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N o v e m b e r 2 1–2 7, 2 0 1 3 | f r e e | v o l . 3 3 N o . 2 1 | p i t c h . c o m

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nov ember 21–27, 2013 | vol . 33 no. 21 E d i t o r i a l

Editor Scott Wilson Managing Editor Justin Kendall Music Editor Natalie Gallagher Staff Writers Charles Ferruzza, David Hudnall, Steve Vockrodt Editorial Operations Manager Deborah Hirsch Events Editor Berry Anderson Proofreader Brent Shepherd Contributing Writers Tracy Abeln, Jonathan Bender, Liz Cook, Adrianne DeWeese, Steve Erickson, April Fleming, Larry Kopitnik, Angela Lutz, Dan Lybarger, Nancy Hull Rigdon, Dan Savage

a r t

Art Director Ashford Stamper Contributing Photographers Angela C. Bond, Barrett Emke, Chris Mullins, Lauren Phillips, Sabrina Staires, Brooke Vandever Intern Christina Larkins

P r o d u c t i o n

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Circulation Director Mike Ryan

B u s i n E s s

Accounts Receivable Jodi Waldsmith Publisher Joel Hornbostel

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Chief Executive Officer Chris Ferrell Chief Financial Officer Patrick Min Chief Marketing Officer Susan Torregrossa Chief Technology Officer Matt Locke Business Manager Eric Norwood Director of Digital Sales & Marketing David Walker Controller Todd Patton Creative Director Heather Pierce Director of Content/Online Development Patrick Rains

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VMG Advertising 888-278-9866, vmgadvertising.com Senior Vice President of Sales Susan Belair Senior Vice President of Sales Operations Joe Larkin

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Kansas’ most vulnerable now have even less health care, thanks to Gov. Brownback. b y s t e v e vo c k r o d t

4

Pl aces th at ar e go ne Heinrich Toh’s Momentary Longing lingers in memory. b y t r ac y a b e l n

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tw er K mach i ne The Queen of Bounce shakes on into KC. b y n ata l i e g a l l ag h e r

20 3 Questionnaire 4 feature 9 agenda 10 art 11 stage 12 film 14 fat city 18 music 2 4 d a i ly l i s t i n g s 3 0 s a v a g e l o v e

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ARCADE FIRE is coming to Starlight Theatre in April. Mike Sanders gets back to talking MASS TRANSPORTATION in the Kansas City area. Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon comes out in support of GAY MARRIAGE.

m o n t h x x–x x , 2 0 0 x

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Questionnaire

J essica Be st

Community director for Emf luence

Hometown: Independence, Missouri

“I can’t stop listening to …” Ella Fitzgerald, Billie Holiday and Carmen McRae At Newport Live

Current neighborhood: The Crossroads District What I do (in 140 characters): I help fellow marketers — from clients to conferences — do smarter e-mail and social-media marketing. In < 140.

The best advice I ever got: “Don’t answer your

e-mail. You’re in France.”

Worst advice: “Here, try this jelly bean … it’s either peach- or vomit-flavored.” (Seriously, whose job is it to configure the vomit flavoring for jelly beans?)

What’s your addiction? Dining out. And chocolate. OK, and Pinterest. What’s your game? Merriam-Webster’s “Test Your Vocabulary” quiz (a combination of word nerdism and fast typing) or maybe Mad Gab, which ends in laughter every single time.

My sidekick: Brian, my partner (in life and in

What’s your drink? Prosecco! I love dry,

that in print.

More

Where’s dinner? Picking

one restaurant is like picking a favorite child! I will say Tannin is my e at n neighborhood haunt and i l On m has one of the best menus pitch.co in town.

Q&As

What’s on your KC postcard? The NelsonAtkins or the Plaza lights at the holidays Finish this sentence: “Kansas City got it right when …” We launched a downtown renais-

sance! There’s been a renewed business focus in the heart of our city, the streetcar making it easier to live downtown, as well as work here.

My dating tragedy: Ohhh, no. I’m not putting S a b r i n a S ta i r e S

sparkling vino. Every occasion is a worthy occasion.

crime solving) — we make a darn good team and laugh all along the way.

My brush with fame: I worked with a nonprofit jazz-series producer in Columbia when I was in college at Mizzou and got to meet Herbie Hancock and Harry Connick Jr., among others.

We’ve been bringing attention and life back to downtown, and I love it.

(Who knows?)

“In five years, I’ll be …” A published author.

My 140-character soapbox: Learn everything

“Kansas City screwed up when …” Ha, I can’t help it: I want to say, “When it decided to do all our downtown highway and bridge maintenance at the same time.”

“I always laugh at …” Laffy Taffy jokes. (“What do you call a fish with no eyes? A fsh!”) Or my dad laughing. When he’s really tickled about something, you can’t help but laugh, too.

What was the last thing you had to apologize for? Being too tough a critic.

“Kansas City needs …” Some sort of magic, faster, more frequent transit to supplement the KC buses (or make them not impacted by traffic) and/or a shuttle from downtown to the airport.

“I’ve been known to binge-watch …” I don’t get

Who’s sorry now? Still not that person.

“I just read …” The Cuckoo’s Calling.

My recent triumph: I spoke on the lineup for South By Southwest Interactive in Austin this year! Definitely a bucket-list item.

around to much TV. Maybe Diners, Drive-ins and Dives?

you can. Try out something you think you hate. Master something you love. Be ready to fail; it means you’re learning.

Johnson County Library Join us and other writers across the country for National Novel Writing Month.

PARTICIPATES IN

Celebrate your NATIONAL NOVEL WRITING MONTH success at a reception on CENTRAL LIBRARY ON THURSDAY, NOV. 21 It’s our way of saying ‘THANK YOU’ to JOAN BERKLEY, the generous sponsor who’s made all our NANOWRIMO events possible. For Details Visit

Your Story Starts Here...

www.jocolibrary.org/nanowrimo

This event is generously sponsored by Johnson County Library Foundation and the Joan Berkley National Novel Writing Month Workshops

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Kanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Kansasâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; most vulnerable now have even less health care, thanks to Gov. Brownback. By S te v e vo c k r o dt | Ph oto g r a Ph y By S a B r i n a S ta i r e S

care 4

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P

ast the doorway to Finn Bullers’ Prairie Village home are framed photos from his wedding day in 1994. There’s Bullers, wearing his suit, standing upright and proud, smiling with a head full of strawberry-blond hair. On this late-October day, Bullers is in his kitchen. The 49-year-old man’s smile remains, but almost everything else has changed since he said, “I do.” His body has been wracked by Charcot-Marie-Tooth, a form of muscular dystrophy. (He also suffers from type 1 diabetes.) His hair is gone, replaced by a flat cap. He’s in a wheelchair, no longer able to stand. He can move his arms well enough to operate a phone and his iPad, but his hands have morphed through muscle loss to resemble claws, and he cannot make precise movements. Bullers’ voice, once clear, now sounds like gasps for air against the steady in-and-out of a ventilator helping him breathe. Caregivers and a nurse provide Bullers with 24/7 support. They help him eat. They administer his insulin. They help him brush his teeth,

clients with permanent physical disabilities, like Bullers, is by cutting Medicaid services. Bullers’ 24/7 care was slated to be reduced by November 1 to 40 hours per week. Caregivers, who now work in three eight-hour shifts, could visit him only on weekdays for eight hours a day, or all seven days of the week for five hours each. “To me, that’s an Orwellian clusterfuck,” Bullers tells The Pitch. “How can you take out that chunk of money on the backs of the most vulnerable and say with a straight face that you’re going to improve services? It defies common sense.” State officials who look after KanCare say they’re comfortable with the cuts. Privacy laws prevent officials from speaking specifically about Bullers’ case. However, on November 15, Bullers sent the state a signed form that allows officials to discuss his health information with the media. But Angela de Rocha, a spokeswoman for the Kansas Department for Aging and Disability Services, did not return a call seeking comment about Bullers’ health.

munity College. (The couple also has two children, ages 13 and 9.)  Bullers is appealing the state’s decision to reduce his care by more than 75 percent, and this preserves his benefits for now. “I remain optimistic, but I’ve always been optimistic,” Bullers says. “The realist in me knows that state bureaucracy is an unwieldy thing that operates slowly.”

M

edicaid is a health program for low-income Americans that’s funded jointly by states and the federal government. Several states have transferred segments of their Medicaid programs to private insurers to curb rising costs. While other states have dipped their toes into the privatization of Medicaid, Kansas has cannonballed into the deep end by shifting all of its Medicaid management to three private companies. “It is the most extensive in the nation,” says Gary Blumenthal, a former Kansas legislator who is now CEO of the Association of

companies were “erecting barriers to care” while plowing the state’s Medicaid money into administrative salaries and profits. States have moved areas like behavioralhealth and acute-care Medicaid programs to managed-care organizations, which some experts believe can increase efficiency and cut costs. But many are leery of moving Medicaid recipients with long-term physical or developmental disabilities to private insurers, especially those receiving home- and community-based services as Bullers is; the only real way to cut costs on their care is to reduce the amount of care they receive. “I think in some areas, managed care can be effective with respect to health-care services of a general population,” Blumenthal says. “With respect to people with significant disabilities, it’s very questionable how much can be achieved in savings without sacrificing the quality of services.” Bullers says his caregivers make $10.30 an hour from Medicaid reimbursements. That suggests a lean-running program. In late 2011, Brownback approved KanCare

“With respect to people with significant disabilities, it’s very questionable how much can be achieved in savings without sacrificing the quality of services.”

bathe and use the toilet. They also operate a device that sucks phlegm from his lungs and they turn his body every few hours to prevent sores — like the one that nearly killed him a few years ago. Since learning of his condition in college, Bullers has slowly lost control of his body. But his mind remains clear. These days, the former Kansas City Star reporter spends his days hounding a bureaucracy in Topeka in an attempt to keep in-home nurses all day, every day. This past January, the state transferred the care of 380,000 Medicaid recipients to three private companies as part of a program called KanCare. Gov. Sam Brownback has said the wholesale privatization of Medicaid under KanCare was meant to save $1 billion over five years. He also promised that the move wouldn’t sacrifice Kansans’ level of care, and the number of people on Medicaid’s waiting list would be reduced. But the only way for the three managedcare organizations to realize cost savings on

In an earlier interview, de Rocha offered an analogy for Medicaid recipients upset by KanCare’s reduction in services. She says it’s as if she had been giving someone a new car every year and then suddenly stopped. “Your natural response to that is going to be, ‘Why is she being so mean to me?’” de Rocha tells The Pitch. “That’s just human nature. It’s very difficult to take away something once you get it. People get used to it. They think that’s what you need.” To Bullers, access to caregivers isn’t like getting a brand-new car, but rather is a lifeand-death matter. If a tube feeding air from a respirator to a hole in his throat fell out while he was alone, he would have about three minutes to live. If that ever happened, there wouldn’t be enough time for paramedics to reach him. With caregivers nearby, Bullers would be able to throttle his throat to signal an emergency. Bullers’ wife, Anne, can’t care for her husband all day. She works full time in public relations for Johnson County Com-

Developmental Disabilities Providers in suburban Boston and a member of the federal National Council on Disability. “Other states have viewed managed care as an area to move slowly and cautiously in the use of managed care, to determine if the use of managed care can produce the savings that advocates claim can occur while preserving the quality and safety for people that it would be serving.” Florida, for example, started privatizing Medicaid by moving 9,000 seniors in nursinghome care to managed-care organizations. In the system, the state passes its Medicaid money to insurance companies, which then pay for providers. For states, the move is purported to cut the costs associated with running a bureaucracy by reducing hospitalizations and other medical costs. For the insurance companies, it’s a new revenue stream. For clients, it can be a mixed bag. In 2012, Connecticut dumped the insurance companies that were managing its Medicaid program to the tune of more than $800 million a year. A USA Today report said those insurance

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through an administrative order, meaning that the Kansas Legislature didn’t vote on the matter. KanCare went into effect in January 2013, so it’s not yet known what kinds of savings the state may realize. Earlier this year, Brownback announced that he would plow $9.2 million in savings from KanCare back into the Medicaid program to whittle 250 people (including 110 Johnson County residents) off the developmentaldisabilities waiting list. The list totals 5,000 people, 900 of whom live in Johnson County. Some lawmakers have expressed skepticism about Brownback’s predictions of how much KanCare will save. “I have concerns that the amount of money that is going to be saved, that it won’t become a reality,” says Barbara Bollier, a Republican House member from Mission Hills whose district includes Bullers’ home. “That remains to be seen, and it may. I’m a physician, and I married a physician, and I’m well aware of how hard it is to control costs in the medical realm.” continued on page 6 n o v e m b e r 2 1 - 2 7, 2 0 1 3

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Kan’t Care

Bullers, former reporter, at his home

continued from page 5 KanCare contracted the state’s Medicaid to three private managed-care organizations: UnitedHealthcare Community Plan, Sunflower State Health Plan and Amerigroup. Those three have contributed directly and indirectly to Brownback’s coffers, according to records with the Kansas Ethics Commission. Centene Corporation, which owns Sunflower State Health Plan, donated $2,000 to Brownback’s election campaign in 2012. Kansas Association of Health Plans, a nonprofit whose board of directors in 2010 included employees of both UnitedHealthcare and Amerigroup owner WellPoint Inc., also contributed to Brownback’s war chest, in 2010. All three companies are publicly traded, so their obligation is first to their shareholders, which they do by maximizing profits. It’s widely speculated that Brownback wants to run for president in 2016. (His 2008 effort fizzled early; the career politician’s Senate record wasn’t strong enough to mount a serious campaign.) Many of Brownback’s directives since becoming Kansas governor — eliminating income taxes on several types of businesses and privatizing Medicaid — have been viewed by opponents as steps to bolster his conservative credentials for a more fruitful 2016 White House bid. Brownback has also been a critic of the Affordable Care Act, the national health policy passed by President Barack Obama that has gotten off to a miserable start. KanCare also hasn’t fared well. The handoff to the private companies was sloppy. Hospitals and other providers have complained that they haven’t been reimbursed by insurers quickly or accurately, especially for patients with longterm needs. “The process has not gone as smoothly as the people at the Statehouse would have you believe, as far as the implementation is concerned,” said Allen Van Driel, CEO of Smith

County Memorial Hospital in north-central Kansas, according to a September 23 Kansas Health Institute News Service report. “The party line is that the managed-care plans are working and that KanCare is a huge success, that it’s processing claims and all that. But that’s simply not factual.” Other hospital executives say they are seeing increases in the number of contested claims. Brownback officials have passed off such criticisms as “bumps in the road,” according to various news reports. De Rocha says managedcare organizations are penalized if they don’t make reimbursements within 30 days, and delays are often the result of clerical errors. “In order to get paid, they have to enter the correct code in the billing mechanism,” de Rocha says. “If they don’t do that, oops, it gets shot back to them.”  When KanCare went into effect, Bullers temporarily lost his in-home care. “It was a very rocky start, to be honest with you,” Bullers says. “They have yet to recover from that.” And not all Medicaid recipients have yet become part of the program. Kansans with developmental disabilities, such as Down syndrome and cerebral palsy, don’t become part of KanCare until January 1, 2014. Johnson County Developmental Supports, a county agency that assists residents with developmental disabilities, predicts some difficulty with signing on to KanCare at the end of the year. “We’re anticipating, once we get involved, that there’s going to be a few challenges through billings and a lot of our small providers who need reimbursement immediately, that they may go out of business,” says Lurena Mead, JCDS’s community-relations manager. For the pro-business Brownback, shuttered providers is just one contradictory aspect of KanCare.


B

ullers was a sophomore at Iowa State University when he learned that he had Charcot-Marie-Tooth. The diagnosis wasn’t entirely unexpected; his mother had the same condition, which affected the way she walked. But the disorder tends to take a heavier toll on men. Bullers studied journalism, serving as editor of the student newspaper his junior year, even though his disorder started making it harder for him to make his way across campus. He did an internship at the Miami Herald, then bounced around various newspapers in middle America before ending up at The Kansas City Star in April 1997. Bullers covered Johnson County for more than a decade for the Star. One of his more memorable dispatches detailed how former Kansas state Sen. Kay O’Connor disliked the 19th Amendment, which affords women the right to vote. O’Connor argued that if men took better care of women, then women wouldn’t need to cast ballots. The news made its way to Jay Leno’s monologue, embarrassing the Olathe Republican and rankling conservatives. Meanwhile, Bullers’ fine-motor skills and his voice began to deteriorate, although he could still function as a journalist by using a tape recorder and manipulating his computer enough to fire off stories. During that time, the Star underwent several rounds of layoffs that gutted its editorial staff. The paper’s Johnson County bureau, where Bullers worked, moved from its tony offices along College Boulevard, in Overland Park, to a dark industrial building within spitting distance of a railroad track, in Olathe. The new office space was the type of disabilityunfriendly environment that the Star would blast within its pages. Bullers couldn’t use the bathroom there. Instead, he would go to the Johnson County Courthouse, about a mile north, for his restroom breaks. “That was a big hit on my dignity,” Bullers says. At one point, Star executives tried to devise some Rube Goldberg–style mechanism to make the newsroom’s restroom functional for Bullers, but the reporter was already getting ready to check out. “It got to a point at the end of 2009 that the daily grind of doing the job was so taxing,” Bullers says. “It was in the middle of winter. Everyone was so busy doing their work that they didn’t answer the door. I sat there for five to 10 minutes trying to get in.” Bullers resigned in 2009, precluding the possibility of a layoff and allowing him to secure longer-term benefits. Not long after, he suffered a bout of double pneumonia, nearly suffocating on the phlegm building up in his lungs. He was placed on a ventilator, and his doctors began discussing end-of-life options with him. “It was pretty dark moments where the demons started taking over,” Bullers says. “I told my wife that I have two kids to take care of and a life to live. I’m not done yet.” Bullers was granted Social Security Disa-

Bullers relaxes with his son, Christian. bility Insurance and Medicaid. The payments allowed him to stay at home to care for his children and occasionally make it out of the house to volunteer. He helped start a student newspaper at Corinth Elementary School. Going to a nursing home wasn’t an option in Bullers’ mind. Medicaid waivers allow people with long-term disabilities to opt out of institutionalized care in favor of home-based community services. Medicaid pays caregivers to come to a patient’s home and provide services such as meal preparation and laundry. In Bullers’ case, they also keep him from getting pressure sores, make sure his breathing tube is secure and help administer medications. Home care is often less expensive for the state than nursing-home care. When KanCare went into effect, Bullers was assigned to UnitedHealthcare. A case manager paid him a visit to see how he lived, to determine what kind of care he needed. The manager noted how long it took for him to brush his teeth, to use the restroom and so on. Those observations later formed the basis for UnitedHealthcare’s decision to reduce his caregiver hours from 168 a week to 40. Bullers says the assessment ignores the incongruities of life that can disrupt the assembly-line style of care that UnitedHealthcare plans to ration to him. “What if I’m constipated? What if I have a loose stool and it takes longer?” Bullers says. “I don’t know what my body is going to do.” Bullers has turned to activism to protest the state’s reduction in his care. He has testified before the state’s KanCare oversight committee in Topeka. There, he ran into James Bart, the

KanCare ombudsman. It wasn’t the first time the two had spoken. Bart also paid an assessment visit to Bullers’ home. Bart says he can’t comment on the specifics of Bullers’ case. “It would be presumptive to do that because I’m not an expert on the physical disabilities waiver. I’m not an expert on his needs. I was not there during the assessment process,” Bart says. “It concerns me that the collaboration or the exploration for an effective solution has not advanced further. I’m not pointing fingers about why it was not advanced.” Bart, a lawyer from Lawrence, is the only ombudsman for all of the state’s Medicaid set. Bart says he’s not supposed to be an advocate for consumers, but rather to function as a mediator, helping them get answers to questions or the assistance they need from the state bureaucracy or managedcare organizations. But his office has been criticized for its lack of independence. (Bart’s boss, Shawn Sullivan, is the secretary for the Kansas Department for Aging and Disability.) The title of ombudsman is also misleading to consumers, who mistake Bart as an advocate and a partner to investigate KanCare’s problems while his main function is a point of contact in the state’s bureaucracy. “The current KanCare ombudsman program is neither independent nor external from existing programs serving the Medicaid population in Kansas,” said Rocky Nichols, executive director of the Disability Rights Center of Kansas, in written testimony to the KanCare oversight committee on October 7. “Moreover, the ombudsman’s office clearly tells consumers that they cannot directly advocate for them. Consumers want and need in an ombudsman

“I don’t know

what my body

is going to do.”

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an independent advocate who is going to be on their side, free from conflicts of interest.” Nichols adds that Wisconsin’s Medicaid program has one ombudsman for every 3,500 consumers; Kansas has one for 380,000. Bart, whose son is autistic and receives Medicaid benefits, had reservations about KanCare before he was hired. “It wasn’t a political belief that made me skeptical,” Bart says. “I’m from a business background. I look at organizational charts and try to understand budgets. … And seeing how money came from the federal government to state government and made its way to my son was very frustrating.” Bart has been contacted by about 1,600 people who have questions about KanCare — they’re figuring out if they’re eligible, or they have problems with billing or with getting prior authorizations, or they’re getting their plans reduced. Bart says he hasn’t been besieged by consumers complaining about cuts in their care plans. “It’s way too early to tell if KanCare will be effective in addressing those consumer needs,” Bart says. “But I’m encouraged.” Bullers is less so. He’s appealing the reduction in his hours of care to the Kansas Office of Administrative Hearings. If Bullers loses, his marriage could end, too. “My wife will divorce me,” Bullers says. “It’s not out of a lack of love. It’s a financial deal. They would have to re-evaluate my needs, and I would be eligible for more benefits.” Bullers acknowledges that it’s a calculated move to end a 19-year marriage, but he and his wife couldn’t live together after the divorce. “The hypocrisies are rife,” Bullers says. “This is an administration that came in on family values. … The hypocrisies are mind-blowing.”

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Week of november 21-27

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It’s win or go home for Graham Zusi and Sporting on Saturday. Kansas City’s pro soccer club meets the Houston Dynamo at a sold-out Sporting Park in the second and deciding match of Major League Soccer’s Eastern Conference finals. For Sporting, it’s a shot at redemption; Houston has knocked Kansas City out of the playoffs the last two seasons. Game time is 6:30 p.m. Bring a coat

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and be prepared to pony up for a ticket.

Daily listings on page 24 pitch.com

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ow much of identity is based on memory? And how much do our memories rely on depictions of the events that form our personal narratives? There is an eerie universality to old family photographs — a collective recall that printmaker Heinrich Toh uses to his advantage in his exhibition Momentary e Mor Longing. One viewer, Toh said, had a hard time convincing herself that t a e in Onl .com she wasn’t looking at pitch one of her own relatives in a piece here at the LeedyVoulkos Art Center. To assemble his layered etchings, Toh uses pre-digital printed pictures sourced from thrift stores in the United States and Singapore, the artist’s cultural poles. He chooses images that show both candid and posed scenes of family life, and we see people or places that any of us might recognize: a dinner-table scene, a couple flanking a costern. The sense of foreboding would be clear tumed rabbit and Alice at Disneyland, a girl even if this Santa wasn’t gazing off to the beaming at us over a birthday sheet cake. We side: that someday these kids will have to see group shots of a basketball team, a footconfront the fact that there is no Santa — and ball team and a class of Catholic schoolgirls. that the fictional Santa isn’t Asian. Before this exhibition, most of the phoA young man wearing a military uniform tographs he chose depicted his own family looks as though he could be of any herimembers. Momentary Longing marks the tage. He’s pointing, and Toh has given him first time he has shown works that include something new to point toward: lantern Caucasians; in what he says is an expression shapes peppered in the foreground beneath of assimilation, we now see, among others, an older woman on a mofolks from the childhood bility scooter. Both people of his wife, Cheryl Toh, an are smiling, but Toh has artist who grew up in the Heinrich Toh: shaped the image’s narUnited States. Momentary Longing rative with the title, “But, Toh wonders whether Through December 28 at Leedy-Voulkos Art Center Grandma, It’s a Minefield” non-Asians will see ver2012 Baltimore — a playful reminder of sions of themselves in the 816-474-1919 the difficulties inherent photos of Asian people leedy-voulkos.com in navigating our cultural (and vice versa). Living in identities and interactions. the Midwest, he says, is The longhaired, smiling noticeably different from girl in “The Beautiful One” is a face that any the time he spent on the West Coast, where of us might recognize while flipping through people from Asia are not as much a minority photo albums filled with physical proof of as they are in Kansas City. our own childhood birthday parties. Behind The commingling of East and West is her is a gridded background that represents front and center in the base image of “It’s the greenhouse of Cheryl’s grandfather; beAll a Lie.” Who has not felt the deep disapyond that personal association, the piece pointment of a childhood belief shattered works on its own visual terms, as do the colby reality? Two little girls of Asian heritage orful spiraled objects superimposed. These stand together next to Santa Claus, also are zanfirico canes — Italian tools used for evidently Asian but dressed in the typical making a kind of blown glass — in homage fur suit that would make literal sense only to Cheryl’s ethnic heritage and to Heinrich’s up in the mountains. Etched into his boots own past as a glass artist. are shadowy silhouettes of pine trees, and Another image that shows up in more than the orange, green, yellow and pink shapes one work is a red-and-white-striped paper balancing the figures are reminiscent of party cup. It’s now considered retro, Toh Christmas ornaments and a Chinese lan-

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“It’s All a Lie” (left) and “It’s a Secret” by Heinrich Toh says, but its implications — of celebration, formal and fleeting — remain meaningful. Viewers can pick out plenty of associations on their own, and Toh’s titles offer glimpses into the dark side of these slowly fading images. He has superimposed red and white pinwheels above the youthful heads of a U.S. school’s football team in “Bit Between Their Teeth,” and you might recognize the Tiger Balm ointment logo charging above the players. Toh says he’s fascinated with the way that American sports teams choose their mascots; there are no tigers in this country, for one thing, but the Chiefs, the Braves and the Redskins are even more curious as cultural appropriations. In contrast to the people around the room is a series of eight “Passing Dream” prints of places. These subtle, postcardlike scenes — of treed landscapes, temples and the surreal structures of Singapore’s Gardens by the Bay — come from photos that Toh has taken during his own travels. Using his layered printing techniques, he presents places that echo with the familiar, even when you’ve never been there to see them yourself. No matter where we are from, we can live in only one place at a time. And no matter where we visit, each experience is unique and impossible to repeat. “They are the memory of a place I’ve been,” Toh says, “and they will never be the same again.”

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s ta g e

Business Weak

MET’s How to Succeed revival falls short of an MBA.

By

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’d never seen How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying, though the get-rich-quick title is a familiar cultural concept, and one of its songs, “The Brotherhood of Man,” is familiar to anyone who has watched the Tony Awards or the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade telecast in recent times. Based on a satirical 1952 book of the same name, How to Succeed premiered in New York in 1961 and won a gaggle of awards the following year: seven Tonys, the Pulitzer Prize for Drama, the New York Drama Critics Circle Award. Half a century later, the Metropolitan Ensemble Theatre has revived it, and I was curious. For one thing, I wondered: Is it dated? Well, yes — but recent revivals (with Matthew Broderick in 1995, with John Larroquette and Daniel Radcliffe in 2011) have been produced for a reason: Frank Loesser’s songs and Abe Burrows, Jack Weinstock and Willie Gilbert’s book spoof workplace politics and corporate America in ways that still feel relevant. “By George, ethical behavior always pays,” says the young protagonist, J. Pierrepont Finch. It was always a joke, and it’s bitterly funny now. That’s not to excuse the play’s sexist 1960s sensibilities: sexy, dippy or lovelorn secretaries; songs such as “Happy to Keep His Dinner Warm,” sung by the secretary Rosemary (Mandy Morris, also the show’s choreographer). But if these aspects must be taken in stride, the performances in this production are pitched at an appropriately over-the-top level. A lowly window washer at the World Wide Wicket Co. when the show begins, the ambi- moves them.) But the show needs more than tious Finch (played by the talented Phil New- those moments deliver. Frequent and time-consuming scene man, who is surely also on the rise) reads from the book How to Succeed in Business Without changes in this three-hour production disReally Trying while working the squeegee with rupt continuity, and some songs just run too his other hand. He wants only to get ahead. Ro- long: “A Secretary Is Not a Toy” and “Coffee Break,” about needing coffee, whose routine mance goes with the job package in Rosemary, devolved into zombie movements with somewho has her own designs. thing inside of me dies. Timing matters, and The company’s president, clueless J.B. Biggley (Bob Paisley, the show’s other an- this show’s pace needs to keep tempo with Finch’s rapid rise. chor), should be concerned. His nephew, Bud As staged here, Act 1 runs more than 90 Frump (Tony Beasley), who relies on nepominutes. And it’s big, with tism, clearly senses a com22 actors. This isn’t the first petitor in Finch. But Biggley How to Succeed time that director Karen is losing his sense over the in Business Without Paisley has amassed a large vapid Hedy LaRue (Celia Really Trying cast in the MET space — Pride Gannon), a head-turning Through December 1 and Prejudice and The Kenold flame who shows up to at Metropolitan Ensemble tucky Cycle come to mind. take a “position.” Theatre, 3614 Main, But while those were balScenes with Newman 816-569-3226, metkc.org letically blocked, the setup and Paisley are seamless here feels claustrophobic, and funny highlights of the show. So, too, are some musical numbers, and it seemed that cast members were being careful not to step on one another’s toes. and the skillful physical comedy, especially It’s common practice at MET to reconfigure by Beasley and Newman. (The exuberant seating and stage to fit a play’s needs, and this Newman thinks on his feet as fast as he

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A day at the office with Newman and Morris production’s containment is clever if crowded (set design by the Paisleys). The offices of the story’s World Wide Wicket Co. — including the elevator doors — use the theater’s entryway, with a set of stairs wrapping around the doorway’s sides to an upper “executive” level. The animated supporting cast members give this show their all, but their vehicle is unwieldy and runs out of gas in the second act. It remains entertaining in places, especially “I Believe in You,” sung by Newman with the men’s ensemble. (A chirpy “Cinderella, Darling,” on the other hand, lacked enough rehearsal.) But a pivotal scene lost its momentum, and dialogue and lyrics during the performance I saw were often drowned out by the recorded music (or lost to sound gaps). Yet I found myself humming “The Brotherhood of Man” the following day and thinking about a character’s “bold caution.” This community theater isn’t cautious, and it’s certainly bold.

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A

fter the emergence of effective treatments for HIV, in the mid 1990s, the illness essentially disappeared from the mainstream media, apart from the occasional report about Africa. Its presence in cinema died down as well, except in the nonfiction realm. Now that the era of an HIV-positive diagnosis meaning an automatic death sentence is almost a generation away, it has been left to documentaries like David France’s How to Survive a Plague and Joaquim Pinto’s What Now? Remind Me. By contrast, Jean-Marc Vallée’s Dallas Buyers Club is the first mainstream dramatic film in 20 years whose protagonist has AIDS.  The fact-based Dalla s Buye rs Club opens in 1986, as Ron Woodroof (Matthew McConaughey) reads an article about Rock Hudson’s death from AIDS. After an accident at work, Ron wakes up in the hospital. He learns that he’s HIV-positive and he’s told that he has only 30 days to live. Determined to cheat death, he starts partying, then hunts down a supply of the then-experimental medicine AZT. Finding it horribly toxic, he searches overseas for safer and more effective treatments. Because those medications aren’t approved by the FDA, he has to smuggle them by car or plane. He teams up with the transsexual Rayon (Jared Leto) and sells them to AIDS patients in Dallas. In some respects, Dallas Buyers Club is actually a retreat from Jonathan Demme’s Philadelphia, which, for all its compromises, put a gay character center stage. Ron is not only a straight white man but also a vocal homophobe. In fact, the film’s very first line of dialogue manages to include the word cocksucker. Though Woodruff comes to spend more time with LGBT people, and the slurs fly out of his mouth far less frequently, Dallas Buyers Club comes dangerously close to making them part of his good-old-boy

Supply meets demand: Leto (left) and McConaughey. persona, like a taste for tequila and the rodeo. Consequently, when the film tries to show him learning to outgrow his prejudices, as in a scene when he defends Rayon in a grocery store (while still calling her “him”), the movie feels like an afterschool special. But in other areas, Dallas Buyers Club goes much further than Philadelphia and has much more in common with a film like How to Survive a Plague. ACT UP is rarely alluded to directly; all the same, Ron’s work to expand access to experimental treatments for AIDS patients is among the things that group fought for. One fact emphasized by How to Survive a Plague is that ACT UP members’ activism stemmed from a desire to save their own lives. Ron may be a capitalist, but all the drugs he sells he first tests on himself — in one case, with near fatal results. He’s trying to save his own life, too. American culture is hardly free from homophobia, but perhaps we’ve turned a corner when 50 Cent goes from rapping about “faggots” dragging him down on “In Da Club” to mentoring a transgender teen on a reality show. Dallas Buyers Club feels like a symptom of such a shift. It works as a buddy movie of sorts, as well as a story of one man heroically defying the system. But it’s never as enlightened as it thinks it is. For that, it would need to give Rayon a life beyond being the transgender equivalent of a Magic Negro, and a story more nuanced than a sad junkie rejected by her father. We can’t expect a single film to tell the story of how AIDS affected America, but we can hope that it won’t be 2033 before Hollywood ventures to make another one.

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film

Old flame

D av iD F e a r

Jennifer Lawrence sparks The Hunger Games: Catching Fire.

W

hen last we left Katniss Everdeen, she of the steady bow and quivering lip, our screen heroine had thwarted the totalitarian entertainment state at its own game(s), doubling down with a suicide pact and sharing the crown with her fellow District 12 contestant, Peeta Mellark. These two youngsters became fan favorites — as did the actors who played them, Jennifer Lawrence and Josh Hutcherson — perpetrating a romance story line so as not to rock the status quo. Donald Sutherland’s President Snow looked disapprovingly at Katniss’ mockingjay pin, a hometown trinket that was slowly becoming a symbol for bucking the system. Author Suzanne Collins, it is assumed, cashed a large check. Viewers settled in, knowing that further installments of this bountiful pop-lit film franchise, one that promised to put the YA back in dystopia, were on the way. Like its high-grossing predecessor, The Hunger Games: Catching Fire mixes broad social satire, blockbuster pulp, teen angst and a vintage-serial sense of thrills, spills, chills into the bleakest of bubble-gum packages. Against a nuclear-winter landscape, Katniss and her actual blue-eyed beau (Liam Hemsworth) pass the time hunting turkeys and dealing with her PTSD. She and fellow “victor” Peeta are occasionally trotted out to the various shantytown districts, using public appearances in front of Russian-constructivist posters to talk up the glory of the Capitol. Except propaganda isn’t stopping the murmurings of revolution. At speeches, certain crowd members hold three fingers in the air: the mockingjay gesture. Truncheons come out. Gunshots are fired. The center can’t hold. Out come the bread and circuses again, only now former winners are pitted against each other. Welcome back, gaudy caricatures of carping showbiz parasites, and Woody Harrelson as Katniss’ drunken mentor. Once more into the fray, photogenic young actors must battle various obstacles — blistering mist, baboons, rainstorms of blood — as well as each other to survive. How we’ve missed you, ongoing sexual tension between Lawrence and Hutcherson’s most-dangerous-game contestants, who gallantly try to retain their humanity while firing arrows into sternums. New faces join the franchise, including Sam Claflin (generically dreamy), Jena Malone (spiky), Amanda Plummer (scenery-chewy) and Philip Seymour Hoffman (Phillip Seymour Hoffman-y). But what’s missing is the shock of the new, an absence that isn’t helped by the narrative and structural similarity to the first

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Don’t get too close. You might get burned. film: tough times, guilt, training sessions, defiance through custom-made couture, countdown, game time, death dealing, repeat. Even with the original film’s director, Gary Ross, out and music-video auteur/I Am Legend director Francis Lawrence in, there doesn’t seem to be any great leaps forward or regressive falls backward. Tonal consistency within a series is one thing. Catching Fire comes closer to feeling like a carbon copy. Collins’ books were phenomenal, not just because they introduced YA readers to far-out notions of class warfare, celebrity-culture vulgarism, Neil Postman 101 theories about amusing ourselves to death and social Darwinism in extremis; any resemblance to the Hunger Games’ world and ours was never supposed to be coincidental. Nor was it because they courted controversy by having brutal kid-onkid violence, though that gave them an edginess that, say, the Harry Potter and Twilight books did not have. It really came down to Katniss, as compelling a character as the literary genre has given us. It can’t be overstated how vital Jennifer Lawrence is: the athleticism, the vulnerability, the guilt, the grit, the martyrdom, the femininity, even the humor. You don’t need to have seen her in Winter’s Bone or Silver Linings Playbook to appreciate the complexity she brings to this role, and how easy she makes it look. Like the book, Catching Fire ends openly, setting up a shitstorm that will take up the two films that will cover the final novel. We won’t come back because of that. We will come back to see how Lawrence deals with it. The odds of that are ever in her favor.

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ew things suck more than being the lone sober person at the bar. No matter your reason for abstaining (pregnancy, Weight Watchers, raging alcoholism), it’s impossible not to feel left out when everyone else is sipping cocktails with names like Elbow’s Sexual Chocolate or Zombie Apocalypse, and you’re drinking unsweetened iced tea garnished with an anemic lemon wedge. Fortunately, many bars indulge the careful with “mocktails”: nonalcoholic drinks that look like what your friends have ordered. I’ve tasted five local mocktails, for all you designated drivers out there, that will let you toe the line without a single foul sip of Diet Coke entering your body.

Drink: Midsummer Classic

Place: Snow & Co., 1815 Wyandotte With a bright, open atmosphere that feels like a dressed-up, Ikea-furnished warehouse, Snow & Co. lacks the dimly lighted, anonymous corners that encourage you to veer from merely drunk to shitfaced. In fact, it feels like the kind of place where you might work on a puzzle or play a game of checkers — for which, naturally, you want to be sober. The bar specializes in premixed alcoholic slushies, so unless you want coffee or hot chocolate, your options are limited — the booze in most of the menu items can’t be taken out. Ah, but the lone exception, the Midsummer Classic, is a testament to the art of blending. A more uniformly smooth slush concoction has never glided through a straw. Caveat: The mixture of orange juice, pineapple and lemonade results in a flavor tart enough to cause involuntary spasms of Welch’s Grape Juice face.

Drink: Lemonade, tonic water, bitters Place: Westside Local, 1663 Summit

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With summer a memory, the breezy-yetintimate beer garden at Westside Local is a fine place to spend 2013’s last almost-temperate evenings, gazing up at the moon through the slats in the pergola. In keeping with this restaurant’s primarily local emphasis, the bar menu features an array of house-made herbals and bitters. I asked the bartender for a tart nonalcoholic drink, and she made me a tall glass of lemonade, tonic water and bitters. Just to be sure I wasn’t crossing a line, I asked her whether bitters were inherently alcoholic, as suggested moments earlier by results of a precautionary Google search. “It’s fermented, so there are trace amounts

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of alcohol,” she said. “But you’d have to drink a lot to feel any effect.” The drink would have been refreshing on a hot afternoon, but I maintain that bitters are still most effectively used to offset the smoky bite of a stiff whiskey drink.

Drink: Mango, lemon, grapefruit, habanero pepper Place: Manifesto, 1924 Main

Manifesto lets you feel like you’re drinking in a turn-of-the-century storm cellar. The only light comes from candles, the walls are made of stone, and the bartenders jovially suggest that they maybe could be vampires because, hey, they haven’t seen daylight in a while. They hadn’t seen a teetotaler in a while, either. When I said I wanted something sweet, spicy and nonalcoholic, the bartender looked confused. There I was, alone and ordering what is essentially fancy fruit juice in a basement filled with vampires. Still, he conjured something tart and tangy that finished with a bite. I was so grateful, I didn’t even miss the Ward & Precinct. (That would be the delicious whiskey drink that, in my opinion, is the single most likely reason that Manifesto has landed on Esquire’s list of the country’s best bars.)

Drink: The Beet Goes On

Place: Extra Virgin, 1900 Main On the night I dropped by Extra Virgin, Paige Unger, winner of the 2013 Paris of the Plains Bartending Competition, was slinging. I asked if she could make a nonalcoholic version of her winning cocktail, the

Westside Local (left) and Extra Virgin mock. Beet Goes On, which combines beet shrub, lemon, Campari, Beefeater gin, St-Germain elderflower liqueur, and a rosemary garnish. “I’ve never done that before,” she said. But after swapping a few of the ingredients and adding tonic water and simple syrup, she returned with a gorgeous, blood-red mocktail. The drink was refreshing and sweet with light f loral undertones. This woman definitely knows her shit.

Drink: Strawberry-thyme cream soda

Place: Tannin Wine Bar & Kitchen, 1526 Walnut By far the most remarkable mocktails I encountered reside at Tannin, the two-year-old Crossroads wine bar. Its house-made sodas are listed on the menu, so you know exactly what you’re getting. I ordered the strawberrythyme cream soda, and my boyfriend bravely asked for a spiced Shirley Temple. Both were delicious. The drinks’ renderings were also impressive. The bartender smashed the ingredients right in front of us and used a carbonator to add fizz. He crushed the thyme garnish on the back of his hand and rubbed it along the rim of the glass, lending the drink an extra dimension of flavor. When coupled with the wine bar’s obscenely decadent truffle-oil fries, a sober night out at Tannin can feel like indulging in extremely sophisticated, highend comfort food. These sodas are so flavorful and aromatic that your wine-swilling friends just might ask to share.

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15


Fat C i t y

Gaines and losses

By

CH A R L E S F E R RU Z Z A

Reminiscing about Ralph Gaines’ restaurant legacy in Kansas City.

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he history of Kansas City restaurants contains many great stories, but one of the best is about Ralph Gaines. The charismatic restaurateur started several iconic eateries in his lifetime (1918-79), including the Colony Steakhouse, which he opened while working as the well-paid manager of a competing steakhouse. When his boss found out, he was fired. The resulting personnel change would have national repercussions. I recently reconnected with an old friend, Karen Gaines, who worked in her father’s restaurants for years after his death and later opened a catering company, finally The Ambassador: Home to Gaines’ retiring from the business in 1990 after her secret steakhouse. son was born. cline; the restaurant was finally shuttered “I just couldn’t do it anymore,” says Gaines, now a business instructor at Kansas City, Kan- by Gaines’ widow in 1980. By that point, the two Gaines restaurants at Union Station — the sas, Community College. “It takes a special kind of person to be in the restaurant busi- Lobster Pot seafood buffet and the Landmark — were very popular. ness. You have to put up with a lot.” “We got a lot of tourist business from the Ralph Gaines was that kind of person: hotels at Crown Center,” Gaines says. “I think “He was this larger-than-life character,” his we were the last tenants left in the building. daughter says. Every time there was a news report that Union Ralph Gaines was lured to Kansas City in Station was finally closing for good, we got doz1950 by Jay Dillingham, president of the Kansas ens of phone calls asking if we were still open.” City Stock Yard Co. Dillingham was ready to When the historic building did close, prior open Kansas City’s first upscale steakhouse, the Golden Ox, in the West Bottoms, then to its renovation, Karen and her brother, Bob (now deceased), combined the two restaurant dominated by the stockyards. Dillingham concepts, creating the Colony Steakhouse and offered Gaines, then managing a successful Chicago restaurant, a sweetheart deal, which Lobster Pot, and they moved it to three differincluded a percentage of the profits to run his ent locations. The final venue closed in 2003, and Bob Gaines went back to practicing law. new steakhouse. In a few years, Gaines was “His heart just wasn’t in it anymore,” making more money than Dillingham. Gaines says. “Well, that was the story,” Gaines says. She says her father was a classic restau“Dad knew that he was going to get fired at rateur, always working in his restaurants, some point, so he secretly opened the Colony always thinking of new Steakhouse in the Ambasideas to try out. The Landsador Hotel on Broadway.” ���It takes a special kind mark was one of the first It wasn’t a secret for long. local restaurants to offer a On Christmas Eve in 1953, of person to be in the salad bar. When Polynesian Dillingham discovered that restaurant business. You lounges became popular, he Gaines was his biggest comhave to put up with a lot.” opened one of those. petitor. Dillingham called “He made my mom and Gaines into his office and I go to the Katz drugstore asked if he was carrying the on Main Street and buy a myna bird. He felt keys for the Golden Ox. He was. the bar needed a live bird,” Gaines says. “The “Give the keys to the guy sitting over there,” customers loved the bird and taught him to Dillingham said. say all kinds of dirty words.” That guy was another young restaurant They don’t have places like that here anymanager, Paul Robinson, who would later more, or restaurateurs like Ralph Gaines. create, with co-founder Joe Gilbert, the successful Gilbert/Robinson company, which opened restaurants all over the United States. E-mail charles.ferruzza@pitch.com Gaines refused to close the original Colony at 3560 Broadway, even as the fortunes of Charles Ferruzza returns to Café next week. that midtown neighborhood went into de-


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17


MuSIC

Black arts

A Lawrence punk band opens

By

its sketchbook and gets on with it.

N ata l ie G a l l a Ghe r

W

ade Kelly is going through an existential crisis. He admits this nonchalantly, between long sips from a pint of Guinness at the Eighth Street Taproom, in Lawrence. The bartender spins vinyl, and a haunting Bessie Smith record oozes out of the speakers, filling up the mostly empty room and clashe r o M i ng w it h t he sou nds of the lone guy working out his pool game. t a ine Onl .com Kelly is folded into a h c pit corner booth, dressed in dark denim jeans, a denim jacket and a black-knit beanie. You can tell that he is very tall even when he’s sitting. His beard is thick, his eyebrows permanently furrowed. Kelly’s band, Black on Black, has a new EP, its third within a year. Get On With It is a five-track free download that doesn’t last more than 12 minutes, but Kelly and the rest of the band — bassist Aaron Riffel and drummer Jason Jones, who splits duties with Kelly’s Austin-based brother, John Benda — accomplish a lot in that space. The heavy, sweat-drenched punk-rock set opens up throwing punches and never slows down. Kelly spits out the lyrics to the opening “Fork in the Road” like he’s charging into battle, and he wields that barely controlled volatility through the rest of the album. For him, this music — unapologetically dark, with sludgy guitar work and inky drumbeats — is a way to ask the big questions that gnaw at his brain. He calls it “medicinal.” “I’m trying to put a different spin on the stuff that keeps me up at night,” Kelly tells me. “In a way, this band is sort of like running a sprint. It’s like a head clearer. It’s so visceral that there’s not a lot of thought put into anything. It’s very primal, and for me, that’s very necessary because I live in my head so much. It’s necessary for me to have something primal to yank me out of that.” On “Made to Suffer,” he furiously demands: Why are we made to suffer? Why do we choose a master? On “The Good Fight,” Kelly’s distorted voice insists that there are secrets. By the closing “Car Fire,” though, he seems to have found a kind of solution: The only way is to grab the wheel on fire, wide-awake. “If my life wasn’t so chaotic, if I wasn’t stretched so thin and stressed out about so many different things, I wouldn’t have Black on Black,” Kelly says. “The band wouldn’t actually exist. I would probably just be a very well-balanced, calm person, playing acoustic songs or whatever.” 18

the pitch

Barrett emke

M us i c

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plans to release a full-length — what Kelly The chaos — the foundation of Kelly’s calls a “big, bulky thing.” artistic output — comes from the fact that “The EP is all you’re gonna get from us,” he simply can’t quiet his own thoughts. he says. “Basically, what it boils down to is That’s the “existential crisis” he has warned me about: the constant questions running that this band is about immediacy. It’s about what’s happening right at this moment. If you through his brain, things he tries to work listen to our EPs, you’re probably listening to through on Get On With It. But Kelly isn’t too interested in discuss- songs that were written within four months ing the contents of the new EP. The point of of the EP being released, or sometimes a little more or a little less. Sometimes I finish them the studiously DIY Black on Black is not to in the studio.” ruminate over the product He goes on: “How many but to experience it. Black on Black bands have you listened to “Let’s just be honest,” EP Release where you love them, and he says. “This music is Friday, November 22, then they go into a fucking not for everybody. It’s just at RecordBar cave somewhere and they not.” He places his palms start listening to a bunch of flat on the table and does a the Who or something, and then they come little content analysis anyway: “I mean, it’s dirty. It’s scuzzy. It’s fairly simplistic. It has out and suddenly it’s not your band anypop elements that give it a nice little flavor. more? We’re trying to take people with us.” Kelly works as a freelance graphic deIt has some hooks. But for the most part, this signer by day, and he likens the Black on is not something that is necessarily for mass Black project — the free EP releases, the rough appeal, and I have no problem with that cuts, the raw and guttural live performances whatsoever. And I don’t mind being under the radar as long as I’m getting something — to a behind-the-scenes artistic process. “People get into looking at the artist’s meaningful out of it.” studio and the artist’s sketchbook. They This ethos is why Black on Black has no

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Kelly: “This music is not for everybody.” want to get in the artist’s head,” he says. “For me, those artists’ diaries and sketchbooks are a million times more important, and that’s what we’re giving people. We’re handing them our diary every six months. We’re handing people what’s going on in our practice space.” In the background, the bartender changes records. Ella Fitzgerald comes on, and the pool balls keep clacking together across the room, echoing off the high ceiling. Kelly has all but forgotten his beer as he focuses with intense seriousness on answering my questions. “I’m not judging my decision making, and that’s because I’ve cut all the fat,” he says. “I’ve cut all the filler. That’s why everything sounds so raw, so live. There’s not any ornamentation on anything that we do, from the artwork to the sound. It is what it is. Because of that, it makes me feel more comfortable in my skin. And when you’re comfortable in your skin, that’s when the actual art comes out.”

E-mail natalie.gallagher@pitch.com


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19


MUSIC

WHERE THE BEST MUSICIANS IN THE WORLD PLAY

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20

the pitch

The Queen of Bounce

By

shakes on into KC.

N ata l ie G a l l a Ghe r

L

ong before Miley Cyrus caused millions of innocent Americans to develop eye twitches with her ludicrous MTV performance, Freddie Ross was twerking his way into the hearts of dance enthusiasts across the country. Ross, better known by his stage name, Big Freedia (say FREED-uh), has led sweaty masses to euphoric highs since he started performing in his native New Orleans in 1999. Having pioneered bounce — a type of hip-hop that has its roots in the Crescent City’s late-1980s music scene — Ross is the form’s undisputed Queen of Bounce, with a reality-TV show of the same name on Fuse and a dedicated following. In advance of his Monday gig at the Riot Room, The Pitch phoned Ross on the road to hear his thoughts on TV stardom, Miley and what bounce is really about. The Pitch: Your reality show premiered October 2. What’s life been like since? Ross: It has been a very good and awesome experience, to be able to open up and let people see me on a more personal level No, not at all. You know, we do more than and get to see different sides of me. They’re used to only seeing me onstage, and they just twerk. “Twerk” is just one of the words in the vocabulary of bounce. I’m not afraid. perceive me a different way and assume difEverything has a time and a season. I won’t ferent things the way they want. This show be twerking forever. is a chance to dig a little deeper into my story I kind of feel that we should get a little history and into my life. I was really nervous in the lesson and a how-to from you. beginning, trying to get used to the cameras Oh, yeah, definitely. The how-to video is and trying to see where I wanted to go with it, coming. [Laughs.] No, really, it’s coming, and because I had a lot of creative control. also the workout DVD. It’ll give me a chance So you saw MTV’s Video Music Awards. to teach people not just how to twerk but also If there’s anyone qualified to comment on the some other different dance moves in bounce whole twerking thing that Miley Cyrus was gomusic, and show what we do in New Orleans ing for, it’s you. and have fun. People feel that she overstepped some Some people think twerking is just something barriers, but I’m actually thankful that she that girls in rap videos do. opened the discussion because it actually put No, bounce is for everybody. We do it from a light on my side of things — that bouncing is part of a culture from New Orleans. It just zero to 99 in New Orleans, from the little baset a fire, when Miley attempted to twerk or bies all the way to our grandmothers. If you watch Episode 5 [of Queen whatever. It set a fire under of Bounce], there was an old me and my camp. It just Big Freedia lady twerking. They were made people aware of me. Monday, November 25, playing my music while I’ve been doing this for at the Riot Room they were riding around a long time. She attempted in New Orleans, and she to twerk on the VMAs, and started twerking.… It was it just opened up another just so New Orleans. door for me. It made it a little bit easier for Your live shows seem intense and exhaustme. I’ve been doing it for a while, and now ing. How do you manage to put on that kind of it’s getting a little mainstream. People disperformance night after night? credited her, but she also helped credit the Oh, my God! [Sighs.] The energy from the twerking and the shaking and the bouncing that we do in New Orleans. So I’m grateful crowd is definitely what gets us going. Once for Miley. She opened that door, and I came we come in, and they get hyped and they start screaming and hollering, all of that through and took my throne. A lot of people are afraid of that word, gives me excitement. Sometimes I’m really worn out from all of the shows — I’m two “mainstream.” Does the twerking phenomweeks into touring right now with almost enon scare you?

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pitch.com

All hail the Queen: Big Freedia. no voice — and I’m still pushing. The only thing that makes me be able to get through all of that are my fans and the energy that they give me. I feed off it, and it turns my light switch on.

E-mail natalie.gallagher@pitch.com

J a z z B e at KEnny Barron Trio, aT ThE Folly ThEaTEr

It would be tough to name a jazz pianist still performing who has recorded with more jazz greats than Kenny Barron has. You hear his talent in the lyrical elegance of his duets with Stan Getz, his trading phrases with Dizzy Gillespie or James Moody, his rollicking bop with Roy Haynes and Charlie Haden, or the base he lays for Jane Monheit to soar “Over the Rainbow.” With nine Grammy nominations, Barron is a veritable jazz master, one you can witness in action with his trio — Barron on piano, Kiyoshi Kitagawa on bass and Lee Pearson on drums — at the Folly Theater Friday night. This is traditional jazz performed by a pianist whom his peers recognize as the best. — Larry Kopitnik Kenny Barron Trio, 8 p.m. Friday, November 22, at the Folly Theater (300 West 12th Street, 816-474-4444), $18–$50.


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Closing Date:9.26.13

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21


Music

Music Forecast Reverend Peyton is not your average cleric. Well, technically, Peyton isn’t ordained, but everyone knows him as “the Reverend” or simply “Rev,” and his music is his gospel. Peyton rotates among a variety of guitars while his wife, Breezy, plays a washboard, and Aaron Persinger pounds away on a drum kit that includes an overturned 5-gallon plastic bucket. Put that way, the band may sound a little modest, but together they deliver an old-fashioned country-blues romp that would get even the quietest church mouse dancing. Friday, November 22, at the Bottleneck (737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483)

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Ray Vietti of the Harmed Brothers

Though they aren’t related by blood, the four boys of the Harmed Brothers like to think of themselves as bound to one another by the religion of music. On Come Morning, the Oregon band’s latest full-length, singers Ray Vietti and Alex Salcido unpack their rough-edged, banjo-heavy songs with characteristic gravelroad weariness. It’s the kind of music that would feel right at home in a campfire setting. Tuesday, Vietta, a native Missourian, plays a homecoming gig at RecordBar. Joe Pug and Ryan Adams fans will find a kindred spirit. Tuesday, November 26, at RecordBar (1020 Westport Road, 816-753-5207)

Iris DeMent

Iris DeMent has been blessed with one of those voices that plucks you out of your current time and place and transports you to another. She’s like the female version of John Prine — a vocal power so haunting and thrilling that it’s easier to listen with your eyes closed and imagine yourself at some abandoned cabin in the countryside, reveling in solitude. Last year, the Arkansas-raised DeMent released Sing the Delta, her first collection of original songs in 16 years. On it, the then-51-year-old folk singer offered a wealth of startlingly beautiful and timeless material, demonstrating

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Eddie Spaghetti

Rusko that the years haven’t diminished her talent. The show is sold out, so be prepared to shell out for a ticket. Saturday, November 23, at Knuckleheads (2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456)

Despite his name, Eddie Spaghetti does not sing nursery rhymes (although that’s an option if his career as a country singersongwriter ever fails him). The longtime Supersuckers frontman’s new solo album, The Value of Nothing, is full of enjoyable twang and guitars but also reveals a more serious side through his lyrics. For an artist who has seemed fixated on his persona more than his music in the Supersuckers, this is an unexpected and welcome change. Monday, November 25,at Czar (1531 Grand, 816-421-0300)

Third Eye Blind

Few bands’ songs lodge themselves as resolutely in your brain as Third Eye Blind’s. I have a slightly paranoid theory that “Jumper” and “How’s It Going to Be” are government-funded songs filled with subliminal messages. That explains why Third Eye Blind garnered such massive airplay in the late ’90s. What was happening in the world in 1997? We’ll never know because so much of what we remember about that year is dominated by Stephan Jenkins’ dispassionate voice and the endless refrain of doo-doo-doo on “Semi-Charmed Life.” Wednesday, November 27, at the Uptown Theater (3700 Broadway, 816-753-8665)

Rusko

Those Darlins

Those Darlins are about as sweet as Sour Patch Kids. Four years ago, the Nashville quartet released a self-titled debut of mostly raunchy punk-country jams with more attitude than ambition. There’s plenty of punch on the band’s latest offering, Blur the Line — not to be confused with Robin Thicke’s incorrigible Blurred Lines — but there’s also a sly undertone of aggression that blooms with sizzling guitar work and lead singer Jessi Zazu’s treacherous vocals. Those Darlins also know how to put on a live show that isn’t easily ignored. Thursday, November 21, at RecordBar (1020 Westport Road, 816-753-5207)

It’ll be interesting to see if dubstep’s newest hero, the L.A. Englishman Christopher

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Pick of the Week

 If You Love the Classics

 Worth the Weeknight

 Nashville Goes Punk

Dance Your Pants Off

Band to Watch

 The Church of Music

Glow Jewelry

 ’90s Revival

Not a Cartoon Character

Bring on the Country

Government Conspiracy

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22

n ata l ie G a l l a Ghe r

Mercer — better known as Rusko — is able to get a Monday-night crowd sweating and shaking at the Midland. Rusko is touring in support of his recent EP, Lift Me Up, a collection of songs that plants him at the fore of the D&B (drum and bass) movement. That might have something to do with Skrillex, the undisputed king of dubstep, signing Rusko to his OWSLA label earlier this summer. Either way, expect strobe lights and glow bracelets. Monday, November 25, at the Midland (1228 Main, 816-283-9921)

The Reverend Peyton’s Big Damn Band

LIKE US ON

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23

11/18/13 10:02 AM


AGENDA

continued from page 9

Thursday | 11.21 |

WENDY HO

C U LT U R A L E V E N T S

Remembrance of the Life and Times of JFK,

SPORTS

a storytelling open mic | 9 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar, 3611 Broadway

Crown Center Ice Terrace | 10 a.m.-11 p.m., $6 ($3

for skate rental), 2450 Grand

SPORTS FILM

The Ice at Park Place | 11 a.m.-10 p.m., $7 ($3 skate rental), 117th St. and Nall, Leawood

Kenneth Branagh’s Macbeth | 1:30 p.m.,$10-$15, Tivoli Cinemas, 4050 Pennsylvania, tivolikc.com

KU vs. Towson men’s basketball | 7 p.m. Allen Fieldhouse, 1651 Naismith Dr., Lawrence

COMEDY

Red Grant | 8 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater, 7260 N.W. 87th St. Josh Wolf | 8 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club, 1867 Village West Pkwy., KCK

MUSIC

Missouri Mavericks vs. St. Charles Chill | 7:05 p.m. Independence Events Center, 19100 E. Valley View Pkwy., Independence

DAY THURS

1 1 . 21

Monster Trucks, Pro Arena Tuff Trucks & Megasaurus | 6:30 p.m. Kemper Arena, 1800

wn at Ho do B’s Missie

Genessee

Miguel Mambo DeLeon and Carte Blanc | 7 p.m.

SHOPPING

The Blue Room, 1616 E. 18th St.

Creative Hand Show and Sale | 4-9 p.m. Shawnee Town Museum’s Town Hall, 11600 Johnson Dr., Shawnee

Alexandra Fetterman, Mikal Shapiro and Kasey Rausch | Westport Saloon, 4112 Pennsylvania

Holiday Open House | 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Browne’s Irish Market, 3300 Pennsylvania

Millage Gilbert Big Blues Band | 7 p.m. Danny’s Big

Easy, 1601 E. 18th St.

NET WORKING

Angela Hesse | 7 p.m. Z Strike, 1370 Grand Hot Caution | The Kill Devil Club, 61 E. 14th St.

Harvest Ho Benefit Show with Wendy Ho | 8 p.m. Missie B’s, 805 W. 39th St.

Roger Jaeger, John Scott-Young, Zach Sims | 8 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

Eddie Moore & the Outer Circle | 9 p.m. Green Lady

Lounge, 1809 Grand

COMEDY

Matt Nathanson, Joshua Radin | 6:30 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence Olassa, Thrift Store 45s | Replay Lounge, 946 Mas-

Zach Mufasa, the Green River Kings, the High Rise Robots | 9 p.m. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club,

3402 Main

The Nace Brothers | 7 p.m. Trouser Mouse, 410 S.

Hwy. 7, Blue Springs

Connect KC: Rep. Emanuel Cleaver | 5:30-7:30 p.m. American Jazz Museum, 1616 E. 18th St.

sachusetts, Lawrence

TobyMac | 7:30 p.m. Independence Events Center, 19100 E. Valley View Pkwy., Independence

Friday | 11.22 |

Red Grant | 8 & 10:30 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater, 7260 N.W. 87th St.

Josh Wolf | 7:45 & 9:45 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club, 1867 Village West Pkwy., KCK

PERFORMING ARTS

Phantoms of Kansas City — History and Jazz | 6:30-8:30 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar, 3611 Broadway Soul Providers Crew | The Brick, 1727 McGee

MUSIC

Kansas City Symphony: French and Austrian Masters | 8 p.m. Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts, 1601 Broadway, kcsymphony.org

Kenny Barron Trio | 8 p.m. Folly Theater, 300 W. 12th St. continued on page 26

ART EXHIBITS & EVENTS About Face: Contemporary Portraiture |

Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, 4525 Oak, nelson-atkins.org

Lynn Benson: Sidetrip | Kiosk Gallery, 3951 Broadway

Celebrating Picasso: Through the Lens of David Douglas Duncan | Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, 4525 Oak

Charlotte Street presents We’ll Make Out Better Than Okay | La Esquina, 1000 W. 25th St.

24

the pitch

Charlotte Street’s 2013 Visual Artist Awards Exhibition | Opening reception 6-9 p.m. Friday,

Dressed Up | Kemper Museum of Contemporary

Craig Colorusso, MB 89:Installation | Recep-

| Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, 4525 Oak

Grand Arts, 1819 Grand

tion at 5 p.m. Thursday, UMKC Gallery of Art, 5015 Holmes, Room 203

Salvador Dali: The Argillet Collection | Meet

Impressionist France | Nelson-Atkins Museum

of Art, 4525 Oak

Art, JCCC, 12345 College Blvd., Overland Park

Edgar Degas Pastels | Nelson-Atkins Museum

Lost and Found: A Group Show | PLUG Projects,

pitch.com

RAW Artist Showcase | 8 p.m. Thursday, VooDoo Lounge, Harrah’s Casino, 1 Riverboat Dr., North Kansas City

Echoes: Islamic Art and Contemporary Artists

Madame Christine Argillet, 6-8 p.m. Saturday, 2-4 p.m. Sunday, Leedy-Voulkos Art Center, 2012 Baltimore, RSVP required, leedy-voulkos.com

of Art, 4525 Oak

n o v e m b e r 2 1 - 2 7, 2 0 1 3

Art, 4420 Warwick Blvd., kemperart.org

Kaws • Ups and Downs; Dylan Mortimer • Illuminate | Nerman Museum of Contemporary

1613 Genessee

Test Patterns and Floor Samples: New Work by Garry Noland | Studios Inc., 1708 Campbell James Turrell: Gard Blue | Spencer Museum of Art, 1301 Mississippi , Lawrence

Visiting Artist Presentations: Judith G. Levy and Miki Baird | 3:30-4:30 p.m. Thursday,

Nerman Museum of Contemporary Art, JCCC, 12345 College Blvd., Overland Park


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KC’S ONLY FM SPORTS STATION! SPORTS RADIO 102.5 THE FAN LINEUP:

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5AM-8AM: Tiki Barber, Brandon & Dana 8AM-11AM: John Feinstein 11AM-2PM: Jim Rome 2PM-5PM: Doug Gottlieb 5PM-9PM: Chris Moore & Brian Jones 9PM-1AM: Scott Ferrall 1AM-5AM: D.A. - Damon Amendolara pitch.com

n o v e m b e r 2 1 - 2 7, 2 0 1 3

the pitch

25


JIM GAFFIGAN

FRIDAY

11.22

Each week, Pitch Street Team cruises around to the hottest clubs, bars and concerts. You name it, we will be there. While we are out, we hand out tons of cool stuff. So look for the Street Team... We will be looking for you!

again Laugh gan. ffi a G h wit

Jim Gaffigan | 7 & 9:30 p.m., $39.75-$49.75, the Midland, 1228 Main, midlandkc.com

Animal Collective @ Indie

First Friday in the Crossroads

continued from page 24 Deep Fried Squirrel, James Rose Jr. | 6 p.m. Replay

Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence

The Doo Dads | 6 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd. Eyelit, Akkilles, Eric + Erica, La Guerre | 8 p.m. The

Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

Sundiver, Black on Black EP Release, We Are Hex, Wrath & Ruin | 9:45 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

Dan Thomas and Voyage | 8:30 p.m. The Blue Room,

1616 E. 18th St.

Tommy Womack | 9 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester

Isaac Hodges, Lindsey Jones, the Blackbird Revue, the Welding | 6 p.m. Czar, 1531 Grand Howard Iceberg and the Titanics, the B’Dinas |

Brodioke | 9 p.m. Bulldog, 1715 Main

The Nace Brothers with Monkey Junk | 8 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester

Check Your Head with Johnny Quest | 10 p.m. The Eighth Street Taproom, 801 New Hampshire, Lawrence

OJT+B | The Kill Devil Club, 61 E. 14th St.

DJ Soulnice | 10 p.m. MiniBar, 3810 Broadway

Origins of Groove | 8 p.m. Take Five Coffee + Bar, 5336

Wendy Ho | 6 p.m. Wilde’s Chateau 24, 2412 Iowa,

The Phantastics, the Basement, Dr. Cotton | 8 p.m.

Underground Heat | 11 p.m. Czar, 1531 Grand

9 p.m. Coda, 1744 Broadway

See more the “promotions” Te link p Tech on N9ne ch at N9ne @ Indie

@ Indie

W. 151st St., Leawood

Upcoming Events

The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence

11.23 - Lee Brice @ Indie 11.25 - Rusko @ Indie 11.27 - The Pitch & Captain Morgan Present Trampled Under Foot @ Knuckleheads 11.27 - Third Eye Blind @ Uptown

See more on the “promotions” link at p 26

the pitch

n o v e m b e r 2 1 - 2 7, 2 0 1 3

pitch.com

NIGHTLIFE

Reverend Peyton’s Big Damn Band | 8 p.m. The

Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence

Lawrence

Saturday | 11.23 | PERFORMING ARTS

ShowYouSuck, Yawn Johnson, Approach, Les Paul, DJ G Train, DJ DG Boogie | 10 p.m. Replay

Kansas City Symphony: French and Austrian Masters | 8 p.m. Kauffman Center for the Performing

Spectramatics, the Cowtown Playboys, the Rotgut Ramblers | Westport Saloon, 4112

Marriage of True Minds: Music of Bach, Vivaldi, Dowland and Handel by the Bach Aria Soloists

Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Pennsylvania

Arts, 1601 Broadway, kcsymphony.org

| 7:30 p.m. Kansas City Central Library, 14 W. 10th St.


TheaTer Dates and times vary. A Christmas Carol | Kansas City Repertory Theatre, 4949 Cherry, kcrep.org Andrew Lloyd Webber’s Tell Me on a Sunday | Egads Theatre, Off Center Theatre, 2450 Grand, egadstheatre.com

Best Laid Plans, a Murder Mystery Dinner |

7 p.m. Saturday, $45-$60, KCMT Tiffany Ballroom, 903 Harrison, grimprov.com/kansas-city

Dead Air | $54/$64, the Golden Ox, 1600 Genessee, kcmysterytrain.com

Fairy Tales’ End | 9:30 p.m. Kansas City Masonic Temple, 903 Harrison Forever Plaid | Chestnut Fine Arts Center, 234 N. Chestnut, Olathe, chestnutfinearts.com

F00d & drink

Beaujolais nouveau 2013 uncorking | 6:45 p.m., $35/$45, Cellar Rat, 1701 Baltimore, afkc.org SportS

the ice at park place | 11 a.m.-10 p.m., $7 ($3 skate

1515 WESTPORT RD. • 816-931-9417

rental), 117th and Nall, Leawood

Missouri Mavericks vs. St. Charles Chill | 7:05 p.m.

Independence Events Center, 19100 E. Valley View Pkwy., Independence

Monster trucks, pro Arena tuff trucks & Megasaurus | 1 & 6:30 p.m. Kemper Arena, 1800

WIFI NOW AVAILABLE!

CHECK OUT THE NEW ALL DAY HAPPY HOUR

Genessee

SeASonAl eventS

northern lights Holiday lighting Ceremony | 6 p.m. Zona Rosa, 8640 N. Dixson Ave.

LIVE MUSIC EVERY FRIDAY NIGHT 8-12PM

SHopping

How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying | Metropolitan Ensemble Theatre, 3614 Main, metkc.org

the Met’s Script-in-Hand Series: Arsenic and Old Lace | 2 p.m. Sunday, Kansas

Nov. 22 - Allied Saints

Nov. 29 - Junebug & The Porchlights

Creative Hand Show and Sale | 10 a.m.-5 p.m.

Dec. 6 - Nace Brothers

Shawnee Town Museum’s Town Hall, 11600 Johnson Dr., Shawnee

City Central Library, 14 W. 10th St.

Holiday open House | 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Browne’s Irish Market, 3300 Pennsylvania

Les Misérables | White Theatre at the Jewish

Saturday swap meet | 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Cowtown Mall-

Community Center, 5801 W. 115th St., Overland Park, jcckc.org/lesmis

mon: rural grit 6pm // karaoke 10 fri 11/22 p s o sat 11/23 ul providers cre m w band 13, ba rron vo wed 11/27 red velvet crush n swagger, the hearer s, fri 11/29 this is my condition sat 11/30 the acb’s, the hips, sh simple line s, leering y boys p a heathens, r ts o f sp sat 12/7 mr marcos eech v7, jorge a rana trio

POOL TABLE • MEGATOUCH • 7 PINBALLS • PINBALL TOURNAMENT WEDNESDAYS • TOUCHTUNES INTERNET JUKEBOX • DRINKING ON THE SMOKING PATIO • CRAFT BEERS • $2 PBR / HIGH LIFE OPEN 12PM ON SATURDAY AND SUNDAY • 4PM - 2AM EVERYDAY

Dec. 13 - Bobby Smith

Dec. 20 - Midlife Crisis

Dec. 27 - True Blood Blues Band CHECK OUT OUR WEBSITE FOR FOOD SPECIALS & UPCOMING BAND DATES!

523 E. Red Bridge Rd. KCMO • Red Bridge Shopping Center •

room, 3101 Gillham Plz.

816.942.0400 • www.theDailyLimitkc.com

Mind & Body

The Mystery of Edwin Drood | The Barn Play-

ers, 6219 Martway, Mission, thebarnplayers.org

kC Metaphysical Fair | 10 a.m.-8 p.m., $7, Holiday

’Twas the Night Before Christmas | Theatre for Young America, H&R Block City Stage Theater, 30 W. Pershing Rd. (Union Station), tya.org

paranormal investigation | 9 p.m.-1 a.m., $65, The

The Wiz | The Coterie, 2450 Grand, Crown Center,

CoMedy

thecoterie.org

Worth, a reading by Forrest Attaway | 6:30 p.m. Sunday-Monday, the Living Room, 1818 McGee

MUSeUM exhibiTS & evenTS Convergence: Jazz, Film, Dance and the Visual Arts | American Jazz Museum, 1616 E. 18th St.

Inn Overland Park-West, 8787 Reeder Rd.

Savoy Grill, 219 W. Ninth St.

red grant | 7 & 10 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater, 7260 N.W. 87th St.

improv team-Up with After School Special | 8 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar, 3611 Broadway

kC improv Co. presents insta-theatre | 8 p.m. Kick Comedy Theater, 4010 Pennsylvania

Josh Wolf | 7:45 & 9:45 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club, 1867 Village West Pkwy., KCK

Music Is My First Love: Lupe M. Gonzalez Dance Orchestra | Kansas City Museum, 3218

MUSiC

Real Pirates | Union Station, 30 W. Pershing Rd.

Band 13, Baron von Swagger, red velvet Crush | 9 p.m. The Brick, 1727 McGee

Gladstone Blvd., kansascitymuseum.org

25th Anniversary and 2013 Holiday Season kickoff | Noon -5 p.m., Saturday, Strawberry

Hill Ethnic Museum and Cultural Center, 720 N. Fourth St., KCK, strawberryhillmuseum.org

Wade Bowen, travis Marvin | 7 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence

lee Brice, Cassadee pope, American young | 8 p.m. The Midland, 1228 Main

continued on page 28

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n o v e m b e r 2 1 - 2 7, 2 0 1 3

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27


continued from page 27 Deadman Flats, Brody Buster Band | 8 p.m. The

Sunday | 11.24 |

Salvador dali

Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence

PERFoRMING ARTS

Dolewite | 10 p.m. The Brooksider, 6330 Brookside Plz.

Kansas City Symphony: French and Austrian Masters | 2 p.m. Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts, 1601 Broadway, kcsymphony.org

The Conquerors, ThinkNoThink | Replay Lounge,

946 Massachusetts, Lawrence

SPoRTS

Elaine McMilian & Jason Beers, Mark Smeltzer & Kris Bruders, Mikal Shapiro & Chad Brothers | 7 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

Crown Center Ice Terrace | 10 a.m.-9 p.m., $6 ($3 for

skate rental), 2450 Grand

Shay Estes & Friends | 8 p.m. Take Five Coffee + Bar, 5336 W. 151st St., Leawood

Gobbler Grind Marathon, Half Marathon & 5k | 8 a.m. Corporate Woods Office Park, 8717 W. 110th St., Overland Park

Alejandro Fernandez | 8 p.m., $62-$152. Sprint Center, 1407 Grand

The Ice at Park Place | 12-8 p.m., $7 ($3 skate rental), 117th and Nall, Leawood

Eboni Fondren | 5 p.m. Green Lady Lounge, 1809

Grand

Kansas City Chiefs vs. San Diego Chargers |

Noon, Arrowhead Stadium

A.J. Gaither, Twenty Thousand Strongmen | Westport Saloon, 4112 Pennsylvania

Darcus Gates | 8:30 p.m. The Blue Room, 1616 E. 18th St. The Grisly Hand, Metatone, DJ Tanner | 10 p.m.

RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

Katy Guillen & the Girls | 5:30 p.m. Quasimodo, 12056

W. 135th St., Overland Park

Scott Hrabko CD-release show | 9 p.m. Coda, 1744

Broadway

Jah Lion with DJ Stigga | Jazzhaus, 926-1/2 Mas-

sachusetts, Lawrence

Lonesome Hank | 7 p.m. Jazz, 1823 W. 39th St.

Salvador Dali: The Argillet Collection | Meet Madame Christine Argillet, 6-8 p.m. Saturday, 2-4 p.m. Sunday, Leedy-Voulkos Art Center, 2012 Baltimore, RSVP required, leedy-voulkos.com

Genessee

SHoPPING

Red Kate, New Lost Souls | Black & Gold Tavern, 3740 Broadway

Shelly Torres-West | 7 p.m. Spirit of Hope MCC,

Holiday open House | 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Browne’s Irish

NIGHTLIFE

Lawrence Craft Collective Inaugural Show |

3801 Wyandotte

ShowYouSuck, Yawn Johnson | Midnight, Czar, 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300

Sidewise, Kingshifter, 10001, What I’ve Become | 7:30 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway Southside Souls, Diles Mavis | Danny’s Bar and Grill, 13350 College Blvd., Lenexa

Guy Morgan, the Rackatees, the Haddonfields, the Timmys | 8:30 p.m. Davey’s Uptown, 3402 Main

Spirit Animal, Sage & Sour, Nikki & the Rooftop Punch | 9:30 p.m. Czar, 1531 Grand

The Lonnie Ray Band | 9 p.m. Quasimodo, 12056 W.

Stolen Winnebagos | The BrewTop Pub and Patio,

135th St., Overland Park

Monster Trucks, Pro Arena Tuff Trucks & Megasaurus | 1 p.m. Kemper Arena, 1800

8614 N. Boardwalk Ave.

Gossip at Reserve Bar | 8 p.m. Ambassador Hotel, 1111 Grand

Market, 3300 Pennsylvania

11 a.m.-5 p.m. Liberty Hall, 644 Massachusetts, Lawrence MIND & BoDY

Wendy Ho | 10 p.m. Missie B’s, 805 W. 39th St. Red Head Revue burlesque showcase | 10 p.m.

The Uptown Arts Bar, 3611 Broadway

KC Metaphysical Fair | 11 a.m.-6 p.m., $7. Holiday Inn Overland Park-West, 8787 Reeder Rd. CoMEDY

Taproom DJ Throwdown | 10 p.m. The Eighth Street

Taproom, 801 New Hampshire, Lawrence

Red Grant | 7 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater, 7260 N.W. 87th St.

TRAMPLED UNDER FOOT November 27th

EXCLUSIVE CONCERT SERIES PRESENTED BY

28

the pitch

n o v e m b e r 2 1 - 2 7, 2 0 1 3

pitch.com

If you're not able to join us for our "Always Choose Adventure" concert series, the Pitch would like to remind you that you can always enjoy or purchase Captain Morgan Original Spiced Rum at any of your favorite stores or local watering holes, including The Landing Bar and Grill, The Cashew, Lukas Liquors and Gomer's.


Music

Lawrence Battle of the Bands with Secret 77, Livid,

sharon Andrews and Ray Keller | 7 p.m. The Uptown

Arts Bar, 3611 Broadway

Karaoke with Paul Nelson | MiniBar, 3810

Rimjob, Mobius Strip, Streetlevel Uprising, Absolute Darkness, Where the Wild Things Are, Riala, Of Greater Tides, the Soiled Doves, Haunt Ananta | 4 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Big freedia, Brent Tactic, Lc, Rooms Without Windows | 8 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

Broadway

Gusto Lounge, 504 Westport Rd.

Mark Lowrey jazz jam | 6 p.m. The Majestic, 931

eddie spaghetti, Dead Ven, Blue Boot heelers, Death Valley Wolf Riders | 9 p.m. Czar, 1531 Grand

Broadway

The Rackatees, city Mouse | Black & Gold Tavern,

Negative Approach, the casualties, American Dischord | 8 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway New Riders of the Purple sage | 8 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester

service industry Gospel Revival | Westport Saloon,

4112 Pennsylvania

sonic spectrum Tribute: The Who | 8 p.m. Record-

Bar, 1020 Westport Rd.

3740 Broadway

The hearers, This is My condition | The Brick,

NiGhTLife

Beautiful Bodies, Royal Teeth, Making Movies and Rev Gusto | 6:30 p.m. The Midland, 1228 Main

Trivia Bang Bang | 7:30 p.m. Helen’s Just Another Dive,

Norma Jean, Vanna, Ken Mode, exotic Animal Petting Zoo | 6:30 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737 New

2002 Armour Rd., North Kansas City

Wednesday | 11.27 |

organ Jazz Trio with Ken Lovern | 9 p.m. Green

sPoRTs

The ice at Park Place | 11 a.m.-10 p.m., $7 ($3 skate

Brad Williams | 7 p.m. The Blue Room, 1616 E.

Missouri Mavericks vs. Quad city Mallards |

Tuesday | 11.26 |

rental), 117th St. and Nall, Leawood

7:05 p.m. Independence Events Center, 19100 E. Valley View Pkwy., Independence

Monday | 11.25 | PeRfoRMiNG ARTs

college Basketball hall of fame classic | 6:30 &

9 p.m. Sprint Center, 1407 Grand

The ice at Park Place | 11 a.m.-10 p.m., $7 ($3 skate rental), 117th St. and Nall, Leawood

3611 Broadway

NiGhTLife

Black Wednesday Party | 7 p.m. Howl at the

seAsoNAL eVeNTs

sonic Temple | Foundation, 1221 Union

Third eye Blind | 7 p.m. Uptown Theater, 3700

Broadway

Victor and Penny | 7-9 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar,

sPoRTs

NiGhTLife

Hampshire, Lawrence

Lady Lounge, 1809 Grand

Waldo Jazz collective | 7-10 p.m. The Piano Room,

18th St.

homegrown for the holidays with the Mowgli’s,

DJ hoodNasty, Brent Tactic & DJ B-stee | 10 p.m.

Rusko | 8 p.m. The Midland, 1228 Main

8410 Wornall

1727 McGee

christmas in the Park | 5:30-10 p.m. Longview Lake Campground, 10711 W. Scherer, Lee’s Summit

christmas in the sky | 5 p.m. Longview Lake, 11100 View High Dr., Lee’s Summit

Moon, 1334 Grand

Body2Body with DJ sheppa, Andrew Northern | 8 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway DJ Madeline’s Twist & shout | 10 p.m. MiniBar,

3810 Broadway

coMeDy

Musical Monday | 7 p.m. Musical Theater Heritage, Off Center Theatre, 2450 Grand

sPoRTs

Music

Billy Beale’s blues jam | 10 p.m. Westport Saloon,

4112 Pennsylvania

Brad ellis | 8 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club, 1867 Village

West Pkwy., KCK

college Basketball hall of fame classic | 6:30 &

Poetic underground open mic | 9 p.m. The Uptown

The Besnard Lakes, the Philistines, Pioneer | 8 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

The ice at Park Place | 11 a.m.-10 p.m., $7 ($3 skate rental), 117th St. and Nall, Leawood

stan Kessler’s horacescope | 9 p.m. Green Lady

Music

Ray Vietti of the harmed Brothers, Joey henry’s Dirty sunshine club, here’s to the Life | 10 p.m.

Admiral of Red, Attacca | 10 p.m. RecordBar, 1020

Westport Rd.

Lounge, 1809 Grand

RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

8:30 p.m. Davey’s Uptown, 3402 Main

Arts Bar, 3611 Broadway

Music 9 p.m. Sprint Center, 1407 Grand

irie in Kc with DJ Rizzo and ellen Degenerate |

Acoustic jam session with Tyler Gregory |

Thanksgiving Teen Night | 8 p.m. Crazy Horse, 126

Jazzhaus, 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence

S. Claiborne, Olathe

steve Andrews Band | 7 p.m. Trouser Mouse, 410 S.

Trivia | 8 p.m. Westport Flea Market, 817 Westport Rd.

ha ha Tonka, Antennas up | 10:30 p.m. RecordBar,

E-mail submissions to calendar@pitch.com or enter submissions at pitch.com, where you can search our complete listings guide.

Hwy. 7, Blue Springs

1020 Westport Rd.

ENTER TO WIN

Tickets to this exclusive concert series

www.AlwaysChooseAdventure.com

EXCLUSIVE CONCERT SERIES PRESENTED BY

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n o v e m b e r 2 1 - 2 7, 2 0 1 3

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HOUSEWIVES Dating Easy made

Dear Dan: I’m a heterosexual guy in my early

20s. I’ve been dating my girlfriend for about six months, and we’ve been fighting because I have a high sex drive in comparison to hers. I want to be intimate on a weekly basis (at least!), and she’s a once-every-three-weeks-or-so person. I’m trying not to put pressure on her. She’s a virgin (no penetration), and the thought of the pain of that first time scares her a bit. That said, physical intimacy with her is important to me and a key part of what I believe is a healthy relationship. But I’m not sure how to bridge this gap.

about two months. We’re extremely turned on by the idea, but I have reservations. Unlike married couples who have years to lay an emotional foundation, my boyfriend and I have less to fall back on. I’m excited by the idea of this but scared I’ll end up feeling used. I’m also afraid he won’t be able to handle the reality of the humiliation. It turns him on to talk about it, but he has never done this. What happens if we’re emotionally wrecked afterward? I’m afraid we’re playing with fire. I love him and don’t want to lose him, but this is something that excites both of us.

Love Is Building Intimacy During Outset

Young and Restless Duo

Dear LIBIDO: I get e-mails daily from miserable people on both sides of this divide, from people with high libidos who married lows and from people with low libidos who married highs. You’re young and straight, and the culture tells the young and the straight that they must be monogamous (because sex is so important) and that they shouldn’t take sexual compatibility into consideration when picking a partner (because sex is so unimportant). Other shit matters, too, of course — emotional compatibility, similar life goals, being on the same page about kids, etc. But basic sexual compatibility matters, too, and its absence will eventually undermine everything else. You’ve been dating this girl long enough to know you’re not sexually compatible — and that’s reason enough to end this relationship.

Dear YARD: Cuckolding realities are a lot more

Dear Dan: Last month at a house party, my boyfriend accidentally burned my chin, neck and cleavage during a clumsily executed volcano shot. I was on fire for a few seconds. I’m healing nicely, but our sex life has become more complicated. Before the accident, we were having sex only every week or so. But now he stares sadly at my neck wound (which still has a red line going down it) every time he looks at me. It’s hard to feel sexy when you’re looked at with pity, regret and concern, and the stress of being sexually frustrated is fueling other stresses.

Kansas City

(816) 326.9936 (913) 904.9977

Burned Dear B: Your boyfriend can’t stare at a neck wound he can’t see. Until you’ve fully recovered, turn off the lights or blindfold him or lace him into a leather hood — or all three — and have sex in the dark. And no more flaming/ stunt drinks!

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n o v e m b e r 2 1 - 2 7, 2 0 1 3

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3111

Dear Dan: My boyfriend and I are in our 20s. We’ve been dating for a little over 10 months. We have a strong emotional bond and are always communicative and honest on everything. We have an amazing and adventurous sex life, and we’ve been fantasizing about cuckolding for

challenging than cuckolding fantasies, emotionally and logistically, so you’re right to be nervous. But relationship longevity doesn’t guarantee cuckolding success. If you take it slow — limit cuckolding play to dirty talk for 10 months at least — you’ll have more of that experience/trust/security stuff to fall back on if and when you find the right bull/stud/lover.

Dear Dan: I’m a 24-year-old lesbian, and I’ve

been with my girlfriend for almost three years. We’ve both been GGG about things, and I’m generally happy with our sex life. But she’s bi and has always wanted to have a threesome with a guy and another girl. I’m all for that in theory, but I have a hard time emotionally. I have anxiety. I’m in therapy and on medication, and still it’s difficult for me to wrap my head around sex with new people. I would spend the entire time silently freaking out. I’m not sure how I feel about her getting fucked by someone else, even if she’s fucking me at the same time. I really want to do this for her, but I don’t want it to go poorly because of my issues. Do you have any advice for how to get game not just in letter but in spirit?

Having Anxiety Raises Difficulties Dear HARD: I’m going to give you the same an-

swer I gave YARD: Talk about it, fantasize about it, be open to it, but take it glacially. Guys who are interested in sexing two women aren’t that difficult to find, so trust that the right guy — who makes you comfortable, who’s nonthreatening — will come into your lives at some point. And she shouldn’t have intercourse with that special someone else the first time you get together. Make out, roll around, engage in a little mutual masturbation. If that doesn’t make you anxious or freak you out, make a plan to get together again. The Savage Lovecast is at savagelovecast.com.

Have a question for Dan Savage? E-mail him at mail@savagelove.net


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The Pitch: November 21, 2013