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November 28–December 4, 2013 | free | vol. 33 No. 22 | pitch.com


novembeR 28–decembeR 4, 2013 | vol. 33 no. 22 E d i t o r i a l

Editor Scott Wilson Managing Editor Justin Kendall Music Editor Natalie Gallagher Staff Writers Charles Ferruzza, David Hudnall, Steve Vockrodt Editorial Operations Manager Deborah Hirsch Events Editor Berry Anderson Proofreader Brent Shepherd Contributing Writers Tracy Abeln, Jonathan Bender, Liz Cook, Adrianne DeWeese, Steve Erickson, April Fleming, Larry Kopitnik, Angela Lutz, Dan Lybarger, Nancy Hull Rigdon, Dan Savage

a r t

Art Director Ashford Stamper Contributing Photographers Angela C. Bond, Barrett Emke, Chris Mullins, Lauren Phillips, Sabrina Staires, Brooke Vandever Intern Christina Larkins

P r o d u c t i o n

Production Manager Christina Riddle Multimedia Designer Vu Radley

a d v E r t i s i n g

Sales Manager Erin Carey Senior Classified Multimedia Specialist Steven Suarez Multimedia Specialists Collin Click, Sharon Donat, Becky Losey Director of Marketing & Operations Jason Dockery Digital Marketing Manager Keli Sweetland Digital Marketing Specialist Lisa Kelly Sales and Marketing Assistant Anna Brescia

th e steak i ss ue C’mon. Nobody really wants turkey. S ta r t S o n pag e 7.

Pass i o n Pi eces

c i r c u l a t i o n

Jim Sajovic raises a blush

Circulation Director Mike Ryan

at the Todd Weiner Gallery.

B u s i n E s s

Accounts Receivable Jodi Waldsmith Publisher Joel Hornbostel

by liz cook

s o u t h c o m m

Chief Executive Officer Chris Ferrell Chief Financial Officer Patrick Min Chief Marketing Officer Susan Torregrossa Chief Technology Officer Matt Locke Business Manager Eric Norwood Director of Digital Sales & Marketing David Walker Controller Todd Patton Creative Director Heather Pierce Director of Content/Online Development Patrick Rains

n a t i o n a l

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s Potli gh t: J o h n R ens enh o us e

a d v E r t i s i n g

The actor-director answers

VMG Advertising 888-278-9866, vmgadvertising.com Senior Vice President of Sales Susan Belair Senior Vice President of Sales Operations Joe Larkin

our first Stage questionnaire.

d i s t r i B u t i o n

The Pitch distributes 45,000 copies a week and is available free throughout Greater Kansas City, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for $5 each, payable at The Pitch’s office in advance. The Pitch may be distributed only by The Pitch’s authorized independent contractors or authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of The Pitch, take more than one copy of each week’s issue. Mail subscriptions: $22.50 for six months or $45 per year, payable in advance. Application to mail at second-class postage rates is pending at Kansas City, MO 64108.

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The contents of The Pitch are Copyright 2013 by KC Communications, LLC. No portion may be reproduced in whole or in part by any means without the express written permission of the publisher. The Pitch address: 1701 Main, Kansas City, MO 64108 For information or to leave a story tip, call: 816-561-6061 Editorial fax: 816-756-0502 For classifieds, call: 816-218-6759 For retail advertising, call: 816-218-6702

on t he c ove R

by debor ah hirSch

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3 4 7 13 15 17 18 20 22 24 30 34

Questionnaire news feature agenda art stage film café fat city music d a i ly l i s t i n g s savage love

meanw h i le at Pi tch .co m

PhotograPhy by Chris Mullins

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SPORTING KC solves the Houston Dynamo postseason riddle, and hosts the MLS final December 7. City Council is set to carve out the KANSAS CITY MUSEUM from Union Station control. KCPD OFFICER pleads guilty to assault charges in beating of carjacker.

m o n t h x x–x x , 2 0 0 x

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Questionnaire

DaviD Hall

Anchor and reporter, KMBC Channel 9

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Hometown: I was born in Hampton Roads, Virginia, but for me, home is where my family is from, and that’s Latin America.

Waxing Electrolysis Facials Chemical Peels

Current neighborhood: The Plaza

2805 W 47th St, Ste A, Westwood, KS 913.362.0404

What I do (in 140 characters): I am a TV broadcaster/journalist. I anchor the news Friday and Saturday evenings on KMBC and KCWE and report during the week.

What’s your addiction? I love traveling to

different countries. I enjoy listening to good music. More I love playing sports, and I enjoy watching the NBA, soccer games, t a ine Onl .com football games, classic h c pit boxing matches, documentaries, movies with great story lines and good acting, and Animal Planet. I also love watching the news.

Q&As

and everything. I play soccer, basketball, volleyball, tennis, golf, football, dominoes, Jenga, kickball, baseball, and I run and swim. I love to compete.

What’s your drink? I honestly drink a lot of water daily. I have never really had coffee, and I rarely drink tea or soda. Water is the source of everything. Where’s dinner? I can cook, so dinner is usually whatever I am cooking. I do like to check out the restaurant scene from time to time. And when it is time to choose a restaurant, I am not picky. I love trying food from different countries. What’s on your KC postcard? The Plaza, all of the great people I have met here, and any of the spots where I get my frozen yogurt.

Finish this sentence: “Kansas City got it right …” With all of the great people I have met in this community.

“Kansas City needs …” A professional basket-

ball team. I would go to every game! I also wish there was a beach nearby.

“In five years …” I hope to be married to an

S a b r i n a S ta i r e S

What’s your game? My game is really any-

“I’ve been known to binge-watch …” NBA

games, World Cup soccer matches, documentaries and most things history-related.

“I can’t stop listening to …” Frank Sinatra, Marvin Gaye, Barry White, Justin Timberlake, Sergio Mendes and Brasil 66, James Brown, and the Beatles. I collect records, and I have a large music collection. I love listening to music from the 1950s to the ’70s because of the message in many of the songs and the way the music sounds. I grew up playing the piano and trumpet, so I enjoy the sound of real instruments. “I read …” A lot of books and articles on his-

tory and people who have impacted history.  

The best advice I ever got: “Take some time to smell the roses,” “Show compassion to everyone,” and “You miss 100 percent of the shots that you don’t take.” I usually seek out my family or mentors for advice.

amazing woman and to continue doing well in my career.

My sidekick: My phone

“I’m always …” Laughing and smiling. I truly

tragic stories. My first real girlfriend came along in college. I call it my first because I had a girlfriend in second grade, but that

enjoy life. I love stand-up comedy.

My dating triumph/tragedy: I have no real

doesn’t count. During the time between second grade and college, I was busy with school and other activities and never had time for a relationship.  

My brush with fame: I have never really been starstruck with anybody. Because I’m on TV, I get to meet a lot of people. So I guess the main thing is that I try to treat people with respect. I will say, I would love to meet Michael Jordan and Muhammad Ali, just to name a few celebrities. I wish I could’ve met Bruce Lee and Frank Sinatra. My 140-character soapbox: I just work and try to enjoy life. If you have any news-story ideas, let me know on Twitter @DavidHallKMBC, or on Facebook, David Halltvnews. What was the last thing you had to apologize for? I don’t remember the last thing;

however, I remember the funniest thing I said sorry for. When I was 8 years old, I was throwing a ball around with my friend, and I threw the ball accidentally through his garage-door window.

My recent triumph: I learned how to surf in Brazil. That was fun, and I got up close and personal with a glacier in Alaska.

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News

Meat puppets

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Unified Government bails out the T-Bones, agrees to buy their stadium.

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T

he Unified Government of Wyandotte County has done the Kansas City T-Bones a solid. The UG quietly agreed to buy the semipro baseball franchise’s stadium and gave its owners a break on their delinquent taxes. An announcement on November 18 from the UG cast its plans to buy CommunityAmerica Ballpark with $8 million of taxpayer money as a “partnership.” That’s more or less true. It was also a maneuver to rescue the T-Bones, which treads in the difficult business of independent-league baseball without a Major League Baseball affiliation. Despite the bailouts, T-Bones owner Adam Ehlert says his franchise is not in distress. "No, not at all," Ehlert tells The Pitch. “We’ve had an awfully good track record for 12 years.” Yet, a January 9 agreement struck between County Administrator Dennis Hays and the T-Bones shows that WyCo agreed to two separate tax rebates for the T-Bones, totaling $156,763. Tax records show that the T-Bones owed delinquency fees on taxes in 2010 and 2011. Ehlert tells The Pitch that while the baseball team itself operates in the black, its profits subsidize his separate business entity, which owns CommunityAmerica Ballpark. The UG’s deal to buy the stadium represents another in a long list of professional sports teams turning to local and state governments for taxpayer assistance. Government subsidies for professional sports more commonly occur at the bigleague levels. Kansas City did it before with the Truman Sports Complex, which is owned by Jackson County. In fact, the T-Bones’ deal with the UG bears similarities to a previous Kansas City stadium deal. Beer baron George Muehlebach built Muehlebach Field at 18th Street and Brooklyn in 1923 and later sold his stadium to Kansas City, at which point it was renamed Municipal Stadium and served as the home of the Kansas City Royals and the Kansas City Chiefs. “No matter how profitable a baseball team or football team is, it’s not going to support its own facility,” Ehlert says. “We are the absolute anomaly here in supporting our own facility, supporting it for 12 years. Frankly, we're not going to support it for another 12.” Hays’ deal in January set the groundwork for the UG to buy the stadium later in the year. The UG made two option payments in January and April, each worth $87,232. Those payments and the tax rebates were not publicly disclosed until November. The agreement also said the bank holding CommunityAmerica Ballpark’s mortgage had agreed not to take “any adverse actions”

november 28 -DECember 4, 2013

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(which probably means foreclosure) on the stadium if both the UG and the T-Bones stuck to the terms of their deal. “The problem with the Ehlerts is, they took out a private loan to pay for that stadium,” Mike Taylor, a spokesman for the UG, tells The Pitch. “The bank note on that loan is a heavy burden.” So the UG will use $8 million worth of salestax revenue (STAR) bonds from the Village West project to take ownership of the stadium, as long as UG commissioners approve the deal later this year. STAR bonds are popular taxpayer-funded financing mechanisms in Kansas, particularly in Wyandotte County. A small part of the financing package for the Kansas Speedway involved STAR bonds. They played a bigger role in the development of Legends at Village West and Sporting Park. STAR bonds work by plowing local and state sales taxes back into projects deemed tourist destinations, places that people will travel more than 100 miles to visit. STAR bonds were once available only to developers for project expenses like utility and infrastructure work related to big projects. Over the years, the Kansas Legislature has restructured the bonds so that today they can be used to buy a completed baseball stadium. Of the $8 million that the UG plans to spend on the stadium purchase, $5.5 million is the actual price tag for CommunityAmerica Ballpark, and $2.5 million will be earmarked for future repairs or upgrades. That would seem to answer the question of which party (the UG) will be responsible for financing stadium improvements during the T-Bones’ planned 20-year lease. Final lease details haven’t been struck.

Wyandotte County may buy Sizzle’s house. From the UG’s perspective, owning the stadium is a better deal than having the T-Bones move or go out of business while Ehlert still holds title to prime real estate in the middle of the county’s main destination point. Neil deMause, a New York author who has written extensively about public financing of sports stadiums and arenas, tells The Pitch that other pro sports facilities have been built privately and then later sold to local governments, such as Nationwide Arena in Columbus, Ohio, the home of the National Hockey League’s Blue Jackets, and the Target Center in Minneapolis, where the NHL’s Wild and the NBA’s Timberwolves play. A scenario similar to the T-Bones’ is playing out in Tennessee, where Major League Baseball’s St. Louis Cardinals bought out its minor league affiliate, the Memphis Redbirds. The club then asked the city to buy the team’s stadium. Memphis Mayor A.C. Wharton Jr. sounded a note of caution about the team’s enthusiasm for the city’s purchase of AutoZone Park. “I do not have a contract,” Wharton told Memphis paper The Commercial Appeal. “I do not have an agreement or even a draft of an agreement to review. What we have, I guess, is a sort of clash of business cultures in which the private sector is moving at a pace that is not exactly in sync with what I, serving the public entity, have to honor.” The T-Bones and the UG clearly don’t have that clash of cultures. They’ve privately worked out a deal.

E-mail steve.vockrodt@pitch.com.


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5–8:30 p.m. | Creative Café Terrace | $1.25–$5 Kick off or conclude your promenade illuminée with hot cocoa and snacks for the whole family.

Saturday, November 30 1–4 p.m. | Bloch Building See the museum through the lens of an antique camera. Discover plein air painting in Noguchi Court. Crêpe-making and tastings by Chez Elle Creperie and Coffeehouse in Bloch Lobby!

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november 28 -december 4, 2013

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5


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————————— The —————————

“Look, I think there’s been a mistake.” “Did you say steak ?” “No. Mistake.” “Oh. See, now you got me all excited.” — Deuce Bigalow: Male Gigolo, 1999 There has been no mistake. You’re reading the Steak Issue because turkey is just an appetizer in Kansas City. So get excited. We put a panel of Kansas Citians through a gauntlet of strips, grilling more than 8 pounds of cattle in search of the one chunk of local beef you’ll want on your grill at your next cookout. continued on page 8

————————— Issue —————————

C’mon. Nobody really wants turkey. | By Jonathan Bender | Photography by Chris Mullins

Dodge City Beef

Bichelmeyer Meats

Local Pig

McGonigle’s

11101 Johnson Drive, Shawnee | dodgecitybeef.com

704 Cheyenne Avenue, Kansas City, Kansas bichelmeyermeatskc.com

2618 Guinotte Avenue | thelocalpig.com

1307 West 79th Street | mcgonigles.com

Origin: Kansas Cut to order: No Price per pound: $18

Walk through a bank lobby that looks as if it’s in the zombie apocalypse, and you’ll find the white freezers that line the floor of Dodge City Beef. After that, you can hunt and peck your way through cuts of Kansas cattle with staff members willing to go back to the bigger freezers to find you a thicker or thinner cut.

Origin: Kansas Cut to order: No Price per pound: $14.99

Bichelmeyer Meats’ concrete-and-steel building, rebuilt after a fire 15 years ago, features one of the longest meat counters (60 feet) in the city, plus Saturday street tacos for those who can’t wait long enough to get back to the stove for their meat fix.

Origin: Kansas Cut to order: No Price per pound: $18.08

Local Pig’s butchering and prep are done on long wooden and stainless-steel tables in view of the cash register. The meats’ farms of origin are listed on a chalkboard that’s updated weekly. Here, it’s about seeing the process or, with butchering classes, being part of the process.

Origin: Iowa Cut to order: No Price per pound: $15.99

McGonigle’s is a butcher shop hiding in plain sight, masquerading as a neighborhood market. The store sells steaks online, and it should phone Pantone to get the McGonigle’s red — from the shimmering lineup of glass-cased hamburger chuck to sirloins — turned into a branded color.

Anton’s Taproom and Restaurant

The Store

Price Chopper

Broadway Butcher Shop

1610 Main | antonskc.com

6624 Raytown Road, Raytown | thestoremeatmarket.com

8430 Wornall | mypricechopper.com

3828 Broadway | facebook.com/broadwaybutchershop

Origin: Missouri Cut to order: Yes Price per pound: $18.80 ($21.20 for dry-aged)

At Anton’s, you can drink a beer at the bar while waiting for your steak to be sliced to the thickness of your choosing. With 67 beers on taps and beef that comes grain- or grass-fed or dry-aged, Anton’s is all about choice.

Origin: Midwest Black Angus Cut to order: No Price per pound: $12.99

A hand-painted cattle mural behind the butcher’s counter and a sign by the register with the cashier’s first name (Debra was working the day I visited) make it clear that the Store is exactly what the lettering on the exterior brick façade says: Old-Fashioned Meat Market.

Origin: USA Cut to order: No Price per pound: $10.79

The grocery-store chain calls its shrinkwrapped steaks “KC Pride Beef.” That sticker is less meaningful than the neon manager’s special, which can knock off a few bucks from the price like a low-rent version of Supermarket Sweep.

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Origin: Southern California Cut to order: Yes Price per pound: $17.99

Greg Madouras is a third-generation butcher who knows that you want more than a cut of meat — you occasionally need advice on what to do with it. In the former Gomer’s Midtown space, Madouras can provide both, along with homemade sauerkraut and sausages.

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The Steak Issue continued from page 7 The rules were simple: nothing directly from a ranch or an operation that ships solely to your door. The chosen steaks are available at least six days a week at a butcher counter or in a case within a 20-minute drive of Kansas City. Ready the A-1 and a steak knife. This is happening.

C

an you guys give me a minute by myself?” chef Craig Adcock asks jokingly as he gently massages a strip steak on a baking pan. On a rainy Tuesday morning in November, Adcock has begun working on nine hunks of meat, sprinkling them with salt and olive oil. Adcock, the owner of Belly Up BBQ and Jude’s Rum Cakes, is playing grill master for the eight hungry men assembled for this communion with the cow. I bought the nine steaks in the last 24 hours from eight shops: Dodge City Beef, Broadway Butcher Shop, the Local Pig, Bichelmeyer Meats, Anton’s Taproom and Restaurant, the Store, Price Chopper and McGonigle’s. I chose the strip because every butcher stocks it, and every home griller is willing to tackle it. As one butcher told me, “When people ask for steak, they’re asking for a strip.” “Steak is what is unique about the Midwest,” says Todd Graves, a lawyer, cattle rancher and founder of the American Royal Steak Competition, which was held for the second time this past October (and loosely inspired this tasting). “It’s the most popular

Breaking down a Steak

E

very Wednesday, the farmyard is delivered to Local Pig — two cows, 10 pigs, two lambs, 120 chickens, and a smattering of ducks and rabbits. This week’s cows, which weigh about 1,500–1,800 pounds when slaughtered, are

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protein and what Kansas City is known for. This is the Napa Valley of steak.” Graves, a former U.S. attorney, is one of eight jurors picked for The Pitch’s blind taste test. He’s joined by Manu Rattan, owner of Village West Discount Liquors; P.J. Angell, director of sales for Handcrafted Wine & Spirits; Jerry Nevins, owner of Snow & Co.; G. David Matz and Bryan Albers of Bottle 12 Wine Bar; and Justin Kendall and David Hudnall of The Pitch. They will decide each steak’s fate. “I’m on Atkins,” Nevins says, looking at the steaks. “This is perfect.” The strips range in size from 8 to 10

ounces (the Local Pig’s is the only outlier, weighing in at 17 ounces). The night before, I defrosted the Dodge City steak, the only frozen entrant, in my refrigerator. Each strip is slightly chilly to the touch when I remove them from a cooler and place them on a baking sheet. That’s why Adcock is massaging them: to bring up the temperature a bit. I’m the only one who knows the origin of the beef when Adcock places the steaks on a Santa Maria–style grill in the parking lot behind his Lenexa commissary kitchen. Adcock has filled the black grill’s open pit with Royal Oak hardwood lump charcoal and

Strip steaks, before and after

delivered in six pieces from Jeff Jones’ ranch in Seneca, Kansas. On a Friday in early November, general manager Adam Northcraft breaks down the 50-pound loin section, which stretches from behind the ribcage to the aitchbone: the H-shaped bone at the top of the rump. Northcraft spends 60 minutes parting out

strips, tenderloins, sirloins, and meat for the hamburger grind. (The fat that gets trimmed off is typically used to make shaving cream.) First, Northcraft removes the flank steak, which sits roughly where your bellybutton would be if you were a cow. The short loin (the little-used muscle along the spine, behind the ribs and above the flank) is next.

He separates the tenderloin from the bone and carefully trims the fat; it’s the most expensive cut in the cow. Filets made from the tenderloin go for $28 a pound. “I’ve got to use my Jedi here,” Northcraft says. “I don’t want to cut into the steak.” The handsaw comes out next. Northcraft cuts free the short loin section containing

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peach wood. He raises and lowers the grate with a side crank, decreasing and increasing the heat. In the hot zones, the grill can reach 650–700 degrees Fahrenheit. “It lets me get a good sear,” Adcock says. “And it’s the most primal.” After about 20 minutes, the steaks are ready. The jury convenes around a pair of 1950s formica kitchen tables. Adcock, who regularly hosts private dinners here, slices the steaks into roughly 1-ounce portions. Each juror is asked to individually consider the


The tasting in Adcock’s kitchen, with (from left) Matz, Albers and Nevins. merits of each piece, scoring from one to 10 (from lowest to highest) on appearance, taste and tenderness. The tasters are to write their scores without initial discussion in order to avoid groupthink. Adcock places the steaks on a cutting board in the same order that they graced the baking pan before the grilling. The first to be cut is from Dodge City Beef. The conversation stops as plates circulate around the table like a proper Thanksgiving dinner. “It was right down the middle,” Albers says later of Dodge City’s steak. The tasters sip red wine and water to

cleanse palates. The second strip comes from Broadway Butcher Shop; Broadway owner Greg Madouras cut the steak just a few hours earlier. “It was really thin, but it had good flavor,” Kendall says. The other tasters concur. Broadway scores highest in the taste category, nearly a full point above the average. Next up is the Local Pig steak, which bears a passing resemblance to the shape of Kansas, according to one taster. The strip, coincidentally, came from a Kansas farm. “I like the tenderness of it,” Matz says. The fourth strip, from Bichelmeyer’s,

the strips. The former electrician, who has been working at Local Pig since February 2012 after taking a life-altering hog-butchering class, then debones that section. He goes in straight with a knife to get around a knob at the end of the bone. Northcraft cuts a total of 13 strips, each weighing between 16 and 20 ounces. If he had

left the tenderloin and strip attached to the bone, that could have been sold as a T-bone or a porterhouse steak. “This has some nice marbling,” Northcraft says, looking at the steak. “You don’t really know what you have until you cut into it.”

has an attractive crust and is deemed the second-best-looking steak of the bunch. The fifth is a grass-fed strip from Anton’s. “Ooh, if it looks this good,” Matz says of the Anton’s steak, trailing off. “I remember thinking, This is going to be good, man.” The cows from the other butcher shops are all grass-fed and grain-finished. (Price Chopper did not return a call about its meat.) “This one grew on me,” Nevins says of the Store’s steak. “It definitely had a lighter flavor that wasn’t overpowering but good.” The meat love ends with steak No. 7, Price Chopper’s strip, the only shrink-wrapped

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steak in the bunch. (Dodge City’s was vacuum-sealed.) The grocery-store chain’s strip is thin with a bit of a grayish pallor. “It was livery and grainy to the touch and a bit bland,” Graves says. “It almost didn’t taste like steak,” Hudnall adds. Price Chopper’s steak earns the lowest scores in taste and appearance. But the next steak, from McGonigle’s, gets a warm reception. Hudnall later suggests that it may have been due to the last point of comparison. “I possibly liked it because I didn’t like the one before,” he says. continued on page 11

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The Steak Issue

Please Join ...

continued from page 9

Anton’s Taproom and Restaurant

McGonigle’s

Price Chopper

The Store

Taste: 6.75 (dry-aged, 6.63) Tenderness: 7.63 (dry-aged, 6.38) Appearance: 7.50 (dry-aged, 7.25)

Taste: 7.50 Tenderness: 7.50 Appearance: 7.75

Taste: 5.13 Tenderness: 6.38 Appearance: 5.25

Taste: 7.00 Tenderness: 6.38 Appearance: 6.38

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Steak scores, from 1 to 10 Bichelmeyer Meats

Local Pig

Broadway Butcher Shop

Dodge City Beef

Taste: 6.63 Tenderness: 6.50 Appearance: 7.63

Taste: 7.00 Tenderness: 6.88 Appearance: 6.88

Taste: 7.63 Tenderness: 7.38 Appearance: 6.75

Taste: 7.00 Tenderness: 6.38 Appearance: 7.00

McGonigle’s scored highest on appearance. “I wanted to eat that steak and then was happy I did,” Albers says. Several of the steak eaters concur. Steak No. 9 is a wild card: a dry-aged strip from Anton’s (the only dry-aged entrant). It is also a thicker cut, more than an inch thick, with a massive fat cap in the shape of a mallard head. “That fat cap looks like the steaks I used to eat as a kid,” Adcock says. “This is what I’d feed to my wife,” Matz says. “I’d give No. 1 [Dodge City] and No. 2 [Broadway] to my friends.”

After discussing the merits of each steak, I ask the judges to pick the one strip they’d choose if they were cooking for themselves. Anton’s and the Store each receive a vote. Broadway Butcher Shop garners two votes. The clear favorite is McGonigle’s, which earns four votes from the judges. Here’s the breakdown: McGonigle’s earned top marks in appearance. Broadway Butcher Shop ranked highest for taste. The judges called Anton’s grass-fed steak the most tender. Price Chopper ranked lowest in taste and appearance, while Bichelmeyer’s and

the Anton’s dry-aged entry tied at the bottom for tenderness. If all three categories — taste, tenderness and appearance — were weighed equally, Anton’s grass-fed steak finished with the highest aggregate score, .05 percentage points higher than fan-favorite McGonigle’s. “Everyone always says, ‘Go to McGonigle’s,’” Albers say. When it comes to steak, sometimes it pays to follow the herd.

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E-mail jonathan.bender@pitch.com pitch.com

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11


Each week, Pitch Street Team cruises around to the hottest clubs, bars and concerts. You name it, we will be there. While we are out, we hand out tons of cool stuff. So look for the Street Team... We will be looking for you!

Strong Ale Fest @ McCoy’s

Strong Ale Fest @ McCoy’s

Refuge driving tours to see warerfowl and wild eagles Live eagle shows by Dickerson Park Zoo hourly from 9-4 on Saturday & 11-3 on Sunday.

http://mdc.mo.gov/events/eagledays http://1.usa.gov/16MGyrN

Little River Band @ Uptown

816-271-3100 Bell Tower Bash @ Arts Asylum

Upcoming Events 11.27 - The Pitch & Captain Morgan Present Trampled Under Foot @ Knuckleheads 11.29, 11.30 - Stanford’s Presents Mike Smith @ Uptown 12.3 - Jeff Tweedy @ Uptown

See more on the “promotions” link at p 12

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november 28 -DECember 4, 2013

pitch.com


WEEK OF NOVEMBER 28-DECEMBER 4

WILLIAM PURNELL/ICON SMI/NEWSCOM

CHIEFS VS. BRONCOS

Coming off consecutive losses, the Chiefs get a shot at payback when Peyton Manning and the Broncos ride into Arrowhead Stadium at 3:25 p.m. Sunday. The AFC West is still up for grabs — both teams are 9–2 — thanks to Denver blowing a lead at New England and Kansas City falling at home to San Diego. The Chiefs will need a banged-up defense to rally. Tickets, well, you’re going to have to trade a family heirloom or shell out a few hundred bucks to get in.

Daily listings on page 30 pitch.com

november 28 -december 4, 2013

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13


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Agave in traditional brick ovens, small batch distillation and our ultra-slow filtration process. Ask for it at your favorite bar or liquor store and try it for yourself.

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art

Passion Pieces

I

f an art exhibition can be said to have curb appeal, a drive past the Todd Weiner Gallery right now yields the visual equivalent of a hot pickup line. Jim Sajovic’s new solo show, Hix Fragments & (pash’n), is hard to miss from the street. e Mor Explosive colors dazzle like fireworks through the gallery’s glimmert a e in Onl .com ing glass windows. And h c pit that effect only intensifies once you’ve stepped into the gallery, where Sajovic’s meditations on human expression and eroticism achieve hypnotic power. Sajovic’s digital paintings blur the line between electronic and physical brushwork, combining pigmented inks and oldfashioned acrylics. The paintings in his Hix Fragments series add text to that already complex aesthetic, overlaying images with lines clipped from the poetry of Sajovic’s friend H.L. Hix. “Never in Control” stamps a fuzzy self-portrait with semitransparent text. The squat, angular lettering simultaneously softens the image and gives it texture, and the crisp turquoise dots separating each word help us parse the poetry. “Sometimes Lie” offers a less straightforward presentation. Sajovic makes you work for the message — letter size and spacing vary within the verse, slowing down your eye as you scan the canvas. Some words are in the foreground, others blurred. The text’s palette

ART

Jim Sajovic raises a blush

By

at the Todd Weiner Gallery.

L i z C ook

here appears more delicate than in Sajovic’s male counterpart. Each of these subjects, the other works, with lighter pinks and sea greens overlaid text says, could become “a razor in the night without warning.” floating ethereally in front of the background Across the gallery, (pash’n) throbs with an image’s deeper tones. almost palpable eroticism. Couples, not indiTwo of the exhibition’s most enthralling viduals, are the focus here, and each paintpieces share a title. “I may kill…” stretches the ing in the series exposes an electric moment same haunting poetic fragment over paintbetween two lovers. “Flicker,” “Licker” and ings of two faces, one male and one female. The Todd Weiner Gallery presents the pieces “Lip Nip” hang together on one wall, crafting visual harmony with interwoven colors. together on one wall, highlighting the themes The vibrant, high-saturation inks meld and and tropes in conversation. Though each tug at the couple’s faces, capturing them as if painting is a stand-alone marvel of emotional and visual depth, the interplay between the through an infrared camera. Heat blooms in two adds yet another layer to Sajovic’s work. Sajovic’s unbridled palette: magentas, deep purples, fiery oranges and The male painting presents lipstick reds. the poetic fragments as a Hix Fragments As in Hix Fragments, howwide net of text, with the & (pash’n) ever, there’s more to these sans-serif letters and wide Through December 2 paintings than what emerges kerning of an eye doctor’s at Todd Weiner Gallery at first blush. Sajovic’s acrylic chart. As in “Sometimes 115 West 18th Street glaze adds a visual texture Lie,” we have to concentrate toddweinergallery.com that you can appreciate only for meaning to emerge — our up close. Razor-thin lines of more immediate focus remains on the man’s expressive features and pale pink and green jet across the paintings like static on an old television. The hand-applied piercing, pool-blue eyes. In the female iteration, the text is fully in- paint flecks the work with slight imperfections as it pools in the corners, making these pieces tegrated in the scene: Words are swiped on the canvas as if on a steamed-up mirror, letting us feel even more human and alive. “Lip Nip” is intoxicating in its intimacy. glimpse the richer, more saturated colors beThe interplay of light and shadow emphasizes hind the fog. The letters are scrawled unevenly the natural curves and contours of a couple’s across the surface, capturing the imperfection of an unsteady finger on glass. The humidity faces, veiling everything but the essentials in softens the woman’s face, but her expression dark romanticism. In each (pash’n) piece, gender isn’t immeis no less haunting and alive than that of her

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From left: “I may kill…” (F), “I may kill…” (M) and “Never in Control” diately apparent; Sajovic allows us to imbue the scenes with our own histories and desires. “Flicker,” for example, presents two faces in near mirror image, their features converging like molten metal into a pattern reminiscent of a Rorschach ink blot. Only the slight tilt of a face breaks the symmetry, allowing us to distinguish one from the other. “Devour” dances more deliberately with this kind of ambiguity. Its commingling splashes of color make it nearly impossible to isolate individual features and faces. Shapes melt together, evolving into a permanent fusion of bodies and passions. “Frenzy” and “Devour” are staged together on their own wall here, a presentation that brings into relief the subtle differences between (pash’n)’s component paintings. These two tweak the palette slightly, mixing dusky blues and greens in the top third of each canvas. That arrangement pulls the eye down to find the higher-saturation colors at each painting’s base. We scan the canvases as we might look upon a mate, our eyes drawn toward colors and curves. As seductive as (pash’n) is, Sajovic’s exhibition is most alluring when taken in at once. The two halves sweep you into a deeply affecting current of intimacy, identity and desire.

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1

ey Go to pitch.com/readersurv

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Be entered to these amazing prizes!

win one of

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Contest begins at 12:01 am [ct] 11/27/13, ends at 12:01 am [ct] 12/27/13. By filling out this survey, you’ll be filling us in on details about who you are, how you spend your time and what you like and dislike. We’ll then use the information you provide to serve you better resulting in more personalized content on our website and in our newspaper. Go to pitch.com/readersurvey now to start letting your voice be heard, as well as your chance to score a sweet prize. 16

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S TA G E

Spotlight: John RenSenhouSe

The actor-director answers

By

our first Stage questionnaire.

De bor a h hir s ch

redit the perfect home for getting John Rensenhouse back in our midst. The KC native’s career has included national Broadway tours, getting killed on TV, meeting fans on the street. Part of the core company of Kansas City Actors Theatre, he has become a familiar local presence as both an actor and a director. While readying the play Almost, Maine at UMKC Theatre (running November 29–December 8), he answered The Pitch’s questions by e-mail. Name: John Rensenhouse Theater occupation: Actor, director and now managing director of Kansas City Actors Theatre What experience lit your theater spark, and how old were you? In first grade, playing Frosty the Snowman in a school pageant, my Frosty pants fell down. The audience laughed and laughed. Afterward, my mom said I was the star of the show. I asked, “What’s a star?” And I was hooked. How and when did you make the leap and decide on a life in theater? When I was a freshman at Grinnell College, I played on the golf team. Then I got cast in the spring play in the theater department, only to later discover that the dates of the play conflicted with the conference golf tournament. I quit the play. As a sophomore, the same thing happened: playing on the golf team and then getting cast in a play that conflicted. This time around, I quit the golf team. Big sea change there. What has drawn you into directing? The larger scope of creativity that must be used. A chance to envision the entire experience and then lead the collaboration required to produce it. Plus, as I get older, it’s getting harder and harder to learn the lines as an actor. When you’re the director, you don’t have to learn the lines! If you had a stage name, what would it be? Rover Conway. First pet + mother’s maiden name. Classic formula. Where did you get your theater training? I majored in theater at Grinnell College, then went on to get an MFA in acting from the Professional Theatre Training Program at the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee. This training program, one of the best in the country, is now located at the University of Delaware, where I go back occasionally to teach and perform. What brought you to KC, and what has kept you here? I turned 40 and felt an overriding urge to own a house. I’m a Taurus. I crave routine and stability, two things that don’t often come

B r i a n Pa u l e t t e

C

included with the actor’s life. I’d been living in New York City and Los Angeles, two places where I couldn’t even come close to being able to afford buying a house. I’d been doing a few plays in St. Louis and I spent some time looking for a house there. Didn’t find one. Then I came to KC one summer, in 1997, to perform at the Shakespeare Festival, drove down a street and saw the perfect house with a for-sale sign in the yard. Bought it. And said, “Guess I’m moving to Kansas City!” I grew up here, out at Lake Quivira, so it feels like a natural place for me to be. I still have family here, and it is very important for me to stay with my father, who has been so good to me, until the end of his life. And I lucked into finding the most fantastic boyfriend ever. We’ve been together for 14 years, and he has a good job here. What’s one of your favorite shows? As You Like It is my favorite Shakespeare play. … But Noises Off is hands-down my favorite show. I did the Broadway national tour of it back in the day, 1984–85, and then directed it here at UMKC in 2007. Funniest damn thing ever. And I love it that the movie version bombed. That play is a real testament to the wonders and beauty of live performance. How did you come to direct Noises Off at UMKC? At a Kansas City Actors Theatre meeting, Tom Mardikes — the chairman of UMKC Theatre and one of the original founders of KCAT — mentioned that UMKC was going to do it, and I told him about my history with the play and how much I loved it. He asked if I wanted to direct it. I wish all jobs were that simple to get.

Rensenhouse rehearsing Almost, Maine What was the seed for KCAT’s collaborations with UMKC Theatre? They’re the brainchild of Tom Mardikes. It was his idea to combine forces. We started using UMKC student designers to design our productions, and the collaboration grew from there. The first full collaboration was Oh, What a Lovely War, in 2011, which we performed at the National World War I Museum. Now, UMKC works with many theaters in town. How is working with students different from more experienced actors? Working with the students is great fun. Not that working with professionals isn’t fun, mind you, but the students bring a refreshing energy and enthusiasm to the work. It is a welcome reminder of the original passion that got me hooked on theater many years ago. How are you affected by the audience? Audience laughter during a comedy, or any play really, relaxes you and gives you a guide for how to proceed. The play becomes a conversation with them. And during the silences of a drama, you listen for the silence of the audience. It, too, is a real sign of the connection that is happening. What’s a favorite fan moment? During my early days in New York City, in the 1980s, I had the good fortune to be a regular on a soap opera, The Edge of Night. My character was named Hector Wilson, and he was a bad guy and eventually got killed off. So, shortly after that demise, I was walking down 42nd Street — this was before they cleaned up Times Square — and I see this hooker coming toward me and I prepare to get propositioned. She starts to get out the

pitch.com

usual line, “Baby, you need a date?” but all of a sudden she backs up and starts screaming, “I am so MAD they killed you off! So mad! You was my favorite!” She goes on to tell me that Edge of Night was her show because it came on right when she got up, 3:30 in the afternoon, and how she loves all the characters and the story and I was her very favorite and she was pissed. I confessed I was a bit sad as well because it meant I was out of a job. She told me not to worry. “You was good, honey, and they’ll be puttin’ you in somethin’ else.” She told me her name was Destin, short for Destiny. What’s the hardest thing you’ve worked on? Directing Long Day’s Journey Into Night for KCAT this past summer was a real challenge. Needing to live inside the story of that family’s pain and addiction for three months while preparing for and then rehearsing it certainly took its toll. I would get home at night and just sit and stare. And drink. The most rewarding? Financially? Playing Scar on the Broadway national tour of The Lion King. I did that for four years, and it has set me up relatively well. Emotionally? Probably that very same Long Day’s Journey Into Night. To get to tangle with such a giant of a play and to learn its lessons has brought me to my knees in humble appreciation. When will we see you next onstage? Next up actingwise for me is Journey’s End, the final show of KCAT’s ninth season and a co-production with UMKC that is being presented at the National World War I Museum. It is a really good play about life in the trenches for a British squadron during WWI. I play a colonel who sends the young guys off to fight in no-man’s land. It opens in February. Or if you are in need of some very large holiday spirit, I will be narrating the Christmas pageant at the Church of the Resurrection, at 137th Street and Roe. Both the church and the show are gigantic! What directing project is in the works? Right now I’m working on a sweet little play called Almost, Maine, produced by UMKC in Room 116 of the Performing Arts Center on campus. It is an intimate blackbox space — such a treat to work in — and the actors are the second-year graduate students from the UMKC Department of Theatre. They are a fantastically talented bunch, and the play is going to be a funny, heartwarming gem that everyone should go see. It opens the day after Thanksgiving and runs through December 8.

E-mail deborah.hirsch@pitch.com

november 28 -december 4, 2013

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17


film INVITES YOU AND A GUEST TO A FILM SCHOOL SCREENING OF

Slouching Toward lincoln

Bruce Dern gets shorted in Nebraska.

By

S c o t t W il S on

F

LOG ON TO PITCH.COM BEGINNING THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 28TH FOR YOUR CHANCE TO WIN A COMPLIMENTARY PASS FOR TWO “LIKE” US AT /ALAMOKANSASCITY FOLLOW US ON AT/ALAMOKC Please note: Winners will be selected at random from all entries. No purchase necessary. Limit one admit-two pass per winner. Employees of participating sponsors are ineligible. THIS FILM IS RATED R FOR GRAPHIC WAR VIOLENCE, DISTURBING IMAGES.

AT ALAMO DRAFTHOUSE DECEMBER 1ST DRAFTHOUSE.COM/KANSAS_CITY/MAINSTREET

INVITES YOU AND A GUEST TO A SPECIAL ADVANCE SCREENING OF

ENTER-TO-WIN A COMPLIMENTARY TICKET! LOG ON TO WWW.GOFOBO.COM/RSVP AND INPUT THE FOLLOWING CODE: PITCHB6XB

FOR MORE CHANCES TO WIN “like” us at facebook/43KIXKansasCity AND FOLLOW US ON twitter at/43KIXKansasCity THIS FILM IS NOT YET RATED. Please note: Passes are available on a first-come, first-served basis. While supplies last. No purchase necessary. Limit one admit-two pass per person. Employees of participating sponsors are ineligible. Arrive early! Seating is first-come, first-served, except for members of the reviewing press. Theater is overbooked to ensure a full house. Theater is not responsible for overbooking.

IN REAL D 3D, HFR 3D AND IMAX 3D DECEMBER 13 thehobbit.com

18

the pitch

ilmmaker Alexander Payne loves his home state enough to live there half the year. He reveres Hollywood’s silent era so much that he threatened a walkout if he couldn’t shoot his latest movie in black-and-white. And he wanted to give 77-year-old Bruce Dern a shot at a great valedictory performance. Those are fine reasons to have made Nebraska — but not quite cause enough to see it. Payne, director and co-writer of The Descendants, Sideways, About Schmidt, Election and Citizen Ruth, usually doesn’t have trouble with character dimension and storytelling momentum. That is, he has rarely hesitated to sacrifice those elements to achieve certain effects. Depending on your admiration for the above-named movies, those effects include either gut laughs punched out by brass-knuckle home truths or cheap shots aimed at flabby homebodies. Nebraska, from a script credited only to first-timer Bob Nelson, amplifies more of the latter, and Payne too often lets these already small characters recede into the distance. That distance is sharp and often lovely, thanks to cinematographer Phedon Papamichael’s deep, detailed black-and-white compositions. But the people in the foreground can’t withstand Payne’s slow, unblinking scrutiny. Dern, under an Einstein shock of white hair, suffers most. He plays Woody Grant, the kind of nonthreatening alcoholic bad-dad cipher native to movies of a certain gnarled whimsy. Woody has fixated on a bulk-rate sweepstakes letter promising a $1 million prize. Neither his wife nor his sons can talk him out of this lastcentury marketing mirage, and Woody, his driver’s license long gone, is ready to walk from Billings, Montana, to Lincoln, Nebraska, to stake his claim. He’s less willing to explain his faulty logic (this, we understand, is how it has always been), and Dern conveys Woody through a series of impatient grunts, exasperated refusals and a twist-hipped shuddering walk. It’s the sort of vanity-free work that generates attention (Dern won the best-actor prize at Cannes this year), but Woody is so lightly conceived that it’s hard even to project your own redemptive hopes onto him. Redemption isn’t the point — this is still Payne’s movie — but the rest of the characters offer little to recognize and less to ponder. Will Forte, the Saturday Night Live veteran and MacGruber star, comes closest as David, the son who agrees to haul Woody toward his cash. The role requires mainly that Forte absorb insults and shocks without yielding to anger, and he does this very well. (His best scenes aren’t with Dern; he’s magnetic in a quiet meeting with a newspaper publisher, played by Angela

november 28 -DECember 4, 2013

THE PITCH

pitch.com

McEwan, and during a couple of confrontations with a jarring Stacy Keach.) He’s easy enough to watch that you almost miss the funniest of the dismayed faces that Bob Odenkirk gets to make as Woody’s other son, Ross. June Squibb, the spouse felled during the first reel of About Schmidt, attacks her part — Kate, Woody’s wife — with a relish that transcends the character’s most vulgar shortcomings. In a movie that sinks too comfortably into glib assumptions about rural mores, failed fathers and sputtering marriages, she’s alert to the script’s few available chances to surprise. And she helps Dern’s fine performance seem like more than this movie allows it to be.

OldbOy

Y

ou keep scratching at Oldboy, looking for something beneath its blood and grime, but your fingernails just darken with the effort. Spike Lee, remaking the stomach-turning 2003 South Korean revenge fantasia, might have refracted the pulpy source material through his moral lens. Instead, he turns Josh Brolin loose with a hammer, calls in a Samuel L. Jackson favor and picks up a paycheck. Most of what makes Lee a frustrating director is on display in Oldboy. Some of what makes Lee a fascinating director is also onscreen, in frustratingly scant quantity. Some directors visibly enjoy the chance to set aside dream projects long enough to complete work-for-hire palate cleansers. Among films by Lee’s peers, Martin Scorsese’s The Aviator and The Departed and Steven Spielberg’s Catch Me If You Can come to mind. But even allied with talented

Dern and Forte hit the road. cinematographer Sean Bobbitt (whose 2013 also includes 12 Years a Slave, The Place Beyond the Pines and the most recent films by Michael Winterbottom and Neil Jordan), the director musters almost no excitement. His only signatory gesture is one shot done in his predictable man-on-a-Segway style, and dispensed with so quickly that it suggests embarrassment. There’s nothing truly shameful on display, barring a laziness that’s beneath Lee but is still probably more work than the genre demands. The story (adapted by I Am Legend screenwriter Mark Protosevich) remains simple: Joe Doucette (an uneven Brolin, first hammy and then too aware of the material) is a mean drunk and a shitty husband and father, and one of his enemies performs an ahead-of-its-time act of extraordinary rendition on him. Locked in a private boutique prison for 20 years and framed for murder, he hones his innate nastiness into a biblical lust for vengeance. Then he is released and commences to stomping and stabbing his way to the center of the conspiracy against him. He gets help from a smartly deployed Michael Imperioli and a distractingly pliant Elizabeth Olsen. He gets hurt by Sharlto Copley, beamed in from some other, more appropriately operatic melodrama. Who survives and how are beside the point, yet Lee directs his Oldboy as though those things matter. It’s not 20 years in a cell, but it’s two hours in poor company without the much-needed advocacy of an engaged talent. — S.W.

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film

Hornets’ nest

By

D av iD HuDn a l l

A tough, scrappy doc aims to pick up a W.

I

Medora, Indiana’s finest n 2009, Davy Rothbart read a New York Times article about the Medora Hornets, a smallDreams. Like the former, it’s an Indiana undertown high school basketball team in Indiana dog story. Like the latter, it uses basketball as that had gone 0-22 the previous year. The playa lens through which to examine some of the ers came from families living near the poverty harsh realities of postindustrial America. But line; some were said to play in work boots beit’s also shot through with a gritty beauty that cause their parents couldn’t afford to buy them feels very personal — the filmmakers clearly basketball shoes. fell in love with Medora and its citizens. Rothbart is the editor of Found, a magazine The film premiered this year at South By that offers a peek into strangers’ lives by pubSouthwest, and on Saturday, Rothbart and lishing discarded letters, notes, lists, photoCohn bring the film to Screenland Armour for a graphs and other items that its contributors screening. Joining them are two of the players discover out in the world. He has spent much featured in the documentary. of the last decade touring in a van and showDespite the fact that Medora is getting a ing off the finds to crowds in cities across the higher-profile release than the average docucountry. So it is perhaps not entirely surprising mentary — thanks in part to the involvement that Rothbart’s instinct upon learning about the Medora Hornets was to move to the town of Olive Productions, a production company formed by Stanley Tucci and (along with his friend and coSteve Buscemi — Rothbart director, Andrew Cohn) and Medora says it has been a relatively film a documentary about 8 p.m. Saturday, November 30, pleasant transition from his the team’s next season. at the Screenland Armour, grassroots Found approach “When you’re out tour408 Armour Road, to the larger scale of Hollying like we were with Found, medorafilm.com wood releases. you’re constantly finding “People kept telling us yourself on these remote stretches of road, and you see some kid playing we’d have to pay a fixer to get the movie in theaters or that we didn’t have a chance of findin the front yard of a trailer park or something,” ing a wider audience because it’s not a millionRothbart tells The Pitch. “And you start to have dollar documentary,” he says. “But I’ve found these daydreams about these kids’ lives. What that when we reached out to theaters individuis their story?” ally, they responded really well. They loved “Found is this thrilling way to get a glimpse of people’s lives, but it’s just the tip of an ice- the film and wanted to share it. So I think one of the lessons we’ve learned with this is that berg,” Rothbart continues. “In Medora, we although the movie industry isn’t necessarily had the opportunity to spend eight months, built on a DIY aesthetic, you can bring it to the a year, with these kids. It was like seeing the system and be successful with it.” rest of the iceberg.” Medora feels like a descendant of a couple of Midwestern basketball films: Hoosiers, Hoop e-mail david.hudnall@pitch.com

408 Armour Rd. NKC, MO. 64116 816.421.9700 www.Screenland.com/Armour

Dec. 7 Gremlins Double Feature DECEMBER 7: BIG LEBOWSKI DECEMBER 9 - 11: NIGHTMARE BEFORE XMAS DECEMBER 12: DIE HARD DECEMBER 18: XMAS PARTY BAD SANTA

Trivia: EVERY WEDNESDAY AT 7PM pitch.com

november 28 -december 4, 2013

the pitch

19


CAfé

Ste a k Ou t

Which icons and newbies are worth the money?

By

Ch a r l e s F er ru z z a

steak dinner represents success, earning power, prosperity. For a century, your ability to afford a juicy rib-eye at a good restaurant at your leisure has signaled your proximity to the American dream. And we notice when we have to eat something else. President Herbert Hoover is said to have promised Americans “a chicken in every pot” (a promise he couldn’t deliver on), then he pissed off a nation by letting a movie crew film him feeding T-bone pieces to his dog in the Rose Garden. By then, millions of citizens could barely afford chicken. After World War II, Kansas City and Chicago stockyards filled again with cattle, and beef became less expensive and more easily available. USDA data show that beef consumption in the United States has nearly doubled over the past e r o M 100 years. To eat all that beef, we turn to a broad t spectrum of possibilities, a ine Onl .com from low-budget buffeth c pit grill concepts (Golden Corral, Ryan’s) to high-end operations (the Capital Grille, Fogo de Chão). You no longer have to be upper-middle-class to afford a steak dinner. But having plenty of scratch helps if you want a great steak dinner. Kansas City’s steakhouses operate at every price point, from a 16-ounce, $18.49 USDA-choice sirloin at the Olathe Texas Roadhouse to the 36-ounce Tomahawk steak at the Capital Grille, dry-aged for 40 days and priced at $80. (People still believe in the steak as status symbol, you see.) Both of the above restaurants are chain operations, but Capital Grille has definitely stolen thunder from local steak joints. Iconic places such as Plaza III and Jess & Jim’s Steakhouse (the oldest beef venue in the metro and nationally famous since Calvin Trillin’s gushing Playboy paean in 1972) face plenty of competition. I wanted to see how well the local beef barns held up against outsiders — and whether these places’ most expensive steaks were worth it.

Café

Rye KC

The 11-month-old Rye KC, the homespun suburban cousin to the cosmopolitan Bluestem, run by James Beard Award–winning chef Colby Garrelts and his wife, Megan, is betterknown for its deep-fried chicken than for its “Reserve Steak Program” — available only at dinner, from a separate menu. Five beefsteak options are on the list, including a 16-ounce slab of prime rib that’s prepared only on Sundays. All of the steaks are USDA Choice (except the center-cut filet 20

the pitch

AngelA C. Bond

A

mignon, which is USDA Prime), from Foster Farms in California. Wait, California? Jeremy Lamb, Rye’s general manager, explains the Garreltses’ choice this way: “The beef we serve isn’t fattened up with whole corn. The ranchers feed them cornflakes.” “Do you mean,” I asked, “like Kellogg’s?” “No, more like flakes of corn integrated with traditional corn feed. Whole corn disrupts a cow’s digestive system.” I couldn’t stop thinking about cattle calmly eating from giant bowls filled with breakfast cereal, so I called Colby Garrelts. He laughed and told me, “That’s not true at all. If I find the right producer, I do use Kansas beef. But for our volume, we just try to find the best beef, no matter where it comes from. The Foster family farms [beef] is well-marbled and good-sized, so we can cut a thick steak. We hand-select all of our beef. But no, they don’t eat cornflakes.” Whatever they eat, it works. Rye’s rib-eye, one of the best-selling cuts here, is as rich and flavorful as any beef I’ve tasted. The cut I sampled arrived beautifully prepared, buttery and tender. It had been dry-aged for 14 days before the chefs grilled it. At $44, it’s not cheap, but it does include soup or salad and one side dish, and I’d order it again even if it didn’t.

Plaza III

When Joe and Bill Gilbert and Paul Robinson opened Plaza III, in 1963, it was the fanciest place for steaks in Kansas City. The halfcentury since has delivered plenty of ups and downs, but until recently, the place had remained relevant.

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Today, though, Plaza III is something of a caricature of its glorious former self. The menu has stayed pretty much the same over the decades, though its prices have soared. The dark, masculine dining room would look even more shopworn if someone turned up the lights. But one diner’s Miss Havisham is another’s warm nostalgia, and this oldest restaurant tenant on the Country Club Plaza still commands loyalists. Plaza III’s slow-roasted prime rib, available regular or thick-cut, is outstanding and exquisitely flavorful. The center-cut Kansas City strip also gets high points for flavor and texture, but let’s be real here: It’s hard to do a bad strip.  With such big-name competition on the Plaza, Capital Grille and Ruth’s Chris Steak House, it may be time for the Plaza III owner to look more to the Jess & Jim’s model as a means of survival — to paraphrase Quentin Crisp: “I don’t try to keep up with Joneses. I drag them down to my level.” The Plaza could benefit from a steak joint that forgoes the little niceties that no one cares about — the relish tray comes to mind — and offers some real bang for the buck. Like the competition’s high-end steak, a Plaza III steak is presented a la carte. And the extras are too expensive. Sure, the 1-pound baked spud — as big as a size 9 shoe — is big enough to comfortably feed two hungry people, but it’s an extra nine bucks, and who shares a baked potato anyway? You want a salad with that steak? Toss in another ten-spot. All of the steaks served here are USDA Prime, but so are those at Jess & Jim’s — and cheaper. The servers at Plaza III still roll out a

Anton’s has a world-class rib-eye (left), and Jess & Jim’s offers a lot of bang for the buck. cart prior to ordering with an example of every cut of meat listed on the menu (and a few of the vegetables for good measure), wrapped in plastic, and they perform a lifeless little sales pitch. No longer, though, is a tank of fresh lobsters at the front of the restaurant, like in the old days. But if you’d like a lobster tail with your steak, it’s an additional $29, which is just what the most expensive cut of beef at Plaza III cost a few years ago.

Jess & Jim’s Steakhouse

Let’s say you wanted to combine the best aspects of Plaza III and a Ponderosa Steakhouse (there hasn’t been one in the metro for years, but you remember). I suspect you’d end up with something like Jess & Jim’s, a cruelly lighted, noisy venue that serves mostly fine steaks. The meat is affordable, which makes sense only in an atmosphere so casual that you could probably walk in wearing a bathrobe without drawing so much as a glance. This place has been a lovable joint since Jess Kinkaid and Jim Wright opened their 135th Street saloon in 1938. There wasn’t much happening in the hamlet of Martin City to suggest that the bar (which moved to a different but nearby location after a tornado razed part of the town in 1957) would become a destination, but Trillin made the place an overnight snoot magnet by calling it “the finest steakhouse in the world.” Well, it wasn’t then and it isn’t now. But Jess & Jim’s remains one of the best-loved


places in the city, and you can indeed have a first-class steak dinner without putting any of your belongings on eBay afterward. Yes, the beef here can be expensive; a Sterling Silver brand, USDA Prime 30-ounce porterhouse goes for $43.99. But that’s a hell of a lot of meat, and it comes with a hell of a lot of sides. I prefer the bacon-wrapped filet (offered in three sizes), which is supremely tender. The Kansas City strip isn’t the finest in town, but even it is well-marbled and flavorful and, like all the steaks here, delivered furiously spitting and sizzling on a white-hot aluminum platter.

Anton’s taproom

Downtown Kansas City suffered a beefy blow when it lost, in a relatively short period of time, both the Hereford House restaurant, at 20th Street and Main, and Benton’s Prime Steakhouse, in the Westin Crown Center Hotel. Both dining spots had been popular with tourists for decades — visitors want a real Kansas City steak, right? — while giving local diners fair bang for the buck (at least in their heydays). Anton Kotar more than takes up the slack with his namesake saloon, which feels like a bar that happens to serve food from the adjoining butcher shop. This may be the only steak joint in the metro that offers both grass-fed and grain-fed beef, cut to order and priced by the ounce. The meat is butchered and aged in-house. (The 28-day steaks are slightly more expensive.) Because Kotar purchases the meat directly from an area ranch, the beef is USDAinspected but not USDA-graded. Believe me, though, this beef gets the highest marks: divinely succulent, ruby-red beefsteak that the kitchen staff butchers into filets, Kansas City strips and rib-eyes that are expertly cooked to deliver a head-spinning buttery richness. The grass-fed steaks are leaner but have their own distinctly herbed essence (which I find extremely appealing). The prices can be as high as you want them to be. If you’re as flush as Diamond Jim Brady (who loved sirloin, but only after polishing off a couple of roasted ducks and a few lobsters), you can go wild with a Flintstones-sized rib-eye, or a 4-ounce filet that’s respectably budget-friendly but still contains more perfect notes than “Rhapsody in Blue.” Every cut I sampled justified its price. Laid-back and boisterously crowded, Anton’s is the antithesis of the expenseaccount-mecca Capital Grille, and it’s not much like what you think of when you recall the pink hues and lobster tanks of yesteryear’s steakhouses. But right now, it might just be the most authentic, least pretentious KC steakhouse — a no-nonsense Great Plains hangout for people who care more about what’s on the plate than what’s on the walls. Anton’s has some good paintings on display, but the real works of art come on the plates.

Have a suggestion for a restaurant The Pitch should review? E-mail charles.ferruzza@pitch.com

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month before Thanksgiving, Capital Grille executive chef Ray Comiskey found himself unexpectedly giving thanks. The Greater Kansas City Restaurant Association surprised Comiskey by naming him its 2013 Missouri Restaurant Chef of the Year at its annual dinner. “Everyone was at my table standing and clapping,” Comiskey says, “and I was like, ‘Why are all of you standing and looking at me?’” Weeks later, Comiskey is cutting steaks in the back of the Plaza restaurant, as he has done for the past 12 years. Comiskey, 44, has been working in kitchens for more than twice as long; he started cutting vegetables in 1985 at a farm-to-table restaurant in Ann Arbor, Michigan. “I think the combination of high school wrestling, cutting weight and working at a restaurant really got me into food,” Comiskey says. “I was 16 and learning how to skin a rabbit or shop at a [farmers] market.” After graduating from high school, Comiskey enrolled in Johnson & Wales University in Charleston, South Carolina. He graduated in 1990 with a bachelor’s degree in hotel and restaurant management. He spent a year at the Hyatt Regency in Hilton Head, preparing banquets for as many as 2,000 people. Two years later, he signed on with a seasonal restaurant serving Southern fare. His first job in Kansas City came in 1993 as the chef of the now-shuttered Starker’s Private Reserve. A little more than a year later, Comiskey took a job at Joe D’s — now the site of Julian — and instantly took to the locally sourced dishes on the daily menus. “I was always taught that it’s not just a potato or a piece of meat. It’s somebody’s hard work,” Comiskey says. “As a chef, we can do our tricks with ingredients to make something great just like farmers are using their soil and hard work.” Comiskey later found himself in a carnivore’s paradise as a regional chef with Morton’s Steakhouse, helping to open the chain’s Kansas City outpost and traveling to sister restaurants across the country. When the Capital Grille came to Kansas City in 2001, it was a natural fit for a chef who wanted more freedom. “This is the perfect job for me,” Comiskey says. “It’s about buying and sourcing the best ingredients. People want something unique, and we can give them that.” The Pitch sat down with Comiskey in a corner booth to learn more about what it takes to make a great steak. The Pitch: What do you look for in an uncooked steak? Comiskey: Every piece of meat is different.

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Comiskey actually prefers beer with his steak. We use whole primal sections and sort them based on marbling and how they look. Those with heavy marbling go into the rare pile, while those with less marbling will be cooked longer. The marbling is what is going to make something really tender. Each broiler cook only does two temperatures: rare and medium rare or medium and medium wells. What’s the right way to season a steak? Simple and plain. You can just do salt. We don’t do oil on our steaks. But you also have marinades and rubs. With our Kona rub, that started nine years ago here. We thought coffee is earthy and tobacco-y, and people kind of liked it. We did it on a filet, but there wasn’t enough fat. It worked really well on a strip. We needed more fat, so we added some butter. We thought we had it right the first time, but now there’s five other ingredients that weren’t in there to start. What steak cut do you order? I like heavily marbled steaks, usually a strip or rib-eye. It has to be medium rare. I eat a lot of steak out. But it’s not just the cut; it’s how you prepare it and trim it. Rib-eyes have a bad rap because they’re so fatty. But if it’s trimmed right, it’s not fatty — it’s marbled. I could just eat the deckle meat [the rib-eye cap]. You could take the rest off, and I’d be happy. How do you handle it when someone wants a steak burnt? When I was younger, I’d get fired up. But now, if that’s your preference, I’ll cook it any way you want. A well-done steak can still be juicy and have flavor. You never want to poke a steak with a fork. You want to sear it to keep the juices in. We cook it a little slower and not under direct heat.

Capital Grille serves sides a la carte. If you had to pick a single side to go with a steak, what would it be? I like to do some kind of fatty potato: an au gratin or something with cheese and fat in there. I like marble heirloom potatoes. I roast them with herbs and butter, and when they come out, add some more herbs and butter. The fat [from the butter] gives it that texture and luster that works really well with the silkiness of the meat. I sometimes think my favorite is corn. Local Missouri corn can be cream corn or sautéed or grilled. I like that with a steak. Maybe it’s because cows eat a lot of corn or the milk solids go really well with steak. What do you drink with a steak? I’m a good old boy. I like good handcrafted beer. Give me a Tank 7 and some potatoes and a steak. When I’m traveling, I like a local beer and steak. You know that somebody handcrafted that beer, and you’ve got this relationship with hops that can be the perfect blend with a steak. Where do you like to eat when you go out? I’m a big Colby [Garrelts] fan. I love Bluestem and Rye. They have really good trout and Brussels sprouts. I like Gram & Dun. They’ve got a killer brunch over there. I like consistent places. I’d get a rib-eye or salmon at J. Alexander’s. I like Michael Smith’s Extra Virgin because you get to try a lot of different things. Where would you send people if they were visiting KC? LC’s. I’d tell them to get the pulled pork; it’s the best in town. I don’t know if it’s the sauce or the smoking or the tenderness. For sides, I’d recommend the big steak fries. I used to go to Jack Stack. I’d get their barbecue without sauce and then put Gates on it.

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Mikey Pruitt lifts up Twenty Thousand Strongmen.

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N ata l ie G a l l a Ghe r

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Barrett emke

Back Room 9:30

M

That was the first instrument I learned, and ikey Pruitt has spent the past three years in North Bend, Nebraska, building a farm that just kind of evolved.” Around 2006, he answered the call of the from the ground up with a friend, and he looks the part: blue flannel shirt, tan corduroy over- open road and started traveling. There was no alls, dark-brown corduroy blazer. He wears an agenda and little money. Busking earned him enough change to get from town to town — and Abe Lincoln beard and a haircut that could be lent him the sound you hear on Be Strong. the product of jagged kitchen scissors. His When I ask Pruitt how he became Twenty brown eyes crinkle at the corners when he Thousand Strongmen, he grins and warns me smiles, which is often. It’s off-season now, so Pruitt has rolled back that this is where his story turns a little morbid. He sliced the knuckle of his left index finger a into his native Kansas City on what he calls his “vacation time.” He’s here only a few weeks, few years ago — he was drunk at a Halloween house party, he says, trying to carve a bow out and he’s keeping a busy schedule. of wood to play a saw. Earlier this year, under the name Twenty He holds up the digit — now a pale, knobby Thousand Strongmen, Pruitt released Be thing — and explains how he “forced” the Strong, Little Brother, a bluesy, banjo-intensive knuckle to heal. Pruitt says he has no feeling record filled with mountain-and-prairie folk songs that sound like they were raked together left there. “I went traveling by myself, down to on a back porch. He’s here doing a handful of local shows, then it’s on to St. Louis on a short Georgia, and I had to still busk because I had to make money, but I couldn’t bend my main tour before he heads back to the farm. finger that I use for the banjo,” Pruitt says. A couple of other players are on Be Strong, but Twenty Thousand Strongmen is really “So I made a drum kit out of trash. I was sitting on a suitcase with a backwards bass just Pruitt, who has made music as a onepedal and a tambourine man-band since he left taped to my shoe. That’s Kansas City six years ago. Twenty Thousand how that started, and then Drinking a $2 Hamm’s at Strongmen once my knuckle healed Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Friday, November 29, and I could play banjo, I Club, Pruitt, 28, recounts at Westport Saloon was like, ‘Well, maybe I patches of his saga. should just try doing what “I’ve been playing music my whole life, for the most part,” he says. “I people in New Orleans do.’ That’s where the started off when I was, like, 7 or 8. My mom one-man-band thing comes from.” Thanks to Pruitt’s tumbleweed travels, tried to teach me piano and cello, and that though, he can now draft from an army of didn’t work out for me at all. But Jim Curley — he used to run the Mountain Music Shoppe musician friends in various states, ready to — he went to our church, and my mom got parachute into Twenty Thousand Strongmen him to give me free lap-dulcimer lessons. on short notice.

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Pruitt: Living like a tramp. “Originally, I was putting out an album where I was recording all the instruments, all the vocals, everything by myself,” he says. “I wanted to come up with something that sounded like it was a whole bunch of people. I wanted to come up with something kind of cheeky, and I thought of [the name] Twenty Thousand Strongmen — because I’m not strong. I’m puny, and there’s one of me. But it’s grown into the name. Now it’s at the point where, when I travel, I pick up members. Most towns I go to, I have people that’ll back me up, and we can play shows.” Pruitt takes another sip of his beer and traces the edge of the wide-brim hat that he has set on the bar. He says he picked up the fur-trimmed felt piece on trade for one of his CDs in Lincoln. I tell Pruitt that he seems to be leading the gypsy life, and he laughs. “Yeah, I suppose I’ve been called that,” he says. “But I like tramp better. Tramp is a good term for me.” It’s a good word for Be Strong, too, which comes off as scrappy and determined. But under its rollicking roughness is an old-fashioned folk record on which Pruitt’s canyon-rich voice stretches wide over banjo and harmonica. “It’s language,” he says of his music. “I just want to speak to the universal collective. I’ve always said that once I write a song, it’s mine, but once I play it for someone, it’s not mine anymore. That’s it. It’s out there now. You’ve released that energy, and now it’s out there. You can’t go out there and collect it back.”

E-mail natalie.gallagher@pitch.com


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november 28 -december 4, 2013

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25


Music

Webb Slinger

Webb Wilder talks making records, growing big and building a credo.

W

ith his spectacles, western shirts and Indiana Jones fedora, Webb Wilder does not immediately come across as a musical force. Don’t be fooled: The guitarslinging troubadour is a legacy act, with a reputation for infusing old-school rock with just a spoonful of country. Wilder has enjoyed a steady career since he and his band, the Beatnecks, e Mor formed back in 1985, just a few years after Wilder moved to Nasht a ine ville, Tennessee. Along Onl .com pitch the way, Wilder came up with a quirky credo that has followed him everywhere: “Work hard, rock hard, eat hard, sleep hard, grow big, wear glasses if you need ’em.” Wilder spoke with The Pitch from his home in Nashville, ahead of his solo show Saturday at Knuckleheads. The Pitch: Are these solo shows more like special occasions? Wilder: They are at this point. I’ve never done a solo show in Kansas City — I’ve only done band shows there. I’ve done more solo shows over the past few years than I have done previously, and I’ve done quite a few duo shows. Last weekend, I was with my bass or “Webb who?” You’re great or you’re nothplayer in Ohio. It’s cool, and I enjoy it, and it ing. That can be hard. I don’t know how it is kind of lets you stretch, like anything — you on other people, but it can be a little weird for expand your creative wheelhouse. me at times. The last album you released was More Like You’re from Mississippi, but you’ve been callMe, back in 2009. Are you working on more ing Nashville home since 1982. You’ve put out material? albums over three decades. Do you have any Yeah, we’ve done a few recordings in drips favorite memories from any of those albums? and drabs, and we’re trying to intensify that I remember when we did the Hybrid Vigor and trying to finish an album now. … I’ve never [1989] album, being in the studio with David been good at turning out an album a year. I Grisman, a great guitar player, and he and I don’t know how people do it. would play together on “Cold Front.” It was What I find strange is that you’re kind of a great. There’s a picture of us together somecountry-rock legend, but press either really loves where during that time. you or has no idea who you And then I remember are. How do you balance that? Webb Wilder when we were doing the Well, I understand the Saturday, November 30, Town & Country [1995] al“no idea” thing because I’ve at Knuckleheads bum, singing backing vonever really been a housecals with George Bradford hold word in the larger, in Jimmy Lester’s garage and highly visible, mainstream, bringing over a lot of great vintage equipment Top 40 picture. On the other hand, it [my that made recording in a garage OK. I rememcareer] hasn’t been insignificant, and there ber recording the David Egan song “Battle of have been achievements and records that have the Bands” over at a studio for the About Time done better than others in terms of airplay and album [2005] with a guy who played steel with stuff. It sounds like the people that don’t know Bob Dylan at one time. Those are all small about me don’t know about me, and the people things, and I could go on and on. that do, there’s at least a large percentage that Do you ever wish you could relive some of think it’s cool. those moments? It can mess with your head, though, beYou know, honestly, I was fairly present and cause you’re sort of all or nothing in this busicognizant of all those things, but if I had among ness. So sometimes it’s “Wow, you’re Webb!” the pitch

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N ata l ie G a l l a Ghe r

ten Webb Wilder and the Beatnecks together, and everybody was young, and we were going at it really hard. We played our first gig in March of ’85, here in Nashville, and there was a big buzz about us and everything, and we had a lot of energy going and stuff. So our first out-of-town gig was in Jackson, Mississippi, on Easter weekend 1985. We loaded up in the van and we went there and we did it, and it was on the way back. Back then, you could get the boom boxes that you could also record on cassettes with built-in mics, and they even sounded pretty good. We would record some of our rehearsals that way. Anyway, Bobby Field, who was the drummer at the time, said, “You know, you’re gonna start doing interviews, and maybe you need some practice. Let’s role-play.” So he turns the record feature on — and I wish I still had this cassette; I don’t know where it is — on the boom box, and he asked me a bunch of questions. They were probably all humorous answers, but at the end of it, he asked, “Is there anything else you’d like to add?” And I hesitated a minute, and I said, “Uh, well, work hard. Rock hard. Eat hard. Sleep hard. Grow big. Wear glasses if you need ’em. Webb Wilder’s credo.” And there it was.

M us i c

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Wilder walks his talk. my list of regrets on all my life … I wish I had been 100 percent present 100 percent of the time. Some stuff just went by me. You’re living so fast, with the touring and your personal life and your health, and it’s just a blitz of an experience. If you are a creative person, sometimes you live in your head, and while you’re living in your head, you’re not always present for the great stuff. That’s a regret I have. Do you feel like you’ve gotten better at getting outside your head as the years have passed? I have gotten better at being present, but I do think there’s a price to pay there as a creative person, too. Of course, you can live in your head in a bad way. You can also be living in your head and living in your imagination and can come up with stuff. It’s a little bit of a trade-off, but I think for emotional, spiritual and mental health, it’s best to be present, and not dwell on yourself and your own ego and psyche. It took me a long time to realize that the ego is not necessarily about hubris and an inflated self-image. It can be the opposite, but you’re still just dwelling on it too much. Let’s talk about your credo. Where did that come from, anyway? It just kind of spilled out of my mouth, all in one spontaneous declaration in 1985. I’ll always remember this because we had just got-

E-mail natalie.gallagher@pitch.com.

J a z z B e at EvErEttE DEvan Jam SESSion, at thE PhoEnix

At this point, the Everette DeVan Jam Session has established itself as a local tradition. Each Tuesday night, Everette DeVan’s trio opens with some jazz standards, maybe even a little blues. Between DeVan’s organ solos and Matt Hopper’s illuminating guitar riffs, the audience sways with joy, helped along by Danny Rojas’ driving percussion. Then there’s the young, up-and-coming vocal talents of Dionne Jeroue, who can belt like she’s been at it for years, and Kelley Gant, who swings the standards, embellished with scat or sometimes a whistle. The second set is a little looser, with other players joining in. Some contributors may not be what you came to hear, but some, like Jeroue and Gant, can be great KC jazz discoveries. — Larry Kopitnik Everette DeVan Jam Session, 7–11 p.m. Tuesdays, at the Phoenix (302 West Eighth Street, 816-221-5299), free admission.


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november 28 -december 4, 2013

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27


Music mon: rural grit 6pm // kar wed 11/27 the hearer aoke 10pm s , fri 11/29 this is my condition sat 11/30 the acb’s, the hips, sh simple line s, leering y boys p a r heathens, ts o fs sat 12/7 mr marcospeech v7, jorge a f r id ay t h ra sat 12/14 e 1 3 t h : h a u n t e d na trio the summit c , forrester r e e p y s

Music Forecast

By

n ata l ie G a l l a Ghe r

The ACBs, the Hips, Shy Boys

Local indie darlings the ACBs have a true talent for heartbreaking pop songs. Lead singer Konnor Ervin’s delicate, childlike voice casts long, lonely shadows on songs with titles such as “Under Weight” and “Xanies.” Those songs figure on the band’s Little Leaves, from earlier this year, a disc that plays with contrasts: Summery, shimmering melodies mask melancholy lyrics. The band plays Friday with a couple of other local favorites: Lawrence garage-rockers the Hips and psych-pop band Shy Boys. Friday, November 29, at the Brick (1727 McGee, 816-421-1634)

1515 WESTPORT RD. • 816-931-9417

Canadian Brass Holiday Concert

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CHECK OUT THE NEW ALL DAY HAPPY HOUR

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WED. 3/6 THURS. 3/7 1020 WESTPORT RD WWW.THERECORDBAR.COM 816-753-5207 LIQUORBUDDIES CAVEMANCOMPUTER HOTDOG SKELETONS MAGIC VEHICLES WED. 11/27 HAHA TONKA / ANTENNA’S UP THURS.FRI. 11/283/8 9PM HERO WORSHIP: B52S TRIBUTE SAT. 3/9

SPUD PATROL: DEVO TRIBUTE 6PM DOODADS 7PM WIRES 10PM CHEROKEE SOFT REEDS FRI. 11/29 7PM THE10PM RAINMAKERS ROCK RIFLE NOISEFM 10PM FOUND A JOB PERFORM BAD IDEAS GENTLEMANSAVAGE THE TALKING HEAD’S STOP MAKING SENSE APPROPRIATE GRAMMAR ANDREAPERDUE

SAT. 11/30 7PM THE RAINMAKERS SUN. 3/10 MON. 3/11 10PM UZIS / DROP A GRAND / ALL BLOOD 8PM DESERT NOISES ALA TURKA MELISMA TICS SUN. 12/1 JEFF HARSHBARBER PRESENTS CD RELEASE SO COW THEPARTY PEOPLE’S LIBERATION BIG BAND (IRELAND)

MON. 12/2 88ER / THE BLACK MARIAH THEATER TUES. WED. 3/13 TUES. 12/3 3/12 REX HOBART & THE MISERY BOYS MIDWEST GOTNEXT OFF WITH THEIR HEADS 2ND ANNUAL SKIVVY SCROUNGE TWO4ONE TEENAGEBOTTLEROCKET TO BENEFIT ReStart Homeless Family Shelter DOMCHRONICLES (AS SEEN ON AMERICA’S GOT TALENT) MASKEDINTRUDER PETER SENSA Y WED. 12/4 TWIN BROTHER/OLD EARTH KILL NOISEBOYS STEDDYP

UPCOMING: 12/6 BIBLE OF THE DEVIL 12/12 HIBOU 12/13 RADKEY 12/18 MISTERWIVES 12/20 PAPER BIRD UPCOMING 12/28 ULTIMATE FAKEBOOK 12/314/8 HEARTS OF DARKNESS 3/14 EXPENDABLES FU MANCHU TENNIS DEEZE 1/22 LIFE&TIMES4/16 1/27MOWGLIS CATE LEBON 3/181/17 DARWIN 1/29 FRANKIE ROSE 2/8 REGGIE & THE FULL EFFECT 3/19 LYDIA LOVELESS 4/23 BLACK MT. 2/19 COM TRUISE 3/34/30 KODALINE 4/3 THAO& TGDSD DEVIL MAKE 3

It’s never too soon to get in the holiday spirit, right? The Kauffman Center turns on its seasonal charm in style. The world-famous Canadian Brass quintet — which includes a horn, a tuba, a trombone and trumpets — shares more than four decades of music and history. Organist Douglas Reed joins the ensemble Monday night, and together the group should fill Helzberg Hall with so many warm and cheery brass-arranged holiday standards that even Scrooge’s heart would melt. Go prepared and smuggle in a flask of eggnog — if you dare. Monday, December 2, at the Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts (1601 Broadway, 816-994-7222)

Diverse Plays Michael Jackson

It’s always a beautiful thing when Kansas City’s renowned jazz group Diverse comes together, but it’s downright magical when the collective puts on its annual Michael Jackson tribute. The concert is so popular that Diverse had to book a venue with more capacity; this marks the show’s first time at the Uptown Theater. Diverse explores the breadth of the king of pop’s catalog, from his Jackson 5 days through the early 2000s. In addition to the core trio of trumpeter Hermon Mehari, bassist Ben Leifer and

OPENDAILY SUN. 12PM-12AM MON.TUES.SAT. 4PM-1:30AM

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Singer-songwriter and violinist Emilie Autumn makes music that’s part Broadway musical and part gothic cabaret. She is, in other words, a pretty niche act. Her latest release, Fight Like a Girl, is a concept album based on her semiautobiographical book, The Asylum for Wayward Victorian Girls. (She has been open about her time in a psychiatric ward.) Her performances suggest a vaudeville show choreographed to showcase “insane” Victorian-styled women and ominous overtures. “Phantom of the Opera goes burlesque” is only the beginning. Monday, December 2, at the Granada (1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390)

Jeff Tweedy

Oh, Jeff Tweedy, how do we love thee? Is it your tousled bed head? Is it your role as frontman for Wilco, America’s most universally beloved post-alt-country band? Or maybe it’s just that

Emilie Autumn you’ve generously elected to bestow an early Christmas gift upon select Midwest and West Coast cities in the form of a solo show. Yes, we particularly love you for that one. Tweedy’s Tuesday-night Kansas City gig kicks off his December solo tour, and we are very ready to receive him. Tuesday, December 3, at the Uptown Theater (3700 Broadway, 816-753-8665)

Twin Brother

The core of Milwaukee’s Twin Brother — singer-songwriter and guitarist Sean Raasch and drummer Tyler Nelson — previously performed as a duo under the rather uninspiring name Jackraasch. Raasch and Nelson haven’t so much reinvented that act as expanded on it. Twin Brother’s self-titled debut still pushes the same gentle, moody folk-rock, now with a bass player. Such songs as “Blue Soldier” and “Dear Sweet Dove” have a characteristically Midwestern sound, simultaneously warm and lonely — the kind of thing that inspires introspection and whiskey drinking.

Wednesday, December 4, at RecordBar (1020 Westport Road, 816-753-5207)

K e Y

Pick of the Week

Corsets

Living Legend

 Indie Rock

 A Bunch of Brass

 Not Actual Twins

 The King of Pop

 Don’t Forget the Eggnog

 Folk-Rock

 Kinda Scary

 Cowboys ’n’ Hipsters

 Locally Sourced

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28

Emilie Autumn

f o r e c a s t

WEEKLY

SUN. 12-5PM BARTENDER’S BRUNCH & BLOODY MARY BAR MON. 7PM SONIC SPECTRUM MUSIC TRIVIA TUES. 7PM HONKY TONK SUPPER CLUB WED. 7PM BOB WALKENHORST & FRIENDS THURS. 7PM TRIVIA CLASH

drummer Ryan Lee, the evening also features singers Julia Haile, Anthony Saunders and Lee Langston, plus a slew of other notable musicians and special guests. Saturday, November 30, at the Uptown Theater (3700 Broadway, 816-753-8665)

n o v e m b e r 2 8 - DEC e m b e r 4 , 2 0 1 3

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“You can’t buy from a nicer bunch of guys!” 13020 West 63rd St. Shawnee KS 66216

(913) 631-1111 Located just 2.5 miles west of I-35 or 3 miles east of I-435 Shawnee Mission Parkway

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AGENDA

continued from page 9

Thursday | 11.28 |

THE PLAZA LIGHTING CEREMONY

SPORTS & REC

Crown Center Ice Terrace | 10 a.m.-9 p.m., $6 ($3

D THURS

AY

1 1 . 28

for skate rental), 2450 Grand

The Ice at Park Place | 11 a.m.-10 p.m., $7 ($3 skate rental), 117th St. and Nall, Leawood

up, Light City s K a nsa

Pilgrim Run 5k Run & Walk | 9 a.m. Pilgrim Chapel, 3801 Gillham, pilgrimrun.org

Ward Parkway Thanksgiving Day 5k Run/ Walk | 9 a.m., $25, Ward Parkway Center, 8600

Ward Pkwy.

SEASONAL EVENTS

Christmas in the Park | 5:30-10 p.m. Longview Lake Campground, 10711 W. Schere COMEDY

Comedy Night with Glenn Bolton, Zach Smith and Nathan Russell | Black & Gold Tavern, 3740

Broadway

Brad Ellis | 8 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club, 1867 Village West Pkwy., KCK

MUSIC

The Bluz Benderz | 7 p.m. Trouser Mouse, 410 S.

Hwy. 7, Blue Springs

Funk Tank | Jazzhaus, 926-1/2 Massachusetts,

Lawrence

The 84th Annual Plaza Lighting Ceremony | 5-8 p.m. Country Club Plaza, Nichols Rd. and Pennsylvania Ave.

Watkins Glen tribute concert | 8 p.m., $8. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

Friday | 11.29 | PERFORMING ARTS

Family-friendly cabaret | 5 & 7 p.m. Atkins

Hero Worship: Tribute to B-52s, Spud Patrol: Tribute to Devo | 10 p.m., $8. RecordBar, 1020

Auditorium, Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, 4525 Oak, nelson-atkins.org

Narkalark, Y(our) Fri(end), Wolf the Rabbit |

Kansas City Symphony: Dreams and Obsessions | Kauffman Center, 1601 Broadway, kcsymphony.org

Westport Rd.

8 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence

Poetry Slam Graffiti Tour | 7:30 p.m. Kultured Chameleon KC Street Art Gallery, 1739 Oak

SPORTS & REC

SEASONAL EVENTS

Crown Center Ice Terrace | 10 a.m.-11 p.m., $6 ($3

Christmas in the Park | 5:30-11 p.m. Longview Lake Campground, 10711 W. Scherer

The Ice at Park Place | 11 a.m.-10 p.m., $7 ($3 skate rental), 117th St. and Nall, Leawood

Mayor’s Christmas Tree Lighting Ceremony |

Missouri Mavericks vs. Tulsa Oilers | 7:05 p.m.

1920s in KC Christmas Tour | 6-9 p.m., $10, HarrisKearney House, 4000 Baltimore, westporthistorical.com

for skate rental), 2450 Grand

Independence Events Center, 19100 E. Valley View Pkwy., Independence

UMKC vs. Sam Houston State women’s basketball | 1 p.m. Swinney Recreation Center, UMKC,

Spirit of Christmas Past | 10 a.m.-4 p.m. BinghamWaggoner Estate, 313 W. Pacific, Independence

5100 Rockhill Rd.

SHOPPING

Bizarre Bazaar | 5-9 p.m. Lawrence Arts Center, 940 New Hampshire, Lawrence

ART EXHIBITS & EVENTS About Face: Contemporary Portraiture | Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, 4525 Oak, nelson-atkins.org

charlottestreet.org

Art, JCCC, 12345 College Blvd., Overland Park

Lynn Benson: Sidetrip | Kiosk Gallery, 3951

Edgar Degas Pastels | Nelson-Atkins Museum

Lost and Found: A Group Show | PLUG Projects,

COMEDY

Celebrating Picasso: Through the Lens of David Douglas Duncan | Nelson-Atkins Museum

Dressed Up | Kemper Museum of Contemporary

SNIPE HUNT | Opening Friday, Percolator, al-

Brad Ellis | 7:45 & 9:45 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club, 1867 Village West Pkwy., KCK

Broadway

of Art, 4525 Oak

Charlotte Street presents We’ll Make Out Better Than Okay | La Esquina, 1000 W. 25th St.

Charlotte Street’s 2013 Visual Artist Awards Exhibition | Grand Arts, 1819 Grand,

of Art, 4525 Oak

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Kaws • Ups and Downs; Dylan Mortimer • Illuminate | Nerman Museum of Contemporary

1613 Genessee

Art, 4420 Warwick Blvd., kemperart.org

ley between Arts Center and Ninth St., Lawrence

Electret, demonstration of visual effects of sound waves on liquid | 11:30 a.m. Monday,

Test Patterns and Floor Samples: New Work by Garry Noland | Studios Inc., 1708 Campbell

UMKC Gallery of Art. 5015 Holmes, Room 203

Impressionist France | Nelson-Atkins Museum

of Art, 4525 Oak

30

5:30 p.m. Crown Center Square, 2450 Grand

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It’s a Wonderful Craft Show | 9 a.m. KCI Expo

Center, 11728 N. Ambassador Dr.

Loni Love | 8 & 10:30 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater, 7260 N.W. 87th St. MUSIC

James Turrell: Gard Blue | Spencer Museum of

Art, 1301 Mississippi , Lawrence

The ACBs, the Hips, Shy Boys | The Brick, 1727

McGee


Antler Salmon, 77 Jefferson, Slow Ya Roll, SeedLove | 8 p.m. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club, 3402 Main The Belairs | 8:30 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715

A Tribute to Trans-Siberian orchestra | 7:30 p.m., $16/$26, Liberty Performing Arts Center, 1600 S. Withers Rd., Liberty, theprophecyshow.com

Rochester

SPoRTS & REC

Jeff Bergen’s Elvis show | 8 p.m. Knuckleheads

Crown Center ice Terrace | 10 a.m.-11 p.m. $6 ($3

Miles Bonny & Draper Family Band | The Kill Devil

The ice at Park Place | 11 a.m.-10 p.m., $7 ($3 skate

Cowgirl’s Train Set, the Terminals | Jazzhaus,

Missouri Mavericks vs. Wichita Thunder |

Saloon, 2715 Rochester

Club, 61 E. 14th St.

926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Bill Crain Quartet | 8:30 p.m. The Blue Room, 1616

E. 18th St.

for skate rental), 2450 Grand

rental), 117th St. and Nall, Leawood

7:05 p.m. Independence Events Center, 19100 E. Valley View Pkwy., Independence

UMKC vs. UW-Milwaukee men’s basketball |

Dolewite | The BrewTop Pub and Patio, 8614 N. Board-

walk Ave.

7:05 p.m. Municipal Auditorium/Music Hall, 301 W. 13th St. SEASoNAL EvENTS

Found a Job: Tribute to the Talking Heads | 10 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

Grant Hart, Danny Pound | 10 p.m. The Eighth Street

Taproom, 801 New Hampshire, Lawrence

High on Fire, Kvelertak, Windhand | 8 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence

ine Onl

pitch.co

at

m

Campground, 10711 W. Scherer

Harrah’s Casino, 1 Riverboat Dr., North Kansas City

Levee Town | 8 p.m. Trouser

Mouse, 410 S. Hwy. 7, Blue Springs

The New Riddim, the Dropsteppers | 8 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

Project H | 8 p.m. Take Five Coffee + Bar, 5336 W. 151st

STONE TEMPLE PILOTS WITH CHESTER BENNINGTON

BLUE OCTOBER

December 8, 2013

December 12, 2013

Spirit of Christmas Past | 10 a.m.-4 p.m. BinghamWaggoner Estate, 313 W. Pacific, Independence Whoville Holidays | 10 a.m.-1:30 p.m. City Market, 205 E. Fifth St.

Kilroy’s Black Friday Bash | 7:45 p.m. VooDoo Lounge,

MOre

EvEnts

Christmas in the Park | 5:30-11 p.m. Longview Lake

SHoPPiNG

Bizarre Bazaar | 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Lawrence Arts Center, 940 New Hampshire, Lawrence

it’s a Wonderful Craft Show | 9 a.m. KCI Expo Center, 11728 N. Ambassador Dr.

Saturday swap meet | 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Cowtown

COLD NIGHTS HOT COUNTRY FEATURING: BART CROW AND SCOTT FORD BAND

CHIPPENDALES February 15, 2014

December 19, 2013

Mallroom, 3101 Gillham Plz.

St., Leawood

CoMEDY

Ashley Raines & the New West Revue | 8 p.m.

Brad Ellis | 7:45 & 9:45 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club, 1867 Village West Pkwy., KCK

The Rainmakers | 7 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 West-

Loni Love | 7 & 10:30 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater, 7260 N.W. 87th St.

NiGHTLiFE

MUSiC

Black Friday Bash | KC Live Block at the Power & Light

The Belairs | 8:30 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715

Brodioke | 9 p.m. Bulldog, 1715 Main

Megan Birdsall Quintet | 9 p.m. Green Lady Lounge,

Westport Saloon, 4112 Pennsylvania

port Rd.

District, 14th St. and Grand

Daisy Bucket’s Broadway Baby | 8 p.m. Hamburger Mary’s, 101 Southwest Blvd.

DJ Sike | MiniBar, 3810 Broadway

Saturday | 11.30 | PERFoRMiNG ARTS

Kansas City Symphony: Dreams and Obsessions | 8 p.m. Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts, 1601

Broadway, kcsymphony.org

Rochester

AARON LEWIS

February 19, 2014

UPCOMING SHOWS: 11/29

1809 Grand

Jeff Black | 7 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester

11/30 12/6

Kilroy Presents: Black Friday Bash Thunder From Down Under Blue Corner 1-800-745-3000

Amy Farrand and Nicolette Paige | 8 p.m. The

Uptown Arts Bar, 3611 Broadway

Jazz Disciples with Clint Ashlock and Stephanie Moore | 8:30 p.m. The Blue Room, 1616 E. 18th St.

12/7 12/14

Magic 107.3 KC Groove Party Wynonna and The Big Noise A Simpler Christmas § VooDooKC.com

Know When To Stop Before You Start.® Gambling Problem? Call 1-888-BETSOFF.

Subject to change or cancellation. Phone and online orders are subject to service fees. Must be 21 years or older to gamble, obtain a Total Rewards ® card or enter VooDoo ®. ©2013, Caesars License Company, LLC.

Karma vision, Skating Polly, the Sluts | 10 p.m.

Replay Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence

continued on page 32

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31

11/22/13 12:54 PM


continued from page 31 The MGDs | The Kill Devil Club, 61 E. 14th St.

JEFF TWEEDY

THEATER Dates and times vary.

Majestics Rhythm Revue, the Crumpletons | 7 p.m. Jazzhaus, 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence

AY TUESD

12.3

Ben Miller Band | 9 p.m. Trouser Mouse, 410 S. Hwy.

7, Blue Springs

the solo at Going . n w to Up

Neak | 8 p.m. Jackpot Music Hall, 943 Massachusetts,

Lawrence

No Coast Benefit with the Rackatees, the Uncouth, 5 Star Disaster, Mercury Mad, Robert Paulson, Tyler Temple & TJ Warren | Black & Gold

A Christmas Carol | Kansas City Repertory Theatre, 4949 Cherry, kcrep.org Almost, Maine | UMKC Theatre | $6-$15, begin-

ning previews Friday, James C. Olson Performing Arts Center, 4949 Cherry, umkctheatre.org

At the End of Apathy, reading by Bryan Moses | 7 p.m. Sunday-Monday, the Living

Room, 1818 McGee, thelivingroomkc.com

Tavern, 3740 Broadway

Clybourne Park | Previews begin Wednesday, Unicorn Theatre, 3828 Main, unicorntheatre.org

L.A. Price, DJ Lee, AJ & ISAAC | 8:30 p.m. Czar,

1531 Grand

Dead Air | $54/$64, the Golden Ox, 1600 Genessee, kcmysterytrain.com

The Rainmakers | 7 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

Forever Plaid | Chestnut Fine Arts Center, 234 N. Chestnut, Olathe, chestnutfinearts.com

The Rex Brothers, Bad Wheels, Stand By Anchors | 9 p.m. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club, 3402 Main

How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying | Metropolitan Ensemble Theatre, 3614

Shebang, Kimbarely Legal, Hank | 8 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence

Main, metkc.org

Simple Lines, Leering Heathens, Parts of Speech | The Brick, 1727 McGee

JFK — A Ghostly Evening , by the Rev. Scott Myers | MeltingPot KC, at Just Off Broadway Theatre, 3051 Central, kcmeltingpot.com

Sons of Brasil | 8 p.m. Take Five Coffee + Bar, 5336

Jeff Tweedy | 6:30 p.m. Uptown Theater, 3700 Broadway

W. 151st St., Leawood

Steddy P & DJ Mahf, Ebony Tusks, COA, Lamb & Lion Jabee | 9 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

Taproom Poetry Series with Megan Kaminski and Jim McCrary | 5 p.m. The Eighth Street Taproom,

801 New Hampshire, Lawrence

Stolen Winnebagos | 8 p.m. Fuel, 7300 W. 119th St.,

FA S H I O N & S T Y L E

Uzis, Drop a Grand, All Blood | 10 p.m. RecordBar,

Best in the Midwest Hair & Fashion Showcase | 7 p.m. Gem Theater, 1615 E. 18th St.

Overland Park

1020 Westport Rd.

SPORTS & REC

Webb Wilder | 9:30 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester

Crown Center Ice Terrace | 10 a.m.-9 p.m., $6 ($3 for skate rental), 2450 Grand

NIGHTLIFE

Backroom Speakeasy | 6 p.m. Harris-Kearney House, 4000 Baltimore, westporthistorical.com

DJ Proof | 10 p.m. The Eighth Street Taproom, 801 New Hampshire, Lawrence

The Irieplaceables | 8 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048

Broadway

The People’s Liberation Big Band | 8 p.m. Record-

Bar, 1020 Westport Rd.

Service Industry Gospel Revival | Westport Saloon,

4112 Pennsylvania

Monday | 12.2 |

Theatre at the Jewish Community Center, 5801 W. 115th St., Overland Park, paulmesnerpuppets.org

The Santaland Diaries | Opening Friday, Kansas City Repertory Theatre, Copaken Stage, 13th St. and Walnut, kcrep.org ’Twas the Night Before Christmas | Theatre for Young America, H&R Block City Stage Theater, 30 W. Pershing Rd. (Union Station), tya.org

SPORTS & REC

The Ice at Park Place | 11 a.m.-10 p.m., $7 ($3 skate

The Ice at Park Place | 12-8 p.m., $7 ($3 skate rental), 117th St. and Nall, Leawood

rental), 117th St. and Nall, Leawood

Kansas City Chiefs vs. Denver Broncos | 3:25 p.m.,

for skate rental), 2450 Grand

Arrowhead Stadium

Paul Mesner Puppets: Hershel and the Hanukkah Goblins | Friday-Tuesday, White

The Wiz | The Coterie, 2450 Grand, Crown Center, thecoterie.org

Crown Center Ice Terrace | 10 a.m.-9 p.m., $6 ($3

SEASONAL EVENTS

MUSEUM EXHIBITS & EVENTS

Christmas in the Park | 5:30-10 p.m. Longview Lake

Convergence: Jazz, Film, Dance and the Visual Arts | American Jazz Museum, 1616

SEASONAL EVENTS

Saturday’s Got Soul with DJ Rico | MiniBar, 3810

Broadway

Thunder From Down Under | 6:30 p.m. VooDoo

Lounge, Harrah’s Casino, 1 Riverboat Dr., North Kansas City

Sunday | 12. 1 |

Christmas in the Park | 5:30-10 p.m. Longview Lake

Campground, 10711 W. Scherer FILM

KC premiere of Medora | 8 p.m. Screenland Armour Theater, 408 Armour Rd., North Kansas City

PERFORMING ARTS

MUSIC

Kansas City Symphony: Dreams and Obsessions | 2 p.m. Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts, 1601

Finntroll, Blackguard, Metsatoll, Klehma, Vanlade | 7 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts,

Broadway, kcsymphony.org

32

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Lawrence

n o v e m b e r 2 8 - DEC e m b e r 4 , 2 0 1 3

Campground, 10711 W. Scherer

Spirit of Christmas Past | 10 a.m.-4 p.m. BinghamWaggoner Estate, 313 W. Pacific, Independence FILM

Slaughter Movie House’s Second Annual Horror Holiday Party | 7 p.m. Czar, 1531 Grand FOOD & DRINK

Kathy Wakile cooking demo | 6-8 p.m. L’Ecole Culinaire, 310 Ward Pkwy.

pitch.com

E. 18th St.

Music Is My First Love: Lupe M. Gonzalez Dance Orchestra | Kansas City Museum, 3218 Gladstone Blvd., kansascitymuseum.org

Real Pirates | Union Station, 30 W. Pershing Rd. Strawberry Hill Ethnic Museum and Cultural Center | 720 N. Fourth St., KCK,

strawberryhillmuseum.org


Wednesday | 12.4 |

KANYE

PERFORMING ARTS

An Evening With Chuck Haddix | 7 p.m. Barnes & Noble, Town Center Plaza, 4751 W. 117th St., Leawood SPORTS & REC

Crown Center Ice Terrace | 10 a.m.-9 p.m., $6 ($3

FIND MOVIE TIMES P ON

p

for skate rental), 2450 Grand

AY TUESD

12.3

The Ice at Park Place | 11 a.m.-10 p.m., $7 ($3 skate rental), 117th St. and Nall, Leawood

s s come Yeezu . C to K

KU vs. Arkansas women’s basketbal | 7 p.m. Allen Fieldhouse, 1651 Naismith Dr., Lawrence

UMKC vs. Maryville women’s basketball | 6 p.m. Swinney Recreation Center, 5100 Rockhill Rd. (UMKC)

Kanye West, Kendrick Lamar | 7:30 p.m., $46.50-$127, Sprint Center, 1407 Grand

SEASONAL EVENTS

UPCOMING EVENTS

Christmas in the Park | 5:30-10 p.m. Longview Lake Campground, 10711 W. Scherer

MUSIC

NOV 27 CONTROL WEDNESDAY DRUM & BASS, JUNGLE NOV 29 CLUB WARS - FALL FREE FOR ALL NOV 30 L.A. PRICE (ALBUM RELEASE) W/ DJ LEE, AJ & ISAAC DEC 2 SLAUGHTER MOVIE HOUSE: 2ND ANNUAL HORROR HOLIDAY PARTY DEC 3 SECRET SHOW (WALK UP ONLY)

Adestria, Kingdom of Giants, Dayseeker, Death of an Era | 6:30 p.m. Czar, 1531 Grand

1531 GRAND KCMO

Spirit of Christmas Past | 10 a.m.-4 p.m. BinghamMUSIC

SEASONAL EVENTS

Allegaeon, Silence the Messenger, In the Shadow, A Plague in Faith | 8 p.m. The Riot Room,

Christmas in the Park | 5:30-10 p.m. Longview Lake Campground, 10711 W. Scherer

4048 Broadway

Emilie Autumn | 7 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390

Spirit of Christmas Past | 10 a.m.-4 p.m. BinghamWaggoner Estate, 313 W. Pacific, Independence

Waggoner Estate, 313 W. Pacific, Independence

HAPPY HOUR DAILY 4-7 PM 816.421.0300 . CZARKC.COM

Nina Diaz | 9:30 p.m. Czar, 1531 Grand

COMMUNITY EVENTS

Brother John’s Motivational R&B/Soul Showcase | 7 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar, 3611 Broadway 88er, Black Mariah Theater | 10 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

Kathleen Holeman | 5:30 p.m. Green Lady Lounge,

Big Hits, Lasting Hurts with Roger Twibell, Carl Peterson, Trent Green and Conrad Dobler |

6:30 p.m. Kansas City Plaza Library, 4801 Main, kclibrary.org

Dave Riser | 7 p.m. The Blue Room, 1616 E. 18th St. NIGHTLIFE

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Control Wednesdays | 10 p.m. Czar, 1531 Grand

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Cowtown Playboys host Turntable Matinee | 7 p.m. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club, 3402 Main

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Kit Contains:

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Rex Hobart & the Misery Boys’ second annual Skivvy Scrounge | 7 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

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E-mail submissions to calendar@pitch.com

Trivia Bang Bang | 7:30 p.m. Helen’s Just Another Dive, 2002 Armour Rd., North Kansas City

BEST Selection of Glass in KC! or enter submissions at pitch.com, where you can search our complete listings guide.

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november 28 -december 4, 2013

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33


S ava g e L o v e

18+

Depressing 816-841-4000 913-279-9218 30 minute FREE trial

Dear Dan: I recently ended a relationship that lasted a year and five months. I loved this woman, but she was, to varying degrees, depressed. I tried to be as helpful and patient as possible with the hope and expectation that she would get better. I got her into counseling. We went to couples counseling. She got on medication. I encouraged her to eat well (I cooked healthy meals) and exercise daily (which she was never able to do). I tried to get her out in nature. I tried to practice strong communication skills. I encouraged her to explore the benefits of a fulfilling and GGG relationship, but our sex life faltered because of the depression and her low libido. She was unable to assert herself to make healthy changes (physical and mental), and the patterns repeated. I eventually ended the relationship, which was the right decision for me, but she was crushed. Do you have any advice for dating someone with depression?

Serious About Depression Dear SAD: “I think SAD did the right thing,” said Rob Delaney, the comedian and author of the new book Rob Delaney: Mother. Wife. Sister. Human. Warrior. Falcon. Yardstick. Turban. Cabbage. “And not only ‘the’ right thing, but a series of right things.” Delaney’s book is a collection of personal essays — most of them hilarious — in which he writes about his own struggle with depression. “This guy went above and beyond, motivated by his obvious love for this woman and his decency as a person,” Delaney continued. “This guy can’t be expected to weld himself to someone he’s been dating for less than a year and a half.” Delaney also felt that your actions could serve as a template for other readers. “SAD was kind, patient and proactive, and when that didn’t work, he ended the relationship,” Delaney said. “He didn’t assume that she would implode without him around. He also showed her another person taking care of himself. But as anyone who’s been around for a while and witnessed trouble and had troubles of their own knows, you cannot will that behavior into people.” Dear Dan: Is it safer for a woman planning to have a one-night stand to take the guy back to her place or to go to his place? Does this apply if both are staying in hotels?

Reader Is Seeking Knowledge Dear RISK: When you’re having sex with a

stranger, it’s generally considered safer — some would argue only marginally so — to go back to his place. The reason for this is kinda depressing: A stranger is less likely to murder you at his

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By

D a n S ava ge

place because then he has to dispose of your body, which is apparently a real pain in the ass.

Dear Dan: I’m a 21-year-old gay male. Can someone grow out of or “quit” a fetish? I’m an ABDL, “adult baby/diaper lover.” I get turned on by putting other guys into diapers or having other, usually older, guys put me in diapers. I can have normal sex and have had a few decent relationships with guys I’ve met through kink sites like Fetlife or through the normal means. I’ve met a great guy who has helped me mix ABDL with bondage for some real fun, and I’m pretty OK with knowing that there’s nothing wrong with having a kink like mine. I had a normal childhood, and didn’t suffer a diaper-related trauma or something. But this particular fetish creeps most people out and is associated with pedophilia, though members of the ABDL community have no interest in kids. But the idea of being into this kink when I’m in my 40s grosses me out. I’ve gone through the binge-and-purge cycle most guys go through with this. But is there any way to retrain your brain to not get off on a particular fetish?

Another Boy Diaper Lover Dear ABDL: Consensus in the sex-and-science

research crowd is that your kinks will always be your kinks — a brain cannot be retrained where kinks are concerned — so you might as well enjoy them. But that’s only if your kinks can be enjoyed consensually, which yours can be. Some people have taken drugs to “treat” disturbing kinks, but these drugs — mostly SSRIs — suppress libido and don’t target (or eradicate) one kink in particular. (Are you willing to give up sex to get over diapers? I didn’t think so.) Kinks have certain narratives — broad themes — and figuring them out may help you tap into, and enjoy, other kinks with similar N’s and T’s but lower creep factors. If what you enjoy is the helplessness and loss of control diapers symbolize, mixed with your submission to an affectionate and caring authority figure, you might find fetish puppy play similarly arousing. Most people don’t find fucking a person who is pretending to be a baby dog any less creepy, but there seem to be more puppy players out there than diaper fans. You should keep looking for a guy who’s into the same things you are. If you can’t date the great guy who helped you mix diaper play with bondage, take his existence as proof of other guys who will like you and what you like. The Savage Lovecast is at savagelovecast.com.

Have a question for Dan Savage? E-mail him at mail@savagelove.net


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The Pitch: November 28, 2013