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SEPTEMBER 12–18, 2013 | FREE | VOL. 33 NO. 11 | PITCH.COM

SEP T E MBER 12–18, 2013 | VOL . 3 3 NO. 11

Trouble is stirring...

Murder at the Royal The Mystery Train

Tickets now available at The Central Ticket Office:

816-235-6222 www.kcmysterytrain.com

E D I T O R I A L

Editor Scott Wilson Managing Editor Justin Kendall Music Editor David Hudnall Staff Writers Charles Ferruzza, Ben Palosaari, Steve Vockrodt Editorial Operations Manager Deborah Hirsch Events Editor Berry Anderson Proofreader Brent Shepherd Contributing Writers Tracy Abeln, Jonathan Bender, Liz Cook, Adrianne DeWeese, April Fleming, Leslie Kinsman, Larry Kopitnik, Angela Lutz, Dan Lybarger, Dan Savage, Lucas Wetzel

ELEPH ANT MAR CH Mayor James wants the 2016 Republican convention. Is it worth the cost? B Y S T E V E VO C K R O D T

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A R T

Art Director Ashford Stamper Contributing Photographers Angela C. Bond, Barrett Emke, Chris Mullins, Lauren Phillips, Sabrina Staires, Brooke Vandever Intern Christina Larkins

LOTS AND LOTS AND LOTS

P R O D U C T I O N

Production Manager Christina Riddle Multimedia Designer Vu Radley

A D V E R T I S I N G

Sales Manager Erin Carey Senior Classified Multimedia Specialist Steven Suarez Multimedia Specialists Collin Click, Sharon Donat, Katee Mejia, Page Olson Director of Marketing & Operations Jason Dockery Digital Marketing Manager Keli Sweetland

C I R C U L A T I O N

Circulation Director Mike Ryan

B U S I N E S S

Accounts Receivable Jodi Waldsmith Publisher Joel Hornbostel

S O U T H C O M M

Chief Executive Officer Chris Ferrell Chief Financial Officer Patrick Min Chief Marketing Officer Susan Torregrossa Chief Technology Officer Matt Locke Business Manager Eric Norwood Director of Digital Sales & Marketing David Walker Controller Todd Patton Creative Director Heather Pierce Director of Content/Online Development Patrick Rains

N A T I O N A L

KCMO’s Land Bank wants you to lighten the city’s blight burden. B Y B E N PA L O S A A R I

A D V E R T I S I N G

VMG Advertising 888-278-9866, vmgadvertising.com Senior Vice President of Sales Susan Belair Senior Vice President of Sales Operations Joe Larkin

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D I S T R I B U T I O N

The Pitch distributes 45,000 copies a week and is available free throughout Greater Kansas City, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for $5 each, payable at The Pitch’s office in advance. The Pitch may be distributed only by The Pitch’s authorized independent contractors or authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of The Pitch, take more than one copy of each week’s issue. Mail subscriptions: $22.50 for six months or $45 per year, payable in advance. Application to mail at second-class postage rates is pending at Kansas City, MO 64108.

L A B R ATS The experimental Black House Collective launches a concert series. BY DAV I D H U D N A L L

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C O P Y R I G H T

The contents of The Pitch are Copyright 2013 by KC Communications, LLC. No portion may be reproduced in whole or in part by any means without the express written permission of the publisher. The Pitch address: 1701 Main, Kansas City, MO 64108 For information or to leave a story tip, call: 816-561-6061 Editorial fax: 816-756-0502 For classifieds, call: 816-218-6759 For retail advertising, call: 816-218-6702

ON T HE C OVE R

3 4 6 11 13 17 19 21 24 30 38

QUESTIONNAIRE NEWS FEATURE AGENDA STAGE FILM CAFE FAT CITY MUSIC D A I LY L I S T I N G S SAVAGE LOVE

MEANW H I LE AT PI TCH .CO M

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Power & Light POP-UP BARBECUE JOINT to feature four American Royal winners. JEFF TWEEDY to play a solo show at the Uptown later this year. Shatto BLUEBERRY MILK is berry low-key.

M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X

THE PITCH

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QUESTIONNAIRE

SCOTT HALL

Vice president for strategic initiatives at the Greater Kansas City Chamber of Commerce

Hometown: Proudly born and raised here.

 

What’s your drink? Water. Sometimes that water also has a combination of malted barley, hops and yeast mixed with it.   Where’s dinner? Usually at home, but if not, I am a Kansas City guy. So, of course, I love barbecue. What’s on your KC postcard? Union Station  

Finish this sentence: “Kansas City got it right when …” We acted together as an entire region

and saved Union Station.

“Kansas City screwed up when …” We turned

away from the Missouri River. We are the only metro that I know of that “faces away” from the natural resource that spurred its creation. There may be other areas that have done as we have, but peer metros like Pittsburgh, Minneapolis, St. Louis and Cleveland have developed more vibrantly along their rivers and incorporated them as an essential part of their regional identity. I would like to see Kansas City do the same.     “Kansas City needs …” To collaborate as a region. We already do a good job of this, but our geography and political boundaries make it so important that we work together so that our peer metros don’t pass us by.   “I always laugh at …” The Office. 

“I’ve been known to binge-watch …” The

NFL. If I could, I would turn the TV on at 8 on Sunday morning and watch football (including pre- and postgame coverage) until 11 Monday night.

“I can’t stop listening to …” The Mowgli’s. I

might just be influenced by our great weather this summer, but they’ve got such a great, upbeat sound. It makes me happy. Plus, I learned recently that one of the band members, Colin Louis Dieden, is from KC, so that made them even more likable.   “I just read …” Bill O’Reilly’s book Killing Lin-

S A B R I N A S TA I R E S

What I do (in 140 characters): I lead the KC Chamber’s day-to-day activity on our major community initiatives. That includes the KC Chamber’s Big 5.   What’s your game? You name the game, and I most likely have played it or will play it — not well, but probably more competitively than is socially acceptable.  

coln, which I am a bit reluctant to admit. It was, though, one of the more captivating history books I’ve read.   The best advice I ever got: They are called the four pillars of community leadership: (1) Start with a good idea, (2) build the best possible team around that idea, (3) work incredibly hard, and (4) don’t worry about who gets the credit. This style of civic leadership is common among most of the people who have made significant contributions to Kansas City and is a pretty good description of our region’s personality.    Worst advice: Color inside the lines.   My sidekick: My three kids    My dating triumph/tragedy: Almost nine years ago, I triumphantly married a woman who is way out of my league. I hope she doesn’t read this and realize she could do better.

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My 140-character soapbox: Cars are going to drive themselves. Soon. We should get in front of this because it might actually play to our region’s unique dispersion.  

• REECE AND NICHOLS #1 AGENT ON THE #1 TEAM IN KC THE KOEHLER BORTNICK TEAM • VOTED BEST OF KC IN 2012 FOR REALTORS OF KANSAS CITY 5 STAR PROFESSIONAL AWARD

What was the last thing you had to apologize for? I apologize to my wife for getting home

from work “a little later than I hoped” almost daily.   My recent triumph: Being offered the opportunity to work on the Big 5 and other community initiatives here at the KC Chamber. I am excited to work with our members, the leaders on our strategic efforts and everyone else in this community to try to make Big KC the best place to work, live and play.

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ast month, Mayors Sly James and Mark Holland traveled to Boston to pitch Kansas City as a potential site for the 2016 Republican National Convention. Why sell typically blue-leaning Kansas City to a decidedly red-meat event? “The answer is simple,” James wrote in an August 20 blog post on his website. “Kansas City deserves to be in that kind of spotlight.” Platitudes aside, Kansas City boosters insist that drawing the convention would be an economic adrenaline rush for a city in search of the next big, attention-grabbing event. They predict 50,000 Republicans would march to the City of Fountains and bring with them $250 million in economic impact. City leaders in Tampa, Florida, made similar claims when that city hosted the 2012 Republican National Convention, which sent Mitt Romney on to electoral defeat to President Barack Obama. The Tampa Bay Host Committee commissioned (read: paid for) a study that claimed the RNC had $214 million in economic impact. That figure goes up to $404 million when factoring in the always nebulous “multiplier effect” that economic development advocates use to measure the supposed spending by visitors. But University of South Florida economist Philip Porter argues that Tampa saw no positive economic impact from the RNC. In a September 2 Tampa Bay Times article, Porter said it went the other way. Porter compared sales-tax revenues in Hillsborough County, Florida, in August 2011 with August 2012, when the RNC was held. He found that sales taxes grew 6.75 percent with the RNC. That growth was less than the 6.92 percent sales-tax increase the rest of the state experienced. As a control, Porter compared the August 2010 sales-tax rate with August 2011 and found that it grew 5.88 percent in

Hillsborough County, which was more than the 5.44 percent for the rest of the Sunshine State. “Comparing August to August over time, it is apparent that the RNC did not stimulate economic activity in Hillsborough County,” Porter told the Times. Porter has been the proverbial turd in the swimming pool for promoters trying to justify the costs associated with hosting conventions and sporting events. He has previously questioned the notion that the Super Bowl is an economic winner for host cities. While local advocates for the 2016 RNC predict 50,000 visitors to Kansas City (the same figure cited for the Tampa convention), it’s a problematic number given the city’s 32,000 hotel rooms. James acknowledged that GOP figureheads in Boston needled him during his pitch about hotel rooms and transportation. On his blog, he wrote that the two-mile Main Street streetcar should be operating by 2016 to “allow us to easily move people from areas around town to downtown.” But James didn’t address the hotel issue. Kansas City isn’t alone in coveting the RNC. Las Vegas, with its 150,000 hotel rooms and 3 million square feet of convention space, is looking to make a bid. Salt Lake City is also exploring an offer. Kansas City hosted the Republican National Convention in 1976 at Kemper Arena, and it didn't bode well for the GOP. That night, Republican delegates selected Gerald Ford, the man who double-crossed an entire nation by pardoning Richard Nixon for his Watergate crimes, over upstart California Gov. Ronald Reagan. Kansas City’s blessing sent Ford on to a narrow defeat in the election to eventual oneterm President Jimmy Carter, who won the Show-Me State.

E-mail steve.vockrodt@pitch.com

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september 12-18, 2013

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LOTS AND LO KCMO’s Land Bank wants you to lighten the city’s blight burden. B Y BEN PA LOSA A RI | PHO T OGR A PH Y B Y A NGEL A C . BOND

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at t Ke eney pu l l s a city-issued white Ford Focus to the curb in front of 4543 South Benton Avenue. The bushes in front of the 101-year-old white bungalow here have grown rampant, blocking a small set of concrete stairs from the sidewalk to the boarded-up front door. This is what Keeney, a field inspector for the Neighborhoods and Housing Services Department, has come to see. Across the street, another house’s screen door opens enough for a man to poke his head out and offer a little advice. “Y’all be careful,” he shouts. “A family of raccoons lives there. There are seven of them!” Keeney is here to assess the property for the Kansas City, Missouri, Land Bank. Its object: Take ownership of derelict properties. He examines the house’s scrubby exterior and sagging roof for a minute, and he knows. “I can see, based on the roof, this is going to more than likely be recommended to be demolished,” he says. 6

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robably more than half of them need to be demolished,” David Park says of the approximately 850 houses held by the land bank. Park, the deputy director for Neighborhoods and Housing Services, has been a city employee for 36 years. This attempt at a land-bank model isn’t a new idea, but it is, he says, an improvement over what came before. The land bank is a central ownership entity for properties that have fallen into tax foreclosure and then gone unpurchased at auction. It also holds properties within city limits that had previously been owned by the Jackson County Land Trust. Since being approved by the state Legislature last year (after failing to pass during the two previous sessions), the land bank has taken possession of more than 3,600 properties throughout the city. Now, Park says, Kansas City can do more with the properties than the land trust was able to do — an improved arrangement if only because KC spent the past decade shelling out cash to deal with the properties anyway. “The city was spending $1.8 million a

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year, approximately, maintaining land-trust properties,” he says. “The city is the one paying the bills, but it had no say in what happened to the properties.” And the bills were going up. “Just the weed [removal] itself has probably gone over the last 10 years from $300,000 to $800,000,” he says. “It’s been growing the last few years as the inventory grows.” The land bank is now assessing its holdings, which include empty lots, homes and nonresidential buildings, so they can be sold to investors through the bank’s website. (So far, pending closing, the land bank has agreements to sell 39 properties, most of them vacant lots.) “We don’t want to hold on to properties,” Park says. “We want to sell properties.” One big challenge, though, is that the majority of the bank’s holdings are either small urban lots that can’t be built on or side lots that abut an occupied property. Park says his team is going to have to be a little creative in unloading the parcels. “Our thinking was, one way to deal with those — to get them back on the tax rolls and out of our maintenance budget — would be to let the next-door neighbor buy it,” Park says.

A homeowner living next to an unexpectedly available parcel could, for instance, end up with a larger yard. “Problem solved,” he says. Some such sales have cleared for $1. Even so, the bank has already uncovered a few quirks that can’t easily be unkinked. One property that has made its way onto the land bank’s ledger is a 7.5-square-foot parcel within the front yard of an occupied home in south Kansas City. It’s the result of platting errors handed down unnoticed over decades of recordkeeping. It’s also, Park says, an example of why the bank is selling certain lots only to neighboring owners. “We don’t want somebody buying it and putting a fence around it in their yard,” he says of that tiny unowned segment of grass. The land bank does have some homes that are in good enough condition to attract new owners — something that Park says could greatly improve neighborhoods. That’s because the land bank means to hold developers accountable for their proposals. The purchase process requires that a prospective buyer explain his or her plans for the property when making an offer. “Somebody can say, ‘I’m only going to give

OTS AND LOTS you $100 for that property, because I’m going to put $30,000 into the structure,’” Park says. “If they don’t put that $30,000 in, or if they don’t make the repairs they promised to make with that $30,000, the land bank can foreclose and take it back.” Developers also must prove that they have the financial stability to improve the home, pass a background check, and agree to occupy the home for three years. “If a house has been vacant for two or three years,” Park says, “and you say, ‘Well, I’m going to paint it’ — OK, tell us what else you’re going to do.”

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he land bank is also able to invoke that ancient adage of business: You gotta spend money to make money. For Park, that means attending tax-foreclosure auctions on the steps outside the Jackson County Courthouse to bid on properties. With smart but modest investments, the thinking goes, the bank can pick up a little window dressing to go with its more blighted holdings. Relatively move-in-ready properties could draw eyes to

readied themselves for bidding wars. (Park the rest of the bank’s holdings while bringing had already decided to pass on everything that in needed revenue. day — knowing the land bank would end up “You want to have good properties in your with something anyway.) Most of what went inventory, because you make money off of up, though, didn’t attract that kind of interest. those to cover your costs of maintaining the “Next parcel is K20121087,” the auctioneer properties that are difficult or impossible to sell,” Park says. “Somebody’s got to droned. “Any bids?” No hands. mow. Somebody’s got to clean up the trash. “Seeing no bids. Next parcel.” Somebody’s got to keep it boarded.” The next one also failed to attract a buyer, At an August 6 tax-foreclosure auction, and in two minutes the land a c o up l e o f h u n d r e d bank was burdened with people showed up to the “Somebody’s got to mow. two more properties. courthouse, looking to Somebody’s got to clean up That means two more snap up properties on the proper t ies to add to a cheap. The crowd was the trash.” website that doesn’t yet racially diverse, with every include photos of most of age group represented and a what’s available. Two more properties for city miniature U.N. of languages spoken. Families employees to research and then input into waited with their bored children as the a database. Two more properties to inspect temperature climbed toward the mid-90s. A and, perhaps, tear down. few arrived early enough to find space for their When Park was studying how to set up his camping chairs in the shadow of the building, office, he spoke with the director of a land but many more more sweated in the sun. bank in Michigan, who told him, “Well, we’re Just about everybody at the auction clutched a copy of a newspaper ad listing the big. We’ve got 600 properties and only 14 staff process. They’d circled properties in marker, members.”

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“OK,” Park says, “now I’ve got 3,600 properties and five staff members, not counting me.” He chuckles.

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t that South Benton house where raccoons may be squatting, Keeney is ready to go inside. The field inspector, one of Park’s five staff members, has left the land bank’s bland Swope Parkway office to spend this sweltering Tuesday making notes on a handful of properties. A quick scan of the land bank’s website map shows two basic commonalities: that most of the holdings are east of Troost, and that the properties are in closely proximate clusters. There’s the one, for example, on Benton Boulevard between East Linwood and East 41st Street: 10 buildings in an eight-block stretch. Another stands between Topping and White avenues, south of Dunbar Park — an area eaten up by encroaching brush and illegal garbage dumping. Some of the singlelane streets look like nature paths rather than thoroughfares, with tree branches hanging low enough to graze passing cars. The bank holds nine properties in continued on page 9

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think what happens to it is going to be crucial for the area.” The reason for his optimism is clear enough: The building is in a good location and is big enough to accommodate a range of purposes. But it’s in awful condition. Outside the back door, two piles of human excrement wait to be stepped in. Inside, the building is a museum of transient lifestyles: soiled futon mattresses and cushions, a room filled with empty beer cases, a propane tank. The second story looks in better shape, with open spaces and large windows and knotty wood beams. Certain parts of the building look as though they were once remodeled with care. There are several glassed-in offices and rooms of various sizes throughout the structure. “Up here you can get a feel for the industrial condo [possibilities],” Keeney says. There’s still the basement to see, though. Keeney points his f lashlight toward the bottom of the stairs, and the beam reflects back up the dark stairwell. Water. The basement is flooded. “You’d have to pump all the water out,” he says. “I have no idea what the cost of that would be.” Keeney walks out of the building and back to his Focus. On the return trip to the office, he says the land bank is more than just a collection of dumpy buildings, more than a burden on the city. The decent properties, he says, are opportunities for people — especially young people — who want to own something. “If you’re paying rent and you have steady employment, and have a couple thousand dollars in savings, you might have an opportunity to very soon be living rent-free,” he says. His voice is more upbeat than you’d expect of someone who has seen human feces smeared on abandoned walls today. “If you can just manage to put as little as $10,000 into some of these properties, and a lot of sweat equity, you might be living without paying rent within a couple of years.”

ROCK ‘N’ BOWL

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continued from page 7 this area, and there appear to be even fewer occupied homes. With the front door inaccessible, Keeney walks around to the overgrown backyard. Normally, he’d use a power drill to remove the screws from the board covering a door. But here, someone has smashed in the wooden cellar door, revealing a 2-foot-wide stone staircase littered with trash and wooden shards and swarmed by giant black flies. “City of Kansas City!” Keeney yells. “This is city-owned property. Hello?” No answer. Down Keeney goes. His first stop is the fuse box, which, as he expected, has been stripped of copper. Upstairs, black mold stretches across the living room and dining room walls almost as completely as a coat of paint. “Fuck this block,” reads a graffiti tag. On the floor, raccoon feces. In the future: razing. “One house I was in the other day had a lot of nursing-school books,” Keeney says. “You don’t know where people’s lives were interrupted, and if they were able to bounce back from an economic hardship.” A block west, another city-owned property, another decaying roof. Keeney takes off the board over the door. Inside this home, the swiftness of a transition from homeownership to eviction is even starker. The house remains so dense with possessions that it’s possible to wonder whether the family might simply be on vacation. Sunlight fills the rooms. The couch is still in the living room. A big dining table waits under a ceiling fan. The basement is cluttered with toys for boys and girls. Keeney points to a basket of kids’ books. He says, “That always breaks my heart — Berenstain Bears.” He drills the door board back up on his way out, though this house is as doomed as the last. He drives to the next property on his list —a sprawling, two-story commercial building at 3200 Gillham, near Martini Corner. The building used to house a laundry business, but the structure has been vacant for years. “We’re getting offers for it,” Park says. “I

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WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 12-18

DANCEFESTOPIA

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ancefestopia organizers Doug and Kevin Bordegon have corralled some big names for their second annual party September 13–14 at Berkley Riverfront Park. For the EDM set: Porter Robinson (pictured), Gramatik, Infected Mushroom, Doctor P and RJD2. Hip-hop fans might be more interested in headliners Wiz Khalifa and Mac Miller. The full schedule (which boasts north of 60 performers) and information on tickets, parking and camping can be found at dancefestopia.com.

Daily listings on page 30 pitch.com

september 12-18, 2013

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S TA G E

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DON IPOCK

CYNTHIA LEVIN

he lights come up on a New York casting office, depressingly institutional, a little seedy. We see a bedsheet-draped fainting couch. We think we know what’s going to happen. Thomas Novachek (played by Rusty Sneary), a playwright and novice director, sifts through a stack of head shots, exhausted after a day of auditions for his female lead. He’s directing his own adaptation of Leopold von Sacher-Masoch’s Venus in Furs, a provocative 19th-century novel by the literary father of masochism. He needs a modern noblewoman: someone sexy but smart, adventurous yet modest and refined. Lightning flashes, the prison-issue overhead fluorescents flicker, and Vanda (Vanessa Severo) bursts into the room, soaking wet and hours late for her audition. She shoves a lean, rain-drenched résumé into Thomas’ hands, tumbles into a frenzied and expletive-colored rant about a creep on the train, then whips off thigh), and she’s a fantastic listener, fully her raincoat to show that she has come dressed present and reactive in each moment. for the part: sheer black bustier, matching garHer pyrotechnic Vanda might have overter belt, panties and stockings. shadowed another actor, but Sneary holds his “Can I run out and fill any prescriptions for own as the sensitive, serious playwright. It’s you?” Thomas asks her. a low-key performance but no less skilled; his She’s crass, imperious, fascinating. She Thomas asserts and wields shares a name with the power insidiously. The two play’s leading lady. And, as Venus in Fur have palpable stage chemisfar as Thomas is concerned, Through September 29 at the try, heating up the audition she couldn’t be more wrong Unicorn Theatre, 3828 Main, room as they slip in and out for the part. 816-531-7529, of Thomas’ script, blurring From here, the Unicorn unicorntheatre.org the lines between audition Theatre’s production of and seduction. David Ives’ Venus in Fur The Tallest Tree Severo recently finished spins into a volatile dance in the Forest a stint as Aphrodite in the for dominance, a carnal Through September 28 at Living Room’s The Death game of cat and mouse the Kansas City Repertory of Cupid, and in some ways in which who is predator Theatre’s Copaken Stage, this feels like a reprise of that and who is prey remain un1 H&R Block Way, role. But Ives’ script resists certain. For all of Vanda’s 816-235-2700, kcrep.org a simplistic inversion from laughable blunders (she male domination to goddess assures Thomas that she Long Day’s Journey worship, offering characters was great as “Hedda GabInto Night more nuanced and humane. uh-ler”), she knows a little Through September 15 at When Thomas launches into too much to be so inept. Union Station’s H&R Block a bitter polemic against our She has every line of the City Stage, 30 West Pershing cultural obsession with rescript memorized, carries Road, 816-235-6222, ducing narratives to social an annotated and worn kcactors.org allegories (race, gender, copy of the source novel, class), Vanda accuses him and makes some curiously of absolving his play’s own sexist paradigms. prescient guesses about Thomas’ fiancée. The debate is heated, sounding at times like Severo is intoxicating as the capricious Ives arguing with himself. charmer, making Vanda’s f luctuations The technical elements are less nuanced between deranged loudmouth and selfthan the psyches, but that seems like a conpossessed seductress look effortless. Her scious choice. The casting room is a dreary comedic timing is note-perfect (“I’m usually beige dungeon, as degrading to Thomas as pretty demure and shit,” she tells Thomas, adjusting that garter belt against her inner the sexual roles he enacts. The lighting cues

are minimal, driven by Vanda’s rummages through the fuse box when she wants to control the mood. Sound designer Michael Heuer contributes subtle atmospheric effects to underscore the tension, and Georgianna Buchanan’s costumes complete Vanda’s transitions from modern mistress to 19th-century paramour. The alley-style seating gives the stage the feel of a boxing ring as the actors circle each other and spar. Ives and the Unicorn keep us guessing for 90 minutes. We’re never quite sure what’s around the next dramatic bend, and the chase is exhilarating. Not every puzzle about these characters gets solved, but the play packs an erotic charge. Maybe it’s my imagination, but the women in the audience seemed to saunter out of the theater with a little more confidence than when they’d come in.

TREE TOO TALL The Rep stumps for Paul Robeson.

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he Kansas City Repertory Theatre’s world-premiere season opener takes on a formidable task: capturing the passions and politics of one of America’s most iconic performers, the rhapsodic musician, actor and social activist Paul Robeson. Developed with the Tectonic Theatre Project and directed by veteran Moises Kaufman, Daniel Beaty’s one-man The Tallest Tree in the Forest collates a series of short scenes and historical snapshots to piece together a dramatic timeline of Robeson’s life and work.

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Left: Severo and Sneary spar. Above: Beaty as Paul Robeson We check in with Robeson at formative moments: his stint as the first African-American (and first-string linebacker) on the Rutgers football team, his marriage to chemist-turnedanthropologist Eslanda “Essie” Goode, his artistic rise through the Harlem Renaissance and onto the silver screen. There’s also his affair with actress Uta Hagen and his controversial support of the Soviet Union (and, later, his failure to denounce Stalin’s treatment of Russian Jews). The script doesn’t flinch from ugly realities, though the scattered approach paints Robeson as a victim of turbulent influences and competing ideologies. On the one hand, his father’s insistence that he show white folks he’s “grateful.” On the other, his fiery brother Reeve’s insistence that Paul “fight until the end,” that “if you have to go, take one with you.” Beaty’s range and athleticism are worthy of Robeson’s. He commands the stage with numerous postures and personas, shifting seamlessly between multiple roles — at times, playing three different characters in the same scene. His specificity keeps the play’s jumps in chronology and character from devolving into confusion. Each transition feels confident and precise, with Beaty furnishing even the most tertiary characters with their own distinct palettes of gesture, expression and inflection. Unfortunately, that variety and specificity don’t extend to Beaty’s portrayal of Robeson himself, when he can sound at times stilted, the voice of an icon instead of a man. We get occasional glimpses continued on page 15

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FAMILY TIME KCAT’s Long Day’s Journey Into Night hastens O’Neill’s dusk.

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n some productions, Long Day’s Journey Into Night really can take just about all day. Not the version onstage at Kansas City Actors Theatre. This second in KCAT’s “Classic American Summer,” directed by John Rensenhouse, dispenses Acts 1 and 2 in just an hour before adjourning for intermission. Trimming what many consider Eugene O’Neill’s masterwork (which won a Tony Award and a Pulitzer Prize) doesn’t have to be sacrilege or feel rushed, though, and this abridgment of the four-act script keeps the play’s mood intact. We still understand how the Tyrone family has come to this place, enduring a drawn-out and, for them, unfortunately typical day in August 1912. The second half of this staging runs an absorbing 95 minutes, allowing us to observe — and be touched by — this household’s tangle of dysfunction and sorrow. In their summer home on the Connecticut shore, they will face accusations, resentments, regrets and misunderstandings, but also love. James Tyrone is a once-famous actor who has always traveled for work. The excellent Paul Vincent O’Connor exposes the patriarch’s layers in a subtle, seemingly effortless performance, eliciting compassion for a husband and father formed by his past and his imperfections. James’ wife, Mary (effectively portrayed by Merle Moores), retreats to a long-ago past to hide from a family history she can’t or won’t face. There’s no Thanks for the memories here.

JEFF RUMANS

continued from page 13 of humor and vulnerability — some joking with Essie, a generous and tender rendition of “Shortnin’ Bread” — but nothing sustains. It’s understandable to err on the side of grandeur for a man deprived of dignity for so long. Robeson’s name was soiled by anti-American accusations during the McCarthy era, and Beaty seems determined to give him his due. Fair enough. But that solemn treatment also distances us emotionally, gives us gravitas when we crave humanity. The music moves us closer. Beaty’s voice is rich and operatic, and skillful music direction by Kenny J. Seymour lends the classic tunes new emotional power. The songs resonate most successfully when Beaty allows himself to relax in passages — as in “Steal Away” and “Scandalize” — dipping into his own, softer cadences instead of striving for Robeson’s inimitable bass-baritone. Beaty’s show delivers a sense of dramatic arc, but it never quite coalesces into something greater than the sum of its individual songs and scenes. Still, the Rep’s elegant staging and Beaty’s prodigious talent succeed in creating a musically lush, historically fascinating portrait of a man both revered and radicalized. — LIZ COOK

O’Connor and Moores cling to the present. “The past is the present, isn’t it?” she wonders. “It’s the future, too. We all try to lie out of that, but life won’t let us.” Her way out: a morphine fog that “hides you from the world and the world from you.” In the process, Mary manages to both dominate this day and dismiss her loved ones. Elder son Jamie (the talented Brian Paulette) is an actor like his father, but alcohol and bad behavior have rendered him unsuccessful. Paulette’s understated portrayal brings a strong presence to a man beset by drink, paternal expectations and sibling rivalry. “I love you more than I hate you,” he tells his brother, Edmund, in a whiskey-drenched family confab where even liquor can’t black out the pain. Edmund, the younger son (Doogin Brown), is O’Neill’s alter ego in this, his most autobiographical work. (According to Arthur and Martha Gelb’s O’Neill, the playwright was working here to “forgive his family and himself.”) He’s a well-educated, well-read 24-year-old whose illness preoccupies the rest of the family. The skillful Brown focuses our attention with a perceptive, quiet and intelligent portrait. The flowing whiskey plays nearly as big a role as the period dress (by Genevieve V. Beller), the family home (set by Jim Misenheimer), and the changing light of day (by Douglas Macur). We almost want to pour a glass, too (as does Jessica Franz, very good as the maid, Cathleen). As booze looses the play’s dialogue, Long Day’s nonaction plays out across arias of recrimination and apology. O’Neill’s words make their own kind of melody; Rensenhouse has occasionally incorporated background music (composed by Greg Mackender), but it sometimes distracts. But we never take our eyes off the Tyrones and their long day. O’Neill’s play went unpublished until after his death, in the 1950s, and it continues to age, burn and go down well. — DEBORAH HIRSCH

E-mail deborah.hirsch@pitch.com

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FILM

BETTER LATE

Now that summer is over,

BY

three good movies finally arrive.

S C O T T W IL S ON

DRINKING BUDDIES

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rinking Buddies has been available on demand long enough that, by the time I watched a studio-provided DVD, at least one of my friends had already seen the movie. We compared notes and reached immediate, shouting disagreement. “Are you kidding?” This an objection to my defense of Anna Kendrick’s character. “She’s the one who’s dishonest. She’s the bad one.” “She’s not!” In fact, that character, Jill, does tell at least one lie. She makes a thing out of confessing this untruth. Her weepy admission is the sort of event that is, in movies of the heart, supposed to be a turning point. “I don’t believe her for a second.” Drinking Buddies being a movie not of the beating heart but of the gabbing mouth. Writer-director Joe Swanberg (Hannah Takes the Stairs) has given his actors a sketch of where scenes start and end but left them to make up most of what comes between. There are silences, and some of them prick, and there are a few important words, some of which gouge. Mostly, though, the point is weightless talk: conversation as act, as mating dance, as comforting ritual, as anything but commitment. Who among these four characters, these easy types (earnest planner, taciturn giver, prolix cynic, soulful flirt), would you pick? My friend went for the flirt: Olivia Wilde’s character, Kate. It is Kate, whose increasingly aggravating tentativeness drives and halts what action occurs in Drinking Buddies. She’s an off-the-rack indie-movie-character mess: irresponsible, emotionally stunted, selfish. “She’s so selfish!” I yelled at my friend. “But she’s Olivia Wilde.” Well, yeah. And Wilde is better than just offthe-rack. She bends an awareness of her physical appeal into a portrait of someone starting to figure out that her usual tricks are getting stale.

Luke — co-worker, best friend, obvious soul mate — sees the con but antes anyway. Jake Johnson, playing Luke as someone for whom figuring out the trick isn’t quite enough, is as good as Wilde. (That leaves Ron Livingston to be a kind of hipster Bill Pullman character, hapless but not altogether wrong but also not right for anybody else here.) Swanberg’s slack construction leaves too much out — there isn’t really enough going on to provoke real argument. But there’s at least enough to invite you to project almost any relationship anxiety onto Drinking Buddies, and that counts as a certain kind of canniness even when the entertainment ebbs. In the end, my friend would have preferred to watch my free copy, and I wouldn’t have minded paying to see it, and, having agreed on something, we both shut the fuck up.

IN A WORLD

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he past few months have felt like a pretty dire spell at the multiplex. It’s getting so you can’t even look forward to hate-watching a blockbuster, let alone find escapist pleasure in seeing the world saved (again) from the latest mass-murdering plasma death ray. A world does get saved in writer, director and

star Lake Bell’s smart, satisfying In a World. It’s a small world — that of movie-trailer voice-over performers — but a fully realized one, which Bell has peopled with sharply drawn characters whose attentiveness, accommodation and tenderness find appropriate rewards (and generate laughs). OK, that sounds a little corny, but it plays closer to miraculous. Imagine: a comedy that’s actually funny, a peek behind the movie-industry curtain that doesn’t feel smug, a visit with couples who make good company. Bell is generous with her castmates (Demetri Martin, Michaela Watkins and Rob Corddry, among others), and her 90-minute movie does something bigger movies haven’t lately. It gives you everything you’ve come hoping to see and leaves you wishing there were more. Sequel?

HANNAH ARENDT

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he couch you’ve put off replacing fails to camoufl age where you both sit and how often you both sit there, pointed at the TV and not at each other. You beam a silent mental defense at guests when you see them note the faded fabric: We talk, too. It’s not just Law & Order reruns and the NFL and Breaking Bad around here. But, really,

Left: Bell’s World; above: Sukowa in Arendt there’s no denying the banality of passivity. The banality of evil, though, that’s cause for debate, at least in Hannah Arendt, a witty, unapologetically intellectual dramatization of a furious moment in midcentury moral argument. Director Margarethe von Trotta doesn’t forget the drama. Or the argument. Or the morality. Or the midcentury. Von Trotta and co-writer Pamela Katz don’t waste time explaining who the thinkers are in this film, which centers on writer and teacher Arendt (Barbara Sukowa, magnificent) and her thorny New Yorker probe of the 1961 Adolf Eichmann trial and the troubling aftermath of its publication. It’s less biopic than in medias res cross-section of postwar academia, Manhattan publishing, and a marriage between philosophical powerhouses at domestic equipoise. (Axel Milberg is both charismatic and soothing as political thinker Heinrich Blücher, Arendt’s husband.) It’s also a velvety-looking ode to a time when people still bothered to make their crazy death threats in writing rather than just shouting at a screen from a sofa.

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CAFÉ be a big annoyance?

BY

CHARLES FERRUZZA

ANGELA C. BOND

YOUR PLATES OR MINE

Do small plates have to

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here are certain restaurant trends that I’m ready to see go the way of the salad bar and the relish tray. Red velvet cake. Duck confit. Bacon anything. And small plates. Enough already. What the hell are small plates, anyway? They’re not really appetizers, and they’re not actually tapas (which were originally pieces of bread or meat small enough to perch on the rim of a glass of sherry in order to keep the flies away), and they’re certainly not dim sum. Yet restaurants now seem to classify all of those once-distinct things within the small-plates rubric. Look, I don’t hate small plates. And before all you foodies exile me to Squaresville, be honest with yourselves: Do you really like to share your food that much? I don’t — not even with close friends. And small plates require you to subdivide your dishes, some of which have been conceived as delicacies. Besides, if you believe, as I do, that “visual appeal” is half the meal, to split up small portions is to commit a brutality. As New York Times critic Pete Wells wrote last year, “Many dishes served at allegedly tapas-style restaurants simply don’t split well. Either they look like a car crash by the time you’ve divided them in four, or your portion ends up being so small you hardly get to know it before it’s gone.” Yes, yes, small plates encourage the communal-minded as well as the experimental, allowing you to share new and exciting dishes among friends or sample the unfamiliar as a solo diner without committing to an entrée. But if one more server gives me a definition of small plates that includes the word fun, I’ll

hurl a real-person-sized dish in his direction. “A small plate is 4 ounces,” says chef Martin Heuser, of the 15-month-old Aff äre restaurant, whose menu is dominated by pretty little dishes. See? Simple. By Heuser’s standards, anything smaller than 4 ounces is in the tapas category (by my standards: a bite). Anything between 7 and 10 ounces is a full meal. If that sounds petite, well, Heuser says he has had to increase the portion sizes of many of Affäre’s dishes. His more well-fed customers couldn’t abide all that daintiness. “I couldn’t take one more complaint about there being only one seared scallop on my plate featuring a scallop and a piece of foie gras with a hollandaise sauce,” he says. “So now there are two scallops.” That extra scallop adds about six bucks to that plate’s price, but it’s hard to quibble when the place operates like a Rolls Royce factory. “The only product I buy,” Heuser boasts, “is tomato paste.” That kind of quality control means that his cabbage-wrapped baked quail (in a supple cassis jus) takes more than six hours to prepare, with as many complicated steps as a Susan Stroman dance routine. Around the corner, at chef Michael Smith’s Extra Virgin, the small-plate menu is divided into seven categories, ranging in price from $3 (for deviled eggs) to $27 for a rib-eye roasted in the kitchen’s oak-burning oven. It seemed like a good place to test the protocol for a single diner, so one evening I sat alone at a hightop table with a window view of the venue’s sunny deck.

I asked the server to give me his best estimate of the right number of small plates for just me. I challenged him to do this without using the predictable phrase “It depends how hungry you are.” “It’s about size,” he said. “Some of our small plates are bigger than others. But for one person, I’d suggest two or three.” I made three choices that met his approval: smoked-paprika shrimp with tissuethin slices of celery and Missouri peaches; a watermelon-and-arugula salad in a tart citrus vinaigrette; and a small bowl of caramelle pasta (they looked like wrapped hard candies and came fi lled with fontina and house-made mozzarella) in a tomato cream sauce. Each would have been difficult to share, even for two people. But they made a complete and rewarding entrée for me. In fact, I really didn’t need that fourth small plate I impulsively asked for: grilled bread with fluff y ricotta. “You’ll ruin your appetite with this,” the waiter chided me. It didn’t, but I passed on dessert. It’s folly for a solo diner to load up on a lot of inexpensive dim sum dishes at the ABC Café in Overland Park. I know because I have. Here, 19 little plates are on offer, priced at $2.88 each. So you see that it just wouldn’t be economical to order fewer than 10. This noisy dining room feels designed for public displays of gluttony. Two of the bigger tables have big Lazy Susans in the center for easy sharing. Not a lot passes Heuser’s 4-ounce rule, but if your definition of small plates is simply sharing piles of tasty food

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Little bites can be deceptively big in flavor, style and imagination. with friends without ending up shamefully bloated, the ABC Café is the perfect dictionary illustration. It’s an ideal place to sample unfamiliar Chinese dishes affordably, and ABC has a vitality that other, swankier smallplate emporiums lack. With its fine hot and cold dishes and its unfussy array of bottled beer (Bud Light, Bud, Heineken and Tsingtao — that’s it), ABC is a chatty Asian snack shop. Kansas City’s best-known tapas vendor, the original La Bodega on Southwest Boulevard, is considerably more expensive than ABC, but while the plates are small, the portions aren’t toddler-sized. It remains a brash, loud dining room — people who like to share prefer to talk loudly, too, apparently — and heavy on the meaty dishes. “We don’t often get diners who come here to eat alone,” one of the servers told me not long ago. “Big parties like to come in here and order a lot of different things.” Bulk, after all, likes more bulk. If one diner can find satisfaction with three small plates, it figures that a raucous group will reward itself with at least that many little objets d’art per person. And that’s if no one at the table feels threatened and orders accordingly, knowing that a little too much sharing lies in store. Restaurateurs know how you are. And by going small, some of them are scoring big.

Have a suggestion for a restaurant The Pitch should review? E-mail charles.ferruzza@pitch.com

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ear the front door of Westport’s Thai Place is the restaurant’s “Wall of Flame,” where a large frame is filled with photos of wild-eyed people who have undertaken the place’s “Super Thai Hot Challenge.” Everyone pictured looks sweaty and exhausted. Also: proud. I asked my server about it, and she looked like she had seen a ghost — or, anyway, a ghost pepper. “They ate it all,” she said without a hint of humor. “When I tried it, I blacked out and had to go home from work.” I looked again at the photos. A red-faced, teary-eyed man seemed to be having a spiritual experience. Another probably was having a stroke. I counted 15 people on the wall, only three of them women. You don’t just show up and get yourself onto the Wall of Flame. It’s an exercise in conquering, first of all, fear. What confronts you is a dish with a terrifying name, “Demon Gapow,” which you must fully consume within 30 minutes. Its ingredients are simple: 2 cups of white rice; minced tofu, steak, chicken or pork; and two fried eggs. And hot peppers. More than 50 hot peppers. Shovel every last bite into your face hole, and you get a T-shirt, a free meal and a $50 gift certificate. Assuming you live. “No problem,” I said. “I got this. Next time.” I procrastinated a bit — 24 months — but last week I felt it. I had on my side the right combination of recklessness and inspirational Facebook memes propelling me to action. Bonus: a thoughtful boyfriend who promised to be my designated driver. I pre-gamed by skipping lunch and buying milk and grapes at the Westport Sun Fresh, at the suggestion of some Facebook friends. (None of them had actually attempted the challenge, but a couple claimed to have eaten ghost-pepper salsa once.) Fucking pussies, I thought, recalling the time I fi nished half a jar of ghost-pepper salsa in 10 minutes standing over the kitchen sink. We arrived at Thai Place around 8 p.m. on a Thursday (the only day of the week when the challenge can be taken). I told our waitress that I wanted to get my picture on the wall. She looked at me with a mixture of pity and incredulity. “I don’t even like to be in the kitchen while they’re cooking it,” she said. “Are you sure?” “Yes,” I said. “Bring it.” What she brought was paperwork. I was asked to sign a waiver releasing Thai Place of responsibility “for any consequences as a result of my participation in this challenge.”

I hereby announced myself as being older than 18 and in good health — a heart condition would have disqualified me. I signed. My boyfriend signed as a witness. This was serious. About 20 minutes later, the Demon Gapow arrived. It was an insane amount of food, piled maybe 6 inches high and completely filling a very large bowl. It looked like way more than just 2 cups of rice. “It is physically possible to eat that much,” my boyfriend assured me. “Mind over matter.” I stabbed the pile with my fork and started for the bottom, and the server began the 30-minute countdown. The fi rst few bites? Easy. Then shit got weird. Let me stop here and talk about the flavor of the dish. Demon Gapow has no flavor. It is all heat. It is not so much an entrée as it is a mechanism for tear and snot production, and very soon fluid was streaming freely down my face. A table of polite diners across from us stared openly. My behavior was no longer socially acceptable. Just 10 minutes in, I had to stop and drink some milk. I’d barely dented the thing, let alone earned bragging rights. “It’s winning,” I said. “I think I might be done.” I kept going, though, and I found a rhythm — a tiny sip of ice water, then a bite of hell dish. For a time, I thought I might finish it.

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Heat. Lots of heat. But even tiny sips were making the rice expand. The fried eggs atop the dish had swollen into pillows I was going to have to chew through. I lifted one with my fork and found more peppers lurking underneath. There was a wave of nausea. There were 15 minutes to go, but I knew this wasn’t my night to be immortalized on the Wall of Flame. But the challenge — the true challenge — had only just begun. The Demon Gapow entered my digestive tract like a flaming coal wrapped in barbed wire and shot from a tiny cannon into a wall of 98.6-degree Jell-O. I could feel everything it did. I knew the exact moment it entered my stomach, settling there like a mound of smoldering ash. At home later, I talked about God and rebirth, about ancient cures for hysteria. Demon Gapow had rendered me effectively stoned. In the morning, I chased my caramel latte from Mud Pie with Pepto Bismol — a cocktail whose path could also be fairly traced and which I won’t recount here. Let’s leave it at this: If you eat the Demon Gapow, win or lose, stay close to home. Stay very close to home. For a couple of days.

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22

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the pitch

MUSIC

LAB RATS

Experimental music organization Black House

BY

Collective launches a two-month concert series.

D AV ID HUDN A L L

I

t’s the idea of: ‘I’ll play your music if you’ll play mine,’” Hunter Long says of his music organization Black House Collective. “I think that’s the basic appeal of what we’re doing.” Long has headed up Black House Collective since 2009, when he and fellow musician Russell Thorpe heard that arts nonprofit Charlotte Street Foundation had put out a call for performing artists looking for a studio residency. “We’d been playing in a band together that was coming to a close, and we thought, ‘We’re performing artists,’” Thorpe says. So they developed an idea, Long wrote up the paperwork, and they got the residency. The gist: Black House Collective selects local musicians to MORE participate in a 10-week composers’ workshop. The ensemble typically T A INE ONL .COM takes the vague shape of a H C PIT big band: trumpets, saxophones, trombones, drums, bass — but sometimes guitars, sometimes electronics. Every Sunday for 10 weeks, the musicians bring in compositions and have them critiqued by the group. Then they’re rehashed and rehearsed, and at the end of the session, the best compositions are performed by the entire ensemble at a concert. “Anybody who plays can bring compositions in,” Long says. “Not everything works out, but everything gets decided by the entire ensemble. We talk about why things work and why they don’t. The whole thing is designed to make the musicians better.” Long describes Black House Collective as a sort of laboratory for experimental music. “Whatever anybody brings in, we’ll play,” he says. “There’s no stylistic agenda or anything. Each performance isn’t necessarily sonically cohesive, but that’s sort of the point.” Long wasn’t sure if anybody would be interested when Black House Collective started out, but “then [veteran KC trumpeter] Stan Kessler came and did a session, and that definitely gave us legitimacy,” Long says. “Now we get a good mix of older, established musicians and younger people who we get from putting out calls at UMKC and KU.” (Alums and current residents include scene stalwarts like TJ Martley, Mike Stover and Nick Howell.) There are no auditions — it’s still mostly a word-of-mouth type of organization — but Long says musicians need to be able to play at a high level. “The material has a tendency to get pretty difficult,” he says. In recent years the projects have grown more ambitious — a series of new operas were performed earlier this year — and as of last Thursday, Black House Collective has

september 12-18, 2013

M US I C

pitch.com

B R O O K E VA N D E V E R

KNUCKLEHEADS

launched Black Lab, a concert series featuring two months of programming from musicians affiliated with the organization. “Our whole thing is to celebrate and promote new music in KC, so a festival was always something we had thought about,” Long says. “This seemed like a small way to dip our toes in and see if it was viable.” In Black House Collective workshops, there’s only enough time for musicians to develop one piece of their own per 10-week session. With Black Lab, Long is seeking to give them more room to breathe. “The idea is that we can give our people a chance to do something unique they couldn’t necessarily do at a club gig where they have to fill three hours,” he says. “These are hour-and-a-half performances — two hours for the ones where we’re doing two ensembles and an intermission — which is a lot easier and more freeing.” Opening night for the Black Lab series was September 5 at the Paragraph Gallery, and there will be shows every Thursday and Saturday evening at the Paragraph through October 26. Performances will cover a lot of sonic territory: chamber music, modern jazz, electronic music, rock music. “It’s very loose, very ambiguous,” Long says. Musicians presiding over their own evenings of compositions include Brad Cox, Mark Southerland, Brian Padavic, Shawn Hansen and Chris Hazelton. (See blackhouse .typepad.com for the full schedule.) This week features Thorpe on Thursday, and Rich Wheeler and Matt Otto on Satur-

Black Lights at Black Lab day. “They’re the two top tenor [sax] players in town, and I really admire both of them,” Long says of Wheeler and Otto. “They’ve done performances together before, and they’ll have a band full of awesome players doing original music.” Thorpe’s will be a two-part performance. He’ll open with his band, Phonologotronic, which he says explores the relationship between sound, knowledge and memories. “We’re trying to get at some ideas about nostalgia, so we’ll use old No. 1 radio hits from the ’70s and ’80s as jumping-off points, present them as jazz tunes in a way people will recognize, and then twist them,” Thorpe says. “We’ll change keys, or switch to a different section instead of the chorus or something — trying to thwart expectations in strange ways.” The second half will feature Thorpe collaborating with Brad Van Wick in their project Mnemosyne, and for it, they’re requiring more than just participation from fellow Black House Collective members. “We’re going to ask the crowd to put on blindfolds,” Thorpe says. “And we’re going to ask some people in the audience to actually touch us musicians while we’re playing, to see how those things change the perception of the music. So we’ll be trying a lot of different things all at once — just kind of this big music experiment.”

E-mail david.hudnall@pitch.com

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september 12-18, 2013

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MUSIC

SOUTHERN GENTLEMAN

Mississippi pop crooner Dent May heats up on Warm Blanket.

BY

D AV ID HUDN A L L

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n the new video for “Born Too Late,” Dent Sounds of summer: May May rides a Ferris wheel and a Tilt-a-Whirl “Shakedown Street” by the Grateful Dead. How at the Neshoba County Fair in Mississippi and does that song tend to go over? hangs out on a boat, drinking and waterskiing Yeah, covering the Dead is definitely polarlike a geeky Kenny Powers. The video closes izing. Some people, indie-rock-snob types, with a flurry of fireworks in the night sky. It just don’t like them and think they’re lame all seems very appropriate: The 27-year-old May is from Jackson and lives in Oxford, Mis- and cheesy or whatever. Then there are Dead fans that think you’re desecrating a sacred sissippi, and his party-friendly songs hearken song. So it’s weird. I love that song because I back to a purer era of pop music. “Born Too think it’s probably the most fun, most poppy Late,” like many of the songs on May’s latest, Warm Blanket, weaves together disco, song the Dead ever did. That cokey era of the Dead is not far off from funk and ’60s pop, with echoes of the Beach the vibe on [2012 album] Do Things or Warm Boys, Harry Nilsson and Michael Jackson. We Blanket. Are you a big Dead fan? caught up with May last week in advance of I’m kind of a late-to-the-game Dead fan, but his show Monday at Czar. The Pitch: You’re on Animal Collective’s Paw I like American Beauty and lots of those Dick’s Picks albums from the ’70s. Obviously we’re Tracks label. Can you talk about how you got not going to do some huge, long jam — but hooked up with those guys? May: They recorded Merriweather Post a song like “Shakedown” I think works well within our repertoire. Pavilion in Oxford, where I live. So they were You’re writing pop songs at a pretty high level, around for over a month, and it’s a small town, so I got to be friends with them. I but in some ways it seems like music fans and met them at a party at my house, actually. critics don’t value sharply crafted pop songs as I gave them a demo I’d done of songs on the much as they maybe used to. I definitely think pop ukulele. music and pop songwriting How important do you Dent May, with are a few rungs lower on the think that association has Dead Gaze and Rooms totem of cultural relevancy been? Without Windows for some people these days. I’m sure it’s been helpful Monday, September 16, People don’t value a great for me to just have a label. at Czar Madonna song as much as a I’d had little offers from lagreat Neil Young song. And, bels before, but they [Paw Tracks] really set me up. Really the most im- you know, I might not either. That’s something I think about a lot, too. But a great pop song is portant thing about it from my point of view a beautiful thing. I think with critics, they’re has been knowing those guys personally and looking for cultural signifiers to put music in going on tour with them and observing how a context where they can tell their own predethey don’t give a fuck and always do whatever they want to do from a creative standpoint. I termined narrative. And for that, pop tends to be an outlier. But I’m not trying to be a critical have friends on other labels that aren’t that darling. I’m trying to connect with people. lucky. You rented a house in Florida to record Warm When I saw you guys in April, you covered

september 12-18, 2013

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Blanket and played all the instruments yourself? Yeah, I had a few other people do some string and horn parts, but the rest was all by myself. I knew I wanted to rent an old house — I’m really into historic architecture. So I was looking at vacation rentals online, and it ended up working out perfectly — I found a beautiful, three-story Victorian house in Florida with a grand piano in it, and I drove all my gear down there and set up. Were you concerned about what recording in an old place like that would sound like? I pretty much tried to embrace the imperfect acoustics of the place. I’ve never been a big studio guy. For the piano I just kind of mic’d it the best I could. Do you think you achieved a specific kind of mood on Warm Blanket by dint of being alone in a strange new place? Yeah, I think the decision to record in a house by myself and not in a traditional studio maybe goes along with some romantic ideas I have about the process of creating music. I had kind of an anti-studio philosophy going in. For the next record, I think I want the band to play on it, but it was cool to have the freedom to let my mind wander and ideas flow while making an album.

E-mail david.hudnall@pitch.com

J A Z Z B E AT EDDIE MOORE AND THE OUTER CIRCLE AT THE GREEN LADY LOUNGE

Other ensembles reimagine jazz standards and classic sides. Eddie Moore and the Outer Circle are all about presenting new compositions. Whether instrumentally expressing a breakup or illustrating the contrast between cities, their music draws you into journeys to diverse emotional places. These musicians — Eddie Moore on keyboard, Adam Schlozman or Matt Hopper on guitar, brothers Ben Leifer on bass and Matt Leifer on drums — speak to one another through their instruments, and the audience is privy to their conversation. You never know: Thursday night at the Green Lady Lounge, you might be hearing one of the next generation’s jazz classics. — LARRY KOPITNIK  Eddie Moore and the Outer Circle, 8– 11 p.m. Thursday, September 12 (and again Thursday, September 26), at the Green Lady Lounge (1809 Grand, 816-215-2954)

d t h n g i l a t o p B S

La Guerre

Much of the Lawrence music scene is made up of folks who moved there to attend the University of Kansas. But Katlyn Conroy is a native of the college town; she’s been playing shows on Mass Street since she was 15. That familiarity, plus her innate musical talent, has given her a leg up, and today she’s one of the fixtures of the local music community. Conroy has collaborated with groups like Hospital Ships and Fourth of July; she’s a member of indie-rock powerhouse Cowboy Indian Bear; and she records her own songs under the name La Guerre (French for “the war”). Her latest EP, Violent, is full of electro-emo songs carried by Conroy’s gorgeous, haunted voice. You just released a new EP, Violent. Tell us about it. Violent is the first EP that I’ve home-recorded, and it’s a lot more electronic than my past releases. The songs were written during the last few Cowboy Indian Bear tours, during long stints on the road, and so that gave them a more cohesive feel. It also contains “Landbreak,” the first instrumental song i’ve written. It was a personal goal for me to get out of my comfort zone and at least, to me, I accomplished that on this EP. You recently did a Daytrotter session? How’d that go? Really well! Although I had done two with Cowboy already, I got really nervous about this one. It’s really the first La Guerre performance on a national platform. Not to mention the morning we arrived, I was, like, half-awake and locked my keys in my van almost immediately. So, that was a bit embarrassing. But I thought we played well, and once I heard the finished project, I was pretty blissed. You’ve got a couple guys you’re playing with live lately? Esteban Gomez and Nick Stahl came on tour with me in July and were incredible. I couldn’t have been more grateful. Unfortunately, Nick is busy playing with the wonderful Your Friend and Esteban is in a band called Holographics, so that tour was kind of a one-time thing with them. Luckily, I had always planned for La Guerre to have a somewhat rotating cast of musicians, so I am already talking about practices with a new lineup. The entire reason I decided to do La Guerre as a rotating cast was because I liked the idea that you would have many different versions of the same songs. Also, I usually end up playing with people who really inspire me. What are your thoughts on the Lawrence scene these days? I see a lot of new, young bands popping up that seem pretty determined, and that’s all you can really ask for. I will go ahead and admit that Lawrence has lost an incredible person with [Hospital Ships members] Jordan Geiger and Taylor Holenbeck moving. And Brendan Hangauer [of Fourth of July]. I feel like I’ve lost some real mentors. But I personally don’t feel the need to leave just yet. I was born here, and have grown up here. And touring really does fulfill that need to travel. Any good road stories? Oh man, too many. One of my favorites was that Cowboy had just played in Champaign, IL, and we were getting gas before heading out of town. Out of nowhere some man comes up to us at the pumps wearing a David Bazan shirt and says “Hey guys—I don’t mean to be weird, but If you’re a traveling band, I own a building right over here where you can use the bathroom or hang out for a second.” We were all a little creeped out, and [Cowboy member] Marty [Hillard] broke the tension by complimenting him on his t-shirt, to which he replied, “Oh, yeah, I’m actually his manager.” So, it turns out we were talking to the legendary Bob Andrews, who was the first touring manager of Wilco. And the building he was talking about was the Undertow Music headquarters. He let us come in and take shirts and CDs from his collection, which included Rocky Votolato, Page France, John Vanderslice. He let us listen to the new Pedro the Lion release. He even took us out to lunch! What’s on the horizon for La Guerre? I’ve teamed back up with my longtime producer (and the producer of all the Cowboy Indian Bear records) Joshua Browning to do a full-length La Guerre album. We’ve been working on it since June and it’s been going great. I can’t wait to hear the finished product. So, that, as well as potentially another Midwest tour next spring. There’s even been talks of a European tour, which would be crazy! I will definitely be keeping busy, playing shows and releasing tracks, so there’s no slowing down for me. Probably ever. pitch.com

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MON: RURAL GRIT 6PM // KARAOKE 10 PM HAUNTED CR JASON AND TH EEPYS, E PUNKNECKS AMY , SAT 9/14 CR FARRAND OSSROADS M U SIC FEST CHEROKEE MR MARCOSROCK RIFLE, STAR HAVEN V7, DEAD VOICES LEE LANGSTO ROUNDERS, N, RURAL GR THU 9/19 B IT ALL STARS OR FRI 9/20 TH N IN BABYLON E BUTTERMIL K SAT 9/21 TH E WALKTALKE BOYS, MAN IN THE RING RS

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M U S I C F O R E CA S T Things don’t seem to be going so hot in the Cheap Trick camp this summer. Former drummer Bun E. Carlos is suing the band for several hundred thousand dollars, and singer Robin Zander’s doddering, electroshock stage presence leaves the impression that he might break a hip at any moment. So this tribute show honoring the arena-rock band — featuring performances by locals the Dead Girls and Federation of Horsepower — might actually end up being better than the real thing. Sunday, September 15, at RecordBar (1020 Westport Road, 816-753-5207)

The Paul Collins Beat

Because of his work in the Nerves and the Beat, Paul Collins enjoys cult-hero status in the world of power-pop enthusiasts. His current band, the Paul Collins Beat, cheekily titled its 2010 album King of Power Pop! It delivers exactly the kind of delicious, melodic hooks you’d expect from a record with such a name. On this Midwestern tour, Collins has recruited like-minded local acts to support at every stop. Here, we’ll be treated to the Dead Girls (whose drummer, Eric Melin, is fresh home from Finland, where he was recently crowned Air Guitar World Champion) and Kinks acolytes Rev Gusto. Wednesday, September 18, at RecordBar (1020 Westport Road, 816-753-5207)

The ninth annual Crossroads Music Fest features a couple of new venues — jazz club Green Lady Lounge and restaurant Collection — but is otherwise the same roots-centric celebration of local music that it has been in recent years. On the bill: She’s a Keeper, Dead Voices, the Grisly Hand, Hearts of Darkness and about 15 more acts at six different venues. It’s $15 in advance, $20 at the gate; see cmfkc.com for the full schedule. Saturday, September 14, at various downtown venues

Mobb Deep, with Mac Lethal

Queens rap duo Mobb Deep is, by now, a legend in the world of hip-hop, and this year, Havoc and Prodigy are celebrating their 20th anniversary of hardcore, East Coast raps that scare the shit out of people. Mac Lethal’s white-boy, slacker hip-hop should help lighten the mood. Tuesday, September 17, at Riot Room (4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179)

Twin Peaks

A quartet of 19-year-olds from Chicago, Twin Peaks calls to mind a revved-up Real Estate: lots of dreamy reverb and mellowed-out lyrics but performed with the urgency of a restless garage-rock band. Its single, “Stand in the Sand,” is pretty hard to argue with. Tuesday, September 17, at Czar (1531 Grand, 816-421-0300)

Danny Brown and Action Bronson

The 2 High 2 Die tour, as they’re calling this jaunt, is a triple stack of unnerving performers. The Detroit rapper Danny Brown dresses the part of indie-rock star (asymmetrical haircut, tight jeans), smokes blunt after blunt, has battled depression, and raps largely about sex and Adderall. (He also famously received a blow job onstage at a show in Minneapo-

F O R E C A S T

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D AV ID HUDN A L L

Sonic Spectrum Tribute to Cheap Trick

Crossroads Music Fest

28

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september 12-18, 2013

Action Bronson lis earlier this year.) Action Bronson is an overweight redhead from Queens who has a Ghostface-like delivery and whose aesthetic (shout-outs to obscure professional wrestlers like Marty Jannetty; song titles such as “Strictly 4 My Jeeps”; a healthy amount of misogyny) is often ridiculous to the point of winking self-parody. Trash Talk is a hardcore act from California best known for its aggressive, destroy-the-room live performances. Wednesday, September 18, at Liberty Hall (644 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1972)

Flatlands Music Festival

No soccer out at Sporting Park this weekend — cowboy hats, not scarves, will be the preferred accessory. The Flatlands Music Festival kicks off with the Charlie Daniels Band, among others, on Thursday. Darius Rucker and Luke Bryan headline on Friday. And Miranda Lambert, Kellie Pickler and Toby Keith bring it all home on Saturday night. See the full lineup at flatlandsfestival.com. Thursday, September 12, through Saturday, September 14, at Sporting Park (1 Sporting Way, Kansas City, Kansas, 800-493-3378)

K E Y

..................................................Pick of the Week

............................................................... Festival

.......................................................Kind of Scary

...................................... Checkerboard Patterns

........................................................Young Bucks

.................................................Murdering Music

.................................................. Locally Sourced

.............................................. Songs About Weed

............................................. Suburban Cowboys

........................................................... Power Pop

............................................... Wal-Mart Country

.................................................... So Many Boots

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8/27/13 3:32 PM

AGENDA

continued from page 11

Thursday | 9.12 |

GARD BLUE

HAUNTED HOUSES

The Beast | 7:30 p.m., 1401 W. 13th St.

PERFORMING ARTS

The Chambers of Poe | 8 p.m., 1100 Santa Fe

A Dancer’s Dream: New York Philharmonic and New York City Ballet | 1 p.m. Tivoli Cinemas, 4050

Y S U N DA

9 .1 5

Pennsylvania

Ol’ Blue Eyes | 8 p.m. Chestnut Fine Arts Center, 234 N. Chestnut, Olathe, through October 20

The Edge of Hell | 7:30 p.m., 1300 W. 12th St. Macabre Cinema | 8 p.m., $27, 1222 W. 12th St.

t ll’s ligh Turre t. n e m in enterta

CIRCUS

COMMUNITY BENEFITS

Corks & Canvas 2013: A benefit for Good Samaritan Project | 7 p.m., $75 (GA), $125 (VIP), Studio Dan Meiners, 2500 West Pennway, gsp-kc.org

Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey: Dragons | 7 p.m. Sprint Center, 1407 Grand

Douglas County CASA presents 2013 CASAblanca | 7:30 p.m. Liberty Hall, 644 Massachusetts,

FOOD & DRINK

Lawrence, dccasa.org

Briarcliff Village Farmers Market | 3-7 p.m. Briarcliff

Village, 4175 N. Mulberry Dr.

COMMUNITY EVENTS

La Chalupa Farmers Market | Mattie Rhodes North-

east, 148 N. Topping Ave.

MORE

EVENTS

ON

AT LINE

PITCH.CO

M

KGRA Paracon UFO/Paranormal Conference

| 8:30 a.m. Unity Temple, 707 W. 47th St., $129-$149, kgraparacon.com

The Un-Chef Cook-Off: Lo-

cal TV personalities compete to benefit Newhouse Shelter | 6 p.m., $35 in advance or $40 at the door, Studio 2131, 2131 Washington

FILM

Archnemesis, Marcobiotics, Kraang | 8 p.m. The

Like color and light coming at you as though in a dream? James Turrell’s Gard Blue is for you. It opens today at the University of Kansas’ Spencer Museum of Art, and the artist is there today to talk about it. He speaks at 11 a.m., and the 1968 projection piece goes live at noon. More of Turrell’s holograms are also at the museum (1301 Mississippi, Lawrence, spencerart .ku.edu), with Gard Blue up through next May.

Joe Cartwright and Duck Warner | 6 p.m. Chaz,

Mines, Lazy, Baby Birds Don’t Drink Milk | 10 p.m.

Trivia | 9 p.m. Westport Flea Market, 817 Westport Rd.

Feel Good | 8 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire,

Eddie Moore and the Outer Circle | 8 p.m. Green

3810 Broadway

MUSIC

Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

325 Ward Pkwy.

Lawrence

Millage Gilbert Big Blues Band | 7 p.m. Danny’s Big

Easy, 1601 E. 18th St.

Grand Marquis | 7 p.m. Jazz, 1823 W. 39th St. Grenadina, Paper Lions, Eight Cities | 10 p.m.

RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

John Paul’s Flying Circus | B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ,

1205 E. 85th St.

John Keck’s Devils and Angels | 8 p.m. Coda, 1744

MiniBar, 3810 Broadway

Lady Lounge, 1809 Grand

Old Canes, SpaceSuit | 10 p.m. Replay Lounge, 946

FOOD & DRINK

E. 18th St.

NIGHTLIFE

7:30-10:30 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar, 3611 Broadway

Brodioke | 9 p.m. Bulldog, 1715 Main DJ Highnoone | Empire Room, 334 E. 31st St.

7 p.m. Sprint Center, 1407 Grand

F E S T I VA L S

Flatlands Festival with Darius Rucker, Luke Bryan, Rodney Atkins, Thompson Square, Kevin Fowler, Drew Six | 2 p.m. Sporting Park, 1 Sporting

Arts & Eats Festival and Battle of the Brisket

Fiesta Hispana | 6 p.m. Barney Allis Plaza, 12th St. and

september 12-18, 2013

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Baby Birds Don’t Drink Milk, CVLTS, YYU | 10 p.m. Replay Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Carswell & Hope, Heidi Gluck | 6 p.m. Replay Lounge,

Playe | 10:30 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar, 3611 Broadway

the pitch

Knuckleheads, 2715 Rochester

Troostwood Youth Garden Market | 3-8 p.m.,

5142 Paseo

The Mavericks with Erik Dylan | 8:30 p.m. Knuck-

30

Room, 4048 Broadway

The Bulletproof Tiger, the Author and the Illustrator, After Nations, Trapper | 6 p.m. Czar, 1531 Grand

| 4 p.m. Sylvester Powell Jr. Community Center, 6200 Martway, Mission

Clockwerk, DJ Archi | Gusto Lounge, 504 Westport Rd.

At the Left Hand of God, Wrath and Ruin, the Cast Pattern, Sorrow by Truth | 8 p.m. The Riot

Friday Farmers Market at BadSeed | 4:30-9 p.m.

DJ Keenan | 9 p.m. Port Fonda, 4141 Pennsylvania

leheads, 2715 Rochester

MUSIC

The BadSeed, 1909 McGee

3402 Main

Mad Libby, the Bad Ideas | 9 p.m. Davey’s Uptown,

Stadium

Atlantic Express featuring Hal Wakes | 8:30 p.m.

Saves the Day, Into It. Over It, Hostage Calm |

Horace Washington | 7 p.m. The Blue Room, 1616

2013 Missouri State Classic Football Game: Grambling State University Tigers vs. Lincoln University Blue Tigers | 4:30 p.m. Arrowhead

CIRCUS

Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey: Dragons |

Broadway

Songwriter’s Showcase with Megan Birdsall |

Friday | 9.13 |

Outlaw Jim and the Whiskey Benders | KC Live

8 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence

SPORTS

XO Blackwater with Steve Gardels | 10 p.m. MiniBar,

Massachusetts, Lawrence

Stage, 14th St. and Grand

E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial | 7:30 p.m. Legacy Park, 901 N.E. Bluestem Dr., Lee’s Summit, lsparks.net

Wyandotte, fiestahispanakansascity.com

946 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Way, KCK

Patrick Gilbert | 5 p.m. The Majestic, 931 Broadway Groove Therapy | The BrewTop Pub and Patio, 8614 N. Boardwalk Ave. continued on page 32

Live Music Live Music 7 nights 7 nights a week

96.5 The Buzz Presents

a week

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september 12-18, 2013

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31

The Beast | 7:30 p.m., 1401 W. 13th St.

Fourth Annual Grape Stomp | 12-2 p.m. Jowler Creek Vineyard & Winery, 16905 Jowler Creek Rd., Platte City, jowlercreek.com

Icona Pop | KC Live Stage, 14th St. and Grand

The Chambers of Poe | 8 p.m., 1100 Santa Fe

Independence Uncorked Wine Festival | 1-6 p.m.

Jazz Disciples | 8:30 p.m. The Blue Room, 1616 E.

The Edge of Hell | 7:30 p.m., 1300 W. 12th St.

continued from page 30 The Haunted Creepys, Jason and the Punknecks, Amy Farrand | The Brick, 1727 McGee

JIM BREUER

18th St.

HAUNTED HOUSES

Macabre Cinema | 8 p.m., $27, 1222 W. 12th St.

Junebug & the Porchlights | 8 p.m. Knuckleheads,

2715 Rochester

Kamelot, Delain, Eklipse | 7 p.m., The Granada, 1020

Turkey Creek Car and Motorcycle Show | 10 a.m.-

Massachusetts, Lawrence

4 p.m., 5740 Merriam Dr., Merriam

Late-night jam session | 1 a.m. Mutual Musicians

MORE

We’ll never forget Jim Breuer’s AC/DC hokeypokey. We doubt Breuer’s aping Brian Johnson is still part of his act — it’s more than a decade old — but he’s still good shit. See him Friday at the Midland, at 8 p.m. Tickets cost $27.50–$32.50.

The Sluts, Haunt Ananta, Psychic Heat | 8 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence

3 p.m. KC Live Stage, 14th St. and Grand

Wyandotte County Museum Crawl | 10 a.m. The National Agricultural Center and Hall of Fame, 630 N. 126th St., Bonner Springs., visitkansascity ks.com

We Are Voices, Clairaudients, Pageantry | 9 p.m.

Downtown Overland Park Farmers Market |

Star Montessori, 6321 Wornall

Cheap Shots riffs Thrashin’ | 9:30 p.m. Screenland Armour Theater, 408 Armour Rd., North Kansas City FOOD & DRINK

Tim Whitmer Trio | 5:30 p.m. Green Lady Lounge,

Grand Court Farmers Market | 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Grand

City Market Farmers Market | 6:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m.,

Young Stone: with B-Roy, GASH, Booney B, Black Smoke, Muney Moss, Scar, Strategy Da Game Plan, Joey Da Spitta and Saul Hernandez | 9 p.m. The 23rd Street Roadhouse, 1003 E. 23rd St., Lawrence

KC Organics and Natural Market | 8 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Minor Park, Holmes at Red Bridge Rd.

Court Retirement Center, 501 W. 107th St.

Troostwood Youth Garden Market | 9 a.m.-3 p.m.,

F E S T I VA L S

Brodioke | 9 p.m. Bulldog, 1715 Main

Indigo Hour with Lady D. | 5 p.m. The Blue Room, 1616 E. 18th St.

KC Improv Festival | 7 p.m. Off Center Theatre, 2450

Grand

Team Trivia | 7 p.m. Brooksider, 6330 Brookside Plz.

Saturday | 9.14 | CIRCUS

Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey: Dragons |

11 a.m., 3 & 7 p.m. Sprint Center, 1407 Grand

32

the pitch

| 2:30 p.m. Volleyball Beach, 13105 Holmes, $25 per player, sandtastic2013.eventbrite.com MUSIC

Four Fried Chickens and a Coke | Trouser Mouse, 410 S. Hwy. 7, Blue Springs

205 E. Fifth St.

The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Brain Damage: A Pink Floyd Tribute | 8 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence Crossroads Music Fest with the Joe Cartwright Trio and Max Groove | 5 p.m. Green Lady Lounge,

1809 Grand

Crossroads Music Fest with Mikal Shapiro, Erik Voeks, Nicolette Paige, and Brian Maloney |

6:30 p.m. Collection, 1532 Grand

5142 Paseo

NIGHTLIFE

E. 31st St.

AT

Sixth Annual Sandtastic Volleyball Tournament

Blackberry Smoke, the Bryant Carter Band | 8 p.m.

6:30 a.m.-1 p.m., on Marty, between 79th and 80th streets

Friends with Benefits Fridays | Empire Room, 334

INE

M PITCH.CO

Sprint Family Fun Days Carnival | 11 a.m.-

FILM

Brookside Farmers Market | 8 a.m.-1 p.m., Border

DJ E | The Quaff, 1010 Broadway

ONL

emark Palace at the Plaza, 500 Nichols Rd.

FOOD & DRINK

The Uncommon Denomination, Outsides, Drop a Grand | 10 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

1809 Grand

EVENTS

KGRA Paracon UFO/Paranormal Conference

| 8:30 a.m. Unity Temple, 707 W. 47th St., $129-$149

Lonnie McFadden | 4:30 p.m. Phoenix, 302 W. Eighth St.

Davey’s Uptown, 3402 Main

The One: Mayweather vs. Canelo | 8 p.m. Cin-

201 N.W. Lou Holland Dr.

Overland Park

Dominique Sanders Trio | 9 p.m. Green Lady Lounge,

The Color Run | 9 a.m., on Massachusetts between Seventh and 11th streets, downtown Lawrence

Celebration of Flight | 10 a.m. Airline History Museum,

J. Love Band | 9 p.m. Quasimodo, 12056 W. 135th St.,

1809 Grand

St., Olathe

COMMUNITY EVENTS

Foundation, 1823 Highland Ave.

Overland Park

SPORTS

Bike MS 2013 | Garmin International, 1200 E. 151st

AUTOS

Mikey Needleman Band | Fuel, 7300 W. 119th St.,

Bingham Waggoner Estate, 313 W. Pacific, Independence, $20/$25, independenceuncorked.com

Arts & Eats Festival and Battle of the Brisket |

7 a.m.-4 p.m. Sylvester Powell Jr. Community Center, 6200 Martway, Mission

Buffalo Bill Days | 3-11 p.m. Leavenworth Convention and Visitor’s Bureau, 518 Shawnee, Leavenworth Fiesta Hispana | Noon, Barney Allis Plaza, 12th St. and Wyandotte

Kansas City Renaissance Festival: Highland Games | 10 a.m.-7 p.m., 633 N. 130th St., Bonner Springs SHOPPING

Parkville Junk Extravaganza | English Landing Park,

First St. and Main

Saturday swap meet | 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Cowtown Mallroom, 3101 Gillham Plz.

september 12-18, 2013

pitch.com

DAY SATUR

9.14

at dieval Get me t. s e F n the Re

Crossroads Music Fest with Cherokee Rock Rifle, Mr. Marco’s V7, Dead Voices, Star Haven Rounders, Lee Langston, and the Rural Grit Allstars | 6 p.m. The Brick, 1727 McGee

Crossroads Music Fest with Not a Planet, the Empty Spaces, Amy Farrand, and the Givens | 6:30 p.m. Midwestern Music

Co., 1830 Locust

Crossroads Music Fest with SUNU, Diverse, Gooding, One Hundred Flowers, the Blackbird Revue | 7 p.m., $15/$20, Czar, 1531 Grand Crossroads Music Fest with Hearts of Darkness, My Brothers and Sisters, the Grisly Hand, She’s a Keeper | 6 p.m. Crossroads KC at Grinders, 417 E. 18th St. Joe DeFio | 5 p.m. The Majestic, 931 Broadway Charlet Embry | 8 p.m. Danny’s Big Easy, 1601 E. 18th St. continued on page 34

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september 12-18, 2013

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33

continued from page 32 Flatlands Festival with Toby Keith, Miranda Lambert, Kellie Pickler, Love and Theft, JT Hodges, Travis Marvin | 2 p.m. Sporting Park, 1

KANSAS CITY CHIEFS HOME OPENER

F E S T I VA L S

Buffalo Bill Days | 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Leavenworth Convention and Visitor’s Bureau, 518 Shawnee St., Leavenworth

Sporting Way, KCK

Y S U N DA

9.15

Groove Therapy | 9 p.m. Fuel, 7300 W. 119th St.,

Overland Park

Fiesta Hispana | Noon, Barney Allis Plaza, 12th St. and Wyandotte

Kansas City Renaissance Festival: Highland Games | 10 a.m.-7 p.m., 633 N. 130th St., Bonner Springs

s leads l Charle Jamaa llas. inst Da KC aga

Late-night jam session | 1 a.m. Mutual Musicians

Foundation, 1823 Highland Ave.

Kansas City Pagan Pride Day | 10 a.m.-6 p.m.

Lonesome Hank & the Heartaches | 5:30 p.m.

Merriam Marketplace, 5740 Merriam Dr., Merriam

Quasimodo, 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park

SHOPPING

Making Movies | The Kill Devil Club, 61 E. 14th St.

Parkville Junk Extravaganza | English Landing Park,

First St. and Main

Terry Malts, Spray Paint, Jocks | 10 p.m. Replay

Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence

FOOD & DRINK

Murder By Death, Kentucky Knife Fight | 9 p.m.

RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

Quiet Corral, the Noise FM, Cowboy Indian Bear

| 8 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

Mama Ray’s Jazz-Meets-Blues Jam | 2-5:30 p.m.

B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ, 1205 E. 85th St.

Fast Johnny Ricker | 9 p.m. B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ, 1205 E. 85th St.

City Market Farmers Market | 8 a.m.-3 p.m. City Market, 205 E. Fifth St.

Chiefs vs. Cowboys | Noon, Arrowhead Stadium

Tim Whitmer & KC Express | 4:30 p.m. The Phoenix,

302 W. Eighth St.

The Zeros | 9 p.m. The Brooksider, 6330 Brookside Plz.

StormCellar | 8:30 p.m. Knuckleheads, 2715 Rochester Switch | The BrewTop Pub and Patio, 8614 N. Boardwalk Ave. Tex Railer’s Doomtown | 10 p.m. Davey’s Uptown,

3402 Main

James Ward Band with Bukeka Shoals | 8:30 p.m.

The Blue Room, 1616 E. 18th St.

SPORTS

Sexy Saturdays | VooDoo Lounge, Harrah’s Casino,

1 Riverboat Dr., North Kansas City

Sunday | 9.15 | PERFORMING ARTS

NIGHTLIFE

DJ E | The Quaff, 1010 Broadway Dropout Boogie | 10 p.m. MiniBar, 3810 Broadway

A Dancer’s Dream: New York Philharmonic and New York City Ballet | 1 p.m. Tivoli Cinemas, 4050

Pennsylvania

Gossip at Reserve Bar | 8 p.m. Ambassador Hotel,

Grand

THEATER Long Day’s Journey Into Night | Kansas City Actors Theatre, H&R Block City Stage, Union Station, 30 W. Pershing Rd., kcactors.org

1 & 5 p.m. Sprint Center, 1407 Grand

Independence, 201 N. Dodgion Rd., Independence, citytheatreofindependence.org

Brush Creek Art Walk | September 13-15, 216

PLUG Projects Critique Night, works by Miki

Miss Saigon | Starlight Theatre, 4600 Starlight

Dr. Sketchy’s Anti-Art School | 6-10 p.m. Sunday, 556 Lowell $10

Baird, Jessica Borusky and Gehry Kohler, and moderated by Julia Cole, James Woodfill and Neil Thurn | 6 p.m. Thursday, 1613 Genessee, plugprojects.com

Romeo & Juliet | She & Her Productions | Just

L’Hourloupe, artwork by Anthony Baab, Josephine

Port of Saints,retrospective of paintings by David

Rd., kcstarlight.com

Off Broadway Theatre, 3051 Central, sheandherproductions.com

The Tallest Tree in the Forest | Kansas City Repertory Theatre, Copaken Stage, 13th St. and Walnut, kcrep.org Venus in Fur | Unicorn Theatre, 3828 Main, unicorntheatre.org

Halvorson, Gabriel Hartley, David Livingston and Scott Wolniak | Greenlease Gallery, Rockhurst University, 1100 Rockhurst Rd.

New Cityscapes by Harriet Bigham | The Late

Show, 1600 Cherry

Order No. 11: Martial Law on the Missouri Border, by Wide Awake Films | The Box Gallery,

1000 Walnut

Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa

Boogaloo 7, SUNU | 6 p.m. Replay Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Broadway

Mengel Brothers Duo | 5-9 p.m. Chaz, 325 Ward Pkwy. Patrice Pike, Maria the Mexican, Driver | 7:30 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

Photo Futures with Andy Adams of FlakPhoto .com | 6-7 p.m. Thursday, Atkins Auditorium,

Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, 4525 Oak, nelsonatkins.org

Ward Parkway, brushcreekartwalk.org

Lauren Anderson | 9 p.m. Jerry’s Bait Shop, 13412

Mark Lowrey jazz jam | 6 p.m. Majestic, 931 Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey: Dragons |

Scott Dickson, Ari Fish, and Colin Leipelt, plus vintage Philip K. Dick paperbacks | 5 p.m. Monday, UMKC Gallery of Art, 5015 Holmes, Room 203

The Miss Firecracker Contest | City Theatre of

MUSIC

Brew Jam | 8 p.m. 75th Street Brewery, 520 W. 75th St.

ART EXHIBITS & EVENTS Anomalous: artists Matt Borruso, Jonah Criswell,

St., Olathe

CIRCUS

1111 Grand

KC Improv Festival | 7 p.m. Off Center Theatre, 2450

Bike MS 2013 | Garmin International, 1200 E. 151st

Goodrich | 6-9 p.m. Friday, 208 W. 19th St.

Second Friday Troost Art Hop | 6-10 p.m. Friday, Ubuntu Village Community Center, 4327 Troost

Dominique Sanders Trio | 10 p.m. Green Lady Lounge Sonic Spectrum Tribute : Cheap Trick with Federation of Horsepower, Dead Girls | 8 p.m. Record-

Bar, 1020 Westport Rd.

NIGHTLIFE

DJ G Train | 10 p.m. Replay Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence

ReelSmart Trivia | 6 p.m. Screenland Theatre at the Crossroads, 1656 Washington

Monday | 9.16 | PERFORMING ARTS

Zona Rosa Arts Festival | Friday-Sunday, 8640 N. Dixson Ave., zonarosa.com/Events

Blue Man Group | 7:30 p.m., $35-$41, Lied Center of Kansas, 1600 Stewart Dr., Lawrence

continued on page 36 34

the pitch

september 12-18, 2013

pitch.com

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september 12-18, 2013

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35

continued from page 34

ANDREW W.K.

FOOD & DRINK

KCK Greenmarket | 7:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Juniper Gardens,

AY TUESD

100 Richmond Ave., KCK

9.17

SPORTS

ty It’s par time!

Royals vs. Indians | 7:10 p.m. Kauffman Stadium MUSIC

Karrin Allyson | 7:30 p.m. Unity Temple, 707 W. 47th St. Aloha Radio | 8 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence Automatic Wolf | 7:30 p.m. Gaslight Gardens, 317 N. Second St., Lawrence

Chet Faker | 10 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd. Ewert & the Two Dragons | 6 p.m. Replay Lounge,

946 Massachusetts, Lawrence

The Mickey Hart Band, Tea Leaf Trio | 7 p.m. Crossroads KC at Grinders, 417 E. 18th St.

Andrew W.K., Six Percent, American Ghouls | 7 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Larry and His Flask, Them Damned Young Livers, the Blue Boot Heelers | 8 p.m. The Riot

FOOD & DRINK

Ken Lovern Trio | 7 p.m. The Blue Room, 1616 E. 18th St.

KCK Greenmarket | 7:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Keeler Women’s Center, 2220 Central, KCK

Mark Lowrey Trio | 6 p.m. The Majestic, 931 Broadway

SPORTS

Room, 4048 Broadway

Dent May, Dead Gaze, Rooms Without Windows

| 7:30 p.m. Czar, 1531 Grand

Rural Grit Happy Hour | 6 p.m. The Brick, 1727 McGee

Sporting KC vs. Real Esteli FC | 7 p.m. Sporting Park

PERFORMING ARTS

Blue Man Group | 7:30 p.m. Lied Center of Kansas, 1600 Stewart Dr., Lawrence LITERARY EVENTS

• UPCOMING EVENTS • 9.11 STEADY P & DJ MAHF, “ALBUM LISTENING PARTY” 9.13 THE BULLETPROOF TIGER, THE AUTHOR & THE ILLUSTRATOR, AFTER NATIONS 9.14 CMF PRESENTS:LEGAL BOOTCAMP FOR MUSICIANS (EARLY SHOW) 9.14 CROSSROADS MUSIC FEST W/ GOODING, DIVERSE, BLACKBIRD REVUE & MORE 9.16 DENT MAY 9.17 TWIN PEAKS W/ SNEAKY CREEPS 9.18 CASEY CRESCENZO OF DEAR HUNTER

Writers Place Poetry Series | 7 p.m. Johnson

County Central Resource Library, 9875 W. 87th St., Overland Park

HAPPY HOUR SPECIALS 4PM - 7PM . MON-SAT

1531 GRAND KCMO

816.421.0300 . CZARKC.COM 36

the pitch

september 12-18, 2013

MUSIC

Billy Beale’s blues jam | 10 p.m. Westport Saloon,

Tuesday | 9.17 |

The Steel Wheels, Joy Zimmerman | 7 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

Twin Peaks | 7:30 p.m. Czar, 1531 Grand

Royals vs. Indians | 7:10 p.m. Kauffman Stadium

Waldo Jazz Collective | 7-10 p.m. The Piano Room,

8410 Wornall

The Shilohs | 8 p.m. Davey’s Uptown, 3402 Main

NIGHTLIFE

DJ Highnoone and DJ Ashton Martin | 9 p.m. Sol

Cantina, 408 E. 31st St.

Futuro with Sigrah, Nmezee and special guests | 10 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

4112 Pennsylvania

Jazz Poetry Jam | 7 p.m. The Blue Room, 1616 E. 18th St.

Hudspeth and Shinetop | 7 p.m. B.B.’s Lawnside

Karaoke with Paul Nelson | MiniBar, 3810 Broadway

BBQ, 1205 E. 85th St.

Hermon Mehari Trio | 6 p.m. Majestic, 931 Broadway

Karaoke with Baby Brie | 11 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

Mobb Deep, Mac Lethal, the Alchemist, DJ Spinstyles, James Christos, the Popper | 8 p.m.

Open-mic comedy night | 9 p.m. Hamburger Mary’s,

Ott, Anomie Belle, Dreadheadedslut | 8 p.m. The

10 p.m. Gusto Lounge, 504 Westport Rd.

The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence

MUSEUM EXHIBITS

101 Southwest Blvd.

DJ HoodNasty, with Brent Tactic & DJ B-Stee |

Wednesday | 9.18 | LITERARY EVENTS

Alien Worlds and Androids | Science City–Union

Station, 30 W. Pershing Rd.

American Sabor: Latinos in U.S. Popular Music | American Jazz Museum, 1616 E. 18th St. Harmonies of the Homefront |National World War I Museum, 100 W. 26th St.

pitch.com

Real Pirates | Union Station, 30 W. Pershing Rd. Take Five Tour | 6 p.m. Tuesday, American Jazz Museum, 1616 E. 18th St., americanjazzmuseum.org

Author Tracey Garvis Graves | 7 p.m., $25.95 plus tax, Rainy Day Books, 2706 W. 53rd St., Fairway FOOD & DRINK

Truman Home Tours | 219 Delaware,

Independence

City Market Farmers Market | 9 a.m.-1 p.m., 205 E. Fifth St.

BEST COAST

WE D N

ESDAY

9.18

s at urf jam Indie S . a anad the Gr

Each week, Pitch Street Team cruises around to the hottest clubs, bars and concerts. You name it, we will be there. While we are out, we hand out tons of cool stuff. So look for the Street Team... We will be looking for you!

Best Coast, Bleached | 7 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Downtown Overland Park Farmers Market |

Foundation Big Band | 9 p.m. Green Lady Lounge,

7:30 a.m.-1 p.m., on Marty, between 79th and 80th streets

1809 Grand

Dueling Wine Dinner | 5-9 p.m., $65 per person, Final

Knuckleheads, 2715 Rochester

Cut Steakhouse at the Hollywood Casino, 777 Hollywood Casino Blvd., KCK

Fresh Promises Farmers Market | 4:30-7:30 p.m. Kill Creek Farm, Kill Creek Road, just off K-10, Gardner Waldo Farmers Market | 3-7 p.m. Habitat for Humanity ReStore, 303 W. 79th St. Westport Plaza Farmers Market | 4:30-7:30 p.m.

Westport Rd. and Wyoming

NET WORKING

1 Million Cups | 9 a.m. Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation, 4801 Rockhill Rd. SPORTS

Kansas City Walk for Water | 3 p.m. Kauffman Stadium, walkforwaterkc.org

Royals vs. Indians | 7:10 p.m. Kauffman Stadium MUSIC

Acoustic jam session with Tyler Gregory |

Jazzhaus, 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Best Coast, Bleached | 7 p.m. The Granada, 1020

Massachusetts, Lawrence

The Paul Collins Beat, Dead Girls, Rev Gusto |

Zoe Muth and the Lost High Rollers | 7:30 p.m.

New Franklin Panthers, Mr. & the Mrs., the Waspmen | 10 p.m. Replay Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Jackson Scott, the Electric Lungs, Nikki and the Rooftop Punch | 8 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

s

Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence

Vindicator, Vanlade | 11:30 p.m. The Riot Room,

4048 Broadway

NIGHTLIFE

DJs Mike Scott, Spinstyles and Bill Pile | MiniBar,

3810 Broadway

Drew Six | 6-9 p.m. Cactus Grill, 11849 Roe, Leawood Karaoke | The Quaff, 1010 Broadway MOKAN Twang Vinyl Country Night | 8 p.m. Frank James Saloon, 10919 N.W. Hwy. 45, Parkville

Tango dance night | 8 p.m. Coda, 1744 Broadway Weirdo Wednesday Supper Club with Annie

Cherry, Damian Blake, Microphone Jack, Tyson Schroeder, and Schwervon! | 7:30 p.m. Davey’s Uptown, 3402 Main

Westport Girlz | 8 p.m. Californos, 4124 Pennsylvania

Casey Crescenzo of the Dear Hunter, Eyelit, Scott Schumann | 7:30 p.m. Czar, 1531 Grand

DJ Ashton Martin | Gusto Lounge, 504 Westport Rd.

644 Massachusetts, Lawrence

First Friday in the Crossroad

The Steel Wheels, Joy Zimmerman | 7 p.m. The

10 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

Danny Brown, Action Bronson | 7 p.m. Liberty Hall,

First Friday ads in the Crossro

E-mail submissions to calendar@pitch.com or enter submissions at pitch.com, where you can search our complete listings guide.

Falld See more ono the link at p o Wald Craw“promotions” ldo Falldo Waldo Crawldo @ Lew’s Grill & Bar

@ Lew’s Grill & Bar

Upcoming Events 9.13 - Icona Pop @ KC Live Block 9.13 & 14 - Dancefestopia @ Berkley Riverfront Park 9.14 - Bike MS @ Lawrence Bike Village 9.15 - AIDS Bicycle Cruise in Westport

See more on the “promotions” link at p pitch.com

september 12-18, 2013

the pitch

37

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size and having him fuck you with toys,” Matthew said. “When it comes to the sheath, keep it jovial — laugh about it and tell him he’s sexy. A fun atmosphere can help alleviate insecurities. And by the time you’re done and dusted, you’ll know better if you prefer him with or without the sheath.” See OhJoySexToy.com to see examples of Erika and Matthew’s work. Their comic about pregnancy is particularly inspired and a great resource for parents who are having a hard time explaining where babies come from.

Dear Dan: I’m a Savage Lovecast listener, but I’m sending this question to your column because my boyfriend would FOR SURE recognize my voice if I called the show. I’m 25, I live in Portland, and my boyfriend and I have been monogamous for five years. His dick is of average size. It’s not small enough for him to have dealt with the emotional baggage associated with “small dicks.” Yet, I’ve had sex with big dicks, and I would love to try one of those dick sheaths or extenders or whatever. But my boyfriend is a sensitive guy, and I feel like I’m going to permanently fuck up our sex life if I ask for one. How can I propose this without him feeling like his manhood is insufficient? I’ve heard you talk about how it’s best to share your kinks as if they were added bonuses — and not as if they were terminal cancers — but I can’t figure out how to talk about this without hurting his ego.

Sincerely Loves Average Man Dear SLAM: “Getting a sheath onto her boyfriend’s dick without hurting his feelings will be a bit tricky,” said Matthew Nolan of OhJoySexToy.com. “No matter their size, lads around the world are brought up with dick insecurities. Having said that, a dick sheath isn’t the worst thing in the world for her to bring to the table: It involves her boyfriend as a participant, and it keeps his dick in the loop.” Matthew and his partner, Erika Moen, collaboratively create an informative, subversive and entertaining weekly comic that focuses on the world of sex — from sex-toy reviews to interviews with people in the sex industry to sharing sex-education lessons. They research and write the text together, and Erika does all the drawing. Why comics? “Sex education is typically very dry,” said Erika. “Comics are especially well-equipped to teach people about their bodies, sexual options and reproductive choices because they combine images and text together, making subjects approachable and visually appealing. And, hey, adding in a joke or two helps make people feel included in the conversation instead of being lectured at.” In a recent comic, Matthew gave cock sheaths a try. A cock sheath — for those of you who haven’t visited a sex-toy shop in a while — is a popular new sex toy that allows an average dude to be huge and a huge dude to be ridiculous. They’re pliable-but-firm hollow dildos that a guy wears over his dick. The dude slides his hard, lubed-up dick inside the sheath, pulls his balls through a ring at the base that prevents the sheath from sliding off, and proceeds to bang away at his partner’s hole(s) like a porn star. That’s the theory anyway. 38

the pitch

september 12-18, 2013

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“The dick sheaths I tried weren’t the greatest thing for my partner and me,” Matthew said. “They dull the senses and turn your dick into an unwieldy mess. Despite owning a few, my preference is to use a big dildo on my partner instead of wearing a dick sheath.” But if it’s a dick sheath you want, Matthew has some advice about how to get one. “SLAM should suggest going sex-toy shopping with her boyfriend,” Matthew said. “She could tell her boyfriend she’s in a filthy mood and fancies something big. She should put the emphasis on wanting him to give her some big-toy fucking and add that this is something that you can both do together. Have him help pick out different toys — like some big dildos — while saying encouraging things, like ‘Ooohh, wouldn’t you like to fuck me with this one?’ When you come across the cock sheath, add it to your cart explaining that it would be a perfect sex-toy solution for your mood.” I’m going to break in here for a second: If you feel like your boyfriend might have a meltdown if you start talking about wanting something huge for a change, head to the sex-toy shop without any stated agenda and see how he reacts to the cock sheaths on display. If he recoils from them, you might wanna steer him over to the body paints and bondage gear. But if he seems intrigued and not threatened by the cock sheaths, ask him how he’d feel about fucking you with one of those, without seeming too hugely invested in being fucked by one of those yourself. And what do you do if you manage to leave the sex-toy store with a cock sheath and a boyfriend whose ego is still intact? “Be encouraging about enjoying the extra

Dear Dan: I���m a 22-year-old heterosexual female. I may possibly be bi, but I don’t know. I really like the dick, but I’m attracted to women and fantasize about fucking a pretty woman with a strap-on. I asked my boyfriend of a year if I could live out my fantasy, but he said he doesn’t want me “fucking another woman like a man.” I asked if maybe I could do this to him instead, but he said no. I like BDSM, but the most he’ll do is hold my arms down and spank me. I’ve asked for other things — bondage, nipple clamps, paddles, etc. — but he says that stuff takes too much time and the bother of it “kills the mood.” I offered to set up stuff beforehand — ropes already tied to the corners of the bed, for instance — but he doesn’t want me to do that because “what if someone saw it.” Am I just being inconsiderate and selfish? Maybe I’m asking too much, but I felt that I was beyond honest about all of this before we started dating. My ex-husband (yes, ex-husband: I got married at 16 and divorced last year) was never OK with any of this, either, and would call me a freak when I opened up about my desires, so I made sure not to hide them from my current boyfriend when we met. Now what am I supposed to do? Just drop it? Or should I talk to him? How do I talk to him?

Confused and Sexually Denied Dear CASD: Yes, you should drop it — and by

“it” I mean “him.” You wasted five years of your life on a man who couldn’t meet your needs and sex-shamed you about your perfectly ordinary, perfectly average kinks. You’ve been with this new guy for a year, and he has revealed himself to be every bit as lazy, inconsiderate and sex-shamey as your ex-husband. DTMFA. There are tons of guys out there who would (1) be happy to indulge your kinks and (2) make lovely boyfriends and/or husbands. Go find one — or two or three or four. The Savage Lovecast is at savagelovecast.com.

Have a question for Dan Savage? E-mail him at mail@savagelove.net

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