I LE AT PI TCH .CO M

PHOTOGRAPHY BY RYAN STRONG

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DRAKE moves Sprint Center show to December 7. PRESIDENT OBAMA scolds Congress, praises the Chiefs in Kansas City. The next time you VOMIT IN A TAXI in Manhattan, Kansas, you’ll have to pay $75.

M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X

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QUESTIONNAIRE

JAY MATLACK

Workforce development coordinator at Kansas City, Kansas, Community College

Occupation: Workforce development coordina-

tor at KCK Community College, co-owner of Tricycle Transit, co-owner of MRJT Real Estate, and assistant cross-country coach

Hometown: Shawnee Current neighborhood: The Crossroads discovering new music, watching any kind of soccer, and running.

What’s your game? Spades. Good friends or family, a cold beer and a good game of spades, and I’m pretty darn satisfied. What’s your drink? Pilsner Urquell for my favorite beer, Miller High Life if I want cheap domestic, or rum and Coke if I know dancing may be involved.

Pairs well with

GE T T I NG LO S T

Where’s dinner? LuLu’s Thai Noodle Shop is

right next door to me. I eat there almost weekly. Mushroom curry is where it’s at! Makes me sweat when I eat it, phew.

Finish this sentence: “Kansas City got it right when …” Barbecuing, tailgating or hosting allstar events.

“Kansas City screwed up when …” Choosing

not to have stadiums closer to downtown. I would love to see the downtown businesses benefit from the extra people.

“In five years, I’ll be …” More focused on one

big project, rather than multiple small ones. I also hope to find a house to purchase in either midtown or the 17th and Summit area.

“I’ve been known to binge-watch …” The Office, Wilfred and, admittedly, reality singing competitions (sigh).

“I can’t stop listening to …” Dave Matthews

Band (yes, still), the Avett Brothers, and just about anything with piano.

“I just read …” Fever Pitch, which describes

a fan’s loyalty and addiction to sports accurately.

When autumn arrives, colors explode in one last hurrah before the gray of winter takes hold. And like fall, Missouri Wines burst with bright flavors. They should. The grapes were ripened by Missouri sunshine and bottled by those who understand how summer’s warmth can make an autumn evening.

4

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The best advice I ever got: “Wherever you

missouriwine.org

are, be sure to be 100 percent there” — from my biology teacher in high school. I try my best to follow this. If I’m at work, I try not to be distracted by anything outside of work. If I’m out with friends, I make sure I give my full attention to having fun.

S A B R I N A S TA I R E S

LOCAL

What’s your addiction? Going to concerts,

My sidekick: Andrew Sully, who was my freshman college roommate. We’ve since been roommates in three separate cities.

My dating triumph/tragedy: Constant bloody nose all date after I had gotten elbowed earlier that day; spent more time in the bathroom (#tragedy). Taking dance lessons at the nearby nursing home on Valentine’s Day (#triumph). My brush with fame: I was on the front page of the NCAA catalog and on the website banner for several years after they took a random photo of the middle of the pack during a collegiate cross-country race. My photo was right next to the big football and basketball stars on their site. Kevin Durant, Vince Young and … me.

My 140-character soapbox: Those who yell at

runners driving by: I know my shorts are too short, and, yes, Forrest Gump is a great movie, but I already know all of the quotes.

Who’s sorry now? That mouse that was in

our office and eating my buffalo meatballs for lunch.

My recent triumph: Due to my running addiction, I often fear lifting heavy things. My triumph is that I have consistently lifted weights for almost four months.

Kansas City, Kansas, Community College hosts a digital storytelling forum, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Thursday, September 26, at the Thomas R. Burke Technical Education Center (6565 State Avenue, in Kansas City, Kansas). Look for experts and employers from KCnext, t2, ArtsKC, the Kansas City FilmFest, and more. The event is free.


NEWS

THE BIG ASK

BY

S T E V E VOCKROD T

UMKC wants the Missouri Legislature to go halfsies on a downtown campus.

K

ansas City’s better-known citizens — the ones who wear suits and don’t play for the Chiefs or Royals — packed Union Station’s Chamber Board Room on September 19. This gathering for those tagged “business and civic leaders” served as an update on the progress of the Greater Kansas City Chamber of Commerce’s “Big 5” ideas. The Big 5 was initiated about two years ago when the chamber, then headed by Burns & McDonnell CEO Greg Graves, asked community members what they wanted to see happen in the Kansas City area. A list of 182 ideas was trimmed to five. The five ideas are laudable in their own right, although some benefit the community more than others. An example: The goal to make E R O M Kansas City “America’s Most Entrepreneurial City” would be difficult T A INE ONL .COM to quantify in any meanH C PIT ingful way and would be hard to measure against cities like Boston, San Diego, San Francisco and Seattle. Another goal, to improve impoverished east Kansas City neighborhoods between 22nd and 52nd streets, sounds good. But much like the entrepreneurship goal, how will anyone know when the threshold of improvement is met? Then there’s the notion that Kansas City should host a global symposium on animal health. Seems like a solid idea to someone working in the scientific community. But it’s difficult to imagine that Mr. and Mrs. Kansas City Citizen have spent much time clamoring for such an event. An idea to grow Kansas City’s medicalresearch community hinges on Jackson County voters passing a half-cent sales tax on November 5. The most promising Big 5 proposal aims to bring the University of Missouri–Kansas City’s arts programs downtown, to an area that has lost businesses and jobs in large numbers. Boosters believe that the idea would accelerate downtown growth with an influx of 600 students and faculty members. But it may also be one of the more challenging of the five goals. The fi rst phase of the UMKC Downtown Arts Campus is to move the school’s Conservatory of Music and Dance near the Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts, at a cost of $90 million. The university received good news earlier this year when Julia Irene

NEWS

Kauff man, daughter of Ewing and Muriel Kauff man, pledged $20 million to the project — if UMKC raises $70 million on its own in the next three years. “I have to get some private fundraising, so don’t run for the door,” UMKC Chancellor Leo Morton told a crowd of about 150 at the chamber’s Union Station meeting. For starters, UMKC is looking to raise $25 million from private sources. Coupled with Kauff man’s $20 million, that works out to half of the $90 million needed to start the Downtown Arts Campus. UMKC hopes that the rest will come from the state of Missouri. A couple of years ago, the Missouri Legislature passed a bill that would allow the state to match up to half the funds raised by the university to make capital improvements on its campus. While the legislation allows arts-related improvements, it’s not an automatic grant program. The common belief is that the Legislature might give preference to projects related to science, technology, engineering and mathematics over the arts. With UMKC counting on matching funds, the always unpredictable state Legislature becomes a critical component of the financing for the proposed Downtown Arts Campus. Given a quirky Legislature — where rural lawmakers have outsized influence and where Kansas City has traditionally not fared well — $25 million is a lot to raise. Morton is undaunted. “This is the most giving community, per capita, in the world,” Morton tells The Pitch. That’s true. UMKC just opened a $32 million building, financed by H&R Block founder Henry Bloch, to serve as the university’s management school. The Hall Family Foundation has promised to donate $75 million to construct a new building at Children’s Mercy Hospital for medical research if Jackson County voters approve that sales-tax increase in November. And there’s Kauffman’s challenge grant. Yet these developments are banking on the same few wealthy Kansas City families: the Halls, the Blochs and the Kauff mans. Morton says he has much of the $25 million “teed up.” He means that the university has made donation requests to various organizations and individuals who might contribute to the Downtown Arts Campus. But, on things like this, it takes awhile to hear back.

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R YA N S T R O N G

att Baldwin puts four of his prized possessions on the table. They’re all jeans. He’s been talking — fast and with much enthusiasm — for a solid 20 minutes, about denim. The fabric’s history, the evolution and look and feel of jeans, the poetry in what washing and wearing do to simple indigo — he’s covering it all. He pauses, clutching one of his best-sellers, the Baldwin Henley in raw selvage denim, as he prepares to explain how his infectious love affair with the material is about to reach the next level. “We’re working with a Japanese mill to produce our own textile,” he says. He looks, as usual, sharp in what is essentially his uniform: his line’s utility pants (rolled), basic black Nikes, leather jacket. “That means you won’t be able to get this denim anywhere else in the world. The Japanese produce the most phenomenal denim. They are so meticulous. You can feel it.” Baldwin’s passion for high-quality denim shines. And the industry is training its lights on his company. The nation’s top style critics have praised the 35-year-old local designer for the tough feat of nailing not only fashion but also workmanship. The accolades have risen to nearsupernatural levels. “The high priest of low-key gear,” GQ calls Baldwin in naming him one of the year’s four Best New Menswear Designers. Or, as Jim Moore, the magazine’s longtime creative director, refers to him in a conversation with The Pitch: “fashion hero.” “He’s a very serious guy, a gentle soul,” Moore says. “But when he talks about denim, he is laser-focused. And I really enjoy being around people who are very passionate about what they do.” On an early September afternoon, inside Baldwin headquarters in Overland Park, a man stops in with flooring samples. It’s time to decide on the front-entrance tile at the company’s new retail store. Across the room, Emily Baldwin — Matt’s wife and business partner — is on the phone. She’s discussing a detail for the launch of the Baldwin collection, which hits 200 Gap stores this week, the result of the GQ honor. A copy of Maxim sits next to her. Inside, there’s a photo of Johnson County–bred Saturday Night Live star Jason Sudeikis in a Baldwin denim jacket — the latest celebrity to wear the brand. She smiles, then shrugs about all the attention. Before a New York press team was assembled this month, she explains, the brand’s publicity work consisted solely of her responding to inquiries. David Hall, manager at the Leawood Baldwin store, remembers when photos surfaced last year of actress Olivia Wilde, Sudeikis’ fiancée, wearing the Baldwin line’s KC hat. “All of a sudden, all these girls were buying the hats,” Hall says. “Girls hadn’t really thought they could wear them before.” The Sudeikis connection dates back a few years. Matt and Emily rushed one of their children to Children’s Mercy Hospital; the infant had a high fever. Thankful for the care, Matt got involved with the hospital’s board. He then met Sudeikis through the Big Slick Celebrity Poker Tournament and Party, an annual benefit for the hospital, and the two men clicked. Other celebrities wear Baldwin simply because they dig the brand. Jay-Z seemingly lived in the line’s camo trousers last fall, prompting demand that quickly dried up the fabric’s initial run. The organic rise to the big time happened quickly. In 2003, the Baldwins opened Standard Style in Leawood, a men’s and women’s boutique carrying designer labels. Four years ago, they rolled out the Baldwin line with men’s jeans; after a year, the brand was for continued on page 9

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continued from page 7 sale on the hottest store racks in New York City and Los Angeles. The luxury brand, Baldwin Denim and Collection, weaves modern design with function and has expanded into a full line: men’s shirts, jackets, trousers, KC hats (the ones you’re seeing everywhere), women’s apparel, children’s jeans. Five U.S. factories crank out the brand. The couple now has four area stores: a second Standard Style on the Plaza; Baldwin in Leawood; and the new Baldwin KC on the Plaza, which opened last weekend and is the first store heavy on Baldwin goods for both men and women. While they have production in L.A. as well as a New York sales team, they’ve kept their base in Kansas City, a location that seems to have caught the fashion industry by surprise. And they have no plans to leave. The Baldwins are tried-and-true Midwesterners — Matt from Kansas, Emily from Missouri. This is home. They’re both beautiful, in that all-American way, and have three gorgeous and, of course, perfectly styled young children. They live in old Leawood, just a few minutes from their stores and offices, in a house they’ve given a modern, minimalist face-lift. To their friends, the house is a go-to for socializing — a place where the swimming pool, the turntable and the karaoke machine get equal action before and after the kids go to bed. “It is a huge blessing that we’re able to raise our kids here while also doing something unique,” Matt says. He’s all about bringing Kansas City along for the ride. Local Gap stores didn’t get last year’s GQ-Gap collection, so this fall he has pulled every string he can to put his clothing in some of the area stores. He also has made sure to sprinkle his hometown in the collection. The KC hat in navy made the cut. “People will be reppin’ KC all over the globe,” he says, through that enthusiastic smile.

B

efore denim, it was skateboarding and snowboarding gear. Growing up outside Wichita, in Andover, Kansas, Matt was part

R YA N S T R O N G

Indigo-go

of the skateboarding movement of the 1980s and ’90s. Skateboarding with his friends and reading Thrasher magazine consumed him. He went to college in New Hampshire and then headed to Colorado to snowboard. There, life started to align. While teaching snowboarding, he met Emily, a wakeboarding instructor. He was drawn to action-sports fashion and moved to California, where he worked for skate- and board-gear brand Volcom. He surfed. He studied apparel manufacturing at Fashion Institute of Design & Merchandising in Los Angeles. Emily joined him there, and they married in 2001. After Matt’s graduation from FIDM, he and Emily returned to Colorado for a ski season and contemplated their next move. When a KC friend offered to invest in their designerboutique idea if they came to the area, they packed their bags and opened Standard Style in Leawood’s Town Center Plaza in 2003. They stocked the store with items by their favorite designers, like Marc Jacobs, whose high-end handbags cost a few hundred dollars, as well as more affordable pieces that went for less than $50. The model was more in line with L.A. than the Midwest. A risk, yes. But why compromise?

The Baldwins bring their style to the Plaza. “I’ve always tried to do only the things I’m passionate about versus following the money or doing what theoretically makes sense,” Matt says. Matt took the lead in the business and served as the house visionary. Emily was the creative director, the women’s buyer, the stylist. But Matt struggled to find the jeans he desired: American-manufactured denim featuring modern design and ultra-premium Japanese and American selvage — a reference to “self-edge,” the crisp edges that don’t easily fray. All denim was once selvage, but today only vintage shuttle looms produce the rare, high-quality fabric. Too often, premium jeans that wear well, he thought, were too stylized, too tricked-out (think busy pockets). He wanted to keep it clean, but he found that simple-looking jeans often lacked craftsmanship. He wasn’t alone. A denim-purist culture had begun to sprout, and Matt found himself in the thick of it. These were people who wanted the same things from a pair of jeans that Matt did. He talked to them when he went to big cities to buy for his store, and he connected with

them online. It was an energetic, grassroots movement, one that took him back to a special place: the skating revolution of his childhood. Meanwhile, Kansas City was embracing Standard Style. The success led to the 2006 opening of the Standard Style store on the Plaza. In 2009, he went for it. With fit and fabric the top priorities, he started designing. The goal: versatile comfort that would attract repeat customers. He took the most durable Japanese and American denim he could find to a U.S. factory, where the fabric was cut and sewn to become Baldwin jeans. His jeans, intended to fit snugly, have several unique details. The label features Missouri steer hide, oiled and treated to age with the pants. A back pocket carries his subtle trademark: a white rivet. And the front-button backing is stamped with a local shout-out: KC. The jeans, which debuted inside Standard Style, sell for around $200 a pair — a steep price point for today’s typical shopper yet half the cost of the Japanese brands he thinks of as his competitors. “Affordable designer,” he calls it. Daniel Cummings began working for Baldwin a few years after Standard Style opened and now serves as the line’s brand manager. He remembers traveling to New York City with Baldwin in 2010 to show the jeans from their cramped hotel room. “Matt wanted it to be organic,” he says. “We wanted to connect with people, let them get to know the product.” Many in the denim community had become familiar with Baldwin jeans through a project featured on denimdebate.com, a site that followed several pairs of raw — or untreated — denim jeans for one year. Cummings blogged about his raw Baldwins, how they changed with minimal washing and maximum wear. Raw denim appeals to jeans junkies because the deep color fades naturally — an outline of the wearer’s wallet slowly appears on a pocket; fabric around the knees lightens. “There were all these bloggers and guys who like to talk about denim in our hotel room, taking pictures of the jeans and taking notes,” says Cummings, a Kansas City native. He credits that customer investment with helping elevate the product. “People saw it as a brand that had a lot of heart.” The number of retailers continued on page 11

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Indigo-go placing wholesale orders for the jeans steadily rose, and the store list began to include the big boys, places such as Barneys. In 2011, the Baldwin men’s shop opened in Leawood’s Town Center Crossing, on the east side of Roe Avenue, across from Town Center Plaza. Standard Style crossed the street to neighbor Baldwin. (The Leawood Standard then shifted its focus to women; the Plaza Standard features men’s and women’s attire.) National attention took off, and people like GQ’s Moore had their fi rst encounters with Baldwin denim — moments they would remember. “I had this fashion editor who came into my office, held up the jeans and said, ‘I have found the perfect pair of jeans. We need to reboot and rethink a pair of jeans because these are going to be amazing,’” Moore tells The Pitch. “They looked dead simple but weren’t void of personality. I could tell, just from looking at them, that they were going to be a good fit.” Moore, who has been with the men’s magazine for 33 years, wanted to try them on. He wasn’t disappointed. “They aren’t flashy. Matt gives the jean up to the wearer — you can mold them to you, make them your own.” About a year later, in 2012, Moore met Matt for the first time at a trade show. He was impressed with the man, too — and with the collection beyond denim. He kept his eye on Matt and his brand and, early this year, was able to call the local designer with good news: The magazine was naming him a Best New Menswear Designer. In Moore’s eyes, Matt’s Midwest perch adds to the glory. It allows him to step out of the industry noise, stay true to himself and design from a different perspective. “Every fashion hero has a story, and Matt’s homegrown-in-Kansas City element makes his story all the more compelling,” he says.

O

n a mid-September weekday, recent University of Kansas grad Todd Harmon stops in at the Leawood Baldwin store to buy a KC hat in gray before moving to San Francisco. “I want to take some Kansas City with me,” he says. Business remains brisk here, though it’s tough to pin down just who is the typical customer. The same day, store manager Hall hears from an elderly man who calls each fall to order a new denim jacket. “We get the young guys who are into denim and the story of breaking in a pair, and then we get the older men who are drawn to quality and classic fit,” says Hall, a Columbia, Missouri, native. The Leawood Baldwin store serves as a laboratory of sorts, a place where Matt’s customer interaction shapes products sold globally. He takes pride in what he calls the store’s upperlevel service, which includes on-the-spot tailoring. (Every employee sews.) A jeans wall of fame hangs by the store’s

R YA N S T R O N G

continued from page 9

There’s more than denim now. front entrance. There, wearers retire their wellworn raw pairs, giving way to design inspiration for worn washes. The store has a sleek, clean and functional aesthetic, a design influenced by Baldwin’s fondness of modern architecture and made possible by Hufft Projects. Architect Matthew Hufft, founder of the firm (which has offices in Kansas City and New York), designed all of the Baldwins’ stores as well as their home remodel. In Springfield, Missouri, he and Emily were high school classmates. He says he often hears people ask Matt, “So, how much longer are you going to be around here?” Hufft knows the answer. “Through his success, Matt’s enthusiasm for Kansas City has increased,” he says. “You see other people taste success and flee from their home, but he’s doing the opposite, which I think is really admirable.” Other local designers are watching Baldwin’s example. Christian Shuster, designer of the menswear line ChristianMICHEAL, says, “Matt Baldwin has proven that you don’t have to transplant to the coasts to make it.”

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riday afternoon, September 20, the new Plaza Baldwin store had been open for an hour. Matt was worn-out from the busiest month of his career so far, yet embracing the high time. He and Emily were at home for four days between New York trips, a schedule that had him missing his kids. The new issue of GQ had just come out — Jeff Bridges on the cover and, a couple of pages in, Baldwin posing in a glossy spread pushing the Gap collection. He talked about what’s next: Open one Baldwin-brand store, much like this one, away from the Kansas City area each year for the next five years. First up: Los Angeles and New York. For now, all eyes are on Kansas City, the new Plaza store serving as the model for national stores. As shoppers trickled in, he flashed that eager smile and said, “It’s so awesome to be doing this in our own backyard.”

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The 34th Annual

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WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 26-OCTOBER 2

F

PHOENIX

rench alt-rock export Phoenix headlines 96.5 the Buzz’s annual Beach Ball. Never mind that the radio-rock fes-

tival is in the fall at Berkley Riverfront Park. The lineup is solid: Alt-J, Cage the Elephant, Awolnation and more. Better leave work early: The show starts at 2:30 p.m. Friday, September 27, at Berkley Riverfront Park

Daily listings on page 28 pitch.com

september 26 -october 2, 2013

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september 26 -october 2, 2013

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S TA G E

CRANE SHOT

Red Badge Variations updates notions of wartime courage.

BY

L I Z C O OK

P

HES PARADIS C O O E Daycare & Resort

A

t the Coterie, Red Badge Variations riffs on Stephen Crane’s iconic Civil War novel to capture a realistic (but teenfriendly) glimpse into the lives of five soldiers deployed during the war on terror. The production strikes a curiously jingoistic opening note: Director Kyle Hatley paces the soldiers through a stylized display of chestE MOR t hu mpi ng a nd hooah chants in their Afghan bunk. Under Art Kent’s T A E IN expressive lights and ONL .COM PITCH snaking shadows, their rituals suggest something primal, even mystical. But to playwright Melissa Cooper, the realities of war are anything but. The Coterie commissioned her script to open its 35th season, and Cooper succeeds in reimagining Crane’s soldiers in a modern context. Some things haven’t changed: the Molotov cocktail of frayed nerves and conflicting emotions, the familial bonds forged among squad members. Other things have. The nature of war in the 21st century is something Crane couldn’t have anticipated. During the Civil War, Cooper suggests, soldiers had a front line, a clear demarcation of combat zones. and the other performances are similarly In Afghanistan, the front line is everywhere. strong. Matthew Joseph energizes the cast as “It’s all around us, man,” one of the soldiers the swaggering JC, a country boy and turkey laments. “We got nowhere to run to.” farmer, and Jake Walker lends his comic timFor newly deployed Henry Fleming (played ing (and some excellent Motown singing) to by the talented Jacob Aaron Cullum), the Doc Bird, a tender medic and former schoolwar starts with friendly fire. He throws his bus driver. Francisco Javier Villegas rounds gear down in an empty rack, and the more out the ensemble as Tat, a seasoned men commence religious man with misgivhazing him like a high Red Badge Variations ings about combat. Tat feels school freshman. It doesn’t Through October 5 at the less complex than the rest help when they discover Coterie Theatre, 2450 Grand, of the squad, but that seems he shares a name with the 816-474-6552, thecoterie.org like a script issue: Cooper protagonist of the novel doesn’t give him much he carries: The Red Badge else to do but thumb through the Bible and of Courage. The men flip through the book, piously refuse poker buy-ins. quick to proclaim Crane’s Fleming a coward, The Middle East is often slanged as “the Fleming the man worse. The military-grade sandbox,” a vernacular literalized in P. Joseph banter feels authentic, albeit sanitized for a Barnett and Scott Hobart’s inventive design. teen audience. (Fleming is profaned as an Their angular set includes a downstage play FNG: “frickin’ new guy.”) area filled with cork granules to suggest the Tough-talking sniper Wilson (Matt unique texture of Afghan sand. The set dressLeonard) leads the charge, but he alone ing is functional and suff used with visual seems to take Fleming’s presence persontexture — draped camouflage netting softens ally. The empty bunk, we learn, was recently hard angles, and a walkway fashioned from occupied by his best friend, and the dead broken pallets opens up the stage to dynamic man’s memory lingers. Leonard skillfully blocking. plumbs the complexities of Wilson, a man Hatley keeps the script taut, choreographwhose gravelly bravado proves brittle in the ing smart physical business to set the high aftershocks of combat. adrenaline of combat against the disorientRed Badge Variations is an ensemble piece,

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Gentry George. Photo Eduardo Patino, NYC

ing boredom of a long deployment. Joseph Concha’s sound design does the heavy lifting in battle scenes, making us feel as surrounded and exposed as the soldiers. Concha’s sounds shape a dream world in one moment and whiplash us back to the present in the next, our ears ringing. With any war tale, we expect a little pathos at the end, and Hatley delivers it here with gut-wrenching efficiency. The final day of deployment is bittersweet, and Fleming hums an elegiac tune that hangs heavy in the air. But Cooper circles back, trying to hit that same note again with an increasingly heavy hand, cueing the soldiers to repeat the song and giving Fleming another monologue. Even at a breakneck 70 minutes, this is milking the material, and the finale feels a shade too maudlin for a script that otherwise rejects sentimentality. Still, Red Badge Variations works as an authentic examination of combat. Crane’s Henry Fleming foolishly believed that battles were nothing more than “crimson blotches on the pages of the past.” Cooper’s Fleming reminds you that the stains don’t fade.

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FILM

HOW DO YOU KNOW?

There are no sure things — except

BY

Nicole Holofcener’s Enough Said.

S C O T T W IL S ON

I

n what would turn out to be the last gasp of brick-and-mortar music retail, indie record shops of the 1990s had to deal with a certain kind of customer. “I need you to open this so I can hear it. Uh, wait — where’s your listening station?” If there was no promo on hand to play — a disc that everyone in the building would then get to hear, all together — this demanding little person would usually flee, empty-handed. The headphones-and-CD-player listening station having been an enabler not of positive decisiveness but of overstimulation and confusion and inaction. People being forever on the lookout for a reason, any reason, not to commit to something. And that’s just when whatever is up for grabs doesn’t eat your food, share your bed and use your toilet, doesn’t criticize you or triage a bad date on the drive home or break up with you in the kitchen. With people — with a person, with a mate — making up your mind is a process. It involves weighing an accumulation of data against various gut-level reactions. It is not easy. And that’s just when the facts or the intuitions swirling through your secondguessing echo chamber of a brain nag at you in your own voice. Enough Said, the nearly perfect new movie by writer-director Nicole Holofcener (Walking and Talking, Friends With Money, Please Give), illustrates the hazards of letting someone else give voice to hesitations that usually remain interior and inchoate. (She also reminds you, in a hold-your-breath awkward but very funny sequence, how fast couple get-togethers can become star chambers for prosecuting petty grievances.) Single parents Eva (Julia Louis-Dreyfus) and Albert (James Gandolfini) meet at a party. They begin dating. But at the same party, Eva has also met a new friend, Marianne — who she soon figures out is Albert’s ex-wife, and whose complaints about him are vitriolic but not necessarily unfounded. Head-shakeinducing quirks — those peculiar habits and tilts of worldview that movies and TV insist we embrace in our partners — can easily enough curdle into teeth-grinding horrors. Surely people have sought divorce for offenses slighter than Albert’s mouthwash hoarding. As an engine for romantic comedy (with a side of bittersweet drama, thanks to Eva’s and Albert’s daughters), Holofcener’s conceit is smart and well-executed. Enough Said is, beat by beat, an exceptionally funny movie. But as a way to unite Louis-Dreyfus and Gandolfini, both gifted, the device is singular. The two actors do things — amusing things and sad things and quiet things — we haven’t seen from them

tures translate without difficulty. Both movies are centered on jeopardy, velocity and the kind of sangfroid we might call post-machismo. And both are hair-raising. What’s different this time, though, is a cinematographer Howard hasn’t used before. Director of photography Anthony Dod Mantle — Danny Boyle’s brilliant go-to — uses vintage lenses but has shot Rush digitally. The result is gorgeous, with a bright palette that heightens Howard’s most kinetic moviemaking yet. Howard, who turns 60 next spring, is about to shoot a fact-based whaling picture, with Morgan adapting the book In the Heart of the Sea and Mantle behind the camera. Rush makes you believe that this often too-reliable director is ready to surprise. — S.W.

DON JON before. That we won’t see more of these things from Gandolfini, who died this summer, gives Enough Said some of its resonance. But that real grief doesn’t weigh the movie down. Enough Said comes by its poignancy and its grace honestly (and from the start — watch Gandolfini’s eyes during the party scene, the way they register possibility and the potential for heartbreak in the same instant). Perhaps the only unbelievable note is that Eva waits as long as she does to find that stash of mouthwash under Albert’s sink. She would have snooped much sooner, we know. Then again, maybe she was already trying to break herself of so much second-guessing, all that wondering just where people who have started over are supposed to put the latecomers to their lives, let alone their abandoned bathroom products. Drawers get full, mismatched items are easily spotted, and there seems to be a lot at stake in staying organized. Not everything fits, though. Not everything should. ■

RUSH

W

ell, this is an unexpected development: Ron Howard has made a James Bond movie — a very good James Bond movie. In the director’s sure, smart new Rush, rivals with European accents chase each other around the world, exchange barbs on their way to do gentlemanly battle, and coolly persist under constant threat of death. Their world is one of fast cars, exotic locales and amorous women. Rush’s men aren’t spies but a pair of 1970s Formula One drivers. James Hunt is the pretty

Gandolfini and Louis-Dreyfus figure it out. Englishman, comfortable among the refined backers who call him “Superstar” but at home only behind a visor and hurtling around a deadly course. Niki Lauda is Hunt’s Austrian nemesis, a fussy details man who prefers calculation to instinct and seems unfazed by the cruel nickname that his dismissive hauteur and hatchet face have brought him (the Rat). The automotive engineering, track safety and loose oversight of a day’s races meant that a swift, fiery end wasn’t just a risk — it was a statistical probability. Playing the real-life duelists are Chris Hemsworth as Hunt (slabby but Byronic, just right) and Daniel Brühl as Lauda (allowed to do more than his co-star but never doing too much). Hemsworth is familiar to American audiences as Thor, god of thunder and property of Marvel Comics; Brühl is an art-house import (Good Bye Lenin!, Inglourious Basterds) new to big-studio projects. That we recognize them both but imagine we know one better than the other is a casting choice indicative of Howard’s usual strong craftsmanship. Craft has always been this director’s thing, but that hasn’t been enough for him in these recent, Dan Brown-larded years. Frost/Nixon, from 2008, showed renewed signs of intelligence trumping prestige for its own sake, but Rush (scripted, like Frost/Nixon, by Peter Morgan, who makes witty biographical drama look easy) is Howard’s most satisfying and purely entertaining work since 1995’s Apollo 13. Here we have another true story, set in a just-previous era and casually immersing the audience in a foreign culture whose broad ges-

pitch.com

J

oseph Gordon-Levitt’s first feature as a director and screenwriter (as well as star) follows a guy whose porn habit approaches Clockwork Orange constancy, and it features as much skin and thrust as can be superfastmontaged into a hard-R movie. But Don Jon’s overall tone is boyish — sometimes even girlish — and its darkest emotions are far from harrowing. It’s a relaxed and assured picture that’s upfront about its debts to Martin Scorsese (Gordon-Levitt likes the editing bay more than the camera, but he likes the camera a lot) and Saturday Night Fever (he also likes broad dinner-table farce and nightclub alphadogging), and it’s a throwback in most of the ways that count. But for the cellphones and the laptops — the tools of modern porn production and consumption — Don Jon could be a modest time capsule from 30 or 40 years ago, a low-key sketch of types on their way to becoming characters. What makes Don Jon modest is that it’s ultimately an examination of ritual and its insular qualities: the rites of family, male friendship and Catholicism more than those of dating or sex (solo or otherwise). It’s less about addiction, then, and more about compulsion — an easing of dramatic necessity that allows dawning realization to win out over sudden epiphany. Not that Gordon-Levitt doesn’t give himself a couple of biggish acting moments; his scenes with Julianne Moore, who joins the picture late to clean up after some thematic sloppiness, give off the whiff of striving (and, mostly, succeeding). — S.W.

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CAFÉ

THE BRADY BRUNCH

A new chef energizes the Ambassador Hotel’s Reserve.

BY

CHARLES FERRUZZA

The Reserve • Ambassador Hotel, 1111 Grand, 816-298-7700 • Hours: 6:30 a.m.–11 p.m. Monday–Friday, 7 a.m.–11 p.m. Saturday–Sunday • Price: $$–$$$

W

hen a new executive chef takes over a restaurant’s kitchen, it can be like a new conductor stepping in to take over a symphony. The performance space stays the same, but style and tone and interpretations change — sometimes dramatically, sometimes subtly. When the boutique Ambassador Hotel, at 11th Street and Grand, opened last year, the owners of the expensively mounted property introduced the Reserve, a combination dining room and bar that was also part of the building’s lobby. The point was to offer a sleek, sophistiMORE cated alternative to the traditional hotel restaurant or coffee shop, and T A INE it was an elegant room, ONL .COM H PITC full of shiny surfaces and tufted seating. It seemed to have more in common with the theatrical lobby designs created for New York hotels of recent vintage (the Ameritania, the Andaz 5th Avenue) than, say, the Raphael’s Chaz on the Plaza or the InterContinental’s Oak Room. The Reserve made a strong visual statement. But the look turned out to be far more exciting than the cuisine, which was created for the space by the hotel’s first chef, Geoffrey van Glabbeek. To his credit, van Glabbeek had a vision for the Reserve, but his menus lacked the high drama necessary to play against the stylized setting. It was like seeing a set built for the musical Chicago, only to witness the production performed by the Baldknobbers. I mean, why? A year later, van Glabbeek has returned to Tulsa, and the Ambassador Hotel’s culinary service is now overseen by Shaun Brady, a baby-faced native of Tipperary, Ireland, who has taken his time making the Reserve his own. Instead of a big, all-at-once culinary statement, Brady has introduced breakfast, lunch and dinner menus slowly, and each has reflected his own taste. (He’s working on his new autumn dishes now.) There’s a cosmopolitan feel here that reflects Brady’s years of cooking in Dublin restaurants. In the morning, he bakes real Irish scones — crusty, golden-brown pastries, filled with dried currants and raisins that he has soaked in apple and orange juices. They’re served steaming hot, with his own thick mixed-berry jam and fresh whipped cream. The prices for breakfast and brunch are, as at most hotel restaurants, hardly modest. But Brady’s theory is that if you’re going to pay premium hotel prices — say, $12 for a bowl of

ANGELA C. BOND

CAFÉ

and apples, is being excommunicated from corned-beef hash — then you should get the the new fall menu. (“I’m focusing on apples or best damned corned-beef hash in the city. sweet potatoes,” he says.) I hope he reconsidBrady buys his pickled beef from the local purveyor Boyle’s and boils it for hours with ers because the piece I tried was the highlight carrots, onions, bay leaf and celery until it’s so of a late-night supper I enjoyed one Friday, when the saloon part of the Reserve space was moist, it practically falls apart when you look packed with well-dressed (and well-behaved) at it. It’s served as a chunky jumble with eggs, roasted Yukon gold potatoes, caramelized on- revelers. The noise level went up considerably, but the vitality in the room was intoxicating. ions, and two thick slabs of toasted Irish soda The food can be equally head-spinning. bread. After polishing off a bowl one morning, I honestly wasn’t hungry again until the A swooning cabernet perfume wafts from Brady’s succulent coq au next day — though the slice of vin, a rustic French dish not cheesecake I ate, post-hash, The Reserve so easy to find about town might have had something to Corned-beef hash ...............$12 anymore. His is made with do with that. Reserve burger....................$10 chicken, not rooster, and it’s I stand by that choice. Pork-belly sandwich ...........$11 heady stuff. (Cabernet is also Sous chef Jeremiah Lyman Coq au vin............................$22 a stimulating ingredient in has a passion for luscious Braised short ribs ............. $28 Brady’s slow-braised beef cheesecake, and that mornChocolate-and-coffee bread pudding ....................$8 short ribs, which he serves ing, he had concocted one with rich gratin potatoes that blended layers of moist made with what tastes like chocolate cake with pumpkin cheesecake on a chocolate-cookie crust. Who a scandalous amount of cream.) An equally wants a doughnut or a sweet roll with coffee fragrant entrée, steamed mussels in a shrimpand-herb broth tucked into a crusty Farm to when you can have cheesecake? Market bread bowl, proves that the better a Or bread pudding, for that matter. Brady dish smells at the Reserve, the more popumakes a surprisingly fluffy brioche pudding lar. The coq au vin, the mussels and a juicy and drenches it in a creamy chocolate-andCreekstone Farms Kansas City strip are Brady’s coffee sauce (the house-blend Roasterie cofbest-selling dishes. fee), and it almost works better as a breakfast Brady loves good Irish pork, so pork belly dish than a dessert. turns up in several choices: a starter of soft One of Brady’s lovelier desserts, an oldfashioned crumble made with blueberries tacos filled with chopped pork belly and

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Fresh basil isn’t just reserved for the flatbread, but complements fresh berries, too. pineapple salsa; a marvelous crispy porkbelly sandwich on the lunch menu — he slowly cooks the pork in apple cider and white wine for hours and tops the well-stacked sandwich with a layer of tart apple slaw. It’s outstanding. Of course, you can also pick from the traditional hotel-menu items: a burger (well executed here), a club sandwich (memorable), a Caesar salad (pretty good). A relic of the van Glabbeek era remains: a crispy crustacean corn dog (van Glabbeek used fake lobster; Brady uses shrimp), but it’s about to slide permanently off the menu. Brady means to replace it with a Mediterranean-style shrimp saganaki. Brady has been in Kansas City — and at the Reserve — just four months, but he says it’s going to be a long-term residency. “The minute I walked into this hotel, I knew I really wanted to work here,” he tells me. Good. This 34-year-old chef is the best thing to have happened yet to Kansas City’s newest hotel, if not the Power & Light District’s restaurant community. Brady isn’t much for blarney, but he does have a theatrical flair, and it makes this intimate venue a solid dining destination.

Have a suggestion for a restaurant The Pitch should review? E-mail charles.ferruzza@pitch.com

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FAT C I T Y

TIME OUT WALDO

T

wo men are at the bar of District Pour The Fall Feather at District House + Kitchen, trying to fi gure out for seniors, the brightened interior of the what size motor they need. How much power District is meant to attract those who still will it take to turn the windmill mounted to like a good Falldo Waldo Crawldo. the ceiling over the dining room? “This is my neighborhood,” McCall says, Then a plate of amber-glazed chicken “and I believe I know what it needs. I want wings arrives. The math can wait. people to have a dinner and a drink and then “It will spin,” Dan McCall says. “Slowly.” head back to Waldo. But we’ll be open late, The windmill is part of a long to-do list so they can come back.” overseen by McCall, who opened the Waldo McCall, a manager for the Classic Cup and restaurant a couple of weeks ago with Jason Rourke, at 7122 Wornall (former home of the Coach’s Bar & Grill, lives with Meyer-McCall in Waldo. Rourke, a longtime manager at Gaf and the Romanelli Grill). Lew’s and the Well, also knows the territory. Over the past three months, the space Both say Waldo needed a restaurant where has undergone a serious face-lift. “I know the building has history,” McCall says. “I you could eat crab dip at the bar or put a didn’t want people to think of Romanelli’s cloth napkin over your lap and order a handcut steak. So McCall brought along the chef or the Gaf. I wanted them to see this as a from Classic Cup, John Magno, to run the new place.” kitchen. Magno is in the process of training The dark wood and drop ceilings that gave the Gaf its hobbit charm are long two sous chefs, Justin Kent and Joe Mayer, previously of the American and the Hi Dive gone. The restaurant’s new feel is more Lounge, respectively. industrial, with a series “We’re calling it casual of cage penda nt l ig hts District fi ne dining,” McCall says. strung between pulleys Pour House + Kitchen “We’ve got the food to be over the long wooden bar 11 a.m.–1:30 a.m. Monday– more of a fi ne-dining res(the only holdover from Saturday, 11 a.m.–midnight taurant, but I’m a guy that the Gaf), and a showpiece Sunday, 816-333-0799, districtpourhouse.com wears jeans.” wall made of reclaimed and There’s an emphasis on broken-down wood palseafood (a snow-crab boil, lets. McCall’s wife, Jenny Meyer-McCall, manager at Sav-Art Gallery, a hazelnut-crusted salmon salad, a crab dip that comes with hush puppies). A deep-fried tapped into her network of artists to commission the disembodied handlebars now catfi sh is served as a fi llet rather than the bone-in dish on Romanelli Grill’s menu. The mounted on a wall in the back room and food leans toward comfort — chicken and the hostess stand wrapped in old license dumplings and meatloaf — with twists, the plates. Finishing touches are being made to former featuring house-made gnocchi, the a downstairs private-event space, and a side latter with trimmings from those hand-cut patio is planned for next summer. steaks. Whereas the Gaf at times felt like a place

District Pour House + Kitchen is ready for some regulars.

The bar is stocked with a rainbow of infused spirits — 32 shelved in glass jars, including fig bourbon and blackberry gin. The Fall Feather, made with brown sugar and pecan-infused Early Times bourbon with vanilla-bean syrup and Barritts ginger beer, is a liquid cousin to high-end hotel oatmeal. “We had Louie’s wine bar right here and Bier Station right up the road,” McCall says, “so we wanted to focus on liquor.” The new Waldo spot does have 14 beers on tap — including a Bell’s seasonal handle, a Lagunitas seasonal and Guinness — and 100 beers total, many of them on display in the three-door cooler at one end of the bar. McCall says District’s happy hour should come together in the next few weeks, with half-price infused cocktails from 3 to 7 p.m. “You can get a drink anywhere, but good food and good people will bring you back,” McCall says. “If someone is going to take the time to try you out, you have to give them the time back.” The door swings open, and two people tentatively walk in, escaping the afternoon sunshine. “Sit anywhere you like,” McCall tells them. “Someone will be rig ht with you.”

SOFT SELL Rolling up on corn f latbread with Eat Arepas.

Y

ou ring the bell and people start salivating,” the man says. In the parking lot of the Environmental Protection Agency’s Lenexa offices, his Pavlovian trigger has ar-

pitch.com

BY

JON AT H A N BENDER

A pork-and-vegetable arepa with cheese rived. He steps up to the food truck’s window, ready for some Eat Arepas. As the truck’s generator hums and the crowd grows to a dozen people, the flatbreads are getting loaded up: pulled pork, chicken, chorizo. There’s a sweet mix of creamy peanut butter, Nutella and banana. Everything but the dessert arepa gets a generous pat of butter and melted muenster cheese on top. “Food trucks are like a carnival. We just need the cotton candy,” says another waiting customer. The lone staffer inside the bright-red truck works at not falling behind as he takes orders, processes Square electronic payments and prepares the food. The arepa (ah-RAY-pah) — a white-corn f latbread that is a staple in many South American countries — is roughly the size of a frozen waffle. It is the bread equivalent of tofu (and is gluten-free), adapting to its surroundings and absorbing f lavors. The pork option ($6) is tender and fi lling. Add a mound of finely diced bell peppers for $1, and the sweetness and crunch give the flatbread brightness. The dessert version ($3) is the kind of kids’ dish that makes adults melt. The peanut butter adds a smooth, salty balance to the sweetness of the Nutella and the banana. (The menu is at eatarepas.com.) Instinct tells you to fold it like a soft taco, and the pliant arepa allows it, as long as you take time enough to avoid creating a fault line down the middle of the spongy bread. The message of the truck is clear by its name: Eat Arepas. It’s advice you should follow. — JONATHAN BENDER

E-mail feedback@pitch.com

september 26 -october 2, 2013

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21


MUSIC

SCREAM VII

I

f you have tickets to see Nine Inch Nails at the Sprint Center — where the band makes its second stop on a new tour — you probably know how “March of the Pigs” looks these days. You’ve probably seen, for instance, YouTube footage from NIN’s Lollapalooza appearance in July. There’s hired tour gun Ilan Rubin, playing his drums at full intensity one moE MOR ment and then, as if by teleportation, appearing behind a keyboard T A E IN ONL .COM several feet away as the PITCH song comes up for air. Rubin taps out a few delicate piano lines, only to resume his place at the kit as the main driver of the song’s frantic, odd-metered rhythm. That stealthy precision, that single choreographic feat, shows the scale and rigor that Trent Reznor brings to NIN shows. It shows that Reznor’s decision to reinstate his band is no concession to an audience that just wants to relive a ’90s experience. Hesitation Marks, the band’s seventh proper album, and its first after a four-year hiatus marked by Reznor’s marriage and fatherhood, arrived in early September. It could have been a nostalgic belch of the anger and the wallowing that were hallmarks of that past decade — features that Reznor himself played no small role in defining. It isn’t.

M US I C

22

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Trent Reznor resurrects

BY

Nine Inch Nails.

S A B Y R E Y E S- K UL K A R NI

On the new album, Reznor hardly raises his voice. And when he sings lines that sound hopeful, lines such as I am home/I am free/I believe, the mood seems so jarringly out of place that you expect a punch line, an ironic subversion to bubble up in a subsequent verse. That doesn’t happen. The album title itself — the forensic term for scars left by the superficial cuts from an attempted or unsuccessful suicide — is a nod to The Downward Spiral’s preoccupation with self-annihilation. But newfound domesticity has given Reznor a very different perspective, one audible in the choices that he and longtime co-producer and collaborator Atticus Ross have made with their arrangements. A typical song on Hesitation Marks moves into its chorus without following the band’s standard pattern of getting bigger, aggressive, guitar-saturated. Instead, these songs retreat inward, though not quite to the implosive head space of The Downward Spiral, which Reznor was consciously looking back on when he set out to write the material that would become the new album. On Hesitation Marks, Reznor and his accompanying musicians still refer to the NIN of decades past. You instantly recognize shades of 1999’s double-disc The Fragile in the appropriated, digitally rubberized funk that defines “All Time Low.” The verse section of “In Two” recalls back to “Down in It,” from

NIN: still as black as your soul. the band’s 1989 debut, Pretty Hate Machine. To channel music onstage that’s violent, sexualized and anguished, Reznor relies on touring musicians who aren’t shy about beating up on their instruments. At times, Reznor and his cohorts have been more focused on wrecking their gear than playing it. There was the band’s performance at Woodstock ’94, for instance, and other footage from around the same time (collected in the 1994–1996 Self Destruct tour documentary) showing a bunch of wild-eyed, malicious pricks whom any sensible person would avoid. Back then, Reznor would freely pound the microphone against his skull, tackle his bandmates, jump all over his equipment, call the audience “fuckheads,” and end songs with extended bouts of whimpering. It’s hard to imagine a similarly extreme approach to putting Hesitation Marks on the road. The record comes off as the work of a songwriter still pushing himself, and pushing more quietly. But as a performer, Reznor remains committed to a kind of physical legacy, and the rapturous response of this summer’s Lollapalooza crowd to his old material attests to its enduring appeal. He still knows how to wield that power onstage.

E-mail feedback@pitch.com


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september 26 -october 2, 2013

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23


MUSIC

CRITICAL THEORY

Bill Shapiro marks 35 years

BY

of Cyprus Avenue on KCUR.

N ATA L IE G A L L A G HE R

BUILDING BRICKS In the spirit of radio playlists, we asked Bill Shapiro to assemble what he would consider the “ultimate mixtape.” If you want a real rock-and-roll education, starting at the very beginning, Shapiro’s assemblage makes a nice jumping-off point: Jackie Bremston & His Delta Cats (arranged by Ike Turner): “Rocket 88,” 1951 Chuck Berry: “Maybellene,” 1955 Elvis Presley: “Heartbreak Hotel,” 1956 Ray Charles: “What’d I Say (Part 1),” 1959

C O U R T E S Y O F KC U R

The Beatles: “I Want To Hold Your Hand,” 1964 The Rolling Stones: “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction,” 1965 Bob Dylan: “Like a Rolling Stone,” 1965 Pink Floyd: “Money,” 1973

B

ill Shapiro can’t quite remember how old Shapiro’s second home, at KCUR he is — 76 or 77. But he can recall the exact date, the precise moment, that he discovered before. And I did this show. And I walked out. And he [the director] said, ‘Well, if you can do Elvis Presley. “I was born in ’37, so I must be 76,” he says it every week, you’re on the radio.’” Over the years, Shapiro has built Cyprus after a moment, with a small chuckle. “But Avenue into a Kansas City staple and a national insurancewise, I’m 77.” reference point. The program itself has evolved Shapiro is seated at an enormous conference table in a plush, softly lighted room at Dysart relatively little — Shapiro is the first to admit his adherence to a now well-worn formula Taylor Cotter McMonigle & Montemore, the law firm where he works. He is dressed casu- of critical commentary wrapped around his ally in khakis and a denim button-up, with carefully chosen playlists. But that model and its longstanding success also reflect Shapiro’s personalized silver cuff links. In person, he speaks in the same soothing rumble familiar own nature — audiophile, music obsessive, to anyone who has heard Cyprus Avenue on rock historian (he has published two books) — and a simple qualification: having been in KCUR 89.3. The weekly radio show marks its the thick of rock music from the day it started. 35th anniversary Saturday with a Sam Baker “Talk about events that were life-changing,” concert at the Folly Theater. he says. “I was at a friend’s house on a Saturday Cyprus Avenue first went on the air in night in January of 1956. At October 1978, through what that time, there was a proShapiro refers to as a lucky Cyprus Avenue Live gram that aired at 6 p.m. on set of circumstances. presents the Sam Baker Band Saturdays called the Jimmy “I was given the opporSaturday, September 28, and Tommy Dorsey show. tunity to meet the program at the Folly Theater , 300 West I’m sitting there, by mydirector at that station,” 12th Street, 816-474-4444, self, listening to this thing, Shapiro says. “I told him follytheater.org and it’s 6:35. Jimmy Dorsey that I had this dream of bewalks up to the microphone, ing a disc jockey, and I’d had it for a long time. I said, ‘I want to do an intel- and he says, ‘Ladies and gentlemen, I’d like to introduce you to a man from Memphis, Tenligent program about rock-and-roll music.’ nessee, who’s creating quite a stir. His name He said, ‘OK. Put one together, and we’ll see what happens.’ Then I had to come up with is Elvis Presley.’ And Elvis came out and did ‘That’s All Right, Mama.’ I became a rock-andmy fantasy life and make it real.” He assembled a set that he titled “Ballads roll nut at that point.” Nearly six decades later, Shapiro still takes by Rockers,” and the broadcast was born. listening to music very seriously — and he wor“So I put together this show, and I walked in ries that others aren’t. and I sat down behind the microphone in the “Most people are now consuming [music] studio,” Shapiro says. “I’d never done radio

24

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on their iPhone or on their iPad,” he says. “They’ve got two little pieces they’ve stuck in their ears. They’ve isolated themselves from the rest of the world while they’re listening to it, and they’re not hearing everything there is to hear. I’m interested in the content of the music, and that’s secondary today. I find that discouraging.” Of course, Shapiro has seen plenty of other industry shifts over the decades. He wryly dissects the return of the single-release format and the near death of the LP, for instance, which he partly blames for today’s abundance of musical “junk.” But he doesn’t play the role of elder antagonist, closed off to the new. Shapiro considers himself a musical optimist. “I’ve always been able to find something that meant something to me, that spoke to me, through different times, through different ages,” Shapiro says. “I mean, you know, that’s a whole lifetime. Graduating from school, marrying, having children, having grandchildren, and I still find things that speak to me. It’s there. I think that music, in its broadest form, is America’s cultural contribution. Popular music has permeated the world’s consciousness, and that is something that I think is oft times overlooked.” To Shapiro, things like seeing Elvis beamed into American living rooms and hearing Bob Dylan pave the way for generations of singersongwriters remain epochal events, touchstones always at hand. With Cyprus Avenue, he has spent the past 35 years fi nding and attempting to elevate artists who have followed that trail, artists who he believes have something meaningful to say.

“I think that if you feed people pabulum all the time or Spam all the time, they’re going to get hungry for steak,” he says. Thirty-five years without Spam — that’s something to celebrate.

E-mail natalie.gallagher@pitch.com

J A Z Z B E AT PHOENIX FEST, AT THE PHOENIX

This weekend, Eighth Street closes between Broadway and Central, and a stage goes up in the street. At the fourth annual Phoenix Fest, as the occasion is known, the performances will vacillate between jazz and blues. Music starts at 1 p.m. with singer, trumpeter and tap-dancer Lonnie McFadden, followed by swing-piano showman Tim Whitmer & KC Express. Singer Millie Edwards leads the Wild Women of KC at 5 p.m., before a pair of blues bands — MGDs and Cadillac Flambe — fill out the night. Inside at the Phoenix, the music begins with dynamic jazz vocalist Eboni Fondren at 6, then gives way to the selfdescribed “groove-driven soul rock” of Brother Bagman. That closed section of Eighth Street is named Scamps Alley, after the classic jazz group that entertained at the Phoenix for years. Saturday, the tradition continues. — LARRY KOPITNIK Phoenix Fest, 1 p.m.–1 a.m. Saturday, September 28, at the Phoenix (302 West Eighth Street, 816-221-5299). Tickets cost $8 in advance or $10 at the door.


d t h n g i l a t o p B S

MARK LOWREY

For the better part of the last decade, Mark Lowrey has been one of the most visible working musicians in town. The pianist has regular gigs at some of the city’s top jazz clubs: the Green Lady Lounge, the Majestic, the Phoenix. But you also find him at less jazz-centric gigs -- in recent years he has explored hip-hop with his series Mark Lowrey vs. Hip Hop and led an evening of tribute to Radiohead. And as he tells us below, he’s fresh off working on a gospel record. In addition to all that, he’s the first performer in the Always Choose Adventure series, a joint production between The Pitch and Captain Morgan. We’re thrilled to present Lowrey and some guests at a special show at the Green Lady Lounge on September 27 to kick off the series. (RSVP as a special guest to this show at alwayschooseadventure.com) Tell us about some of your recent projects and releases. You always seem to have something in the hopper. I'm really excited to be playing the most artistically rewarding regular gigs of my career. At the Majestic, my trio performs every Sunday and Monday from 6-10 p.m. On Sundays, we host a jazz jam session and Mondays are all trio arrangements. The trio is a rotating cast of some of the best musicians in the city: Sam Wisman, Ben Leifer, Dominique Sanders, Ryan Lee, Bob Bowman, Karl Mccomas-Reichl, Brian Steever, etc. On Fridays, I always have a double header, beginning at the Phoenix with the Lonnie McFadden Trio 4:30-8:30 p.m., then I rush over to the Green Lady to play from 9-12 p.m. [Green Lady owner] John Scott has allowed me to curate a different show every week. Sometimes it is a standard piano/bass/drums jazz trio, sometimes I do an afro-cuban thing with percussionists like Pat Alonzo Conway, Miguel "Mambo" Deleon, and Pablo Sanhueza. I've brought in vocalists like Shay Estes and Eboni Fondren. It's a lot of fun to take advantage of the deep pool of talent here and improvise with a variety of artists. Just this last year, I made a gospel record with two of the most fantastic singers I've met. Nathan Granner and Ben Gulley (both former members of the American Tenors) and I arranged a sort of jazz-meets-opera-meetsstraight-up-church-music record. It was fun and different for me. We're beginning to tour a bit -- Austin and Nashville this month. I also released my second solo piano CD earlier this year, Tangos for 18th Street. You’re doing a show at the Green Lady Lounge as part of this PMA concert promotion series thing. Do you have anything special planned? That gig will be the Mark Lowrey Trio, but expect a few guest artists. One is my friend Rob Scheps, a New York musician, on sax. He’s played with a lot of cats -- Buddy Rich, Mel Torme. Do you want to talk a little about the Green Lady Lounge as a venue? The Green Lady is super hip. The piano is well cared-for and tuned regularly, which is an absolute must for me. It makes a world of difference, and I'm excited when I find that a club owner prioritized it. At both the Green Lady and the Majestic, our rep is ever expanding. Along with classic jazz standards, we reinterpret works by Chopin, Satie, Elliott Smith, John Lennon, of course Radiohead, and many other less traditional sources for jazz improvisation. General thoughts on the state of jazz in KC right now? Jazz, like live theater in KC, is experiencing a renaissance. There are so many great musicians, both young and old, and everybody is swinging. I see more fraternization and less segregation of all kinds than when I hit the scene right out of high school. If I have any criticism, it's that many Kansas Citians are missing out on it. A lot of folks that live here don't know what's happening right in front of them. You’ve won a bunch of PMAs in a row. What’s the secret? I am very flattered to receive my fourth Pitch award in a row. That being said, if more people were aware of how many brilliant jazz musicians are in this town, I might have less bling on my desk. I think one thing that helps is that, though I identify myself as a jazz musician, I am very interested in most all styles of music. I've played in a tango ensemble, in salsa bands, rock bands, cover bands, in chamber ensembles, folk bands, free jazz groups, cabaret shows, etc. It's important to be well rounded. Plus, it goes well with my ADD. pitch.com

september 26 -october 2, 2013

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25


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9/26 STAND-UP COMEDY W/ GLENN BOLTON & SPECIAL GUESTS - 8PM 9/28 MIZZOU VS ARKANSAS STATE WATCH PARTY - 6:30PM // LUCKY GRAVES, FOUR ARM SHIVER, SLOW YA ROLL - 8PM

9/30 STREET FOLK MONDAY - 9PM

VISIT US AT BLACKGOLDKC.COM

816-561-1099 • 3740 BROADWAY KCMO

M U S I C F O R E CA S T You may be wondering if the world truly needs another folk-rock band. Perhaps the notion keeps you awake at night. You blink drearily at the ceiling, asking yourself if there will ever be another artist able to seamlessly blend heartfelt acoustic playing and robust rock elements in a way that touches your soul and makes you believe that music has a future beyond computers and synthesizers. Enter Nashville band Apache Relay: earnest lyrics, uplifting melodies, Arcade Fire–like energy. Even if you really want to dislike them, they make it pretty hard. As a bonus, this is a free show.

Thursday, September 26, at the Granada (1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390)

Paperhaus

There’s something delightfully imperfect about the DIY nature of the Washington, D.C., foursome that is Paperhaus. This past May, the band self-released a hazy four-song EP, Lo Hi Lo, and in it you can hear the individual influences of four very disparate songwriters coming together to make some surprisingly genuine indie-pop music. Here, Paperhaus is joined by local electro-pop artist Scammers (the stage name of Phil Diamond) and Lazy.

Travis

Before Coldplay, there was Travis. And Travis was better. The Scottish foursome has been around for nearly 25 years, and its sound has only improved with age. The band’s seventh album, the recently released Where You Stand, is a smooth, mature collection of songs that prove Britpop lives on. If nothing else, you should go for the accents.

Sunday, September 29, at VooDoo Lounge (Harrah’s Casino, 1 Riverboat Drive, 816-889-4237)

Youth Lagoon (left) and Richard Buckner

Scar the Martyr

It seems slightly odd that Slipknot percussionist Joey Jordison would need to fi nd another creative outlet to unleash more angst and rage, but some people have a lot of that, I guess. Scar the Martyr, formed earlier this year, is due to release its debut album September 30. I wonder if the ever-endearing “maggot” tag is going to carry over.

Friday, September 27, at the Riot Room (4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179)

Shemekia Copeland

Shemekia Copeland has a voice that can blast through brick walls. The two-time Grammy nominee is a well-known force of nature in the blues world, channeling the indomitable energies of such blues legends as Etta James and B.B. King. If you like singers who can rip out your heart in a single note change, Copeland is the woman for you. And the show is free.

Sunday, September 29, KC Live in the Power & Light District (14th Street and Grand)

Youth Lagoon

Trevor Powers — better known by his stage name, Youth Lagoon — is a fresh 23 years old, and he’s making music for other 23-year-olds who are into experimental computer music and weird, noisy synth-pop. His sophomore album, Wondrous Bughouse, is a densely layered mess of electronic carnival sounds. Powers’ music would sound entirely appropriate blasting from camouflaged speakers in a house of mirrors, which would actually be a really cool way to see him perform — and it would match the strange anxiety of his lyrics really well. But until he can pack that kind of setup into his tour van, RecordBar works just fine. Austin’s Pure X opens; its ambient, lo-fi electronica should match the frenzy of Youth Lagoon nicely.

Sunday, September 29, at RecordBar (1020 Westport Road, 816-753-5207)

F O R E C A S T

the pitch

N ATA L IE G A L L A G HE R

Apache Relay

Wednesday, October 2, at FOKL (556 Central, Kansas City, Kansas, 816-665-3748, foklcenter.com)

26

BY

Richard Buckner

Richard Buckner is one of those underappreciated artists who makes categorization difficult for music journalists. In the span of his 20-plus-year career, Buckner has managed to release nearly a dozen full-length albums that slither between acoustic alt-country and folktronica. His new Surrounded is no exception, with its expansive, contemplative songs that blossom like sad, doomed flowers along the side of a dirt road. Buckner’s live performances are typically stoic sets that focus purely on the music, and there’s certainly nothing wrong with that.

Monday, September 30, at RecordBar (1020 Westport Road, 816-753-5207)

K E Y

..................................................Pick of the Week

.............................................Anger Management

........................................................Young Bucks

................................................ Legitimate Talent

....................................... Almost Award-Winning

.........................................Kids and Their Synths

....................................................Hooks for Days

........................................Been Around the Block

............................................ All the Cowboy Hats

.......................................................Kind of Scary

............................................Bands With Accents

........................................................ DIY Darlings

september 26 -october 2, 2013

pitch.com


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For more info & tickets

knuckleheadskc.com pitch.com

september 26 -october 2, 2013

the pitch

27


AGENDA

continued from page 13

Thursday | 9.26 |

Friday | 9.27 |

ANTHONY JESELNIK

LITERARY EVENTS

PERFORMING ARTS

Blogger Jen Mann | 7 p.m. Johnson County Lackman

The Capulets & the Montagues | 7:30 p.m. Lyric Opera, Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts, 1601 Broadway

Library, 15345 W. 87th St. Pkwy., Lenexa FOOD & DRINK

D THURS

AY

9 . 26

La Chalupa Farmers Market | Mattie Rhodes North-

New Dance Partners featuring Owen/Cox Dance Group, Kansas City Ballet and Wylliams/Henry Contemporary Dance | 8 p.m. Yardley Hall at JCCC, 12345 College Blvd., Overland Park

g the Bringin C ive to K offens

east, 148 N. Topping Ave.

FILM LITERARY EVENTS

UMKC’s Movies About Making Movies: American Movie | with filmmaker Sarah Price, 7 p.m. Tivoli

Books and Brews: A Literacy Crawl, benefit for

Cinemas, 4050 Pennsylvania

Reach Out and Read Kansas City | 5 p.m. Kansas City Central Library, 14 W. 10th St.

SPORTS FOOD & DRINK

The American Royal Youth Invitational Rodeo |

Hale Arena, 1701 American Royal Ct.

Fourth Annual Grünauer Oktoberfest | 4 p.m.

Grünauer, 101 W. 22nd St.

MUSIC

Friday Farmers Market at BadSeed | 4-9 p.m. The BadSeed, 1909 McGee

Acoustic Open Jam with Karen, Tom & Chris | Quasimodo, 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park

Shawnee Great Griller’s Blues and Barbeque | 6 p.m. Shawnee Town 1929, 11501 W. 57th St., Shawnee

Apache Relay, Eyelit, Not a Planet, We Are Voices | 7 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Megan Birdsall | 7:30-10:30 p.m. Uptown Arts Bar,

3611 Broadway

Eddie Moore & the Outer Circle | 8 p.m. Green Lady

MORE

EVENTS

ONL

INE

Anthony Jeselnik | 8 p.m. The Midland, 1228 Main, midlandkc.com

Chris Cagle & Jacob Powell | KC Live Stage, 14th St. and Grand

AT

M PITCH.CO

Miguel Mambo DeLeon and Carte Blanc | 7 p.m. The

Blue Room, 1616 E. 18th St.

Lounge, 1809 Grand

F E S T I VA L S

NIGHTLIFE

Beer pong Thursday | The Velvet Dog, 400 E. 31st St.

Patio jam with Don Spain, Mark Goins & Bryan Winkert | 7 p.m. Anton’s Taproom, 1610 Main

Brodioke | 9 p.m. Bulldog, 1715 Main

Hillary Scott | 8 p.m. Knuckleheads, 2715 Rochester

Cocktail Club with DJ Highnoone | Empire Room,

Scammers, Giant Claw | Crossroads KC at Grinders,

334 E. 31st St.

Lee’s Summit Chamber’s Oktoberfest | 5-11 p.m. Downtown Lee’s Summit, intersection of Third St. and Green Liberty Fall Fest | 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Historic Square, downtown Liberty, libertyfallfest.com HALLOWEEN EVENTS

The Beast | 7:30 p.m., 1401 W. 13th St.

Billy Ebeling | Jazz, 1859 Village West Pkwy., KCK

417 E. 18th St.

DJ Tequila Bear | MiniBar, 3810 Broadway

Millage Gilbert Big Blues Band | 7 p.m. Danny’s Big

Drew Six | 8 p.m. Fuel, 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park

Feel Good | 10 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire,

Lawrence

The Edge of Hell | 7:30 p.m., 1300 W. 12th St.

Girl in a Coma, Grenadina | 10 p.m. Czar, 1531 Grand

A Skylit Drive, For All Those Sleeping, Wolves at the Gate, I the Mighty, PVRIS, On the Shoulders of Giants, Demise | 5:30 p.m. Aftershock Bar & Grill,

Karaoke Lime Light | 8 p.m. Fat Fish Blue, 7260

Halloween Haunt 2013 | 8 p.m. Worlds of Fun, East

Live Free or Die with DJ Keenan | 9 p.m. Port Fonda,

4141 Pennsylvania

Macabre Cinema | 8 p.m., $27, 1222 W. 12th St.

Steddy P & DJ Mahf, Dutch Newman, Joey Cool

Easy, 1601 E. 18th St.

Caroline Glaser | 7:30 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence

Grand Marquis | 7 p.m. Jazz, 1823 W. 39th St. John Paul’s Flying Circus | B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ,

1205 E. 85th St.

5240 Merriam Dr., Merriam

| 10 p.m. Replay Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Two Tons of Steel CD-release show | 8 p.m. Knuckleheads, 2715 Rochester

Jason Kayne | 9 p.m. Jerry’s Bait Shop, 13412 Santa

Victor & Penny | 7 p.m. Take Five Coffee + Bar, 5336

Krissy Krissy, Tanner Walle, Colin Martin | 6 p.m.

Windhand, Hosferatu, Expo ’70 | 10 p.m. RecordBar,

Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa

W. 151st St., Overland Park

Czar, 1531 Grand

1020 Westport Rd.

Laura Lisbeth | 7 p.m. Coda, 1744 Broadway

Yawn Johnson album-release show | 8 p.m. The

28

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Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

september 26 -october 2, 2013

pitch.com

N.W. 87th St.

The Chambers of Poe | 8 p.m., 1100 Santa Fe

Loop I-435

NET WORKING

Luxury Bump | 10 p.m. Firefly Lounge, 4118 Penn-

sylvania

T.J. Miller | 8 p.m., Stanford’s Comedy Club, 1867 Village West Pkwy, KCK

Playe | 10:30 p.m. Uptown Arts Bar, 3611 Broadway Pop Shots with Clockwerk & DJ Archi | Gusto

Lounge, 504 Westport Rd.

Trivia | 9 p.m. Westport Flea Market, 817 Westport Rd.

Connect KC: Congressman Emanuel Cleaver| 5:30-7:30 p.m. American Jazz Museum, 1616 E. 18th St. SPORTS

The American Royal ProRodeo | 7:30 p.m. Hale

Arena, 1701 American Royal Ct.

The American Royal Youth Invitational Rodeo |

Hale Arena, 1701 American Royal Ct.

continued on page 30


50% + OFF LOCAL

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september 26 -october 2, 2013

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29


continued from page 28 Critical Mass: a slow-paced group bicycle ride |

KC Organics and Natural Market | 8 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Minor Park, Holmes at Red Bridge Rd.

THE DEAD GIRLS

6 p.m. Meet at Sun Fresh Market, 4001 Mill St.

Shawnee Great Griller’s Blues and Barbeque | 10 a.m. Shawnee Town 1929, 11501 W. 57th St., Shawnee

Sporting KC vs. Philadelphia Union | 7 p.m. Sporting

Park, 1 Sporting Way, KCK

32nd Annual Pig-Pickin’ Chicken-Lickin’ Feast

| 4-7 p.m. Bingham-Waggoner Estate, 313 W. Pacific, Independence

MUSIC

Jeff Bergen’s Elvis show | 8 p.m. Knuckleheads,

2715 Rochester

Troostwood Youth Garden Market | 9 a.m.-4 p.m., 5142 Paseo

Blue 88 | 9 p.m. B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ, 1205 E. 85th St.

F E S T I VA L S

FRIDAY

Mike Borgia and the Problems, Bright Giant, Jake Stanton and the Outback Jake House |

9 . 27

9 p.m. Davey’s Uptown, 3402 Main

erfront Park

Fidlar, the Orwells, the Wheelers | 7 p.m. Czar,

1531 Grand

Filthy 13 | 5:30 p.m. Quasimodo, 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park

14730 Hwy. 68, Louisburg

Concert for the Climate | 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Lewis & Clark

Dead A new l iv r ar a

Buzz Beach Ball, with Phoenix, Alt-J, Cage the Elephant, more | Starting at 2:30 p.m., Berkley Riv-

The Doo Dads | 6 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

Ciderfest 2013 | 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Louisburg Cider Mill,

Historic Park at Kaw Point, 1 River City Dr.

Dead Girls CD-release show with the ACBs, Rev Gusto | 10 p.m. Replay Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Jeremy Nichols Band | The BrewTop Pub and Patio,

8614 N. Boardwalk Ave.

DJ E | The Quaff, 1010 Broadway DJ Sike | MiniBar, 3810 Broadway

Mary Flower | 8 p.m. Bentley Guitar Studio, 122 S.

One More Time: a tribute to Daft Punk, DJ Konsept | 7 p.m. Uptown Theater, 3700 Broadway

Friends with Benefits Fridays | Empire Room, 334

Michael Franti & Spearhead, Moon Taxi | 7 p.m.

Pescivito, RobotMonkeyMadman, Late Night Rendezvous | 9 p.m. Coda, 1744 Broadway

T.J. Miller | 8 p.m., Stanford’s Comedy Club, 1867 Vil-

Main, Parkville

Crossroads KC at Grinders, 417 E. 18th St.

Darcus Gates | 8:30 p.m. The Blue Room, 1616 E. 18th St. Patrick Gilbert | 5 p.m. The Majestic, 931 Broadway Helen Gillet and James Singleton | Crossroads KC at Grinders, 417 E. 18th St.

The Grascals | 8 p.m. Knuckleheads, 2715 Rochester Indigenous | 7 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts,

Lawrence

Late-night jam session | 1 a.m. Mutual Musicians

Foundation, 1823 Highland

Little Class Records music showcase | 6:30 p.m.

Westport Saloon, 4112 Pennsylvania

Lonnie Ray | 7 p.m. Jazz, 1823 W. 39th St. Lonnie McFadden | 4:30 p.m. The Phoenix, 302 W.

Eighth St.

Walker McGuire | 4-9 p.m. Kanza Hall, 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park

Red Elvises | 10 p.m. Knuckleheads, 2715 Rochester Rich the Factor, DJ Rockwell | 10 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

Scar the Martyr featuring Joey Jordison, Eyes Set to Kill, In the Shadow, the Sibyl | 8 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

Shaman’s Harvest, Evalyn Awake | KC Live Stage,

14th St. and Grand

The Shanks | Fuel, 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park Sobriquet, Knife Crime, Field Day Dreams | 10 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

Valentine and the Ticklers | 7 p.m. Jazz, 1859 Village

West Pkwy., KCK

Phillip Wakefield Trio | 5:30 p.m. Green Lady Lounge,

1809 Grand

Bram Wijnands Trio | 7 p.m. Majestic, 931 Broadway Til Willis & Erratic Cowboy, Plains | 6 p.m. Replay

Brandon Mezzelo Triptet CD-release show

Mountain Sprout, Coyote Union | 9 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence 30

the pitch

lage West Pkwy, KCK

TNT Team Trivia | 7 p.m. The Brooksider, 6330 Brook-

side Plz.

Saturday | 9.28 | PERFORMING ARTS

New Dance Partners featuring Owen/Cox Dance

NIGHTLIFE

Grand Festival of Chez Lez Canses | 9 a.m.4:30 p.m. Fort Osage Education Center, 107 Osage St., Sibley

Kansas City Renaissance Festival | 10 a.m.-7 p.m., 633 N. 130th St., Bonner Springs, kcrenfest.com Lee’s Summit Chamber’s Oktoberfest | 10 a.m.-

11 p.m. Downtown Lee’s Summit, intersection of Third St. and Green

Liberty Fall Fest | 9 a.m.-9 p.m. Historic Square, downtown Liberty, libertyfallfest.com

Oktoberfest | 4-10 p.m. St. John the Evangelist Church, 1234 Kentucky, Lawrence

Overland Park Fall Festival | 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.

Santa Fe Commons Park, 8045 Santa Fe Dr., Overland Park

Group, Kansas City Ballet and Wylliams/Henry Contemporary Dance | 8 p.m. Yardley Hall at JCCC, 12345 College Blvd., Overland Park

SloveneFest 2013 | 5-10 p.m. Holy Family Catholic Church, 274 Orchard, KCK

FOOD & DRINK

Wild West Days | 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Mahaffie Stagecoach

Brookside Farmers Market | 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Border

Stop and Farm, 1100 Kansas City Rd., Olathe

Star Montessori, 6321 Wornall

City Market Farmers Market | 6:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m.

City Market, 205 E. Fifth St.

Downtown Overland Park Farmers Market |

Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence

| 8 p.m. Take Five Coffee + Bar, 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park

E. 31st St.

Fall Festival | 5-9 p.m. Jowler Creek Vineyard & Winery, 16905 Jowler Creek Rd., Platte City

HALLOWEEN EVENTS

The Beast | 7:30 p.m., 1401 W. 13th St. The Chambers of Poe | 8 p.m., 1100 Santa Fe

6:30 a.m.-1 p.m., between 79th and 80th streets

The Edge of Hell | 7:30 p.m., 1300 W. 12th St.

Fourth Annual Grünauer Oktoberfest | 11:30 a.m.

Halloween Haunt 2013 | 8 p.m. Worlds of Fun, East

Grand Court Farmers Market | 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Grand

Macabre Cinema | 8 p.m., $27, 1222 W. 12th St.

Grünauer, 101 W. 22nd St.

Court Retirement Center, 501 W. 107th St.

Loop I-435

SHOPPING

Brodioke | 9 p.m. Bulldog, 1715 Main

Grub Crawl | 6-8 p.m. City Market, 205 E. Fifth St.

Daisy Bucket’s Broadway Baby | 8 p.m. Hamburger

Irish Whiskey tasting | 2-4 p.m. Celtic Ranch, 404

Mary’s, 101 Southwest Blvd.

september 26 -october 2, 2013

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Main, Weston

Saturday swap meet | 1 a.m.-4 p.m. Cowtown Mallroom, 3101 Gillham Plz.

continued on page 32


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pitch.com

september 26 -october 2, 2013

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31


KC BEER FEST

continued from page 30 COMMUNITY BENEFITS

NIGHTLIFE

Gossip at Reserve Bar | 8 p.m. Ambassador Hotel,

1111 Grand

Walk to Defeat ALS | 9 a.m. Kauffman Stadium

DAY SATUR

T.J. Miller | 8 p.m., Stanford’s Comedy Club, 1867 Village West Pkwy, KCK

9.28

COMMUNITY EVENTS

American Royal Parade | 9:45 a.m., Grand Blvd., from Pershing Rd. to Truman Rd.

Saturday’s Got Soul with DJ Rico | MiniBar, 3810

Ready r. to pou

Third Annual Pink Power Ride, a benefit for the American Cancer Society’s Making Strides Against Breast Cancer | 8:30 a.m. Menorah Medical Center, 5721 W. 119th St., Overland Park

Broadway

32nd Annual Miss Gay KC Pageant | 8-10 p.m. Hamburger Mary’s, 101 Southwest Blvd.

Sunday | 9.29 |

SPORTS PERFORMING ARTS

The American Royal ProRodeo | 2 & 7:30 p.m. Hale

Arena, 1701 American Royal Ct.

4th Annual Big Brothers Big Sisters KC Disc Golf Tournament | 8 a.m., $45, Thornfield Disc Golf

Course, 6701 W. 167th St., Stilwell MUSIC

DC Bellamy | 9 p.m. B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ, 1205 E. 85th St.

Brandon Phillips & Tony Ladesich, Howard Iceberg, David George & Cody Wyoming, Mike Alexander | 9 p.m. Uptown Arts Bar, 3611 Broadway BrokenHorn | 9 p.m. Bill’s 32, 6500 Kaw Dr., KCK Joe DeFio | 5 p.m. The Majestic, 931 Broadway Everette DeVan with Greg Skaff | 8:30 p.m. The

Blue Room, 1616 E. 18th St.

Be/Non, Schwervon, Standby Anchors | 10 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

The Capulets & the Montagues | 2 p.m. Lyric Opera, Kauffman Center, 1601 Broadway

KC Beer Fest | 3-6 p.m. KC Live, 14th St. and Grand

Max Groove Trio | 9 p.m. Green Lady Lounge, 1809

Grand

Ha Ha Tonka, Amanda Shires, Clairaudients |

9 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence

Brian Hicks Quartet | 5 p.m. Green Lady Lounge,

1809 Grand

She’s a Keeper | 9 p.m. Sky Zone, 6495 Quivira, Shawnee

Stan Kessler with Joe Cartwright | 8 p.m. Take Five Coffee + Bar, 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park Late-night jam session | 1 a.m. Mutual Musicians

Foundation, 1823 Highland

Loaded Goat, Crybaby Ranch | 9 p.m. Coda, 1744 Broadway

Lonesome Hank | 7 p.m. Jazz, 1823 W. 39th St. Love Over Gold featuring Pieta Brown & Lucie Thorne | 8 p.m. Knuckleheads, 2715 Rochester 32

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man Center, 1601 Broadway

J. Roddy Walston & the Business, Gringo Star, Scruffy & the Janitors, DJ Thundercutz | 7 p.m. Czar, 1531 Grand

Phoenix Fest with the Wild Women of KC, Eboni Fondren, Brother Bagman, MGDs, Cadillac Flambe, Tim Whitmer & KC Express, Lonnie McFadden | 1 p.m. The Phoenix, 302 W. Eighth St.

Hillary Watts Riot, Love Tusk, Across the Earth

| Crossroads KC at Grinders, 417 E. 18th St.

F E S T I VA L S

Ciderfest 2013 | 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Louisburg Cider Mill, 14730 Hwy. 68, Louisburg

Grand Festival of Chez Lez Canses | 9 a.m.-

Wells the Traveler | 9 p.m. Quasimodo, 12056 W. 135th

4:30 p.m. Fort Osage Education Center, 107 Osage St., Sibley

Tim Whitmer & KC Express | 4:30 p.m. The Phoenix,

Kansas City Renaissance Festival | 10 a.m.-7 p.m., 633 N. 130th St., Bonner Springs, kcrenfest.com

Supersuckers, Hellbound Glory, the Deadstring Brothers | 8:30 p.m. Knuckleheads, 2715 Rochester

St., Overland Park

35th Anniversary of Cyprus Avenue with Bill Shapiro and the Sam Baker Band | 7:30 p.m. Folly

302 W. Eighth St.

Theater, 300 W. 12th St.

Bram Wijnands Trio | 7 p.m. Majestic, 931 Broadway

town Liberty

Truckstop Honeymoon, Wells the Traveler | 8 p.m.

Marilyn Wood | 7 p.m. Californos, 4124 Pennsylvania

Wild West Days | 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Mahaffie Stagecoach

The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence

The Zeros | Fuel, 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park

Liberty Fall Fest | 12-4 p.m. Historic Square, down-

Stop and Farm, 1100 Kansas City Rd., Olathe

continued on page 34

ART EXHIBITS & EVENTS

Federation of Horsepower, ESE, Red Kate | 9 p.m. Davey’s Uptown, 3402 Main

Carol Williams organ performance | 4 p.m. Kauff-

About Face | Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, 4525 Oak, nelson-atkins.org Americana | Northland Exposure Artists Gallery, 110 Main, Parkville

Anomalous: Matt Borruso, Jonah Criswell, Scott

Final Friday Lawrence Art Party | 5:309:30 p.m. Lawrence Creates Makerspace, 512 E. Ninth St., Lawrence

L’Hourloupe | Greenlease Gallery, Rockhurst University, 1100 Rockhurst Rd.

Dickson, Ari Fish, and Colin Leipelt, plus a collection of vintage Philip K. Dick paperbacks | 5 p.m. Monday, UMKC Gallery of Art, 5015 Holmes, Room 203

Monomania: New works by Mark S. Nelson and Zach Lovely | 7 p.m. Saturday, Steel Gallery

Marc Bosworth & Eric Dodson: Tactile Diagrams | Kiosk Gallery, 3951 Broadway

Nomads: Traversing Adolescence | Kemper

Echoes: Islamic Art and Contemporary Artists

Order No. 11: Martial Law on the Missouri Border, by Wide Awake Films | The Box Gallery,

| Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, 4525 Oak

Faculty Art Exhibition | Carter Art Center, Penn

Valley Community College

Kukuli Velarde: Plunder Me, Baby | Ceramic

sculptures of Kukuli Velarde, opening reception 6 p.m. Friday, Nerman Museum of Contemporary Art, JCCC, 12345 College Blvd., Overland Park

september 26 -october 2, 2013

pitch.com

& Studio, 1219 Union

East, 200 E. 44th St., kemperart.org

1000 Walnut

Our People, Our Land, Our Images | Mid-America Arts Alliance, 2018 Baltimore, maaa.org A Painter’s Pad | Thomas Hart Benton Home, 3616 Belleview

Permanent Collection Highlights Walk-in Tour, Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, 4525 Oak Port of Saints, a retrospective of paintings by David Goodrich | EventPort Fridays, 6-9 p.m. 208 W. 19th St. RAW Artist Showcase | VooDoo Lounge, Harrah’s Casino, 1 Riverboat Dr., NKC

Sticks and Stones by Melissa Furness | Three Link Gallery, 106 N. Bridge St., Smithville

James Turrell: Gard Blue | Spencer Museum of Art, 1301 Mississippi , Lawrence Under Arabian Skies: A Celebration of Art, Science and Astronomy From the Islamic World | 5-9 p.m. Saturday, Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, 4525 Oak


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33


Youth Lagoon, Pure X | 8 p.m. RecordBar, 1020

continued from page 32 FOOD & DRINK

City Market Farmers Market | 8 a.m.-3 p.m. City Market, 205 E. Fifth St.

SHEMEKIA COPELAND

Westport Rd.

Monday | 9.30 |

Exhumed, Troglodyte, Marasmus | 7:30 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

Hudspeth and Shinetop | 7 p.m. B.B.’s Lawnside

BBQ, 1205 E. 85th St.

MUSIC

La Guerre, Plaid Dragon, Echo Collider | 10 p.m.

SPORTS

Chiefs vs. Giants | Noon, Arrowhead Stadium MUSIC

Dan Bliss | Jazz, 1823 W. 39th St.

Second St., Lawrence

3611 Broadway

Jazz Disciples | 7 p.m. The Blue Room, 1616

Lauren Mann & the Fairly Odd Folk, Clay Hughes & the Tuning Spoon, Justin Andrew Murray |

8 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

E. 18th St.

The Grisly Hand, Rachel Ries | Crossroads KC at

Jazzbo | 6-9 p.m. Jazz, 1823 W. 39th St.

Rich Hill | 7 p.m. Californos, 4124 Pennsylvania Rich Hill’s jazz brunch | 11 a.m. The Majestic, 931

Live music with Soular | 8 p.m. Uptown Arts Bar,

A Band of Orcs, Merlin, Hellevate, Meatshank |

Brew Jam | 8 p.m. 75th Street Brewery, 520 W. 75th St.

Grinders, 417 E. 18th St.

Mark Lowrey Trio | 6 p.m. The Majestic, 931 Broadway

9.29

Nine Inch Nails afterparty with Filth Inferno, VJ Stryfe and Darquedesmodus | 10 p.m. Czar,

Mengel Brothers Duo | 5-9 p.m. Chaz, 325 Ward Pkwy. Red Kate, Ese | 10 p.m. Replay Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence

1531 Grand

Nine Inch Nails, Explosions in the Sky | 7:30 p.m.

Sprint Center, 1407 Grand

Rural Grit Happy Hour | 6-9 p.m. The Brick, 1727 McGee

Dominique Sanders Trio | 10 p.m. Green Lady Lounge,

Son Volt | Knuckleheads, 2715 Rochester

8410 Wornall

The Technicolors, Volcano Veins, Westerners |

Why, Astronautalis | 7 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Mas-

7:30 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

Waldo Jazz Collective | 7-10 p.m. The Piano Room,

sachusetts, Lawrence

Travis | VooDoo Lounge (Harrah’s Casino), 1 Riverboat Dr.

Naughty Pines Happy Hour Band | 6-8 p.m. Coda, Shemekia Copeland | 6 p.m. KC Live Stage, 14th St. and Grand

NIGHTLIFE

Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz | 7:30 p.m. Rhythm and

Karaoke | 10:30 p.m. The Brick, 1727 McGee McMonday Karaoke | 9:30 p.m. Jazzhaus, 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Sonic Spectrum Music Trivia | 7 p.m. RecordBar,

Taking Back Mondays with Sovereign States |

8 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence

Trivia with Matt Larson | 8 p.m. Bulldog, 1715 Main

Tuesday | 10.1 | MUSIC Rick Bacus | Jazz, 1823 W. 39th St.

Billy Beale’s blues jam | 10 p.m. Westport Saloon,

Booze, 423 Southwest Blvd.

4112 Pennsylvania

Bram Wijnands stride piano | 7 p.m. Green Lady

Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz | 8 p.m. Green Room Burgers & Beer, 4010 Pennsylvania

Richard Buckner, Dead Voices | 10 p.m. RecordBar,

Lounge, 1809 Grand

Lawrence

MUSEUM EXHIBITS American Sabor: Latinos in U.S. Popular Music | American Jazz Museum, 1616 E. 18th St. Harmonies of the Homefront |National World War I Museum, 100 W. 26th St.

Real Pirates | Union Station, 30 W. Pershing Rd. Truman Home Tours | 219 Delaware, 34

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Open jam with El Barrio Band | 7 p.m. Danny’s Big

Easy, 1601 E. 18th St.

Open Jam with the Everette DeVan Trio | 7 p.m. The Phoenix, 302 W. Eighth St.

1020 Westport Rd.

Lawrence

Shovels and Rope, Shakey Graves | 9 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence

Trampled Under Foot | 7 p.m. B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ, 1205 E. 85th St.

Tullamore, Tannahill Weavers | 7 p.m. Unity Temple,

707 W. 47th St.

Yip Deceiver | 10 p.m. Replay Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence continued on page 36

THEATER

Yellow Claw, Timmy Tutone, Brent Tactic, Trill Ferrell | 7 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts,

Independence

New Jazz Order Big Band | 9 p.m. Green Lady Lounge,

Radical Something, Down with Webster, Matt Easton | 7 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts,

Uncle Dirtytoes, Jon Fitzgerald, MC Cow | 6 p.m. Replay Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence

1744 Broadway

1809 Grand

1020 Westport Rd.

Singer/Songwriter open mic with host Jon Theobald | 7 p.m. Davey’s Uptown

1809 Grand

Hermon Mehari Trio | 6 p.m. Majestic, 931 Broadway

Vi Tran and Alexandra Fetterman | 8 p.m.

Mark Lowrey jazz jam | 6 p.m. The Majestic, 931

Lee McBee and the Confessors | 6-9 p.m. B.B.’s

Joel McNulty | Jerry’s Bait Shop, 13412 Santa Fe Trail

Dr., Lenexa

ms t Rhyth Distric Live C at K

MiniBar, 3810 Broadway

Lawnside BBQ, 1205 E. 85th St.

8 p.m. Czar, 1531 Grand

Y S U N DA

Broadway

Broadway

RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

Automatic Wolf | 7:30 p.m. Gaslight Gardens, 317 N.

Dates and times vary. Contact theaters for more information. Best Laid Plans — A Murder Mystery Dinner | 7 p.m. Friday, KCMT Tiffany Ballroom, 903 Harrison Carrie: The Musical | opening Wednesday, Egads Theatre, Off Center Theatre, 2450 Grand, egadstheatre.com

The Mistakes Madeline Made | Opening Wednesday, The Living Room, 1818 McGee, thelivingroomkc.com

Seven Guitars | UMKC Theatre, Studio 116, James C. Olson PAC, 4949 Cherry, umkctheatre.org

Ol’ Blue Eyes | Chestnut Fine Arts Center, 234 N.

Martway, Mission, thebarnplayers.org

Chestnut, Olathe

Spring Awakening | The Barn Players, 6219

The Rainmaker | Metropolitan Ensemble Theatre, 3614 Main, metkc.org

The Tallest Tree in the Forest | Kansas City Repertory Theatre, Copaken Stage, 13th St. and Walnut, kcrep.org

The Fox on the Fairway | Paradise Playhouse, 101

Red Badge Variations | The Coterie Theatre, 2450 Grand, Crown Center, thecoterie.org

Venus in Fur | Unicorn Theatre, 3828 Main, unicorntheatre.org

Gruesome Playground Injuries | Opening

Romeo & Juliet | She & Her Productions | Just Off Broadway Theatre, 3051 Central, sheandher productions.com

Spring St., Excelsior Springs, paradiseplayhouse.org

Saturday, 8 p.m. Fishtank Performance Studio, 1715 Wyandotte

september 26 -october 2, 2013

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35

9/19/13 2:31 PM


continued from page 34 NIGHTLIFE

DJ Highnoone and DJ Ashton Martin | 9 p.m. Sol Cantina, 408 E. 31st St.

Karaoke with Paul Nelson | MiniBar, 3810 Broadway The Low End with Nmezee & Sigrah | 10 p.m. The

Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

Each week, Pitch Street Team cruises around to the hottest clubs, bars and concerts. You name it, we will be there. While we are out, we hand out tons of cool stuff. So look for the Street Team... We will be looking for you!

Open-mic comedy night | 9 p.m. Hamburger Mary’s, 101 Southwest Blvd.

EVENTS

Bar, 1020 Westport Rd.

E AT NLIN

PITCH.CO

M

DJ HoodNasty, Brent Tactic & DJ B-Stee | 10 p.m. Gusto

Lounge, 504 Westport Rd.

Team Trivia with Teague Hayes | 8:30 p.m. Coda, 1744 Broadway

Wednesday | 10.2 | PERFORMING ARTS

Poetic Underground open-mic series | 9-11 p.m.

Dancefestopia Park Dancefestopia erfront iv R y @ le B rk e e rk B ley Riverfront Pa @ rk

Uptown Arts Bar, 3611 Broadway

36

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september 26 -october 2, 2013

Trail Dr., Lenexa

land Park

Cameron McGill | 8 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence Organ Jazz Trio with Ken Lovern | 9 p.m. Green

Lady Lounge, 1809 Grand

Rabbitt Killer, Chad Bryan, Folkicide | 8 p.m. Davey’s Uptown, 3402 Main

Shinetop Jr. | 7-9 p.m. B.B.’s Lawnside, 1205 E. 85th St. Title Fight, Balance and Composure, Cruel Hand, Slingshot Dakota | 7 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence

400 E. 31st St.

FOOD & DRINK

Drew Six | 6-9 p.m. Cactus Grill, 11849 Roe, Leawood

City Market Farmers Market | 9 a.m.-1 p.m. City

Devin Henderson’s Mind Madness | 7:30 p.m.

1 Million Cups | 9 a.m. Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation, 4801 Rockhill Rd. MUSIC

Acoustic jam session with Tyler Gregory | Jazzhaus, 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Dan Bliss | 7 p.m. Quasimodo, 12056 W. 135th St.,

pitch.com

Jam Night | 9 p.m. Jerry’s Bait Shop, 13412 Santa Fe

DJs Mike Scott, Spinstyles and Bill Pile | MiniBar,

@ Screenland Armour

See more on the “promotions” link at p

The Irieplaceables | 8 p.m. Mike’s Tavern, 5424 Troost

by Bobby Watson and Tim Whitmer, Unity Temple on the Plaza

NET WORKING

9.27 - Shaman’s Harvest, Evalyn Awake @ KC Live Block 9.27 - Tommy Emmanuel @ Indie 9.27 - The Pitch & Captain Morgan Present Mark Lowrey @ Green Lady Lounge 10.3 - Bassnectar @ Indie

1809 Grand

Backyard Jam with DJ Lee | 9 p.m. The Velvet Dog, Chuck Haddix discusses his book Bird: The Life and Music of Charlie Parker | with music

Westport Plaza Farmers Market | 4:30-7:30 p.m.

Upcoming Events

Kathleen Holeman | 5:30 p.m. Green Lady Lounge,

NIGHTLIFE

Westport Road and Wyoming

DS Bicycle Cruise

Max Groove Trio | 6 p.m. Chaz, 325 Ward Pkwy.

LITERARY EVENTS

Market, 205 E. Fifth St.

See more on the “promotions”Arlink p ts &at Craf ts AI

Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

The Lacs | 8 p.m. Kanza Hall, 7300 W. 119th St., OverRex Hobart’s Honky Tonk Supper Club | 7 p.m. Record-

MORE

O

Tara Elisha, Til Willis, the Way Back | 7:30 p.m. The

3810 Broadway

Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater, 7260 N.W. 87th St.

Karaoke | The Quaff, 1010 Broadway Ladies’ Night Karaoke and VJ Show with DJ McLovin | 8:30 p.m. One Eyed Jacks, 5044 N.E. Parvin Rd.

MOKAN Twang Vinyl Country Night | 8 p.m. Frank James Saloon, 10919 N.W. Hwy. 45, Parkville

Tango dance night | 8 p.m. Coda, 1744 Broadway Trivia | 8 p.m. Westport Flea Market, 817 Westport Rd.

Overland Park

Trivia | 9 p.m. Lew’s Grill and Bar, 7539 Wornall

Carl Butler’s Gospel Lounge | 7:30 p.m. Knuckle-

Westport Girlz | 8 p.m. Californos, 4124 Pennsylvania

Dinsdale, the YellowBricks | 8 p.m. Czar, 1531 Grand

504 Westport Rd.

heads, 2715 Rochester

Dream Wolf, the Ned Ludd Band, Rosewood Shipwreck | 10 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd. Billy Ebeling | 7 p.m. Jazz, 1823 W. 39th St.

You’re Retro with DJ Ashton Martin | Gusto Lounge,

E-mail submissions to calendar@pitch.com or enter submissions at pitch.com, where you can search our complete listings guide.


> Music

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on “that second date” with anyone you feel is beneath you — not to spare you his ghastly company but to spare him yours. Look, Gloria Upson, if dating gay men your own age means exposing yourself to guys who are in “states of transience” — normal states for dudes in their early 20s — then date guys in their 30s and 40s. Not that dating older guys is a surefire recipe for romantic success: Your snobbery, classism and elitism are so repulsive that most older guys will be blocking your number before you can call about a second date. Andrew Sullivan wrote a beautiful post at The Dish a few weeks ago about the egalitarianism of getting laid. He recalled dancing all night in a gay club full of African-American guys back when he was a “cute twinky English schoolboy.” And Andrew didn’t just dance with the black guys he encountered after moving to Washington, D.C. “There’s nothing like dating or fucking a person of another background, race, or class to help you see the humanity in everyone,” Andrew wrote. “How do you get scared of generic young black men when you’ve danced with them all night long? … In that sense, I’ve always felt that being gay was a real moral blessing. I could have been so much worse a human being if I’d been straight.” You’re young, and I’m being hard on you. I don’t mean to step on your pingpong ball. But if you don’t get a grip on your classism and snobbery, you will become so much worse a human being than you need to be. So snap the fuck out of it, OK? And remember: We gay people are a tiny, tiny minority. If you reject as potential partners, friends and fuck buddies all

september 26 -october 2, 2013

pitch.com

gay men who aren’t of your exact same class, education level, social status (ugh) or salary level (barf), you won’t be left with many guys to date, hang out with or fuck. Which is not to say you’ll wind up alone. Refusing to date any gay man who doesn’t belong to the same club that Bunny Bixler does will complicate your search for love, but there are other gay snobs out there. You could find a boyfriend who’s just like you, i.e., same class, same education, same income bracket, same snobbery and shitty-ass attitude. But I wouldn’t wish that kind of guy on anyone. Not even on you.

Dear Dan: I recently started dating a 26-year-old female. I was a little surprised when she told me that she gets nothing out of oral sex, as that has been my typical method for getting my past partners off. I was to discover that this was because she has no external glans (clitoris hood/head). It’s just smooth skin where a clit would be. I was shocked when she showed me. She is probably the easiest person I’ve ever met to get to orgasm, so this isn’t a problem, just a mystery. I know that the clitoris is much larger than just the part you can see — the “head” — and she gets off on the feeling of pressure on and around where the glans would normally be, so I’m sure she has developed nerves and, I guess, has a clit under the skin. She assumed that this was common enough, as none of her gynecologists have ever brought it to her attention. Have you heard of this? Is it common?

Clitorless Lad in Torment Dear CLIT: “It’s pretty rare, but yes, it hap-

pens,” said Debby Herbenick, a research scientist at Indiana University, a sexual health educator at the Kinsey Institute, the author of Sex Made Easy (among other books), a fre-

quent guest expert for Savage Love, and the only woman who has ever chased me around a room with a vulva puppet. When a woman doesn’t have an exposed clitoral glans, “there’s usually other genital parts that haven’t developed or have developed in atypical ways,” Herbenick said. “But there have been a few case reports in which the women had other typically developed genital parts — labia, etc. — while the clitoris alone is missing or very small. Some of these women report erotic sensation in the clitoral area.” Should your girlfriend talk to a doctor about it? “I haven’t seen this woman’s genitals specifically,” Herbenick said, “but sometimes there is atrophy or even ‘coverage’ of the clitoris (for example, the hood fuses over the glans partially or completely) due to vulvar skin disorders such as lichen sclerosus. Some children have LS, and often it goes undiagnosed for years and, without treatment, her clitoral hood could have fused over the glans. A dermatologist or gynecologist knowledgeable about vulvar dermatoses could look into this possibility via a very small biopsy. (Doctors with expertise in vulvar health can be found through issvd.org.)”

Dear Dan: My girlfriend and I have a vibrant

relationship. Sex is great and adventurous when we have it, but I have one small issue that clouds up the sexual chemistry and turns me into a somber theologian: Since the earliest days of my childhood, I was told that abortion was a horrible thing. And that has complicated my relationships. I don’t know how to get past this thought and indulge my partner and myself sexually without feeling uncertain about the possible outcome of our getting funky. I feel awful that my girlfriend has to deal with this moral panic of mine, and I’m sick of putting her through it. Help!

Bummed About Bad Experiences Dear BABE: Use a hormonal birth-control

method and a condom and pull out before you come. Don’t have penis-in-vagina intercourse — you can stick to oral sex, mutual masturbation and doing her in the butt (if being done in the butt is something your girlfriend enjoys). Deposit a few loads at a sperm bank, keep ’em on ice until you want kids and get a vasectomy. Or you could learn more about abortion while continuing to act responsibly. Abortion is not a horrible thing. It is a medical thing. The Savage Lovecast is at savagelovecast.com.

Have a question for Dan Savage? E-mail him at mail@savagelove.net


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The Pitch: September 26, 2013