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OC TOBER 3–9, 2013 | VOL. 33 NO. 14 E D I T O R I A L

Editor Scott Wilson Managing Editor Justin Kendall Music Editor Natalie Gallagher Staff Writers Charles Ferruzza, David Hudnall, Steve Vockrodt Editorial Operations Manager Deborah Hirsch Events Editor Berry Anderson Proofreader Brent Shepherd Contributing Writers Tracy Abeln, Jonathan Bender, Liz Cook, Adrianne DeWeese, April Fleming, Nancy Hull Rigdon, Larry Kopitnik, Angela Lutz, Dan Lybarger, Dan Savage, Lucas Wetzel

DR AW I NG FI R E KU’s David Guth blunders into a red-state test of the First Amendment. BY DAV I D H U D N A L L

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BALLO T S CI ENCE Before KC can become a translational research hub, a November 5 measure tests sales-tax tolerance. B Y S T E V E VO C K R O D T

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Filmmaker Roger Ross Williams’ God Loves Uganda exposes U.S. influence on Africa’s anti-homosexuality legislation. BY DA N LY B A R G E R

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DRAWING FIRE

KU’s David Guth blunders into a red-state test of the First Amendment.

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NEWS

Careful opening your beak, buddy.

punching them in the throat and kicking there balls in until they can taste them.” Beneath this bit of Swiftian rhetoric, Stoneking chimed in by posting the home address of Aaron Estabrook, a member of the Manhattan, Kansas, School Board and a founder of the Moderate Party of Kansas. Estabrook is also a combat veteran who served in Afghanistan. Stoneking was subsequently called upon to resign from the KSRA for inciting violence against Estabrook. Unmoved by her detractors’ arguments, she rode out the controversy and stayed on as president. So she could make helpful statements like this one, about Guth: “Its [sic] one thing to engage in thoughtful dialogue and speak against something but it is quite another to incite violence.” Of course, none of these Kansas Republicans sounded quite so incensed back in 2011, when Kansas Rep. Virgil Peck suggested that the state should take on illegal immigrants the same way it uses helicopters and guns to control the wild-pig population. “It looks to me that if shooting these immigrating feral hogs works, maybe we have found a [solution] to our illegal immigration problem,” he memorably quipped. By the end of the week, Chancellor GrayLittle announced that Guth would be taking an indefinite paid administrative leave while KU reviewed matters. What the school must ask itself now is what professors are allowed to say outside their classrooms. Guth is a public employee, but his tweet was not related to his work at the university. Does his job as a public employee abridge his First Amendment right to tweet as he pleases? Public universities exist in part to challenge ideas, cultivate independent thinking and present differing viewpoints. Professors need the academic freedom to do these things — and, sometimes, to provoke debate — without worrying about losing their jobs. Firing Guth would reinforce for flat-earthers like Stoneking and Bruce the idea that it’s acceptable to hold university funding hostage over pet political issues. Imagine if Guth had left out the most provocative sentence of his tweet: “Next time, let it be YOUR sons and daughters.” His clumsy remarks would still have been polarizing, but it seems unlikely that anybody would have hounded Guth over them. But in that sentence might be the line between speech that’s protected and speech that, in Kansas, is not. The only upside to this melodrama for Guth is that his case may help draw that line. Unfortunately for him, he won’t have much say about which side he lands on.

E-mail david.hudnall@pitch.com pitch.com

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nsas cit Ka ycle s y er rc o

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I support any budget proposals or recommendations for the University of Kansas,” Smith said in a press release. In other words, Smith is willing to starve one of the largest employers in the state unless it fires one guy who tweeted something Smith didn’t like. Leadership Kansans can count on. Also windbagging it up was Senate majority leader Terry Bruce, of Hutchinson, who pronounced himself “appalled” by the tweet and implored KU chancellor Bernadette GrayLittle to ax Guth. Bruce, who scores a perfect 100 percent with the NRA, has also received $2,500 in campaign contributions from the organization since 2004. Less influential but equally full of shit was Patricia Stoneking, president of the Kansas State Rifle Association. In a news release, Stoneking vowed that the KSRA would do “everything possible” to see that Guth was removed from his position at the university. Are you maybe thinking right now that the person in charge of a rifle association in Kansas has probably been involved in more reprehensible activities than Guth’s tweet? Guess what? In the backwaters of the Sunflower State, there exists a survivalist militia group called the Kansas Frontiersmen. God knows what its members do when they get together, but when they convene on the Internet, they like to grouse about Muslims, liberals and insufficiently conservative “RINOs” (Republicans in Name Only). This past June, a member named James R. Miller Jr. made a belligerent post on the Frontiersmen’s Facebook page condemning those who work with moderate politicians. Fill in your own [sic]s: “They need to know we do not support this form of compromise … I am at the point of now when some raises there fists to me in a threatening manner, I am going to respond by

D AV ID HUDN A L L

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o, a white guy in Kansas has said something idiotic and sparked another tiresome round in the culture wars. Except this time, it wasn’t a knuckledragging Republican channeling those simpler days when women kept silent and gays were too ashamed to hold hands in public. No, this particular white guy is a member of the “liberal elite” — a professor in the journalism department at the University of Kansas. On September 16, reacting to the Navy Yard shooting in Washington, D.C., that claimed the lives of 13 people (counting the killer), KU’s David Guth wrote on his personal blog, Snapping Turtle: “The NRA has championed a gun culMORE ture that is shredding our nation’s moral authority like armor-plated bullets T A E IN ONL .COM ripping through flesh. … H C IT P There is no justification for the widespread sale of assault weapons, high-volume magazines or hollow-point bullets. In fact, their sale is a well-documented threat to national security.” That was not the stupid part. The stupid part was that Guth followed it up with this tweet: “The blood is on the hands of the #NRA. Next time, let it be YOUR sons and daughters. Shame on you. May God damn you.” Gulp. Guth teaches strategic communications, but this bit of public fire starting felt less than tactical. And he was maybe one atrocity too late to make his best case against the NRA. Aaron Alexis, the Navy Yard shooter, had obtained his weapon legally and was already on the authorities’ radar. Once those facts came to light, Guth came across as even more unhinged in his geezerlike outrage. (Not helping matters is that Guth’s blog appears to predate Wordpress by a few presidential administrations. A post after his NRA screed heralds the songwriting prowess of the band Five for Fighting.) Not that anybody noticed — at first. But three days after that tweet, a conservative blog called CampusReform.org picked up the “story.” The NRA wasted no time corralling its conservative lackeys in Kansas politics, who pounced on KU and called for Guth’s head. Leading the charge was Kansas Sen. Greg Smith, a high school social studies teacher in the Shawnee Mission School District. The NRA gave Smith a 92 percent, or “A,” rating in 2012. “As long as Professor Guth remains employed by the University of Kansas I will no longer recommend the university as an institution worthy of attendance by any of my students nor, as a State Senator, will

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Before KC can become a translational-research hub, a November 5 measure tests sales-tax tolerance.

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etting to Lynda Bonewald’s office requires navigating a maze of windowless corridors on an upper floor of the University of Missouri– Kansas City’s School of Dentistry. Past the door, her Hospital Hill work space is no place for the claustrophobic. It’s an unassuming little room, out of proportion with Bonewald’s status as one of the nation’s betterregarded scientists in her field. The splendidly named UMKC science researcher has made her career studying bones, earning particular acclaim with her inquiries into the osteocyte, a bone cell that, prior to

her work, was thought to be almost without function. Bonewald’s fellow researchers admonished her for wasting time on osteocytes. She ignored those warnings. “I pursued it anyway because I couldn’t believe that cell wasn’t important,” Bonewald says. She has been at it since 1993, when she saw another researcher’s image of the spaceship-shaped cell; over the past 20 years, she has helped prove that the cells are among the most important elements in human-bone biology. These days, one of Bonewald’s most important studies is the development of new bone

cement for fixing broken limbs or securing prosthetics such as hip replacements. The bone cements that have been on the market for the past 40 years are toxic. Bonewald is chasing a safe replacement. If successful through clinical trials, the result of her work could represent a researcher’s holy grail, a discovery that could improve lives and make millions. And while the physical route to Bonewald’s office is labyrinthine, federal research funding has found a clearer path to her doorstep, given the high regard for her work. Last year, she received an $8.3 million grant from the National Institutes of Health

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to study how bones and muscles relate to each other in order to find out why both lose mass as humans age. She knows she’s fortunate to get this help when political infighting and a broke federal government have pinched NIH grants. What has historically been a thick artery for research dollars has had its budget cut $1.7 billion since the passage of the Budget Control Act of 2011. Current NIH biomedical research is $4.7 billion less than 2003 funding levels, according to the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. continued on page 10 o c t o b e r 3 - 9, 2 0 1 3

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Ballot Science continued from page 9 “It’s really disheartening to see what’s happening to my colleagues,” Bonewald says. That’s why Bonewald, a member of the Kansas City Area Life Sciences Institute, is among those lobbying Jackson County voters to pass a November 5 ballot measure to increase the sales tax by a half-cent. Doing so would raise $800 million over 20 years to fund what’s called “translational research,” the type of work Bonewald does: building on basic research in order to find treatments that can be sold to patients. That revenue would go to a newly formed Jackson County Institute for Translational Medicine; half would then be administered for research at Children’s Mercy Hospital, with most of the rest split evenly among St. Luke’s Health System and UMKC. Advocates for the tax say the steady, reliable stream of money it would generate could be parlayed into more research dollars from other sources and could lead to major medicalresearch breakthroughs in Jackson County. It could, they say, put this area on the research map at a level similar to Boston and San Diego. But the proposal has some scratching their heads, unaccustomed to a measure that would direct sales tax away from its usual destinations, including public safety and badly needed infrastructure. Sales tax in Kansas City is already among the highest in the Midwest, and it already disproportionately affects the poorest re side nt s of one of

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the least wealthy counties in the metro, a place where nearly one in four people between the ages of 18 and 64 don’t have access to health insurance. At those residents’ expense, money from the tax increase would funnel into a speculative venture (medical research comes with no guarantees) and fund well-paid scientists. Compounding skepticism about the tax is the way it has been trotted out, splashed publicly for the first time on the front page of the August 8 edition of The Kansas City Star, less than three months before voting. But little organized opposition has emerged so far. Perhaps Jackson County voters are fine with paying more sales tax so that local researchers can look for new medical treatments. (The pro-tax TV ads that show kids and seniors in hospital rooms don’t do much to explain translational research, but they tug the heartstrings.) Or maybe marching out a big, complicated proposal just weeks before an off-year Election Day is supposed to shortcircuit the kind of discussion that could push against the tax.

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he proposal basically goes like this: If the tax passes, $40 million a year for the next 20 years will mostly fund translational medical research. Translational research is what happens after basic research. For example, basic research might focus on figuring out which gene mutations trigger a type of cancer. Translational medical research uses that knowledge to develop treatments for that type of cancer, put them through clinical trials and, if successful, bring them to market. Patients get medicine, and pharmaceutical companies make millions, if not billions. The $40 million a year would flow through a Jackson County Institute for Translational Medicine. The institute at Hospital Hill would use half of that annual $40 million for research by Children’s Mercy Hospital, while 20 percent would be earmarked for research at UMKC, and another 20 percent for St. Luke’s. The rest would go to vaguely defined grants and research-training programs offered through the Metropolitan Community College system.

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Dan Tarwater, a longtime county legislator, asked Levi what would happen if one of the hospitals or UMKC successfully marketed a medical treatment that had already been in development before the tax passed. Could the institutions make some argument to keep some of the profits from the treatment? “What’s to stop an institution, from them saying, ‘We were 50 percent of the way there,’” Tarwater asked. “So we [Jackson County] get 20 percent of the 50 percent? What is going to happen?” Levi punted. “That will have to be one of the first things ironed out and presented to the board of directors. I can’t give you an exact answer today,” Levi said. “Right now, there’s no particular device, no particular drug we can identify that’s ackson County’s pursuit of funding for currently being developed or marketed.” An early copy of the proposed ballot lanmedical research goes back as far as 2007. guage stated that 20 percent of profits from But you wouldn’t have known it from the Jackson County Legislature’s August 26 meeting, the commercialization of treatments develwhen elected officials were asked to put the oped in Jackson County would go back to the $800 million tax (more, if you count inflation) county’s health-care foundation. But no referon the November 5 ballot. ence to that 20 percent apSecuring a vote that day pears in the ballot language was important to tax advothat legislators approved. “I think it’s a sign cates, who wouldn’t have Levi tells The Pitch in of very bad acting another audience with the an e-mail that the 20-perJackson County Legislature cent prof it-red i rec t ion on the Civic before the deadline for addlanguage was taken out ing their measure this year. because it seemed confusCouncil’s part.” In the basement of the ing. He adds that because Independence Courthouse Jackson County Executive Annex on that hot, sweaty Sanders signed a memoday, Legislature chairman Greg Grounds randum of understanding — also signed by leaned toward his microphone and told an unall the parties involved, such as Children’s usually packed crowd (mostly media and tax Mercy, St. Luke’s and UMKC — the language proponents) that the noon meeting would start can’t be changed without the approval of late. Bureaucrats were still trying to type up the all involved. ballot and ordinance language to meet several The Pitch wrote back to Levi, asking if the changes requested by legislators since the tax memorandum of understanding is a legally proposal’s public airing the week before. binding document, thus ensuring that the 20 The ballot information made it to the legislapercent would indeed go back to the county. tors, but some additional specifics needed to Levi did not respond. be pinned down. Brad Bradshaw, a physician, lawyer and Seated before the legislators were Wayne leading opponent of the tax, doesn’t think it Carter, president and CEO of the Kansas City is binding. Area Life Sciences Institute (a research propoOne of the main parties pushing for the tax nent), and Pete Levi, a Polsinelli lawyer doing is the Civic Council of Greater Kansas City, a pro bono work for the KCALSI. nonprofit organization of local business execuBackers of the proposal are betting that the research might lead to those pharmaceutical billions. If a discovery makes money, 20 percent of the net revenue from its sales are supposed to come back to Jackson County for various purposes, such as public health, or back to the JCITM itself. The idea that Jackson County residents would pay for this type of research is a new concept for the public at large, but the measure’s planners have been developing it for years. The opportunity they had hoped for came when another Jackson County initiative, a large-scale mass-transit proposal shopped around for the past few years by Jackson County Executive Mike Sanders, went off the rails earlier this year.

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tives who pool their influence and finances for various causes. That they’ve played a role in pushing the tax so close to the voting date has been an annoyance to other civic types. “I think it’s a sign of very bad acting on the Civic Council’s part that they do this in such a way that it comes out in August for approval

cials there have worked for about a year to get a half-cent sales-tax increase to finance that community’s chronically underfunded parks and recreation program. Dale Carter, a Blue Springs City Council member (no relation to Wayne Carter), tells The Pitch that he had no idea the research tax was coming, while the city had been in dis-

“Taxes not only go out of your pocket — it drives up the cost of food.” in November, giving us no time to talk about it,” says Crosby Kemper III, CEO of the Kansas City Public Library. Tax proponents zeroed in on the November 5 ballot after Sanders announced that he wouldn’t put his transit proposal up for a vote this year. Sanders couldn’t work out agreements with railway companies to share their tracks for a commuter rail system. But why not put the research tax on the April 2014 ballot, when there could be more time for discussion? That April ballot may have some other issues, like the proposed Kansas City Charter revision. Levi says having the vote in November allows the public to focus on one issue. “There has also been so much energy to make this happen, putting it off until April, there was a chance for that energy to dissipate,” Levi tells The Pitch. Mark Jorgenson, president of U.S. Bank in Kansas City and a member of the Civic Council’s executive committee, acknowledges the skepticism about the research tax’s timing. “I understand the cynicism and if not involved, I would harbor some of the same thoughts,” Jorgenson tells The Pitch. “Something like this, with as many partners, is complicated in terms of trying to put together the right organizational arrangement. You’ve got Children’s Mercy, you’ve got UMKC, you’ve got St. Luke’s, you’ve got Jackson County. You’ve got a lot of constituencies, and it takes awhile to make sure what you’re putting together makes sense.” The research tax bears resemblance to the 2011 sales-tax increase for the Kansas City Zoo. The zoo tax was also scheduled for an off-year election with no other high-profile causes or campaign races that typically draw voters in large numbers. Off-year, single-issue elections typically yield low turnout, especially for opponents of a measure; the zoo tax brought out only 11 percent of Jackson County voters, 63 percent of whom approved the sales tax to bring penguins to the zoo. People such as Kemper weren’t the only ones caught off guard by the timing of the research-tax announcement. Blue Springs residents are the only voters who have two decisions to make on November 5. City offi-

cussions with Sanders about his transit-tax idea for years. “I’m very concerned it’s going to have a negative impact on a tax we’ve been working on for some time,” Carter says. Speaking of transit, enthusiasts for Sanders’ commuter-rail plan were also floored that the Jackson County executive made a play for a research tax after working for three years on trying to get commuter rail on the ballot. “We were a little bit surprised by this decision to go after a half-cent sales tax for health care,” says Kite Singleton, chairman of the Kansas City Regional Transit Alliance. Sanders, through a spokesman, declined to be interviewed for this story.

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efore Wayne Carter moved to the Midwest, he lived with his family in Connecticut, close to Pfizer, where he worked as the pharmaceutical company’s director of translational research. While Carter was there, his team developed a voice acoustic technology that could interpret the sounds of a speaker’s voice and give a reasonable prediction of the person’s risk for Parkinson’s disease. But Pfizer deemed that the Parkinson’s market was not large enough and didn’t pursue the development further. Major drug companies like Pfizer shy away from products or treatments that won’t generate around $1 billion a year in revenue. Carter tells The Pitch that major pharmaceutical companies that do translational medical research invest only in treatments that are reasonably sure to make plenty of money, leaving out more speculative ventures. “It is so expensive for a company like Pfizer or Novartis to get a drug on the market,” Carter says over coffee at Union Station, which houses the KCALSI offices. “They’re looking for that next massive blockbuster drug that will create revenue for the next 15 to 17 years.” That means much of translational research has become the province of university and medical-center researchers. “Just like the federal government, the pharmaceutical industry is going through a bit of a change as far as it runs its business,” says Stephen Kingsmore, a genomic researcher at

Children’s Mercy Hospital. “Pharma is trying to reinvent itself in a number of ways to be more profitable. Traditionally, it was a powerhouse of basic research. Increasingly, they’ve become more marketing majors as opposed to research majors.” Kingsmore is considered one of the leading genomic researchers in the United States and beyond. He directs Children’s Mercy Hospital’s Center for Pediatric Genomic Medicine, where his staff is able to sequence the genes of a newborn child or a toddler in two days, at a cost of $10,000. By contrast, sequencing a human’s genes took more than 15 years and $3 billion the first time it was done, in 2003. Rapid gene sequencing is important for treating newborns and toddlers with genetic disorders. Without a fast method of sequencing their genes, diagnosing a specific disorder is something of a crapshoot. The Scottish-born researcher came to Kansas City from New Mexico’s National Center for Genomic Researchers. Children’s Mercy invested more than $10 million to get his team up and running. Kingsmore says Kansas City had little in the way of a reputation for medical research when he was in New Mexico. “It was zero. I knew nothing about it,” he says. “When people think of powerhouses in medical research and biotech, they think of the East Coast and West Coast — Kansas City was a flyover region when it came to genomics. Now we’re recognized as a leader.” Last month, Kingsmore’s team received a $5.8 million NIH grant for genomic sequencing for children. Like Bonewald, Kingsmore understands his good fortune. As recently as 2000, he says, grant applications had about a 33 percent success rate. Today, only about 9 percent of applications end up with funding, a decline due largely to federal cutbacks in research. “If you think about it, you need to put in 11 applications to win one,” Kingsmore says. “That’s above and beyond what most people are able to do.” A September 24 NIH report indicates that the United States has slashed its scientific continued on page 12

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Ballot Science continued from page 11 research-and-development funding 5 percent this year, thanks to sequestration. At the same time, China’s spending went up 15 percent. Germany, Japan and South Korea also have added to their research-and-development outlays. Sequestration’s effects have been noticeable here. At the University of Kansas Medical Center, researchers received $53 million in NIH grants for fiscal year 2013, down $3.5 million from the year before. Kingsmore would like to see Jackson County voters approve the sales tax for medical research, for long-term and short-term reasons. His $5.8 million NIH grant was preceded by $1 million in seed funding from the William

In 2004, California voters passed Proposition 71 to publicly fund stem-cell research through the state’s sale of up to $3 billion in bonds. Closer to home, Johnson County voters in 2008 agreed to spring for a one-eighth-cent sales-tax increase to fund what was called the Johnson County Education Research Triangle. As its name suggests, the JCERT tax funded three specific projects. JCERT pumped money into developing the Kansas State University Innovation Campus in Olathe; the Business, Engineering, Science and Technology Building at KU’s Overland Park Edwards Campus; and the KU Clinical Research Center in Fairway. The JCERT tax played a significant role in KU’s snagging the National Cancer Institute designation, a recognition that’s expected to yield more cancer-research positions at KU and more funding for those researchers’ work.

“Jackson County’s proposal doesn’t raise near enough money. One-half cent statewide would generate $400 million a year.” T. Kemper Foundation. He believes the two are related. ���If you don’t have the $1 million, the chance of getting the $6 million is much, much less,” Kingsmore says.

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Gentry George. Photo Eduardo Patino, NYC

P R E S E N T S

ithout the Stowers Institute for Medical Research, no one today would be talking about a translational-research tax. The Kansas City research complex was first envisioned in 1994 with a $2 billion endowment from American Century Investments founder Jim Stowers and his wife, Virginia, both cancer survivors. The thing about the Stowers Institute, however, is that it almost exclusively conducts basic research. In 2007, the KCALSI’s scientific advisory board (made up of top researchers from such places as Harvard University and the University of California–Berkeley) told KCALSI officials that they needed to figure out a way to capitalize on the opportunity presented by the Stowers Institute — namely, finding a way to translate the institute’s basic research. But not much got done that year. Or in 2008. Or in 2009. “By year 2010, they said, ‘Are you guys listening to us?’ ” Wayne Carter tells The Pitch. Some members of the local civic community decided upon sales tax as the best way to fund the research after contemplating property tax or establishing a research foundation. Advocates for the tax say they’re not aware of another place in the country that would cull sales taxes for translational medical research, but the idea isn’t without precedent.

But critics of the Jackson County research proposal see fault in its use of sales tax, often considered a regressive tax because it has a disproportionate effect on poorer areas of the county, areas where people have enough trouble as it is accessing health care. The tax increase would boost some areas of Jackson County into the stratosphere of Midwest sales-tax rates. Omaha’s sales-tax rate is 7 percent. Minneapolis’ is 7.75 percent. Chicago’s sales-tax rate is 9.25 percent on general merchandise. Jackson County’s base sales-tax rate is already 8.35 percent, but Kansas City’s sales tax in downtown’s south loop has gone up to 10.35 percent now that the streetcar transportation development district has kicked in. With the research tax, that would swell to 10.85 percent. “You have to add everything else in,” says Kemper, who is also chairman of the Show-Me Institute, a Missouri libertarian think tank. “Taxes not only go out of your pocket — it drives up the cost of food, it drives up the cost of everything else. The only places we are looking good on taxes is food and cigarettes. We should probably be raising our taxes there.” The chief financial officer for Washington, D.C., every year prepares a report comparing that city’s tax burden with other major cities across the country. Its 2011 report ranks Kansas City’s tax burden No. 15 in the United States for a hypothetical family of three on an income of $25,000. That’s one position ahead of New York City and three positions ahead of Detroit, a city that earlier this year declared the largest municipal bankruptcy in U.S. history. Steve Glorioso, a longtime local political


operative who these days is one of the minds behind pro-medical-tax Committee for Research, Treatments and Cures, takes exception to the “regressive” adjective. “All local taxes are regressive — sales tax, property tax, earnings tax in Kansas City,” he says. Or, as the notes he took with him to meet with the Star’s editorial board say, “The only really non-regressive tax is the federal income tax. Especially when you include the earned income tax credit.” But some sales taxes that pay for public goods, like safety and infrastructure, are scheduled to go back before voters in the coming years. Will those sales taxes be renewed if the medical-research tax has already pushed sales tax into the double digits? Advocates envision Jackson County getting a return on voters’ investment — if the three institutes benefiting from the tax can develop treatments or cures. “What I would tell you is, you’re probably not looking at all your costs,” says UMKC Chancellor Leo Morton when asked how the university justifies a regressive tax for medical research. “What would you pay to have your child lead a healthier life? Is that worth the investment?” Cures and treatments can take a long time to develop and bring to market after years of clinical trials and regulatory approvals, a fact that tax advocates acknowledge. So any return on Jackson County’s investment could be several years in the making, assuming local researchers discover a medical breakthrough and bring it to market. “It’s hard to say to a researcher, ‘You will have a discovery by the end of the month,’ ” Morton says. “We just have to believe it can happen here because it has happened here. “It’s not a bet. It would be a gamble if it had never happened before.”

B

rad Bradshaw started his professional life as a doctor. When he saw how sloppy doctors could be, he became a lawyer, representing patients in medical malpractice suits. He learned both professions at UMKC, but now he’s something of a thorn in his alma mater’s side. And he’s not making friends with St. Luke’s Health System, Children’s Mercy Hospital or other civic interests hoping to pass the research tax. He has funded Citizens for Responsible Research, nominally an opposition group to the research tax, with about $100,000 of his own money. So far, his is the primary opposition to the research-tax proposal, the only entity airing TV ads against the measure. Bradshaw’s critics seize on the fact that he lives in Springfield, Missouri. (He practices there and in St. Louis; his KC office is on the Country Club Plaza.) “It’s perplexing as to why an out-oftown lawyer who makes part of his living suing hospitals would want to deny Jackson County citizens the opportunity to improve their lives through advanced medical re-

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search and healthcare,” campaign spokesman Pat O’Neill said in a statement to The Pitch. (He sent the same note to the Star for its piece on Bradshaw.) Bradshaw wanted to put a statewide salestax proposal for medical research on the ballot in 2015 or 2016, a measure that he says would raise 10 times more money than the Jackson County proposal and generate more meaningful research. “Jackson County’s proposal doesn’t raise near enough money,” he says. “One-half cent statewide would generate $400 million a year.” Bradshaw calls the Jackson County proposal venture capital for private corporations. And St. Luke’s and Children’s Mercy are indeed big-dollar organizations. Children’s Mercy, for example, reported $816.8 million in revenue in fiscal year 2011, $13.2 million after expenses. Its fund balance is $519 million. David Westbrook, a vice president of strategy and innovation for Children’s Mercy, defends the hospital’s half-billion-dollar-plus fund balance. The hospital needs that money, he says, to maintain its standing with ratings agencies, which assign the equivalent of a personal credit score to companies and organizations. “That amount of cash we keep in the bank is there to protect us against aberrations that can take place in the market,” Westbrook told The Pitch in September. The Pitch still had questions for Westbrook about the hospital’s finances, but Westbrook ended the interview and said he had a meeting coming up that would last 30 minutes. “I’ll call you back,” he said. He never did, nor did he respond to followup messages.

E-mail steve.vockrodt@pitch.com

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P p

P welcomes Outpost Journal to Kansas City! OutpOst JOurnal Issue 3 OutpOst JOurnal p celebrates the thriving creative culture of Kansas City with 64 gorgeous full color pages, including a limited edition screen print and insert by Kansas City-based artists. As seen through the eyes of the Outpost Journal staff, “Kansas City is undergoing an explosive time of creativity and ideas.”

Drop by Mid-America Arts Alliance at 2018 Baltimore in the Crossroads on First Friday, Oct. 4, as they host the official Launch Party welcoming OutpOst JOuRNAL to the Midwest! Also on FIRST FRIDAY at Mid-America Arts Alliance: “Our People, Our Land, Our Images”: Indigenous Peoples Though the Eyes of Indigenous Photographers authentic work of indigenous artists from North America, Peru, Iraq, and New Zealand. ◊ ExhibitiOn hOurs: 5:30 p.m.-8 p.m. bLuE OrLEAns: October’s LIVE! in the Crossroads concert features Blue Orleans, a great rhythm and roots band from Kansas City. Blue Orleans mixes zydeco, Bourbon Street rock ‘n’ roll, blues, reggae, ska and Caribbean. ◊ PErFOrMAncE tiME: 8 p.m.-10 p.m. 14

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Issue 3

available for a limited time at: American Jazz Museum Birdies Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art Mid-America Arts Alliance Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art YJ’s Snack Bar Wonder Fair (Lawrence)

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WEEK OF OCTOBER 3-9

FIRST FRIDAY HIT LIST A

t the Mattie Rhodes Gallery (915 West 17th Street), the Día de Los Muertos exhibition celebrates its quinceañera with KC’s beloved Scribe. What he’s done with traditional motifs such as calaveras (skulls) is endearing. The cross-pollination of cultures is one of the best things about this city, and this annual event remains a high point on the calendar. A man who goes by Anson the Ornery, one of the artists showing tonight at Pop Up (2100 Grand), challenges viewers to mark all over his huge self-portrait. You have permission to grapple with the concept of paying to destroy or preserve artwork by altering smaller pieces that then will be auctioned off. Pushing personal boundaries, Lisa Lala has gone 3-D with LED. Her Lit Portals, at Blue Gallery (118 Southwest Boulevard), is best viewed after dusk. Sonja Shaffer’s solo show at Beco Gallery (1922 Baltimore), One Day, offers calm views of the everyday. At Todd Weiner Gallery (115 West 18th Street), painter Ian Young’s color riots are front and center. (Some more adult-themed works are in the back room.) His boardgame-based works are a little like colorized Tom Huck prints, chockfull of detail, structure and social commentary. Board Game Taboos adds up to an impressive debut for this young artist, who studied in recent years with his father, master architectural and scale painter Michael Young. It’s a must-see show.

Daily listings on page 30 Artwork by Scribe pitch.com

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SHOP GIRL INVITES YOU AND A GUEST TO A FILM SCHOOL SCREENING OF

FOUND IN TRANSLATION

Coki Reardon’s line is French for jewelry.

BY

N A NC Y HULL RIGDON

LOG ON TO PITCH.COM BEGINNING THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3RD FOR YOUR CHANCE TO WIN A COMPLIMENTARY PASS FOR TWO “LIKE” US AT /ALAMOKANSASCITY FOLLOW US ON AT/ALAMOKC Please note: Winners will be selected at random from all entries. No purchase necessary. Limit one admit-two pass per winner. Employees of participating sponsors are ineligible. THIS FILM HAS BEEN RATED PG13 FOR VIOLENCE AND SEXUAL CONTENT.

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THE PITCH

Arts Incubator.) Her retail neighbors include ewelry designer Coki Reardon wants to Oracle—Fine Curiosities, a shop that pulls off infuse the Crossroads with a bit of Paris. taxidermy as high art, and the Orchid Loft, “We’re going to knock these cinder-block a soon-to-open urban-gardening boutique. windows out and put in long glass windows, Reardon’s design roots lead to Paris. After like a storefront,” she says, pointing to the graduating from the University of Kansas in wall of her studio, which runs along the Bauer Building’s side alley. “It will be like a Pari- 1988 with a liberal arts degree, she landed a nanny job there and then sian market. I’m excited to fell into an apprenticeship introduce Kansas City to Find It with a jeweler. She learned alley retail.” Coki Bijoux jewelry studio wax modeling, lost wax Reardon started First opens 5–9 p.m. Friday, casting and metalwork in a Friday sales of her Coki October 4, in the Bauer Building, studio near famed shopping Bijoux line several months 115 West 18th Street (entry on street Rue de la Paix. Inspiago. For now, the side enthe west side of the building). ration from Cartier and Van trance leading to her space Or shop online at zaarly.com/ kansas-city/stores/cokibijoux. Cleef & Arpels seeped into inside the newly renovated her work. West 18th Street building After 10 years in France, is a little tricky to find. But Jeff Owens — the mastermind who has trans- she came home to Kansas City and began craftformed the former Kansas City Arts Incubator ing items that merged her time in Europe with her own style. She mixes precious metals with into the Bauer — is dedicated to making the simple designs to create pieces suitable for alley storefront a reality for Reardon and her everyday wear. Her work includes thin bronze neighboring tenants. bangles that bring subtle glamour; a sterlingThe Bauer includes an event space and mixes artist studios, galleries, offices and retail silver cat’s-eye ring with a classic statement; and the versatile 6-inch lemon-drop earring, space. Reardon’s first-floor studio occasiona sparkling lemon quartz bead dangling from ally opens for shopping. (She had a secondfloor studio in the building when it was the a delicate 6-inch 14-carat gold chain.

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Reardon incorporates sculpture into her statement jewelry. Reardon describes her work as sophisticated bohemian. “I love that high-end, Parisian glam, like Dior,” she says. “But I want to be relaxed, not too polished and perfect. I like to think of it as Paris meets Brooklyn.” She has teamed up with fashion designers in the annual West 18th Street Fashion Show the past several years to showcase her work. For the “Gilded Summer” show this past May, she used 3-D printing and wax casting to replicate an orchid by French designer René Lalique. The exercise in sculpture resulted in an eye-catching neon-green plastic bracelet as well as an art nouveau bronze cuff that Reardon sees as the ideal bridesmaid accessory. The items in her standard collection run from less than $30 to north of $200. Reardon packages each purchase with a spritz of her signature scent: French perfume from Roger & Gallet. “I miss Paris,” she says. “At least I can share it this way.”

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FA S H I O N BY

with Sporting KC’s Aurélien Collin and more.

N A NC Y HULL RIGDON

CHRIS MULLINS

CHRIS MULLINS

s Kansas City Fashion Week Executive local designer Tom Paolini on a fashionweek collection for the duo’s line, AC78. Director Teisha Barber puts it, “Nothing says Kansas City like Union Station.” It’s The collaboration goes back to 2010, when Paolini was tapped to make custom suits fitting, then, she says, that the grand space for the team. The owner of Paolini Garhosts the local biannual, four-day fashion ment District, a Mission shop specializing run that kicks off Thursday. in custom suits and tuxedos, was impressed “We’re really excited about having this with the athlete’s attention season there and hope to to detail and eye for style. make it our home in the Kansas City Collin, Paolini learned, future,” Barber says. Fashion Week was taking fashion classes. The event has grown to Thursday, October 3, The men kept in touch and include 31 designers. We through Sunday, October 6. rolled out their line this take a peek at a few in this Details at kcfashionweek.com. past summer during MLS weekend’s lineup. All-Star festivities. ThursSporting Kansas City defender and MLS All-Star Aurélien Collin day evening’s show marks their Kansas City Fashion Week debut. spends mornings training for soccer and Expect a collection including both afternoons designing a menswear collection streetwear and tailored clothing for profesfor fashion week. sionals that blends Collin’s European roots “I like that I’m doing something aside with local preferences. from soccer,” he says. “When I’m doing fash“I know these type of collections are someion, I forget about soccer. When I’m doing soccer, I forget about fashion. This allows times really an athlete putting his name on a collection, but Aurélien is definitely taking me to better focus on each one.” Paris-born Collin is working alongside the creative onus on this,” Paolini says.

CHRIS MULLINS

A

S A B R I N A S TA I R E S

S A B R I N A S TA I R E S

S A B R I N A S TA I R E S

FALL FOR FASHION

Our primer to Kansas City Fashion Week

The show is hardly the only big event for the design pair on Thursday. They’re also launching a collection that night for Halls Downstairs on the Plaza. “We’ll be hustlin’ to make it from a guysnight-out event at Halls to Union Station,” Paolini says. “We’re so focused on this that I don’t even know what comes after October 3.” Brittany Davidson is gearing up for her fourth, and fi nal, season with Kansas City Fashion Week — a bittersweet occasion. A couple of months ago, the Kansas City native and designer behind BMDesigns moved to fashion epicenter New York City with the intention of elevating her career. One recent evening, The Pitch caught up with her as she was dealing with the unglamorous side of big-city life: walking 30plus blocks to a tow lot after discovering that her car vanished while she attended a taping of Late Show With David Letterman. A few weeks ago, during New York Fashion Week, Davidson found a way to stand out from the pack. “I made a dress out of my business cards and walked around Lincoln

Davidson (far left) plans a loud, bright and fun collection. Paolini and Collin (above) are Paris-inspired.

pitch.com

Center,” she says of the stunt, which brought interest from potential customers. Davidson is focusing on creating custom garments for individual clients while packing in as many shows as possible. She aims for sophisticated, classic women’s styles with a modern twist — a look she has shown on fashion-week runways in Omaha, St. Louis and New York City. For the Saturday-night show, she’s pulling together a collection that she describes as “loud and bright and fun — a whimsical childhood feel while still tailored and grown-up.” After her finale, Davidson says, she’ll miss the event’s community atmosphere. “It’s a group of people who truly want to see the others involved succeed, and you don’t get that everywhere else.”

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FILM

WESTERN INFLUENCE

Roger Ross Williams’ God Loves Uganda exposes the United

BY

States’ inf luence on Africa’s anti-homosexuality legislation.

D A N LY B A R G E R

O

scar-winning documentarian Roger Ross Williams is probably best known for getting Kanye’d at the Academy Awards in 2010. Fellow producer Elinor Burkett charged the stage and blasted Williams before he could deliver his speech. It was a curious development for Williams’ upbeat documentary Music by Prudence, which spotlighted Prudence Mabhena, a disabled but remarkably gifted Zimbabwean musician. When the filmmaker arrived at the Tivoli in Kansas City on September 19, Williams had just returned from Capetown, South Africa, where he’s making a film about former Archbishop and Nobel Peace Prize winner Desmond Tutu. Williams’ most recent movie, God Loves Uganda, was also shot in Africa, but Kansas City is important to it. The Tivoli event was part of the Reformation Project, a nonprofit group trying to change the way churches view and teach about homosexuality. During the three years of filming, Williams interviewed missionaries from Grandviewbased International House of Prayer (IHOP), including Lou Engle, which sends missionaries to Uganda and other nations and has supported conversion therapy in an attempt to “cure” homosexuality. In Uganda, an antihomosexuality bill in Parliament would penalize gays with death if enacted. God Loves Uganda explores how the connection between the United States and Uganda has resulted in potentially draconian legislation. The film shows Sunday at 2:30 p.m. at the Glenwood Arts in Overland Park as part of the Kansas International Film Festival. Williams discussed the film with The Pitch. The Pitch: Africa is familiar territory for you. Williams: I spent many years in Africa, in Zimbabwe, shooting that film [Music by Prudence]. That climate inspired me a little because I noticed the sort of hold of especially fundamentalist Christianity in Zimbabwe and sub-Saharan Africa. In Zimbabwe, there’s, like many other African countries, a church on every corner, so I noticed that and thought it was fascinating how Jesus was sort of flowing around. Why has Africa been such fertile ground for homophobic violence? In a place like Uganda, it’s a very corrupt country, one of the most corrupt in the world. People take the law into their own hands. For example, let’s say someone hits a woman and a child with their car, the people will beat the person to death before the police arrive. It becomes this scene of mob violence. Then [anti-gay American] pastor Scott Lively came to Uganda, and said this lie that Western gays were coming in to recruit their

Williams’ poker face children. Anytime there’s a threat to the tribal society, you fight for the tribe, to the death. What you have in Uganda is pastors, like Martin Ssempa, who build their ministry on whipping people up into a frenzy. And they do that in order to get money and favor from the American fundamentalist community, who they believe want to support this kind of antiLGBT hatred because they’re frustrated here in the U.S. He also whips them up because it’s like an act. It’s like a show. People go for the show. They get worked up, and what happens is that with Ugandans, and in many other countries, the gay person becomes the scapegoat for everything that has gone wrong in their life. It’s not a country where homosexuality is what they’re worried about. They’re worried about their next meal. They’re worried about jobs and how to survive. You can distract people from that by creating this enemy. The government here does that well. It’s an easy sort of group to scapegoat. You say you have a good poker face. Was it tough to keep it up during some of the sermons you show in the film or when KC-based missionaries deny even knowing about the “Kill the Gays” bill? For me, I was just excited that I was able to document the absurdity of it all. That person, that 20-year-old girl, when she says to that wise old [Ugandan] woman in her hut, “I’ve come all this way across the ocean to deliver a message to you,” that means something because she represents everything that America represents. She represents money and power and wealth. The African thinks, “Oh, this is America.” America has done a really great job, mostly via Hollywood, of creating this amazing myth about us. But it is the wealthiest country in the world. You want to, by connection, listen

to that, this 20-year-old girl who has no idea about my life or my culture. How tricky was it to get Lou Engle and the other people at IHOP to talk with you? What’s fascinating is how unguarded they are in the film. Engle, for example, attributes his faith to keeping him away from pornography. One of the things about the evangelical faith is that you’re kind of rewarded for coming back like a George W. Bush, a redemption from alcoholism, lesbianism in her [Rev. Jo Anna Watson’s] case, porn in Lou Engle’s case. People are like, “Yay! He conquered porn!” Because you’re gay, was it tough to get the missionaries from IHOP to talk with you? No, if anything, they wanted to cure me. [Laughs.] Jono [Hall, director of media at IHOP] says he specializes in sexual brokenness, so we can help you overcome your [sickness]. I didn’t say anything. And Jesse prayed over me a lot in Uganda. With Uganda, it was different. It’s illegal, iffy, and you can be arrested. I was way more careful in Uganda, but they all found out anyway. It’s scary in Uganda. Your film also includes two prominent Christian clergymen who’ve been fighting for the rights of LBGT people in the country. Bishop Christopher Senyonjo has taken a lot of grief for his stands, but how did you find Ungandan-born Rev. Kapya Kaoma from Boston, who has gone undercover to reveal how harsh the bill and the punishments for LGBT people are? Rev. Kapya Kaoma’s work is not that widely read, but if you do your research it’s not hard to find. His work is for Public Research Associates. He did a paper called “Globalizing the Culture Wars” about the influence of American missionaries on Africa, so I read that report. Your film includes footage of Scott Lively, who is now being tried for crimes against humanity. He’s not that well known in America, but he’s got power abroad that, say, the Westboro Baptist Church could never have. Why do you think that is? Because of America and what America represents, all you have to do is say he’s Dr. Lively, and he can go to Uganda and address the Parliament for five hours. They don’t differentiate between the crackpots and the legitimate. They don’t know he’s an extremist. They just know he’s an American. He’s a doctor who says he’s an expert on homosexuality.

E-mail feedback@pitch.com The fest runs Friday, October 4, through Thursday, October 10, at the Glenwood Arts (9575 Metcalf, Overland Park, 913-642-4404); tickets at kansasfilm.com.

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FO U R M O R E TO W ATC H BLUE CAPRICE

The Beltway Sniper killings terrified America in 2002, but French-born director Alexandre Moors hasn’t made the usual serial-killer picture. He’s more interested in the twisted father-son relationship between John Allen Muhammad (Isaiah Washington) and Lee Boyd Malvo (Tequan Richmond). Washington and Richmond are terrific; the former exudes an odd paternalism, a glimpse at what the teenage Malvo must have mistaken for a role model. (5:35 p.m. Friday, October 4)

BLOOD BROTHER

Pittsburgh filmmaker Steve Hoover’s Blood Brother follows his childhood pal Rocky Braat as he volunteers at an orphanage outside Chennai, India, for children with HIV. Braat had a difficult childhood, and now he is among children who are clearly suffering. Nonetheless, the kids are charming onscreen, and Hoover shows us why Braat wants to take care of them. (5:35 p.m. Saturday, October 5)

CITIZEN KOCH

PBS reportedly got cold feet about broadcasting this film. Kansas-born billionaires Charles and David Koch have a long political reach (and no arts or humanities outfit — including public broadcasting — is eager to lessen David Koch's contributions), and they'd probably prefer that few people see this overview of the Supreme Court’s Citizens United ruling. Citizen Koch doesn’t spend much time on the Kochs themselves but instead follows one of their candidates, Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker, and demonstrates how his election and his policies are directly beholden to them. Co-director Carl Deal takes part in a Q&A via Skype after the 5:30 p.m. screening Friday, October 4.

CONDUCTING HOPE

In the Lansing Correctional Facility, former opera singer Kirk Carson conducts the East Hills Singers — a choir whose members might, through music, stand a better chance of staying out of prison after release. (Veterans of the choir have only a 15 percent recidivism rate.) Conducting Hope is a fairly straightforward film, but it’s also straightforwardly inspiring. The 3 p.m. Saturday, October 5, screening features producer Margie Friedman and a live performance by the East Hills Singers.  o c t o b e r 3 - 9, 2 0 1 3

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CAFÉ

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BY

CHARLES FERRUZZA

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n this era of neatly packaged, smoothly run corporate restaurants, Esther Mulbah’s little strip-center spot in Lenexa isn’t just oldfashioned. It’s downright aberrant. Her fivemonth-old Esther’s African Cuisine seems to do everything wrong — by conventional standards. And that’s why I like it so much. Sure, I wasn’t thrilled about an hour wait for my meal on a Saturday night, but Mulbah isn’t just the owner of this eccentric West African restaurant: She’s waitress, chef and cashier, and she clears tables. Sometimes her younger children, Gondo and Zjohnpu, step in and help, but mostly this is a one-woman show. You almost want to stick around to applaud her when she finally turns off the illuminated “open” sign at the end of the night. That sign stays lighted a lot longer than the restaurant hours listed on a sheet of paper taped to the front door. The posted hours say Esther’s closes at 6 p.m. Saturdays. The truth is, Mulbah keeps her dining room open as long as customers are coming in. “If the sign is on, I’m open,” she says. Mulbah and her husband — both natives of Liberia — moved to Kansas City in 1994 to attend Calvary Bible College. A few years after graduation, Saiday Mulbah was diagnosed with ALS, which progressed quickly. Esther was a widow by 1997. Mulbah was left with five children and no career. She took several jobs but decided to ease into the restaurant business a few years ago by serving a few dishes at a West African grocery in Overland Park. This year, she took a leap of faith and leased a former cupcake shop on 87th Street Parkway. There’s still no sign on the building (“We’re saving for that,” she says), and directory assistance is still giving out the phone number and address of her former location at the grocery store. You might pass this place if you don’t look closely, but once you see the Peachwave frozen-yogurt joint, you’re practically there. Now back to the things that might drive some customers crazy: Mulbah serves her cuisine in paper containers and Styrofoam boxes and with plastic forks. (I used to be snobbish about this, but these days, I’ll happily eat from any platter as long as I don’t have to cook.) For patrons who must have an alcoholic drink, the closest thing Mulbah has to an intoxicating beverage is booze-free ginger beer. She says she plans to go for her liquor license someday, maybe after she pays for the signage. And, for something completely different, Esther’s African Cuisine may be the only fullservice restaurant in the metro offering meal-

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dishes, though, and I’m guessing that she also uses, discreetly, cinnamon and thyme. The blandest choice on the menu also has replacement shakes. I should be ordering the the most festive name, fu fu (not to be conshakes, but the West African cuisine sounded so much more alluring. It’s not an elaborate fused with the French foufou, which means menu — how could it be with one cook? — but crazy) — a starchy steamed dumpling made with cassava and potatoes. It’s good dipped everything I tasted was truly delicious. in the robust peanut soup or the goat stew. A “This is home-style food,” Mulbah says. “These are the kind of dishes I serve in my bit of fu fu is also tasty with the chick kebabs (dark meat skewered and grilled) or Esther’s home. And that’s how I treat my customers, fragrant stewed collard greens, made with as if they were dining at my house.” smoked turkey and peppers. Unlike the bony, gristly goat meat served Desserts, Mulbah explains, are less imin too many of the city’s ethnic restaurants, portant to Africans than to sweets-loving Mulbah’s slow-braised goat hunks are meaty Americans, but she offers a sticky roasted and fall off the bone. And chunks of moist coconut candy, and a pastry she calls purple chicken are smothered with a delicately seapie, a wedge of slightly grainy sweet-potato soned brown gravy — this is as close to tradipie made with purple sweet tional American soul food as spuds. She serves it with a you’ll find here. Esther’s African can of “whipped cream” that Meals are served with Cuisine she lavishly applies. Note: white rice or, for an upcharge, Goat stew ....................$7.99 It’s better with the whipped an extraordinary concoction Chicken gravy ............ $6.99 cream. of rice cooked with tomatoes, Ground-pea soup ...... $4.99 Esther’s African Cuisine carrots, onions, peas and Jealof rice side dish . $2.99 may struggle on the way shredded chicken called Fu fu ............................. $1.99 from being a modest neighJealof rice. “It’s the Sunday Purple pie ................... $2.50 borhood space to a dining dish in my country,” Mulbah room ready for patrons from says. It’s hearty and comfortall over the metro. Eating ing, as a side or a full meal. here is supposed to feel like you’re a guest at Another classic Liberian dish on the menu is Esther’s house, not like an anonymous subground pea soup — peanut soup, by any other name. A silky, creamy liquid is dappled with urban customer. But if you accept the place’s pieces of chicken and green pepper, and the eccentricities and Esther’s unhurried pace, you’ll go fu fu for the food. peanut taste is a subtle note in a more interesting cacophony of mostly spicy flavors. Mulbah is fiercely proprietary about her use Have a suggestion for a restaurant of spices. Her mantra: “It’s a secret.” I could The Pitch should review? detect ginger, chilies and garlic in many of her E-mail charles.ferruzza@pitch.com

A plated piece of potato-packed purple pie

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es, Sabor Centro Americano is still open. The question is, how much longer? The restaurant, at 2661 Independence Avenue in the Historic Northeast, has been serving the cuisine of Honduras, Guatemala, El Salvador and Costa Rica in a former Captain D’s for the past seven years. But the clock appears to be running out. Texas-based developer Cabinrock Investments LLC, which owns the property as well as several surrounding buildings, plans to tear down Sabor Centro Americano. The idea is to use the parcel (and the weed-choked vacant lot behind it) as the footprint for a new building that would house an Advance Auto Parts store. “That’s phase one of the plan,” says Mike Bushnell, publisher of Northeast News and an outspoken advocate of the proposed development. E R MO The second phase would be to tear down an old florist shop and empty T A INE ONL .COM post-office building and PITCH take over another weedfilled lot and construct a new retail development, which this stretch of Independence Avenue hasn’t had in decades.” Not everyone is so upbeat about Cabinrock’s plan. Just go to the Real Northeast Facebook page to meet the neighborhood residents who oppose the project (and a few who support it, and at least one who would like to see a new Captain D’s in the area). Many of them are angry about the perceived exclusion of neighborhood residents from the decision-making process. “The developers say that they talked to all the neighbors who own homes surrounding the property,” says actor Ron Megee, who lives around the corner from Sabor Centro Americano. “But they lied. No one told us anything. I found out by accident.” Some of the other arguments on the Real Northeast page: “I actually don’t have a problem with it, it’s just that Independence Avenue already has a Napa, O’Reilly, and Advanced Auto Parts [sic] …”; “More specifically, an auto parts store does not seem to be congruent with the plans for the Avenue’s resurrection …”; and “I also do not think it is a bad thing. … A business that will close at night, with a secure lot. Finally, no place for drug dealers to hide, hookers to service men, and killings in the Honduran restaurant parking lot.” The last comment was from Megee who admits, somewhat sheepishly, that he wants to see the auto-parts store built. “I’ll get hell from my neighbors for saying this, but I like the plan,” he says. “It will be harder for johns from Johnson County to come here

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and have sex with Independence Avenue hookers in my neighborhood. People are really passionate about this, though. Someone keeps calling the lots behind the restaurant ‘green space.’ It’s really just old lots filled with weeds.” Bushnell adds: “[The] developer has bent over backward to appease the neighborhood. The opposition needs to sit down and take a good long look at exactly what they’re fighting.” Bushnell believes that the properties at Independence Avenue and Chestnut will be developed, furor or not, and that Sabor Centro Americano, which is beloved in this ethnically diverse community, will live on in another location. “There’s an empty restaurant property just up the street,” Bushnell says. “It just needs a tenant.”

REID OPTION Tasting Arrowhead’s new, Philly-homage Chiefsteak.

W

hat. Is. That?” asked the first man I walked by on the concourse Sunday at Arrowhead Stadium. He pointed at the comically large cardboard box I was balancing. Inside the box was a footlong bun loaded down with smoked brisket, primary-colored swatches of cheese and bell peppers, and a burping river of barbecue sauce: the Kansas City Chiefsteak. The stadium has introduced its newest sandwich in homage to Andy Reid, the mustachioed head coach whose most recent previous

The Chiefsteak tastes like a punt. job was in the city of angioplasty. (Philadelphia has not officially adopted this slogan. Yet.) I’ll say this for the $15 sub: It’s certainly an attention-getter. I was briefly as popular as the nearby cheerleader talking about her swimsuit calendar. But, as with any showpiece purchase, the Chiefsteak began to depreciate as soon as money changed hands. This novelty sandwich was more novelty than sandwich. That big bun was just a hotdog roll on HGH — a sad misstep in a city with great bread. The smoked brisket was tender but hidden under a cheddar sauce as thick and characterless as elementary-school paste. It’s fundamentally wrong that the sweet peppers turned out to be the part of the sandwich I enjoyed most. You need a fork and a knife to battle through the Chiefsteak, which slays a forest of napkins. The moat of crispy, peppery barbecue chips, packed in with this meat volcano, was the real star of the box I bought. The other side item, a jalapeño slaw, didn’t deliver on the promised kick. So add the Chiefsteak to the list of Phillyhopeful sandwiches that fall short. But some things — like football fans who use Cheez Whiz to dull their battery-throwing, expletivespewing pain in the wake of the great Chip Kelly experiment — are best left to that city anyway. What the Chiefsteak has going for it is basic KC value: It’s filling (working well split between two people) and, as stadium food goes, cheap. — JONATHAN BENDER

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WHERE THE BEST MUSICIANS IN THE WORLD PLAY

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o c t o b e r 3 - 9, 2 0 1 3

FRANK HILL

OCTOBER:

2: Gospel Lounge w/ The Nace Brothers 2: The Crayons 3: Jimmie Bratcher 3: Sarah Jarosz 4: Johnny Winter w/ Candye Kane 5: Shooter Jennings & Rev Payton’s Big Damn Band 6: Hamilton Loomis 6: Stina Stenerud 9: Gospel Lounge w/ Levee Town 9: Jackson Browne Tribute 10: GB Leighton 10: John Corbett w/ Logan Brill 11: Jerry’s Westport Play House Reunion 12: Sarah Lee Guthrie & Johnny Irion 12: Jim Suhler & Monkey Beat 16: Todd Snider 17: Here Comes the Mummies 18: Carolyn Wonderland 18: Amy LaVere

H

ere is how to do this: Put on Ha Ha Tonka’s new record, Lessons. Sit back. Close your eyes. You’re lying on the grass, under the stars, breathing with the music. After less than a minute, the band has drawn you in. “Dead to the World,” the first song, extends a hand to you with its sweeping orchestral introduction. Lead singer Brian Roberts tells you that he has had his eyes closed to the possibilities around him, then declares, in the epic chorus, that he doesn’t want to be dead to the world anymore. He sings this as though he has just woken up, as though he has been shot with adrenaline. He is telling you the mission statement for the rest of the album. Over the next 50 minutes, Roberts, drummer Lennon Bone, bassist Luke Long and guitarist Brett Anderson go about living very fully. Lessons is the band’s fourth record, and though Ha Ha Tonka has had a good thing going for a while, this may be the moment when things get great. Being an indie Americana band today is a tough and tired road, the advent and subsequent ubiquity of Mumford & Sons having cheapened a usually dependable genre. Yet, on Lessons, Ha Ha Tonka rises above the banality that hamstrings lesser folk-rock acts. The album blossoms, song by song, into rustic poetry. It’s poetry that is full of heavy themes, with Roberts exploring the inevitable washing of innocence and time (“Colorful Kids,” “Past Has Arms”) and the broken cycle of the American dream (“American Ambition”). That he does this without dragging you into a ring of depression is a feat that Roberts credits to an unlikely inspiration.

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“I was listening to the PBS interview with Maurice Sendak, and he was talking about his views on life and art and living life to the fullest,” Roberts says. “The interview — if you haven’t heard it, Google it. It’s the best thing I’ve ever heard; it’ll break you down into tears. Just the way that he’s able to see the world with hope and optimism, and not wanting to give up or forget — I wanted to get at that.” Optimism doesn’t come without difficulty. Midway through the album, the title track begins with a stark electric guitar and a pulsing beat, and Roberts growls: My heart is hurting/I don’t know what to say or when. But part of Ha Ha Tonka’s accomplishment on Lessons is that, for all its heaviness, the record is an easy, joyful listen. “Rewrite Our Lives” makes an uplifting, arena-sized sound out of the line brand-new start with a synthetic heart. Even “Terrible Tomorrow” — in which Roberts dreams that he replaces President Lincoln inside Ford’s Theatre, then wakes up and checks the back of his head for blood — gets a cheerful presentation, with soaring electric guitars and big organ notes. Throughout, gentle harmonies fit effortlessly among hard riffs and rumbling drumbeats. It’s an extension of a sound that Ha Ha Tonka has been crafting since its 2007 debut, Buckle in the Bible Belt. A sound we can safely call classic Ozark. Roberts says, “We’re from Kansas City. Lennon and Brett are really a part of this community, and that reflects in our music. We all grew up around here, so we want to keep the sound of the Ozarks in our music. I think it’s

Ha Ha Tonka: Where the wild things are. just so ingrained in our DNA that it always comes out in small ways.” Fine-grained detail is part of what makes Lessons so rewarding, but nothing feels forced. Two-thirds of the way through the 13-track album, “Pied Pipers” appears, a carefree tambourine rambler to clear the air and keep Lessons as casual as the classic countryfolk album it wants to be. Still, by the time you arrive at the ambling, earthy closer, “Prove the World Wrong,” you’re tired. And so is Roberts. You can hear the weariness scratching his voice: I set out to prove the world wrong, and all the lessons I’ve learned … have only taught me that I’m stubborn. It takes stubbornness to make a battered and bruised collection of human truths sound so pleasing. Lessons is like tarnished heirloom silver, precious and heavier than you might think but modest. Ha Ha Tonka is saying something here — something big and hopeful — while playing like a band only just realizing how good it is. “Whenever we make our music together, it just comes out,” Roberts says. “It’s kind of our way, inevitably.” He laughs and goes on: “You never want to brag, but I really think it’s our best album to date. We’ve talked about it, how lucky we were that everything worked out the way it did, and it’s really special. I think we’ve had the most fun we’ve ever had. If people enjoy listening to it half as much as we enjoyed making it, I think we’re in a good place.”

E-mail natalie.gallagher@pitch.com


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o c t o b e r 3 - 9, 2 0 1 3

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o c t o b e r 3 - 9, 2 0 1 3

Har Mar Superstar returns with a delicious vintage R&B sound.

ean Tillmann — stage name Har Mar Har Mar Superstar: still a sex symbol Superstar — is a polarizing artist. You either their most embarrassing moments. What made totally adore him or seriously can’t stand him. Those in the former camp love him for his you pick that topic? That was just sort of something to go off of, bawdy, over-the-top persona. Har Mar Superstar is entirely comfortable performing in front like a conversation starter. It makes everyone be like, “Oh, well, let me tell you about this one of hundreds of people while wearing only a time …” and then they start telling stories and sparkly thong, with his hairy back and protrudthen it gets fun. But you know, I don’t even ing gut on display for all to balk at. On the other hand, Tillmann’s sweaty, sexy, really do that anymore. The podcast is really just about having fun talking. It’s just a way undeniably catchy pop alienates listeners too to open a conversation with someone. high-minded to enjoy someone they view as a You seem like someone who would be imposone-dimensional pop clown. Whatever else he might be, Tillmann has sible to embarrass. I don’t really have any shame. I don’t know always been a talented songwriter. His latest … that’s one of those things I album, Bye Bye 17, is more can’t even answer. If I went proof of that, but it also Har Mar Superstar on my show, I wouldn’t be brings some new game to Saturday, October 5, able to talk about it, you the table. It’s a swaggerat the Riot Room know? I’ve been in some ing, heavy-hitting set of crazy situations. Every vintage-diamond soul, exweird situation that is possible to have happloding with propulsive horns and introducing a little old-school class to the Har Mar pened has happened to me. I don’t think there’s anything crazy left. Nothing can Superstar outfit. Ahead of Saturday’s Riot Room gig, really get to me like that. Do you give a fuck about the part where Tillmann answered The Pitch’s call at his people are calling Bye Bye 17 your “best work”? home in Brooklyn. It’s cool. It’s kind of vindicating, but at the The Pitch: You just had a day named after same time, it’s kind of annoying because that you. September 20 is now Har Mar Superstar means that the last 13 years are kind of looked Day in Minneapolis. How did you celebrate? Tillmann: It was kind of nuts, actually. I cele- back on with this like, “Oh, wow, he’s actually good,” when in reality the songs I’ve been writbrated by playing a crazy show at First Avenue, and it was sold out. It was really fun — my whole ing … they’ve actually been as good as any song on any other R&B album all along. The fact that family was there — but I didn’t have much time [for Bye Bye 17] I put on a suit and people can to chill out with anyone. We flew in that day for show [the album to] their grandma. … This the show and were gone the next day. record makes them respect me, but also, it’s Bummer. So, you’re in your second year of like, I don’t care. I don’t care about people’s doing this podcast called Nocturnal Emotions, opinions. It’s like slave trading in some ways, where you interview famous personalities about

pitch.com

BY

N ATA L IE G A L L A G HE R

this whole cult of approval. It’s so wishy-washy, and none of it matters. It feels good, I guess, but when it calls into question 17 years of work you’ve done, that sucks, because I’ve been doing great work all along. Bye Bye 17 is your first album in four years, since 2009’s Dark Touches. Why the long stretch of time between releases? I think at this point you don’t really need an album every three or four or five years. If you put out albums too frequently, it seems like throwaway garbage to people — and oftentimes it is throwaway garbage. So I’d rather focus on one really solid album at a time. I write for movies and TV shows and shit and I make money other ways so that I don’t have to inundate people with my feelings all the time. Your live performances have always been delightfully raunchy — striptease-worthy spectacles. Are you doing away with the stage antics? Yeah, I mean, I don’t get down to my underwear anymore because people started to expect it. I just don’t do that because people will focus on that too much instead of the music, and that ruins the song. I don’t really feel like it’s necessary anymore. I’m not compromising or holding back anything. I’m just adding to it. I don’t know. I think my audiences get what I’m doing now, and the people who don’t just don’t show up.

E-mail natalie.gallagher@pitch.com

J A Z Z B E AT THE JAMES ISAAC GROUP, AT TAKE FIVE COFFEE + BAR

Contemporary jazz with accessibility intact: What else would you expect from four veterans of the eclectic People’s Liberation Big Band? The James Isaac Group starts with saxophonist Isaac, also part of the ensemble Killer Strayhorn. His warm tenor tone invites you to ride solos of unique twists and intriguing turns. Mike Stover’s steel guitar, familiar to Grisly Hand fans, spices the jazz here with its distinctive voice. Bassist Jeff Harshbarger gets to stretch, playing solos that sweep a listener with intelligence and ideally complement drummer Scotty McBee. Some contemporary jazz thrives on discordance, and Isaac has assembled a combo that welcomes you in. — LARRY KOPITNIK The James Isaac Group, 8–10 p.m. Saturday, October 5, at Take Five Coffee + Bar (5336 West 151st Street, Leawood, 913-948-5550), $5 cover.


d t h n g i l a t o p B S

Rumblejetts

If you were to make a list of the hardest-working bands in Kansas City, the Rumblejetts would have to be in the running. As their name suggests, they’re loud, fast and relentless, and their boot-kicking sound -- rockabilly with a little Sun Records thrown in -- is a guaranteed party-starter. When did you guys start out? Rumblejetts were formed in 1998 and we’re still going strong. Listening to Eddie Cochran, Gene Vincent and the Stray Cats in the late 70's inspired the interest in rockabilly. Seeing rockabilly-influenced bands come through venues such as the Grand Emporium and Davey's Uptown in the late 80's & 90's inspired the beginning of forming a rockabilly band. Who are some of your other musical heroes? Scotty Moore, Carl Perkins, early Elvis, Chet Atkins, Bill Black, Johnny Cash, Hank, The Cramps, X, The Clash. To name a few. You’ve watched the Kansas City music scene evolve since the ‘90s. What’s your take on its current state? It's inspiring to have access to many genres of music and bands. Any night of the week you can see live music here in Kansas City. Our venues are plentiful and the venue owners are very supportive. Lots of talent in our city. You guys played Sturgis last year? How’d that go? We did four days of shows at Full Throttle Saloon. We had a great time! Rockabilly is rock n’ roll, so we seem to fit well in the "biker" scene. Everything you've heard about Sturgis is true, and we liked it! For the past two years, Full Throttle Saloon has brought the experience here to Kansas City and included The Rumblejetts in the music lineup. Always a good time as well. What kinds of covers are you guys throwing into your set lists lately? “Cretin Hop” and “Commando” by the Ramones. “I Found You” by Jerry Reed. “I Stopped Loving Her Today” by George Jones. Who has the best tattoo in the band? Jud and Chad are heavily tattooed, so that's a toss up. Jim, on the other hand, considers his body a temple and not to be tampered with -- tat-free. You’ve won three PMAs in a row? What’s the secret? We all have day jobs that we have to be professional and accountable to, and we treat all band business the same way. We build relationships with venues by being dependable and always playing the best show possible. We appreciate and do our best to acknowledge the folks who come to see our shows. We practice a lot. We were surprised three years ago to learn we even had been nominated for the PMA, so to win 3 years in a row is humbling. It's good to know our city supports us! What's next? We just got back from our European tour -- 33 shows in 30 days. (Yes, it's possible.) Booked pretty solid till November, then taking some time off for the holidays. Back at it in 2014 with a new album, new antics and more rock and another tour somewhere unknown to us at the moment. pitch.com

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27


MUSIC MON: RURAL GRIT 6PM // KARAOKE 10PM SAT 10/5 THE PH ILISTINES, DEAD VO ICES, THIR THU 10/10 PHILDNESEVEN FRI 10/11 RUN W AL & THE WORNALLS SAT 10/12 DECO ITH IT, BRETT COPELAND AUTO, REV PALE HEARTS GUSTO, THU 10/17 MIKE FRI 10/18 THE CLDILLON BAND EMENTINES, Now MONK’S WINE Here,

M U S I C F O R E CAS T

BY

N ATA L IE G A L L A G HE R

Is/Is

Full disclosure: Is/Is is a Minneapolis band, a relatively popular one, and I have seen it perform multiple times. It does kind of a lo-fi, DIY, postpunk thing, like releasing new music on limited-edition cassettes. It would all sound a little too precious if Is/Is wasn’t such a legitimate rock band, managing to somehow turn fuzzy, disjointed, static chords into intricate and sophisticated songs. Lead singer Sarah Rose layers her vocals with some oozy distortion, giving the band’s recently released self-titled album a deliciously sludgy sound. Wednesday, October 9, at FOKL (556 Central, Kansas City, Kansas, foklcenter.com)

Vampire Weekend

1515 WESTPORT RD. • 816-931-9417

Vampire Weekend has accomplished a lot for itself in the six or so years that the band has been putting out music, moving fast up the venue ladder to play, for example, the Barclays Center last month. Compared with that, this date at the Midland is like a club show. The band’s new Modern Vampires of the City contains enough smart, bouncy music that at least one song is sure to get “Horchata” out of everyone’s head. Yeah, it’s tempting to write these guys off as arrogant hacks — that can happen when bands lose their “indie” cool and gain widespread popularity (or when the band members happen to all dress like arrogant hacks). But if you resist that temptation, this promises to be a tight and entertaining show. Tuesday, October 8, at the Midland (1228 Main, 816-283-9921)

mandolin-picking music, and you know what? It’s actually pretty good. Carrabba’s voice is well-suited to spirited folk rock — almost suspiciously so, given the chorus-sing-along craze driven by Mumford & Sons. Still, one thing is sure: Unlike most young alt-folk bands making similarly themed music, Twin Forks has the benefit of knowing what to do with its instruments. Thursday, October 3, at the Riot Room (4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179)

WIFI NOW AVAILABLE!

CHECK OUT THE NEW ALL DAY HAPPY HOUR

Once upon a time, I bought a record by Dashboard Confessional. Then I grew up and became a real person, and I forgot all about them. Many moons later, Dashboard frontman Chris Carrabba formed a new band called Twin Forks (alongside members of the Narrative, Bad Books and Manchester Orchestra), and that group has re-emerged with a sound that’s a lot closer to Americana than to emo. Twin Forks focuses on old-fashioned foot-stomping,

If you ask the Internet, Papa is going to be the next big thing in indie music. In 2011, it released an EP titled A Good Woman Is Hard to Find, with lead singer and drummer Darren Weiss putting down vocals that recall the Clash at its most anthem-glorious. The recording is chock-full of robust, echoy drumbeats and well-placed synths and arena-rock energy. Now the band is set to put out a debut full-length October 8, and it’s opening for Cold War Kids for most of that month before traipsing through Europe.

F O R E C A S T

28

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o c t o b e r 3 - 9, 2 0 1 3

So this is your chance to get a taste before things get obnoxious. In a year, you can say you saw Papa in the intimate Czar Bar, and then you can complain that the group is overrated. Friday, October 4, at Czar (1531 Grand, 816-421-0300)

Oh Land Papa

Twin Forks

Vampire Weekend goes big.

A few years ago, I discovered Oh Land — born Nanna Øland Fabricius in her native Denmark — and thought that she was saving electronic pop music from itself. Oh Land’s latest album, the exuberant, shimmering Wish Bone, is proof of my excellent taste and foresight. This fairy-voiced chanteuse is oh-so-likable, and her elaborate orchestrations stay lodged inside your head for days. Sunday, October 6, at the Granada (1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390)

K E Y

..................................................Pick of the Week

................................................. Internet-Famous

........................................................ DIY Darlings

.............................................................Folk Rock

..................................................................Swoon

............................................................. Vampires

............................................................. Stomping

....................................................Hooks for Days

.........................................................Sing-Alongs

............................................................. ’80s Hair

............................................................ Huge Bias

............................................. Tasteful Indie Rock

pitch.com


98285.12 | The Pitch | 10-03-2013

HINDER & CANDLEBOX

STEVE VAI

THUNDER FROM DOWN UNDER

BLUE OCTOBER

October 24, 2013

October 27, 2013

November 30, 2013

December 8, 2013

STONE TEMPLE PILOTS WITH CHESTER BENNINGTON December 12, 2013

UPCOMING SHOWS: 10/4

KC’s Big III featuring: Poison Overdose, Almost Kiss and KCDC

1-800-745-3000

10/11 Flirt Friday 10/19 Sexy Saturday

• VooDooKC.com

Know When To Stop Before You Start.® Gambling Problem? Call 1-888-BETSOFF. Subject to change or cancellation. Phone and online orders are subject to service fees. Must be 21 years or older to gamble, obtain a Total Rewards ® card or enter VooDoo ®. ©2013, Caesars License Company, LLC.

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29

9/26/13 11:51 AM


AGENDA

continued from page 15

Thursday | 10.3 |

THE AMERICAN ROYAL

Chambers of Poe | 8 p.m., 1100 Santa Fe, chamber

sofpoe.com

AUTHOR EVENTS

3rd Street Asylum | 7 p.m. Corner of Third St. and Cedar, Bonner Springs, 3rdstreetasylum.com

Author Terry McMillan | TerryMcMillan, Unity Temple on the Plaza, 707 W. 47th St., rainydaybooks.com

FRIDAY

10. 4

Wellness and yoga instructor Sadie Nardini | 6 p.m. Terrace on Grand, 1520 Grand

Edge of Hell | 7:30 p.m., 1300 W. 12th St., edgeofhell.com Halloween Haunt 2013 | 8 p.m. Worlds of Fun, East Loop I-435, worldsoffun.com

meat Is your t? the bes

FOOD & DRINK

Macabre Cinema | 8 p.m., 1222 W. 12th St., macabre

Brookside Wine Walk | 63rd St. and Brookside Blvd.,

cinema.com

brooksidekc.org/bba/tags/wine

FILM

World Series of Barbecue | Kemper Arena, 1800 Genessee

Kansas International Film Festival | 9575 Metcalf, Overland Park

FILM

True Grit | 2 p.m. Kansas City Public Library, Waldo Branch, 201 E. 75th St., kclibrary.org

UMKC’s Movies About Making Movies: Beware of a Holy Whore | 7 p.m. Tivoli Cinemas, 4050 Penn-

sylvania, tivolikc.com

SPORTS

ARCA Racing Series/Sprint Cup Series Qualifying Day | 4:10 p.m. Kansas Speedway, 400 Speedway

MUSIC

Blvd., KCK

Bassnectar with Koan Sound & Andreilien | 8 p.m.,

$35 and up, the Midland, 1228 Main

MUSIC

Tyrone Clark Quartet | 7 p.m. The Blue Room, 1616

World Series of Barbecue | Noon-2 a.m., Kemper Arena, 1800 Genessee

Todd Clouser’s A Love Electric, Jeff Harshbarger Trio | 10 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

Brent Tactic | Gusto Lounge, 504 Westport Rd.

Detective, Spirit Animal, Pink Royal | 9 p.m. Jackpot

Village West Pkwy., KCK

E. 18th St.

Music Hall, 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Gold Panda, Voices of Black, Slow Magic | 8 p.m.

Daryl Wright | 8 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club, 1867

Friday | 10.4 |

The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Sarah Jarosz with Willie Watson | 8 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester

PERFORMING ARTS

Twin Forks, Matrimony, Refero | 7:30 p.m. The Riot

Room, 4048 Broadway

Feel Good | 8 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire,

Tony Rock | 8 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater, 7260 N.W. 87th St.

30

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o c t o b e r 3 - 9, 2 0 1 3

Harvest Celebration & Antique Tractor Show

| 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Powell Gardens, 1609 N.W. Hwy. 50, Kingsville, powellgardens.org

Uptown Ramblers Club, 3402 Main

Robert Deeble with Adam Breckenridge and Wes Crawford | 7:30 p.m. Morton Hall, 3936 Main (entrance behind Oddly Correct)

Grimm and Poe It! — professional storytelling | 9:30 p.m.

Summit Art Festival | 4-9 p.m., intersection of Third

Jabee, Ebony Tusks, Stik Figa, Approach | 9 p.m. Jackpot Music Hall, 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence

SHOPPING

Mark Mallman, Hidden Pictures | 10 p.m. Replay

MORE

EVENTS

AT LINE

M PITCH.CO

The Uptown Arts Bar, 3611 Broadway

Last Poet Standing with Natasha Ria El-Scari and DJ Q | 8 p.m., $10 to watch or $20

to compete, Westport Coffee House, 4010 Pennsylvania

Baltimore, outinthecrossroads.com

St. and Green, downtown Lee’s Summit

Good Ju Ju | 8:30 a.m.-8:30 p.m., 1420 W. 13th Terr. Liberty Belle | 8:30 a.m.-8 p.m., 1320 W. 13th St. Rag and Bone | 8:30 a.m.-9 p.m., 1412 W. 12th St.

Symphonic Dances and Mendlessohn’s violin concerto | 8 p.m., $25-$76. Kauffman Center for the

Restoration Emporium | 8:30 a.m.-8:30 p.m., 1300

FOOD & DRINK

Urban Mining Sale | 9 a.m.-9 p.m. Urban Mining

Performing Arts, 1601 Broadway

Lawrence

Luxury Bump | 10p.m.FireflyLounge,4118Pennsylvania

Holmes, Gladstone

Cher UK, the Dead Girls, Drop a Grand, John Velghe and the Prodigal Sons | 9 p.m. Davey’s

Drew Holcomb & the Neighbors, David Ramirez

NIGHTLIFE

DJ Highnoone | Empire Room, 334 E. 31st St.

Gladfest 34 — 2013 | 5-10 p.m., 70th St. and N.

Out in the Crossroads | 5 p.m.-midnight, 19th St. and

ON

Paul Zaborac Trio | 7 p.m. Take Five Coffee + Bar, 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park

VooDoo Lounge, Harrah’s Casino, 1 Riverboat Dr., NKC

F E S T I VA L S

Flamenco de los Barrios | 6:30 p.m. Kansas City Public Library, Plaza Branch, 4801 Main, kclibrary.org

Oils, SW/MM/NG, Psychic Heat | 10 p.m. Replay Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Almost Kiss, KC/DC, Poison Overdose | 8 p.m.

First Friday Lunches | 11:30 a.m. The American

Restaurant, 200 E. 25th St.

World Series of Barbecue | Noon-2 a.m., Kemper Arena, 1800 Genessee

pitch.com

W. 13th St.

Homewares and Co., 3924 Walnut

| 9 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence

Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Hermon Mehari with Ben Van Gelder | 8 p.m., $5.

Take Five Coffee + Bar, 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park

Aaron Neville | 8 p.m., $30-$75, Folly Theater, 300 W. 12th St.

Outsides, Ghosty, Mr. History | 8 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

Cassie Taylor Band | B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ, 1205 E.

85th St.

HALLOWEEN EVENTS

The Beast | 7:30 p.m., 1401 W. 13th St., kcbeast.com

Vi Tran Band & the American Heroine Orchestra, David George & a Crooked Mile, Jessica Furney & Friends | The Kill Devil Club, 61 E. 14th St.


GRAVITY

Trouble is stirring...

Murder at the Royal FRIDAY

10.4

the 3-D Worth rge upcha

The heavily pimped new Sandra Bullock-in-a-space-helmet movie opens today — and totally lives up to the hype. (See review at pitch.com.) We Came as Romans, Silverstein, Chunk No Captain Chunk, the Color Morale, Dangerkids | 6 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachu-

F E S T I VA L S

Art Center, 1740 Jefferson

Wild Men of Kansas City | 8:30 p.m. The Blue Room,

Fall Festival of Arts, Crafts and Music | 10 a.m.5 p.m. Missouri Town 1855, 8010 E. Park Rd. (in Fleming Park), Lee’s Summit

Johnny Winter with Candye Kane | 8:30 p.m., $30. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester

Gladfest 34 — 2013 | 10 a.m.-10 p.m., 70th St. and N.

Holmes, Gladstone

NIGHTLIFE

DJ Cruz & Cyan | MiniBar, 3810 Broadway DJ P, Hoodwerk, Kid Twist | 9 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

Tickets now available at The Central Ticket Office:

816-235-6222 www.kcmysterytrain.com

Live Music Live Music 7 nights 7 nights a week

a week

Día de los Muertos Festival | 1-10 p.m. Mattie Rhodes

setts, Lawrence

1616 E. 18th St.

The Mystery Train

816.561.2444 www.erniebiggs.com nsas 4115 Mill Street West Port Ka

City

Greater Kansas City Japan Festival | 10:30 a.m.7:30 p.m. Carlsen Center at JCCC, 12345 College Blvd., Overland Park

AS HEARD ON

Harvest Celebration & Antique Tractor Show

Hookah smoking | 7-11 p.m. Jaskki’s Tobacco Café, 1400 W. 12th St., jaskkis.com

Tony Rock | 8 & 10:30 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and

Dinner Theater, 7260 N.W. 87th St.

| 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Powell Gardens, 1609 N.W. Hwy. 50, Kingsville, powellgardens.org

Nordic Heritage Festival | Noon, Douglas

County Fairgrounds, 2110 Harper, Lawrence, ksnordicfest.com

18th St.

Soul Providers Block Party | 7 p.m. Birdies, 116 W.

Out in the Crossroads | 11 a.m.-midnight, 19th St. and Baltimore, outinthecrossroads.com

Daryl Wright | 7:45 & 9:45 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy

Summit Art Festival | 10 a.m.-9 p.m., intersection

Club, 1867 Village West Pkwy., KCK

Saturday | 10.5 |

of Third St. and Green, downtown Lee’s Summit

Weston Applefest Celebration | 10 a.m.-6 p.m., 300 Main, downtown Weston, westonmo.com

FOOD & DRINK SHOPPING

A Taste of Zona Rosa | 6 p.m., $45 per person or $85 per couple, Zona Rosa, 8640 N. Dixson Ave.

Farmers Market Harvest Fest | 7 a.m.-noon, intersection of Third St. and Green, downtown Lee’s Summit Pumpkins, Gourds & Apples, Oh My! | 9 a.m.-1 p.m.

City Market Summer Book Sale | 9 a.m.-2 p.m.,

205 E. Fifth St.

Good Ju Ju | 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., 1420 W. 13th Terr. Liberty Belle | 9 a.m.-6 p.m., 1320 W. 13th St.

ON TOUR NOW

10/11/13 MIDLAND THEATRE

City Market, 205 E. Fifth St.

Rag and Bone | 9 a.m.-6 p.m., 1412 W. 12th St.

DEBUT ALBUM FEATURING “365 DAYS” AND “PUT THE GUN DOWN”

World Series of Barbecue | 10 a.m.-2 a.m. Kemper

Restoration Emporium | 9 a.m.-6 p.m., 1300 W.

AVAILABLE AT

Arena, 1800 Genessee

13th St.

continued on page 32

“AMAZON, AMAZON.COM AND THE AMAZON.COM LOGO ARE REGISTERED TRADEMARKS OF AMAZON.COM, INC. OR ITS AFFILIATES.”

ACCESS MUSIC AND VIDEOS AT ZZWARD.COM

pitch.com

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31


continued from page 31 Saturday swap meet | 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Cowtown Mallroom, 3101 Gillham Plz.

Urban Mining Sale | 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Urban Mining Homewares and Co., 3924 Walnut

HALLOWEEN EVENTS

The Beast | 7:30 p.m., 1401 W. 13th St., kcbeast.com Chambers of Poe | 8 p.m., 1100 Santa Fe, chambers

Har Mar Superstar, Lizzo, Dated | 7:30 p.m. The

Phil Neal and the Wornalls, the Silver Maggies, the Ned Ludd Band | 9 p.m. Coda, 1744 Broadway

Uptown Open Mic and Comedy Showcase | 7 p.m.

Gretchen Parlato Quartet | 8 p.m. Folly

Daryl Wright | 7:45 & 9:45 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy

Theater, 300 W. 12th St.

3rd Street Asylum | 7 p.m., corner of Third St. and Cedar, Bonner Springs, 3rdstreetasylum.com

The Phantastics | 10 p.m. Danny’s Big

Loop I-435, worldsoffun.com

Macabre Cinema | 8 p.m., 1222 W. 12th St., macabre-

cinema.com

RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

Easy, 1601 E. 18th St.

NASCAR Nationwide Series: Kansas Lottery 300 | $40, Kansas Speedway, 400 Speedway Blvd., KCK Run for the Penguins | 8:30 a.m. The Kansas City Zoological Park, 6800 Zoo Dr., kansascityzoorun.org

Dogs of Delphi, Kingshifter | 8 p.m. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club, 3402 Main

Club, 1867 Village West Pkwy., KCK

Sunday | 10.6 |

him at Outlaw eads. leh Knuck

F E S T I VA L S

Fall Festival of Arts, Crafts and Music | 11 a.m.5 p.m. Missouri Town 1855, 8010 E. Park Rd. (in Fleming Park), Lee’s Summit

The Philistines, Dead Voices, Third Seven | The Brick, 1727 McGee

Gladfest 34 — 2013 | Noon-5 p.m., 70th St. and N.

Holmes, Gladstone

RLT, Mother Russia, DJ Gent | 10 p.m. MiniBar,

3810 Broadway

Harvest Celebration & Antique Tractor Show

Shooter Jennings and Rev. Payton’s Big Damn Band with Leopold & His Fiction and Judd Henry Mason | 8 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester

Spirit Is the Spirit, Rev Gusto, Les Izmore, Jorge Arana Trio | 9:45 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

Ass Jamz | 10:30 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hamp-

#RunThePark — Gathering of the Arts | Noon8 p.m. Swope Park, Meyer Blvd. and Swope Pkwy.

Matt Wertz, Elenowen | 7 p.m. The Granada, 1020

DJ Margo May | 10 p.m. MiniBar, 3810 Broadway

Summit Art Festival | Noon-5 p.m., intersection of Third St. and Green, downtown Lee’s Summit

Performing Arts, 1601 Broadway

Darryl White Quintet | 8:30 p.m. The Blue Room,

1616 E. 18th St.

shire, Lawrence

KC Cabaret variety show | 9:30 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar, 3611 Broadway

The Rainmaker | Metropolitan Ensemble Theatre,

About Face | Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, 4525 Oak, nelson-atkins.org

Carrie: The Musical | Egads Theatre, Off Center Theatre, 2450 Grand, egadstheatre.com

Red Badge Variations | The Coterie Theatre, 2450 Grand, Crown Center, thecoterie.org

Anomalous: Matt Borruso, Jonah Criswell, Scott

Dracula: The Journal of Jonathan Harker

Rumplestiltskin | Opening Wednesday, Paul Mesner Puppet Studio, 1006 E. Linwood Blvd.

Paradise Playhouse, 101 Spring St., Excelsior Springs, paradiseplayhouse.org

Gruesome Playground Injuries | 8 p.m. Friday-Sunday, Fishtank Performance Studio, 1715 Wyandotte Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus | 8 p.m. Friday, The Midland, 1228 Main,

midlandkc.com

The Mistakes Madeline Made | The Living

Room, 1818 McGee, thelivingroomkc.com

3614 Main, metkc.org

Seven Guitars | UMKC Theatre, Studio 116 James C. Olson PAC, 4949 Cherry, umkctheatre.org

Spring Awakening | The Barn Players, 6219 Martway, Mission, thebarnplayers.org

o c t o b e r 3 - 9, 2 0 1 3

Gallery, 3951 Broadway

Brush Creek Art Walk, art opening reception

Wicked | Opening Wednesday, Music Hall, 301

| Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, 4525 Oak

W. 13th St.

Your Hit Parade: The American Songbook | Quality Hill Playhouse, 303 W. 10th St., qualityhillplayhouse.com

Echoes: Islamic Art and Contemporary Artists

L’Hourloupe , artwork by Anthony Baab,

JosephineHalvorson, Gabriel Hartley, David Livingston and Scott Wolniak | Greenlease Gallery, Rockhurst University, 1100 Rockhurst Rd.

Meet Me at the Museum Tour | 2-3 p.m. Satur-

Chestnut, Olathe

the pitch

Marc Bosworth & Eric Dodson: Tactile Diagrams | 6-9 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, Kiosk

Venus in Fur | Unicorn Theatre, 3828 Main,

Ol’ Blue Eyes | Chestnut Fine Arts Center, 234 N.

32

Dickson, Ari Fish, and Colin Leipelt, plus vintage Philip K. Dick paperbacks | 5 p.m. Monday, UMKC Gallery of Art, 5015 Holmes, Room 203

| 5-8 p.m. The Gallery at Bruce Watkins Cultural Heritage Center, 3700 Blue Pkwy., brushcreek artwalk.org

unicorntheatre.org

pitch.com

Weston Applefest Celebration | 11 a.m.-5 p.m., 300 Main, downtown Weston, westonmo.com

ART EXHIBITS & EVENTS

Dates and times vary. Contact theaters for more information.

The Fox on the Fairway | Opening Friday,

Jewish Arts Festival | 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Jewish Community Center, 5801 W. 115th St., Overland Park

NIGHTLIFE

THEATER

| Opening Wednesday, the Coterie Theatre, 2450 Grand, Crown Center, thecoterie.org

| 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Powell Gardens, 1609 N.W. Hwy. 50, Kingsville, powellgardens.org

Symphonic Dances and Mendlessohn’s violin concerto | 8 p.m., $25-$76, Kauffman Center for the

Massachusetts, Lawrence

MUSIC

The Uptown Arts Bar, 3611 Broadway

10.5

side BBQ, 1205 E. 85th St.

KC Tweed Ride | 10 a.m., Cliff Drive, bike walkkc.org

Theater, 7260 N.W. 87th St.

DAY SATUR

Shannon & the Rhythm Kings | 9 p.m. B.B.’s LawnSPORTS

Harrah’s Casino, 1 Riverboat Dr., NKC

Tony Rock | 7 & 10 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner

5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park

Pedaljets, Expassionates | 7 p.m.

Halloween Haunt 2013 | 8 p.m. Worlds of Fun, East

Magic 107.3 Groove Party | 7 p.m. VooDoo Lounge,

James Isaac Group | 8 p.m. Take Five Coffee + Bar,

ofpoe.com

Edge of Hell | 7:30 p.m., 1300 W. 12th St., edgeofhell.com

SHOOTER JENNINGS

Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

day, Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art, 4420 Warwick Blvd.

Nomads: Traversing Adolescence | Kemper

East, 200 E. 44th St., kemperart.org

Our People, Our Land, Our Images | 11 a.m. Thursday and Friday, Mid-America Arts Alliance, 2018 Baltimore, maaa.org

The Sketchbook Project Mobile Library | 2 p.m. Thursday, University Playhouse, 51st St. and Holmes Thieves Guild Drink and Draw | 7 p.m. Monday, Fatso’s Public House and Stage, 1016 Massachusetts, Lawrence James Turrell: Gard Blue | Spencer Museum of Art, 1301 Mississippi , Lawrence Under Arabian Skies: A Celebration of Art, Science and Astronomy From the Islamic World | 5-9 p.m. Saturday, Nelson-Atkins Museum

of Art, 4525 Oak


Blue Sky Black Death, Sister Crayon | 9 p.m. The

FRANZ FERDINAND

SHOPPING

Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence

Good Ju Ju | 11 a.m.-4 p.m., 1420 W. 13th Terr.

9 Plus 1 | 9 p.m. Green Lady Lounge, 1809 Grand

Liberty Belle | 11 a.m.-4 p.m., 1320 W. 13th St.

On My Honor, Veara, Four Arm Shiver | 8 p.m. The

Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

Rag and Bone | 11 a.m.-5 p.m., 1412 W. 12th St. Restoration Emporium | Noon-5 p.m., 1300 W. 13th St.

Trampled Under Foot | 7 p.m. B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ,

1205 E. 85th St.

Urban Mining Sale | Noon-5 p.m. Urban Mining Homewares and Co., 3924 Walnut

Vampire Weekend, Sky Ferreira | 7 p.m. The Midland, 1228 Main

COMMUNITY EVENTS

AY TUESD

Wayne Payne and the Shit Stains, Buck Biloxi and the Fucks, Peace Warrior | 9 p.m. MiniBar,

10.8

Dogtoberfest | 10 a.m.-3 p.m. South Park, 1141 Mas-

sachusetts, Lawrence

3810 Broadway

Wednesday | 10.9 |

oys. Right b

Walk to End Alzheimer’s | 11 a.m. Corporate Woods Office Park, 8717 W. 110th St., Overland Park

LITERARY EVENTS FOOD & DRINK

World Series of Barbecue | Kemper Arena, 1800 Genessee

Inside the Park: Running the Base Path of Life with Willie Wilson | 6 p.m. Kansas City Public Library, Plaza Branch, 4801 Main St.

Franz Ferdinand, Frankie Rose | 7 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence

SPORTS

MUSIC

Krystle Warren & the Faculty | KC Live Stage at the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series — Hollywood Casino 400 Green Flag, pre-race concert with Everclear |

1 p.m. Kansas Speedway, 400 Speedway Blvd., KCK

Pink Laundry 5k Run/Walk | 8 a.m., $32, Third St.

and Green, downtown Lee’s Summit, pinklaundry.org MUSIC

Hamilton Loomis | 7 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon,

2715 Rochester

Oh Land, Sun Rai | 7 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Julia Othmer | 7:30 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway The People’s Liberation Big Band | 8 p.m. Record-

Bar, 1020 Westport Rd.

Symphonic Dances and Mendlessohn’s violin concerto | 8 p.m., $25-$76. Kauffman Center, 1601 Broadway The Tontons | 10 p.m. Replay Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Power & Light District, 14th St. and Grand

Glenn Tilbrook (of Squeeze), Joe Michelini, Carswell & Hope | 7:30 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

NIGHTLIFE

NIGHTLIFE

Tony Rock | 7 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner

Dropout Boogie | Westport Flea Market, 817 West-

Theater, 7260 N.W. 87th St.

port Rd.

Taproom Poetry Series | 5 p.m. The Eighth Street Taproom, 801 New Hampshire, Lawrence

Sonic Spectrum Music Trivia | 7 p.m. RecordBar,

Monday | 10.7 | LITERARY EVENTS

Author Loren Cordain | 6:30 p.m. Unity Temple on the Plaza, 707 W. 47th St., rainydaybooks.com

OUTSpoken KC: Love and Marriage — Dramatic Reading of True Stories from KC’s LGBT Community | 7 p.m. Unity Temple on the Plaza, 707 W. 47th St.,outspokenkc.com

1020 Westport Rd.

Airport Novels, Toy Instruments, Conflicts! |

8 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

Citizen Cope | 8 p.m. The Midland, 1228 Main Hot Buttered Rum, Head for the Hills,Tyler Gregory, Ashes to Immortality | 7 p.m. The Granada,

1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence

The Irieplaceables | 8 p.m. Mike’s Tavern, 5424 Troost

Taking Back Mondays with Sovereign States | 8 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence

Tuesday | 10.8 |

Kool Keith, James Christos, OOBERGEEK, Sir Adams, Dread Swilla, JPZ | 7 p.m. Czar, 1531 Grand Mercury Mad & the Plastic Bitches, Scary Cherry and the Bang Bangs, Admiral of Red |

LITERARY EVENTS

Author Garrison Keillor | 7 p.m., $20, Unity Temple on

10 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

the Plaza, 707 W. 47th St., rainydaybooks.com

Pat Nichols | 7 p.m. B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ, 1205 E. 85th St.

Speaker Series: The March of the Amazon Army

A tribute to Jackson Browne | 8 p.m. Knuckleheads

MUSIC

| 7 p.m. Shawnee Town, 11501 W. 57th St., Shawnee, shawneetown.org

Automatic Wolf | 7:30 p.m. Gaslight Gardens, 317 N.

True Life, True Grit: Achieve the Honorable with Rep.

Saloon, 2715 Rochester

NIGHTLIFE Second St., Lawrence

DAY SATUR

10.8

ge fest herita Nordic

Brother John’s Motivational R&B/Soul Showcase | 7 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar, 3611 Broadway

Diverse with Ben Van Gelder | 7

p.m. The Blue Room, 1616 E. 18th St.

Ike Skelton and Crosby Kemper III | 6:30 p.m. Kansas City Public Library, Central Branch, 14 W. 10th St.

The Brick, 1727 McGee

Jon Spencer Blues Explosion, Kid Congo & the Pink Monkey Birds |

9:30 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

DJs Mike Scott, Spinstyles and Bill Pile | MiniBar,

3810 Broadway

FOOD & DRINK

Sustainable Seafood Soiree | 6 p.m., $20, The Kansas City Zoological Park, 6800 Zoo Dr.

MOKAN Twang Vinyl Country Night | 8 p.m. Frank James Saloon, 10919 N.W. Hwy. 45, Parkville Poetic Underground open-mic series | 9-11 p.m.

MUSIC

Rural Grit Happy Hour | 6-9 p.m.

DJ Ashton Martin | Gusto Lounge, 504 Westport Rd.

ArtSounds, with the People’s Liberation Big Band | 7:30 p.m. Epperson Auditorium, Kansas City

The Uptown Arts Bar, 3611 Broadway

Art Institute, 4415 Warwick

Billy Beale’s blues jam | 10 p.m. Westport Saloon,

4112 Pennsylvania

E-mail submissions to calendar@pitch.com or enter submissions at pitch.com, where you can search our complete listings guide.

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o c t o b e r 3 - 9, 2 0 1 3

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10,000 times you sent it because any regular reader of my column — and someone who emails me daily for three years is presumed to be a regular reader — would know what my advice would be in a case like yours: Level with your fucking wife about your boring fucking foot fetish already, you fucking coward. She may think those brief foot sessions are enough to satisfy what you’ve allowed her to believe is a mild foot fetish. Would those sessions be longer, more intense and freakier if she knew how central this was to your sexuality? Come out to your partner as the absolute freak that you are. While your dilemma is stupid and your spamming is annoying (and your wife potentially fictitious), I chose to run your letter because this is actually a pretty good hypothetical: “Is it fair for me to ask for this after being together so long without the same need?” Sexual boredom is a huge problem in many long-term monogamous relationships. We humans are wired to seek some degree of novelty and variety in everything we do. Two people who agree not to seek sexual novelty or variety outside of their relationship have to work at creating some of both inside the relationship or risk watching their sexual connection wither and die. (There are plenty of happy and sexless marriages out there, but a dead sexual connection can poison a relationship.) There is risk in disclosing: What if one partner’s “new need” is another partner’s libido killer? But I would argue that sexual boredom poses a much bigger threat than coming clean about an old or new kink.

Dear Dan: I’m a straight woman, married for 10 years. We’ve been in a rut, emotionally and sexually. Neither of us has done anything to harm or sabotage our marriage. We’re very good together, and the love we have is huge. I have plenty of male friends, but there’s one I’ve been getting to

BY

D A N S AVA G E

know, a colleague. We really connect. He kissed me a few weeks ago. I liked it. I like him. The impact on my marriage has been strangely great. I disclosed everything to my husband. He said, “I couldn’t get in the way of your happiness. Is this something you need to explore?” This is the response of someone who truly loves me. We’re communicating better now, our sex life is off the chain, and we’re committed to working through things as a couple. So why can’t I stop thinking of my colleague? I don’t plan on seeing him anymore. He’s a distraction to my marriage. But what do you do to get someone out of your head?

Wanting It Forever Dear WIF: Keep doing what you’re doing: Keep fucking your husband, keep avoiding your colleague, keep feeling your feelings, and with enough time, your crush should wither away. So far, it would appear that this emotional affair has had a positive impact on your marriage. So if your colleague knew you were married and didn’t ask you to leave your husband, and if your husband didn’t threaten to divorce you but asked if this was “something you need to explore,” you might be able to have a relationship with your colleague without having to end your marriage. Dear Dan: If a random guy hands a girl his number, unsolicited, on a piece of paper without talking to the girl first, is it wrong for the girl’s boyfriend to send this guy a picture of his shit? I think it’s OK. Others think it’s abhorrent. I think worse things have happened to people who ask out girls with protective and insecure boyfriends.

Butthole King Dear BK: It’s not really Random Guy to whom you’re being an asshole. RG is gonna delete the pic and get on with his life. So it’s not RG that you’re trying to intimidate or humiliate. It’s your girlfriend. You’re telling her that she’s stuck with a guy who regards her as his property and will react like a huge asshole whenever someone else expresses the least interest in her, even if she didn’t invite it. And you shouldn’t act like an asshole if she did invite it. Sometimes partnered people engage in a little innocent flirting because it makes them feel attractive and alive — and then, all cranked up, they go home and fuck the shit out of their partners. If you can’t chill the fuck out about it, your girlfriend is gonna get sick of your shit and delete you. The Savage Lovecast is at savagelovecast.com.

Have a question for Dan Savage? E-mail him at mail@savagelove.net


KC’s Got Some Pretty Little Women . . And You’l Find ‘Em At Bazooka’s! 1717 Main St. Kansas City, MO 816/421.1915 facebook.com/bazookasshowgirls bazookasshowgirls.com Now Taking Applications for Bazooka’s Showgirls Entertainers. Apply Today at Bazooka’s!

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The Pitch: October 03, 2013