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No v e mb e r 7–13 , 2 013 | f r e e | v ol . 3 3 No. 19 | p i t c h.c om

Nov ember 7–13, 2013 | vol . 33 No. 19 E d i t o r i a l

F r o m t h e Ac A d e m y AwA r d w i n n i n g d i r e c to r o F ®

The LasT King Of scOTLand

“TENDER, HUMANE, AND SEARING.

It STANDS AS SOMETHING ALL TOO RARE: A MOVIE ABOUT YOUNG PEOPLE THAT YOUNG PEOPLE MAY LOVE BUT NOT ONE THAT LIES TO THEM, AND NOT ONE BUILT FOR THEM ALONE.”

Editor Scott Wilson Managing Editor Justin Kendall Music Editor Natalie Gallagher Staff Writers Charles Ferruzza, David Hudnall, Steve Vockrodt Editorial Operations Manager Deborah Hirsch Events Editor Berry Anderson Proofreader Brent Shepherd Contributing Writers Tracy Abeln, Jonathan Bender, Jen Chen, Liz Cook, Adrianne DeWeese, April Fleming, Larry Kopitnik, Angela Lutz, Dan Lybarger, Nancy Hull Rigdon, Dan Savage

a d v E r t i s i n g

BRAcING cOMING-OF-AGE TALE. SAOIRSE RONAN SHINES.”

SaoirSe ronan

-Karen Durbin, Elle

Streetcar Authority: a love story. b y s t e v e vo c k r o d t

5

a r t

P r o d u c t i o n

“AN ATMOSPHERIc,

Marketing firm meets

Art Director Ashford Stamper Contributing Photographers Angela C. Bond, Barrett Emke, Chris Mullins, Lauren Phillips, Sabrina Staires, Brooke Vandever Intern Christina Larkins

Production Manager Christina Riddle Multimedia Designer Vu Radley

-Alan Scherstuhl, Village Voice

i Ns i de tr ack?

Sales Manager Erin Carey Senior Classified Multimedia Specialist Steven Suarez Multimedia Specialists Collin Click, Sharon Donat, Katee Mejia, Page Olson Director of Marketing & Operations Jason Dockery Digital Marketing Manager Keli Sweetland

bleedi Ng k aNsas Gov. Sam Brownback and a tea-party-soaked Legislature have made Kansas a lab experiment. They’re killing the patient. b y dav i d h u d n a l l

c i r c u l a t i o n

Circulation Director Mike Ryan

7

B u s i n E s s

Accounts Receivable Jodi Waldsmith Publisher Joel Hornbostel

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oN t he c ove r

Lee Langston musters an army of local talent. b y n ata l i e g a l l ag h e r

20 3 5 7 11 13 15 17 18 20 26 30

Questionnaire news feature agenda art stage café fat city music d a i ly l i s t i n g s savage love

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HAMBURGER MARY’S is moving to the Uptown Theater. ÇA VA champagne bar: cold bubbly and potato chips. GREEN LADY LOUNGE has a traffic accident.

m o n t h x x–x x , 2 0 0 x

THE PITCH

2

Questionnaire partner at Single Wing Creative

S a b r i n a S ta i r e S

Emily ElmorE

Creative director, managing

Hometown: Ozark, Missouri Current neighborhood: Beacon Hill What I do (in 140 characters): I help create

brands and market businesses.

What’s your addiction? Diet Coke What’s your game? Pro Football 1861

“I’ve been known to binge-watch …” Adven-

ture Time.

“I can’t stop listening to …” Resurrection by

Common.

“I just read …” Contagious by Jonah Berger. The best advice I ever got: Tell people what you really want.

What’s your drink? Greyhound

Worst advice: Here. Try this.

Where’s dinner? Voltaire

My sidekick: Rachel Scott. The other side of

What’s on your KC postcard? The Royals, the

Single Wing.

Crossroads and the future streetcar

My dating triumph/tragedy: Meh.

Finish this sentence: “Kansas City got it right when …” It chose to move toward an open-

My brush with fame: Talking to you.

source city.

My 140-character soapbox: Double meh.

“Kansas City screwed up when …” It tore down

What was the last thing you had to apologize for? I accidentally ate the last of Rachel’s

historic buildings.

“Kansas City needs …” More creatives and tech

almonds.

junkies.

Who’s sorry now? The almonds. RIP.

“In five years, I’ll be …” Alive.

My recent triumph: Helping to rebrand KCMO.

“I always laugh at …” Selleck Waterfall Sand-

Single Wing Creative designed Kansas City, Missouri’s new logo.

wich images.

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p The entrepreneurial spirit is a powerful force to engage.

Global Entrepreneurship Week November 13-24 Entrepreneurs like Chris Zink are driven by a fire that comes from within. But Chris will be the first to tell you it was programs like Kauffman’s 1 Million Cups that really helped his entrepreneurial idea take off.

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CHRIS ZINK

Founder and CEO, Autoswaprz.com 1 Million Cups Presenter BetaBlox Entrepreneur

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News

InsIde Track?

By

S t e v e v ock rod t

Marketing f irm meets Streetcar Authority: a love story.

I

t’s just before noon on Halloween, and Tom Trabon wants to hurry the Kansas City Streetcar Authority along. The group overseeing the development of Kansas City’s 2-mile streetcar line is about halfway through its agenda, 50 minutes after the meetMore ing started. Trabon wants to get it wrapped up in the next 10 minutes so t a ine Onl .com that the media and other pitch members of the public can be booted from this conference room at the Port Authority’s River Market offices. The closed-session part of the meeting promises to be lengthier and more detailed. “Then they shouldn’t have spent 30 minutes on conflicts of interest,” Kansas City Star City Hall reporter Lynn Horsley says to no one in particular, with a laugh. There’s a good reason that the Streetcar Authority has spent the opening half-hour of this October 31 meeting reviewing its conflict-of-interest policy, though no one names it plainly. One of the authority’s members recently took a job with a marketing company — a firm that plans to bid on branding opportunities for the tax-funded, $100 million–plus transit project. Matt Staub has been an outspoken advocate for the streetcar system, enough so that he landed a spot on the Streetcar Authority when it was formed, more than a year ago. At that time, he worked for H&R Block as a social-media manager. But he recently took a job as a partner with Graphicmachine, an agency in the River Market. That job switch by itself isn’t the sort of thing that should trigger conspiracy theories from rational people. But a statement put out by the marketing firm following Staub’s move there seemed to wink at the competition. An October 9 blog item on Graphicmachine’s website talks up the company’s advocacy for the streetcar project, touts Staub’s move to the Graphicmachine, then announces the company’s ambition to cash the Streetcar Authority’s marketing checks. “Does Graphicmachine plan to bid on these opportunities? Absolutely, as we know others that have been involved will as well,” writes Patience Jones, one of the agency’s partners. It’s a disclosure odd enough to leave streetcar critics wondering if Graphicmachine might have an inside track on bids for a forthcoming contract for streetcar marketing services. Graphicmachine hasn’t done any paid services for the streetcar so far.

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5399 Martway Mission, KS • 913.432.7000 Pairs well with Hitching a ride The Streetcar Authority has a marketing committee, charged with looking over bids from agencies and making a recommendation to the full board. When Staub took the position at Graphicmachine, he became the third marketing-committee member from that agency. Patience Jones and Brian Jones have served on the committee; Brian Jones has since stepped down from it. The Streetcar Authority has been looking in earnest for marketing agencies, sending out a solicitation for potential vendors. Graphicmachine was one of a dozen agencies that initially responded but, following questions about its conspicuous insider presence, it has withdrawn its application to handle marketing for the streetcar project. The Streetcar Authority’s existing conflictof-interest policy would already have precluded Staub from discussing or voting on a marketing contract if Graphicmachine had planned to bid on the project. Teri Rogers, owner of the Crossroads District marketing agency Take 2 Studios and chairwoman of the streetcar marketing committee, tells The Pitch that Graphicmachine probably wouldn’t have been asked to bid on the streetcar regardless. “It is doubtful they would have been asked to respond to the [request for proposals] anyway, due to their lack of branding experience, as it compared to the other respondents,” Rogers tells The Pitch via e-mail. Graphicmachine’s love for the Streetcar Authority turns out to be a bit on the unrequited side.

C ATC H I N G U P

Friends gather and the room fills with laughter. Nothing fits these moments better than a bottle of Chambourcin. After all, inside each bottle is a story, written by Missouri winemakers for anyone with a little Missouri in their hearts. Learn more about Chambourcin and other varietals at missouriwine.org.

E-mail steve.vockrodt@pitch.com

pitch.com n o v e m b e r 7 - 1 3 , 2 0 1 3 Client: Missouri Wines / State of Missouri Publication: The Pitch

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.com

by David Hudnall  Illustration by Christina Larkins

Sam Brownback and a tea-party-soaked Legislature have made Kansas a lab experiment. They’re killing the patient.

SuicideS are up in KanSaS — way up.

An October report from the Kansas Department of Health and Environment revealed that 505 Kansans killed themselves in 2012, a startling 31.5 percent jump from the 384 suicides committed in 2011. That sobering increase can be attributed, in part, to ripple effects from the recession. Suicide numbers tend to climb in economically challenging times. But the spike also correlates to state policy. From 2009 to 2012, Kansas cut 12.4 percent from its mental-health budget — the ninthlargest decrease in the nation over that period. In Sedgwick County, where 88 people took their lives in 2012, the community mentalhealth center has lost more than half its state funding since 2009. The KDHE’s report shines a morbid light on one of the consequences of a businessobsessed state ignoring the needs of its citizens: More people die.

Poke around Kansas and you’ll see variations on this theme. Government agencies and institutions that are already squeezed end up starved by the state and further stretched, and citizens struggle to receive basic services. In Kansas, this isn’t merely the product of a lousy national economy. It’s the result of Gov. Sam Brownback and a willing state Legislature testing the crackpot tea-party idea that gutting government operations, while eliminating business and income taxes, makes Kansas a desirable place to live and work. But life under Brownback is a bewildering existence, and some days that seems almost by political design. Every week, there’s news of some new budgetary atrocity or comically backward piece of legislation being floated. Are guns really allowed in courthouses now? Are public schools actually so underfunded that the revenue formula is unconstitutional? What was that thing about outlawing all sustainable practices? Was that an Onion article?

How are you even supposed to keep up with all this nonsense, let alone keep your head above the mudslide? Before the clowns in the Kansas Legislature suit up for another season of high jinks in January, here’s The Pitch’s guide to all the depressing events occurring in the state. Remember: Brownback is up for re-election next year, and his approval rating is hovering around 35 percent. No flower blooms forever, not even in the Sunflower State.

——— K- 1 2 E D U C AT I O N ———

H

ere is all you really need to know about Brownback’s tax policies: In 2012, he signed a five-year, $3.7 billion tax cut, with no plan to restore the state spending on education that had been cut by roughly $511 million from 2009 through 2012. Kansas school districts sued the state over the budget, and a three-judge District Court panel unanimously ruled this past January

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that Kansas’ spending on education was unconstitutionally low and must be increased by a minimum of about $400 million to meet standards. The court also noted that it “seems completely illogical that the state can argue that a reduction in education funding was necessitated by the downturn in the economy and the state’s diminishing resources and at the same time cut taxes further.” Kansas senators, naturally, have challenged that ruling, proposing a constitutional amendment that would bar state courts from having oversight of such matters. The state also appealed the District Court’s decision and took the case to the Kansas Supreme Court last month. “The state is advancing technical arguments like judiciability and standing issue to avoid grappling with the simple fact that the schools are underfunded,” says Alan Rupe, who represented the school districts in the Supreme Court hearing. “In doing so, they’re clearly admitting that if continued on page 8 n ov e m b e r 7- 1 3, 20 1 3

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Bleeding Kansas

2012



“Kansas may not prevent federal employees and officials from carrying out their official responsibilities,” Holder wrote to Brownback, declaring the obvious. “And a state certainly may not criminalize the exercise of federal responsibilities.” Brownback countered with a meaningless statement about how “the people of Kansas have expressed their sovereign will,” forgetting to add, “but we still want farm subsidies!”

12,408

continued from page 7 they lose, there’s no evidence to suggest Kansas education funding is adequate for our kids. The trial court panel — which, by the way, was assembled by the Kansas Legislature — listened to weeks of testimony and reviewed a lot of information and reached the conclusion that Kansas education is underfunded. There’s no way around that, so the state is using these technical arguments as a last attempt to avoid the consequences of their constitutional failure.” You needn’t look too far to see the effects of this reckless policy. The Shawnee Mission School District has eliminated 400 positions over the past three years. Early childhood education, new library books, all-day kindergarten and social workers for homeless students are now out of reach. A Kansas Supreme Court decision on the case is expected in January. Some state lawmakers, meanwhile, have pledged to ignore the court if it doesn’t find in the state’s favor. Sane lawmakers have expressed concern about the outcome. “I don’t believe the state under the current tax law can sustain over the next five years,” says Rep. Melissa Rooker, a Republican House member from Fairway who sits on the House Education Committee. She tells The Pitch: “If you add the ramifications of losing the court case, I don’t think it’s a sustainable plan. … I don’t have enough experience to know how we navigate the crisis, but I think such a crisis is on the horizon.”

——— G U N S ———

N

ewtown, Aurora, the Navy Yard, LAX: It has been a horrifying couple of years for gun violence in America. But at least public outrage over these and other devastating events has opened up a discussion about U.S. gun laws. That discussion in Kansas? Make the gun laws way looser! Sell more guns and let people take them to more places! That was the thinking behind House Bill 2052, which is now the law of the land in Kansas. Citizens with concealedcarry permits can now

2013



25,319

Since 2006, when concealed-carry law passed 

80,362

——— E N E R G Y ———

P

concealed-carry licenses issued in Kansas take their guns into any public building — including schools, libraries and government offices — not protected by metal detectors or security guards. Employees in these public buildings are also permitted to take their guns to work. Say your child attends one of Kansas’ many underfunded public schools. Unless that school finds a stack of cash to pay for new metal detectors or the salaries of armed guards, any parent, guardian or administrator at the school with a concealed-carry license — more than 25,000 such licenses have been issued since the beginning of 2013 alone — is free to wander the halls with a gun in his or her jacket. The onus is now on all these public entities — government hospitals, the University of Kansas, you name it — to figure out how to pay for and comply with the “adequate security measures” dictated by the bill. Most have requested temporary exemptions (from six months to four years) in order to evaluate their buildings and prepare for this costly new law. But short of some kind of reversal, everybody will have to be in compliance by 2017. This from the party that hates government regulation. There are some Easter eggs hidden inside H.B. 2052. The personal information of those

applying for concealed-carry licenses is now confidential and exempt from Freedom of Information Act requests. Also, if licensed gun owners bring their guns into the few places left in Kansas where they’re still prohibited, guess what? They can’t be criminally prosecuted. A different bill, H.B. 2162, prohibits the use of state-appropriated money for “publicity or propaganda purposes relating to gun control.” “The practice of using taxpayer dollars to fund gun control support and lobby against your Second Amendment rights must be stopped,” the NRA writes in a press release about the bill. “The NRA applauds Gov. Brownback for signing this important reform into law.” And in a bit of valedictory grandstanding, Brownback has also signed what has come to be called the Second Amendment Protection Act. This one exempts firearms manufactured in Kansas from federal regulation. So if the feds come into the state and try to enforce federal gun laws, well, then Kansas law enforcement could, in legal theory, arrest the feds. U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder immediately threatened legal action against the state, just as everybody who has ever taken a social studies class knew he would.

People like Hedke don’t care if they look corrupt and idiotic.

robably the most hilarious bill the Kansas House brought to the floor in 2013 was H.B. 2366. It states: “No public funds may be used, either directly or indirectly, to promote, support, mandate, require, order, incentivize, advocate, plan for, participate in or implement sustainable development.” The gang that put forth this bill — the Orwellian-named Committee on Energy and Environment — is chaired by a man named Dennis Hedke. He’s a Republican representative from Wichita. He’s also a geophysicist who does contract work for dozens of — wait for it — oil and gas companies in the region. “I can’t see why,” he told The Topeka Capital-Journal, when asked whether his nonpolitical career presented an obvious conflict of interest with his duties as an elected official. “I didn’t think about that. It never really crossed my mind.” In an interview with Bloomberg, Hedke acknowledged that Kansas has no laws that relate to sustainable development. He considers his bill a preventive measure. He also told the Capital-Journal that he sponsored the bill because of concerns voiced by his constituents about sustainable development. Then he declined to identify any group or individual who had expressed those concerns. What’s remarkable about this is that people like Hedke are so happy being lap dogs for the oil and gas industry that they don’t care if it makes them look corrupt and idiotic. They will continue to sponsor ludicrous legislation and bullshit the press as long as they can snuggle up with that Koch money every night. Meanwhile, Kansas oil fields, which many big energy companies have invested in over the past few years, are not yielding the North

deepest cuts to state funding of K-12 puBlic education since 2008, nationwide

(By percentage)

This past September, the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, a nonprofit research group in Washington, D.C., found that Kansas’ reductions

16.5%

17.2%

20.1%

22.8%

AL

OK

in public spending on education are the fourth-most in the nation, behind only Alabama, Arizona and Oklahoma. KS 8

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AZ

Dakota–level returns that the state had hoped for. Shell announced in September that it would leave Kansas. Tug Hill Operating has also closed up shop for the foreseeable future. And a few weeks ago, about 52 counties in Kansas filed a lawsuit against the state, alleging that they had been stiffed $7.6 million in aid meant to help soften the blow of declining oil and gas production. As Bloomberg notes, if Kansas developed just a tiny fraction of its wind potential — 7,158 megawatts — by 2030, that enterprise would bring some $7.8 billion to the state. Good thing Kansas has men like Hedke to keep that clean cash out.

science The Kansas Bioscience Authority was created by the Kansas Legislature in 2004, with the goal of growing the Kansas bioscience sector into a pillar of the state’s economy by investing in bioenergy, animal health, human health and agriculture. In other words, to jump-start new business in the state.

$

14 million

$

3.2 million

over the last year

——— A B O R T I O N ———

B

rownback has promised to sign any antiabortion bill that lands on his desk. Unfortunately, in 1973, the Supreme Court struck down state abortion bans. This means that states have to get creative in finding ways to make it difficult for women to make decisions about their own bodies. Kansas lawmakers are pretty good at this. The thing to remember about antiabortion laws in Kansas is that they are basically written by an extremely powerful specialinterest group called Kansans for Life. Every year, Kansans for Life devises an agenda for the legislative session, and the lawmakers in its pocket — they are legion — then dutifully push it through. For the vast majority of Republicans in the state, opposing a Kansans for Life–backed bill would be political suicide. The group has chipped away at abortion rights in small but meaningful ways in recent years. In 2011, Brownback inked bills requiring minors to get signed consent from both parents and prohibiting private insurance companies from covering abortions. The so-called “conscience bill,” signed during the 2012 session, allows doctors to refuse to prescribe, and pharmacists to refuse to dispense, birth-control pills and morning-after pills (such as Plan B) or any other care that they “reasonably believe may result in the

45%

Drop in revenues at KBA

State funding for KBA, fiscal year 2012

State funding for KBA, fiscal year 2013

termination of a pregnancy.” So if you live in an isolated part of the state and your doctor is an asshole, you’ve got some phone calls, some research and a long drive ahead of you if you want any control over your reproductive system. In the 2013 session, Kansas lawmakers changed the tax code in 12 areas, increasing the financial burden on abortion seekers and providers. Abortion providers are also prohibited now from volunteering in public schools in the state of Kansas. Under appeal is another law, signed by Brownback, that requires Planned Parenthood to include on its website a warning that a fetus can feel pain by the 20th week of pregnancy (a claim with zero medical evidence to support it) and a note indicating a link between abortions and breast cancer. (“Inconclusive,” is how the American Cancer Society charitably characterizes this second claim.) There are a few clues out there as to what we may expect from Kansans for Life in 2014. Executive Director Mary Kay Culp has suggested that the group will pursue a provision requiring doctors of patients who are con-

“At a time when more Kansans are turning to higher education to improve their lives, these cuts will be devastating.”

sidering abortions to point out the features of the fetus on an ultrasound. Sen. Mary Pilcher-Cook of Shawnee has lately been crusading against in-vitro fertilization. And the “heartbeat bill,” which could ban abortions as early as 18 days after conception, is likely to return to the House floor. There is some good news: Phill Kline (former Kansas attorney general and Johnson County district attorney) is no longer allowed to practice law in Kansas.

——— H I G H E R E D ———

R

ailing against academia is a time-honored tradition among conservative politicians. All those liberal professors, gathering their facts in their libraries, not generating enough quarterly profits, not thinking enough with their guts. But in a culturally spartan place like Kansas, the University of Kansas, Kansas State University and Wichita State University are among the primary reasons that people bother sticking around. And the University of Kansas Medical Center has a growing national profile. These institutions are not just socially valuable, though. They’re also big employers, and their financial viability is very important to the state. You wouldn’t imagine that fiscally minded Republicans would want to mess with such reliable cash cows. Yet Kansas Republicans have put a higher premium on cutting income

taxes, and the money required to do that has to come from somewhere. So earlier this year, Brownback signed a bill cutting 1.5 percent from the state’s general fund for higher education. He also gave a high-five to a bizarre system for making these cuts based on employee salaries, which added to the reductions. As The Kansas City Star put it: “If a school spent more on salaries than previously estimated, the Legislature cut the school’s budget by the amount of the overage. And if a school spent less on salaries, the Legislature cut that school’s budget by the amount of the shortfall. Universities and colleges couldn’t win.” At the University of Kansas Medical Center, that sets up a loss of $8 million over the next two years. “Essentially, this penalizes us for being frugal and planning our finances to anticipate future needs,” Dr. Doug Girod, KU Med executive vice chancellor, wrote in a memo to his staff. Overall, the cuts bleed $36.4 million from higher education over the next two years. “These cuts impact all aspects of public higher education including the 32 public institutions, the Board of Regents office, student financial aid, and adult-education programs,” the Kansas Board of Regents wrote in a statement. “At a time when more Kansans are turning to higher education to improve their lives, these cuts will be devastating.” Brownback has said that when the legislative session reconvenes in January, he will lobby to restore the cuts made to higher education, though he passed on vetoing them in 2012. Playing bad cop to his unlikely good cop are the legislators who make up the House Appropriations and Senate Ways and Means committees. As part of their process of considering a restoration of funding, a gang of those officials recently conducted a “factfinding mission” of six of the state’s universities, a saber-rattling tour designed to remind colleges just where the power in the state lies. “It really looked as if a lot of the questions were written in such a way to give the budget committee justification to cut university budgets more,” Rep. John Wilson, a Kansas Democrat, told the Star. No kidding.

E-mail david.hudnall@pitch.com

Budget cuts By university over the next two years Fort Hays University: Pittsburg State University: Emporia State University: Wichita State University: University of Kansas: University of Kansas Medical Center:

$

1.2 million $

1.4 million $

2.5 million $

3 million $

5.5 million $

8.1 million

Kansas State University:

$

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Week of November 7-13

“Mr. Weekend” Mike Simi’s piece looms over We’ll Make Out Better Than Okay.

Barrett emke

Review on page 13.

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art

By

Main Street, Charlotte Street.

L i z C ook

Barrett emke

B ette r Days

At La Esquina: Wall Street,

I

t has been five years since the start of the financial crisis. Are you doing any better? Not so much, answer the artists in We’ll Make Out Better Than Okay, a debut exhibition from the Charlotte Street Foundation’s new curator-in-residence, Danny Orendorff. Among the 15 or so American artists from whom Orendorff has selected works for this interactive show is Mike Simi, whose enormous kinetic sculpture “Mr. Weekend” might be the most assertive of these offerings. It’s a 15-foot-tall sock puppet, constructed from a decommissioned robotic arm once used in a Detroit auto plant. (The plant is now closed.) A tent-sized athletic sock masks the inner workings, making the defunct industry artifact into a ventriloquist dummy. Its cartoonish, beach-ball eyes seem to follow you around the room, and it speaks in a Droopy monotone, the sound of which provides an absurdist score for the whole exhibit. Daniel Tucker’s “Crisis Image Archives” is less playful. For his introduction to the meltdown’s victims and villains, he has gathered 750 images from the Alternative Press Center to catalog diverse visual responses to the crisis, arrayed along a neat shelf of subject-categorized three-ring binders. The result is a kind of immersive scholarship, and the longer you flip through the slippery pageprotector sheets, the more hope shrinks. The piece takes on the feel of an evidence locker, with angry red line-graph vectors rather than bloodstains building a case for a court date that’s unlikely to come. Orendorff’s aesthetic here is confron-

to inspire citizens to imagine new life for those tational and occasionally anti-formalist — many of the works on display at La Esquina spaces. Armchair artists have come up with a host of ideas for how to complete the phrase, ask to be experienced more than appraised. their wishes ranging from the straightforward There’s little to passively admire in Blake and simple (“a home”) to the fanciful (“full of Fall-Conroy’s “Minimum Wage Machine,” for nymphomaniacs with Ph.Ds”). At La Esquina, example. The machine hides in an unadorned you can grab a sticker of your own to make plywood frame, a utilitarian presentation that keeps the focus on the software and mechan- your wishes known or you can simply admire ics inside. When you crank a wooden handle, photos of Chang’s stickers in the wild. But Chang’s project embodies an insecupennies drop into a tray at a measured pace. rity at the heart of this exhibition. Stickers Do it for 60 minutes, and you’ll walk out with can’t buy an empty building, after all, and the equivalent of Kansas City’s minimum despite earnest intentions, her piece plays into wage: $7.25 an hour. I didn’t make it nearly that long. I cranked the same ironic optimism as the show’s title until tedium set in, then thrust my hand in the — the prayer that wishes might transform a depressed landscape, that crippling debt and tray to claim my reward: six cents. lingering unemployment won’t keep us from Steve Lambert’s cheery capitalist sign, hung directly behind the machine, dispenses inspi- making out better than OK. Few of the artists suggest ration for tired toilers. “Give a practical plan for how we and Give and Give” broadWe’ll Make Out Better might get there. How we casts its aggressive message Than Okay got here, however — that’s in gleaming aluminum and Charlotte Street Foundation a question addressed in a acrylic, each “Give” flashing Through December 20 at Vegas-ready buffet of rage. in sequence like a marquee. La Esquina, 1000 West 25th Street, charlottestreet.org The works on display offer There’s something soothing incisive takedowns of bankabout the shiny plastic and ers, politicians and privacyclean white light. Lambert’s work taps into the sanitizing comforts of con- crushing tech giants. Alex Schaefer’s richly sumer culture with all of the buoyant energy textured paintings show Chase Bank branches on fire, and Stephanie Syjuco’s tongue-inand artificial light of a shopping mall. Other works invite viewers to participate cheek affront to intellectual-property law in their own creations. The most striking of lets gallerygoers tear off a URL to access a these might be Candy Chang’s “I Wish This free e-copy of texts, such as “U.S. IntellecWas,” a series of fill-in-the-blank stickers. Dis- tual Property Law and Policy.” But We’ll Make Out’s diffusion exposes the exhibit to couraged by vacant New Orleans storefronts, the same critique that many levied against Chang left boxes of her stickers around the city

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Syjuco’s “Free Texts” (left) and Schaefer’s “Chase Pasadena,” “Chase Beverly Hills” and “Chase Burbank” Occupy Wall Street — that the anger at hand is too unfocused, too hard to unify into a cogent and change-inducing movement. William Powhida’s “Griftopia” works to combat that criticism, connecting a spider web of political and socioeconomic ills in an intricate identification of public enemies. Watercolor portraits of bigwigs, such as Michele Bachmann, Alan Greenspan and President Obama, pepper the 5-foot-by-10foot paper. Handwritten lines of indicting commentary frame the faces, snaking across the enormous spread and converging with new trains of thought where issues and persons intersect. Powhida’s piece is crucial to the exhibit, providing a synthesis of its disparate maze of causes and concerns. Hours after I left the show, I felt something dig into my hip. I slid a penny out of my pocket. My few seconds of cranking the minimum-wage machine that morning had netted me this virgin coin, gleaming and untarnished, minted after the 2010 design change. The tail side showed a striped Union Shield, with “E Pluribus Unum” splashed much more prominently across the surface. Now the coin seemed like its own ironic commentary. A nation that immortalizes its democratic aspirations on its currency seems more politically divided than ever.

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No DepressioN

Ain’t Misbehavin’ and Three Viewings:

By

a little mourning and a great Harlem night.

De bor a h hir s ch

A

Manon Halliburton

faded yellow light illuminates the keyboards of a piano at center stage as an old, scratchy recording of Fats Waller sounds. So begins Ain’t Misbehavin’: Waller’s voice, or his ghost, materializing before us. And before he and his notes have faded away, musical director Angie Benson has discreetly slipped onstage and onto the bench and, with her back to us, into the persona of a nightclub pianist as she starts to play. It’s a remarkable transition, one that admits us to a different era. Unlike traditional musical theater, Ain’t Misbehavin’ has little dialogue and no story line. The songs and the performances evoke the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s and ’30s — the people, the clubs, the nights, including the rent parties that helped make ends meet: The roof is rockin/The neighbors knockin. It also transmits one huge personality and its legacy. Waller — who died in 1943, at age 39 — was known for his love of life and its pleasures. He made his passion audible in his innovative stride piano: a rhythmic jazz keeps going, slow or fast, never really stopping, the musicians — Benson, percussionist style rooted partly in ragtime but also highly Julian Goff, bassist Brian Wilson — pull us in improvisational. The force of the man and his music comes through in this spirited Spin- and hold us. The show’s tempo fluidly segues in seconds from company numbers to solos ning Tree Theatre show, nimbly directed and and duos and trios and back, altering mood choreographed at Off Broadway Theatre by and focus and energy. One song ends and the Michael Grayman and Andy Parkhurst. next begins, creating continual movement — The original 1978 production (created by no pauses, little time for applause. The show Richard Maltby Jr. and Murray Horwitz) takes its name from the famous Waller song “Ain’t zips through 30-some numbers, each one unlike the next. Misbehavin’” (Ain’t misbehavin’, I’m savin’ my The elegant, sexy Greenberry runs her love for you) and includes others, while also incorporating the lyrics (and some of the mu- smooth voice up and down the scale like fingers on the back of your neck. A captivatsic) of other songwriters. The show won a Tony ing McKenzie is physically Award for Best Musical, the small but a fusion of movefirst musical revue to do so. Ain’t Misbehavin’ ment and ability. A regular And when it was re-created Spinning Tree Theatre presence in KC’s jazz scene, on Broadway 10 years later, Through November 17 Fondren adds depth and it was nominated again. at Off Broadway Theatre, glamour with her rich voice It’s easy to see why. The 3051 Central, 816-569-5277, and amusing sass. But the show is a virtual party, spinningtreetheatre.com women don’t overshadow with blocking that eats up the men. King’s vocal chops the stage and here makes Three Viewings add to a natural and physifull use of the Off Broadway Kansas City Actors Theatre cally expressive stage presspace, diverting our attenThrough November 10 ence. And as Waller himself, tion from singers to band to at Muehlebach Funeral Home, Lackey lends his own consingers to set. This is live eye 6800 Troost, 816-235-6222, kcactors.org siderable charm and talent. candy, allowing us to feast In “The Viper’s Drag,” on the action, the color and performed with the comthe sound. Five distinctly talented and magnetic pany, King dreams of a 5-foot reefer, and we imagine it, too. Then, he and Fondren singers — Eboni Fondren, Jennie Greenberry, are all attitude in “That Ain’t Right.” Lackey Matthew King, Ron Lackey and Linnaia McKenzie — make up an ensemble even greater adds humor with “Your Feet’s Too Big” and style with Greenberry in “Lounging at the than its parts. They exhibit both individual Waldorf” (which will make you want to wear ability and strength as a group, particularly in the striking harmonies of “Black and Blue.” a hat). Whether about love (“Honeysuckle The band stands out equally. As the music Rose,” “Keepin’ Out of Mischief Now”), war

From left: Greenberry, Fondren, McKenzie, King and Lackey are a “Handful of Keys.” (“When the Nylons Bloom Again,” “Cash for Your Trash”), sex (“Find Out What They Like”), good times (“The Joint Is Jumpin’”) or painful times (“Mean to Me’), these singers inhabit each song and own the material. The set, designed by Michael Benson (with assistance from his students at the University of Central Missouri), subtly evokes a club, with a twin set of stairs ascending to a platform and hugging the band between them. Paul Tilson’s effective lighting design creates environment and alters mood. And the costumes, designed by Shannon Smith-Regnier, are period-appropriate and often stunning. By the second act, I was in one of those Harlem nightclubs, and by the end of the show I was ready to dance onto the stage myself. It’s a sin to tell a lie, we hear, and I truly wanted the party to go on and on. Too bad Off Broadway’s show doesn’t run for weeks or months as it would in New York. But we still have a couple of weeks for the sort of show that could draw us in, again and again.

Three Viewings

I

wasn’t sure I was in the right place. Blackclad attendants stood at the Muehlebach Funeral Home’s entryway, through which I saw a roomful of people. Was this a service after all, rather than the scheduled performance of Three Viewings? The man and the woman handing out programs and taking tickets really were a

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former funeral director and his wife (according to a woman I sat next to), which lent an authentic uneasiness to the moments before the performance. No acting needed yet to produce a somewhat surreal mood. That’s part of what staging a play in such an atypical venue can do. Does Three Viewings benefit from this literal setting? The play, directed here by Melinda McCrary for Kansas City Actors Theatre, is composed of three scenes, or vignettes, each lasting about a half-hour and starring one actor. The monologues are absorbing and cleverly constructed, yet I was more disconcerted than transported by my surroundings. In the first scene, “Tell-Tale,” featuring David Fritts as black-suited funeral director Emil, the place seemed fairly natural, as the character maneuvered lighting effects and flower arrangements as his job would require in the course of a day at a funeral parlor. His story is more about love than loss, delineating the thin separation between them. Fritts’ appearance was distractingly Nixonian, though — which added to Emil’s creep factor while giving power to his longing for something more. There’s much humor in this play about death because it’s really about life, about the survivors of the deceased. Playwright Jeffrey Hatcher is also a screenwriter, and this is reflected in crisp composition and moments that feel neatly packaged — often too much so. But there’s earned poignancy in the segment “The Thief of Tears,” starring the charismatic Katie Gilchrist as Mac. Her complicated character, not always sympathetic, provides the one surprise of the evening, touching us with Mac’s vivacity, her grief — and her guilt. Jeanne Averill is engaging in an adept characterization of Virginia Carpolotti, a woman burying her longtime husband while discovering some of his secrets. In “Thirteen Things About Ed Carpolotti,��� she perches on a couch at the front of the room, her portrayal no less riveting for its lack of movement. Each of these actors gives a skilled performance, holding us in a singular domination of the room. But in the end, they are working in just a room. There’s no forgetting that actors and audience alike are in a funeral home, and the setting and the script feel equally contrived. At the conclusion of the final scene, after the actors took their bows, that woman sitting next to me said to her friends: “That was cute.” After a pause, she turned again to her friends. “And touching,” she said. Yes, in that order.

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Moti Mahal isn’t Bollywoodslick, but it isn’t bad.

By

Ch a r l e s F er ru z z a

Moti Mahal • 8140 Northwest Prairie View Road, 816-746-8000 • Hours: Lunch buffet 11 a�m�–2:30 p�m� daily, dinner 5–9:30 p�m� daily • Price: $–$$

T

A Drink?

AngelA C. Bond

here are moments when I really want my life to be a Bollywood movie. I want singing and dancing and spectacular costumes and Sushant Singh Rajput and Parineeti Chopra as my co-stars. I’m not exactly sure what I would be doing in this movie, but I know I’d get to wear sandals and an embroidered sherwani and sip a cold mango lassi and chew on a tandoori-baked drumstick. If I were willing to live with just the cold drink and the vivid red chicken leg, I could stay in Kansas City, where plenty of Indian restaurants provide the essence of Mumbai or Bangalore without need of a passport. Some of these places are decorated with enough flourish to transport me for an hour, their murals or tapestries or gilded idols or elaborate wood carvings ready to be part of a big production number. And then there’s Moti Mahal. The twomonth-old Indian restaurant is no one’s idea of Bollywood. It’s a lot closer to the In-A-Tub joint on the same stretch of Prairie View Road tensity were as mild as Gerber’s baby food; the than it is to Jaipur, with a dreary interior and “hot” versions didn’t have me reaching for my an exterior dominated by the neighboring water glass, either. Dirk’s Sports Bar. No charm, in other words. The traditional Tamil mulligatawny soup But some of the food is really good. The place makes some pretty terrific pako- supposedly translates as “pepper water” and is typically well-seasoned. Here, it’s a soothras, for starters, and the Moti Mahal platter — all the deep-fried hits from the starter menu — is ing, bland lentil concoction. And the chicken soup (“boneless chunks of white meat floata satisfying bargain for diners who want the ing in a tasty broth,” according to the menu) Indian equivalent of a Midwest saloon’s array tastes vaguely rehydrated, with that chicken of deep-fried pepper poppers, onion rings and nearly microscopic. waffle fries. And why shouldn’t the American Things get a good deal chunkier when you passion for fried delicacies find a tasty companorder from the entrée selection. Moti Mahal’s ion in the ancient culture of the Indian subconcooks are generous with the lamb, chicken tinent? Call it an onion ring or an onion bhaji, and goat tucked into the it’s the same thing — though thick, creamy sauces in the Moti Mahal’s tangy, sticky Moti Mahal korma, masala and vindaloo tamarind chutney makes a Moti Mahal Platter ��������$9�95 repertoire. And the globs of much better dipping sauce. Vegetable kofta�������������$13�95 “vegetable patties” — kofta Moti Mahal replaced a Lunch buffet �������������������$9�95 indicates a meatball, but the different Indian restaurant, Lamb vindaloo ���������������$14�95 Moti Mahal biriyani ������$15�95 meatless version has the Saffron, in this location (“Safconsistency of a marshmalfron could be a winner if the low — hidden under a supple, spice is right,” November 6, 2012), and it was equally unattractive. But creamy tomato-based sauce are handball-size. There’s a memorable chicken goa curry, if the dishes listed on the Moti Mahal menu come on stronger now, it should be noted that blanketed in a fine tomato-and-coconut this restaurant’s owner, Jorabar “Jay” Shokar, cream sauce, and I liked the saffron-scented biriyani dishes I tried, including the restauis also a partner in the Westport location of rant’s signature version of the dish: a mix of Korma Sutra. The food at both locations of Korma Sutra rice, lamb, chicken, shrimp, steamed white fish and fresh vegetables. It’s one of those is very good, and the strapping young cook back in the Moti Mahal kitchen is trying very dishes that never seems to shrink, no matter hard to adhere to that standard. But nothing how many times you spoon yourself a serious portion. In fact, even as a leftover, it appears I sampled here was very spicy. The dishes I to multiply in the refrigerator. tasted at what the menu calls “medium” in-

Need

Moti Mahal’s cuisine is hot but not too spicy� I’m wary of Indian buffets these days (not every local restaurant is as meticulous at maintaining the steam tables as Moti Mahal is), but a friend dined with me one afternoon and made a dash for it. He found an impressive selection of meat and vegetarian dishes, served with lots of freshly baked naan and a complimentary mango lassi, and he thought it was a damn good deal. He filled up and polished off at least three or four plates piled with saag paneer, chicken tikka, chana aloo, and lamb curry. The breads at Moti Mahal don’t stack up well against some of this restaurant’s rival venues (including the far more glamorous and expensive Swagat, just across the street in the Zona Rosa complex). The naan here is greasy and far too chewy. The desserts, however, are sweet and pretty — even when you don’t want them. On each of my visits, I was presented with a cube of mango kulfi and a tiny dish of milky rice pudding. I like rice pudding on occasion, but Moti Mahal needed something that I couldn’t quite put my finger on. I was in my car and driving away before the answer came to me: a sublime Bollywood touch of chocolatemousse cake. That’s how it is in my movie, anyway.

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17

fat c i t y

P.S. I Love You?

By

A ngel A l u t z

Pumpkin-spice lattes are in season. Sigh.

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ull on your yoga pants and your hoodies, everybody, because it’s time to talk about fall — specifically, the season’s most ubiquitous harbinger: the pumpkin-spice latte. This beverage has become a ritual like pies on Thanksgiving or 10 a.m. beers on Chiefs Sundays. Just ask Twitter. To wit: “It’s so goddamn autumn outside, I want to burn a pile of leaves and make out with a pumpkin spice latte.” The only problem: Sometimes a pumpkin-spice latte just isn’t as good as we’d like to pretend. How do a few local versions stack up?

8140 NW Prairie View Rd. | 816.746.8000

Mud Pie’s PuMPkin-sPice latte

Contains: pumpkin-spice syrup, espresso,

soy milk.

Hi Hat’s Frost on the Pumpkin

while wearing a Snuggie. Mud Pie is all vegan, so its lattes are made with soy milk (or, at your request, almond, coconut or hemp milk). The natural sweetness of the soy complements the pumpkin’s earthiness, giving this latte the right amount of flavor. It goes well with Mud Pie’s pumpkinchocolate-chip muffin. It’s healthy because it’s vegan, right?

the Caramello, the Pom Pom and the Frost on the Pumpkin. The latter drink lives up to the name. In fact, you might feel a little guilty for indulging in this treat, especially in the morning. It’s sweet and creamy, and it has the texture of a milkshake, plus the caffeine you need.

Tastes like: skipping work to watch The Craft

lattéland’s MaPle-PuMPkin latte

Contains: pumpkin purée, maple syrup, sugar,

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Hi Hat’s Frost on tHe PuMPkin

Contains: pumpkin, spice, milk, espresso, ice. Tastes like: taking all of the candy from one of

those buckets with a sign that politely asks you to take only one. Going to Hi Hat feels like getting your morning coffee from a kiosk inside Hogwarts. Located in a quaint brick house off State Line Road, this cozy café’s menu items sometimes sound like something out of a book on spells:

RECEIVE A COMPLIMENTARY CHEESE DIP

18

milk, espresso. Tastes like: one of those accidental midafternoon naps from which you wake up, find that it’s dark and think it’s tomorrow. I tried to order this drink iced, but the barista cautioned me against that choice. Because it’s made with actual pumpkin purée, the drink, I was told, is “not very good” cold. The texture is indeed somewhat grainy, even at 180 degrees, so I can imagine that the iced version may be akin to pumpkin-flavored backwash. That said, this is probably the most authentically pumpkin-flavored latte I’ve tasted. The maple syrup adds a much-needed dimension of sweetness, and it’s very pleasing overall for the first 10 minutes. Just don’t let it sit long enough to cool.

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one More cuP’s MaPle-sPice latte

Contains: maple-spice syrup, nonfat milk, espresso.

Tastes like: planting your face into a fresh pile of crisp autumn foliage. My pumpkin-spice fixation was getting out of hand by the time I got here. So when I saw maple spice as an alternative, I jumped. I drank this latte while driving to work, and along the way, I began wondering why I could taste the rust-colored treetops in the pits of my molars. I love everything about One More Cup, but when it comes to fall treats, this latte is a little too real. It’s like a crisp autumn breeze all up in my face, bitch.

coFFee Girls’ PuMPkin sHake

Contains: pumpkin-spice syrup, malt powder and milk, topped with whipped cream. Tastes like: bypassing the line — and the shrieking gaggle of high school girls — at the Edge of Hell. I had this shake for lunch and knew from the first sip that I’d be doing penance later at the gym. It tastes like the real deal — that is, frozen pumpkin pie with a side of vanilla ice cream. You can order it nonfat, but that’s silly. Don’t skip the whipped cream, either. The only downside: This shake does not contain espresso, though the baristas would probably add some if you asked nicely (and paid them 65 cents).

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fat c i t y

Buttered up

By

Je n Che n

Gooey butter cake slips onto a couple of local menus.

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dessert that’s synonymous with St. Louis has infiltrated our side of the state. Gooey butter cake, which tastes just like it sounds, is on the menu at Waldo Pizza and Lattéland. Though many variations of the recipe exist, it’s generally composed of a yellow-cake base in a crackly crust, topped with a sticky and buttery layer and a dusting of powdered sugar. The result is a sugary-sweet concoction that’s similar to a lemon bar but with a soft, cheesecakelike consistency. Waldo Pizza owner Phil Bourne was born and raised in St. Louis, and he wanted to serve some of the food that he grew up eating. The butter cake, he says, is a St. Louis–bakery tradition — legend has it that it was invented by the city’s German bakers in the 1930s. In his family, it was for a holiday or birthday. “You could buy it at the grocery store, but it would be homemade for special occasions,” he says. Waldo Pizza’s cake ($4.50) was concocted by Melanie Anselmo, the restaurant’s prep cook and baker, who is also a St. Louis native. Based on a family recipe that she tweaked a bit, it starts off, yes, with yellow-cake mix. “It’s a great recipe,” Bourne says. The goo layer (butter, cream cheese, sugar and eggs) contributes a pillowy softness that contrasts with the crunch of the top crust; the whole thing is enhanced by a side of strawberry sauce. Waldo offers a pumpkinflavored version of the cake (available until around mid-December) and also fills orders for whole cakes.

L

attéland’s gooey butter cake ($2.59) comes via its merger with the St. Louis–based Kaldi’s Coffee Roasting Co. about a year and a half ago. According to Tom Norlin, Lattéland’s bakery manager, the two outfits have been

Waldo Pizza’s butter cake is soft and crunchy. sharing recipes, and the GBC has become a big seller here. From 30 to 40 pans a week are baked in the store at 79th Street and State Line and shipped to the other stores around town, Norlin says. Lattéland’s version is dense and selfcontained, with a caramelized, cookielike crust and a firmer goo coating. It’s capped with a chewy, crackly top. This gives it a certain advantage for commuters, according to Norlin: “It’s pretty travel-ready. It’s good on a plate, or if you grab a fork, tear open the pastry bag and have it at your desk at work.” So if there were an I-70 Series of desserts, what would KC put up against gooey butter cake? Both Bourne and Norlin are a bit stumped. “That’s a tough one,” Bourne says. “Back in the day, TJ Cinnamon’s — I’d definitely put that up. There’s no monster cinnamon roll in St. Louis that I’m aware of. Christopher Elbow chocolate would get close.” Anselmo, the Waldo Pizza baker, points out, “German settlers in St. Louis opened a lot of bakeries. You don’t see that so much in Kansas City. There aren’t a lot of older bakeries. McLain’s might be older — I’m not sure — but it’s known for its shortbread cookies.” Norlin says he believes in KC’s bakery scene. “There’s been a lot of expansion away from grocery-store bakeries in the past five to 10 years,” he says. “More people are finding a niche, like decorated cookies, cupcakes, special cakes. There’s been a big explosion in the Northeast of Hispanic bakeries. It’s really been encouraging to see.” But what about a true KC dessert? “We need to find something,” Norlin says.

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music

General lee

Lee Langston musters an army of local talent.

By

N ata l ie G a l l a Ghe r

S

B r o o k e Va n d e V e r

pend an afternoon with Lee Langston and you find yourself charmed by his easy smile and his comforting openness. Somehow, you start telling him about your own hopes and dreams and heartbreaks, though you’ve come to talk about his work and his projects. Langston is intuitive like that. He asks questions. He wants to listen. He believes in the power of exchange. Over the past five years, Langston has been building a name for himself around town as a Renaissance man. A soul singer who got his start playing at the former Harper’s on the Vine, in the historic 18th and Vine District, he gigs with other musicians and also organizes and produces other acts’ shows. Asked to sum up the all in his catchall approach, he laughs. “There’s not even one answer for it,” Langston says. “At any given time, I’m hosting something, I’m rehearsing with my band, I’m at a gig with my band — Lee Langston and Prototype — or I’m being called to be a part of someone’s ensemble or I’m putting Lee, and that’s when I told him about the idea about a tribute to Luther Vandross for Buck.” on a tribute show or I’m producing some kind The Vandross show is especially elaborate. of show under my entertainment company In addition to his own singing role, Langston [Langston’s Hues Entertainment].” has drafted fellow soul singers Sean Tyler and Some of what Langston puts on are tributes: shows for which he puts together a slate of lo- LeVelle as well as funk keyboardist Doriel cal talent to honor one artist’s catalog. What Demps, drummer Quintin Donley Sr., bassist started three years ago, with a Lauryn Hill Deandre Manning, guitarist John Bridgewater, and sax player Jamal Hill. tribute, has become a calling card for him. “Typically, with any tribute show that “As an artist, you always want to see the things that you do grow,” Langston says. “A I put together, I put the music on loop,” lot of times, we desire to put on these amaz- Langston says. “I let it loop, and I’m thinking about what vocalists do ing shows, but the financial I know that will connect backing isn’t always there, Buck’s Bash: with this group of songs so it’s always awesome The Power of Love and that group of songs. I when corporations come A Luther Vandross Tribute, am blessed beyond all beto you. Companies started with Howard Hewett, lief that all the vocalists and approaching me to organize Saturday, November 9, artists I know, if I reach out shows for them, and it was at the Gem Theater to them for a show, they’re great because it would allow happy and eager and ready for me to pull in all these artto work because they know Dessa ists that can’t get enough opThursday, November 7, that we’re about to put on portunities to get onstage.” at Jackpot Music Hall something big.” Case in point: the Negro Langston views his role of Leagues Baseball Museum, producer as more of a comwhich has called on Langsmunity appointment. His band and his cast ton to organize a tribute to Luther Vandross for rotate members, based not only on schedules its November 9 Buck’s Bash. The event honors and availability but also on his desire to keep the memory of baseball legend Buck O’Neil on what would have been his 102nd birthday. plenty of names in the mix. “A lot of times, people don’t realize how “I’ve been a fan of Lee’s for a while,” says difficult it is to be an artist or a musician,” Bob Kendrick, president of the NLBM. “We did he explains. “If there’s a musician in need, a salute to Charley Pride [the country singer you know, of all the musicians that I work and baseball player] in April, when we awarded him the Jackie Robinson Lifetime Achieve- with, they’re the ones I’ll call for an ensemble project or something like that. Those gigs ment Award. And I called Lee in, and he was are going to help them get through whatever so excited about the opportunity. That’s the first time I had the opportunity to work with storm they’re in.

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Langston: “We’re about to put on something big.” Dessa: “We have a really electric show.” “There are all these different pockets of amazing in Kansas City,” he adds. “Some of them are intertwined and some of them stay separated. When I see other artists that are trying to find their way and trying to be seen, and I feel like they have talent and the city needs to see it, then I want to give them a chance.”

New Parts Dessa puts a torch to her sound.

I

t’s hard to say what the Minneapolis MC Dessa is best-known for: her membership with indie hip-hop collective Doomtree, her own material or the poetry and essays she writes. But you can hear all her ambition on Parts of Speech, the deeply personal, tightly wound, ballad-intensive solo project that’s bringing her to Lawrence this week. The Pitch: How have people been responding to the album? Dessa: So far, so good. With certain songs on the album, there’s a lot of musical terrain to cover. I knew that there was a risk there, and I’m not immune to the nerves associated with that risk. On the whole, we’ve been really wellreceived. Even if someone purchased the album and didn’t hear what they anticipated, I feel like people have really been willing to invest some time in it and participate in it. Have you discovered anything new about these songs? I think, in some ways, the time that you’re singing a song into a microphone to record it for your record is usually when you are least

familiar with it. Over the course of the next few months, you learn more about it. Like, “Oh, this song is better presented if I take a breath here” or “What if I were to sing this song in a higher register?” Usually it’s the faster songs that people are more vocal about liking, especially live. When you listen to a slow, sad song at a show, you’re never really like, “Yeah!” In my e-mail, there’s a different set of songs that people really comment on. It’s interesting to try and balance those two modes of feedback. Your van was robbed in Buffalo, New York, recently, but then within two days you met your $30,000 goal on Indiegogo. How are you doing? The day after the burglary happened, I felt really guilty. I realize that that’s not totally appropriate, but I just felt like, “Oh, this is on my watch.” And then when people came through and helped everybody repurchase stuff, I was like, “This is awesome!” And now, you know, psychologically, physically, I feel tired, but I’m not, like, constantly fighting tears or anything. What’s been the best part about this tour so far? I’m excited for the first time, on this year of touring, to feel really, really confident in the product of our live show. I think in the past, I’ve felt confident as a writer, I’ve felt increasingly confident as a recording artist. But this year I think we have a really electric show, and I think we have something that you don’t really find in a lot of other rooms in the country. I don’t see a lot of people working the lane that we’re working on, and I’m proud of that.

E-mail natalie.gallagher@pitch.com

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WHERE THE BEST MUSICIANS IN THE WORLD PLAY

KNUCKLEHEADS F re e S h u tt le in S u rr o u n d in g A reth e a

NOVEMBER: 6: Carl Butlers Guitar Army 6: The Crayons 8pm $8 Cover

NOVEMBER 7

ori naftaly band

music

Bee’s Nest

The buzz is on for Me Like Bees.

By

A ngel A l u t z

F

ollowing the EF5 tornado that leveled 25 percent of Joplin, Missouri, in May 2011, the Joplin indie-rock band Me Like Bees responded the best way its members knew how. Singer and guitarist Luke Sheafer, guitarist Pete Burton, drummer Tim Cote and bassist Nick Bynum together wrote the haunting but buoyant “Naked Trees.” Enduring tough times while searching for that elusive silver lining is one of the thematic threads that runs through Me Like Bees’ e r Mo f irst f ull-leng th, The Ides, released earlier this year. The album’s t a e in Onl .com 14 songs were written pitch over a six-year period, starting with “Kids in the Kitchen” in 2007. It was recorded at Studio 2100 in Springfield, Missouri, marking the band’s first time in a real studio. “This album was a lot of dealing with sorrow and life experiences, kind of coming Me Like Bees’ debut album has been out from tragedy,” Sheafer tells The Pitch six years in the making. by phone. “That’s all real-life stuff for me. I hour trek home to Joplin the same night. think we’ve all had junk in our lives.” But enthusiasm didn’t wane. “A lot of it has to do with redemption as “We have a policy,” Sheafer says. “No well — there’s a bright side to everything,” matter who we’re playing for, we’ll play a Burton adds. “Somebody said we sound crazy show and be as energetic as we can, like Modest Mouse, but we still have hope even if it’s just Pete’s mom and dad — which for the world.” happened a couple of times in Kansas City. Fortunately, that hope isn’t usually misBut now we have a nice following. We have placed, at least not in the case of the band’s a lot of support there.” hometown. Two years after the tornado, Me Like Bees is already gathering matewhich was one of the deadliest in U.S. hisrial for another album and working with its tory, Joplin is well on its way to recovery. label, Loveway Records, “There doesn’t seem like to promote The Ides. It’s a there’s a black cloud over Me Like Bees busy time for a band whose everyone’s heads now, beFriday, November 8, members also juggle day-tocause that’s the way it was at the Riot Room day life. Three of the guys for about a year,” Sheafer are married, and each has a says. “It’s still something full-time job. (According to Burton, Bynum I think most people think about every day, “dresses up like the Statue of Liberty during but it’s not as heavy as it was. It was a very tax season and spins the sign in front of the heavy time for a long time.” tax place.”) The occasional heavy topic notwithThey still feel like they’re just learning how standing, Me Like Bees knows how to have a to navigate the music industry, though Sheafer good time. Sounding like a vigorous blend of notes that “figuring out how to make a living the White Stripes and, yes, Modest Mouse, doing this” is a struggle many musicians face. Me Like Bees tears up the stage during its “Most people you’re dealing with — this is live performances. The bandmates are detheir second, third or fourth job,” Cote adds. termined to share their energy with the “As long as you can have a realistic outlook audience, whether they’re playing Chicago’s on it and go with the flow, it becomes relaHouse of Blues or a sparsely attended Montively easy to take it all in stride.” day-night bar gig in Kansas City. It’s an approach that seems to be workWhen the band first started, there were ing. After playing KC’s Warped Tour this plenty of those barely filled rooms. Gigs past summer, Me Like Bees was one of four followed a pattern: The band would drive acts, out of 20,000, selected to compete at to Kansas City, play in front of a handful the upcoming Ernie Ball Battle of the Bands of people, then make the two-and-a-half-

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2014 in Hollywood. The competition gives the band the opportunity to play in front of big-name producers and showcase its infectious energy on a national stage. That’s great news for a band dead set on a killer live show. “We want to play for people,” Burton says. “We want people to enjoy it, and we want people to come back.”

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J a z z B e at IntErstrIng, at takE FIvE CoFFEE + Bar

Interstring’s music has an intensity and an intricacy. The jazz masters have performed together for more than 15 years, and they’ve developed a tightly woven interplay. Rhythms have defined this music since guitarists Rod Fleeman and Danny Embrey, bassist Bob Bowman and drummer Todd Strait first came together to play some standards, some bop and some originals. Over time, these musicians drifted apart. But Monday, you’re in for a treat: Strait, who now lives in Portland, Oregon, returns to town, and Interstring reunites for a special show at Take Five Coffee + Bar. This is jazz that commands your attention, performed at a venue where the audience listens. — Larry Kopitnik Interstring, 7–9 p.m. Monday, November 11, at Take Five Coffee + Bar (5336 W. 151st St., Leawood, 913-948-5550), $5

REACH

d t h n g i l a t o p B S

Stacy “Reach” Smith has been a vital contributor to Kansas City’s hip-hop scene for thirteen years now. Though his raps remain as sharp and compelling as ever, Reach has also taken on a sort of elder statesman role – identifying and spotlighting young talent and engaging with the community at large through arts education. He may look intimidating – the guy is built like a brick – but he’s consistently a positive force for change in KC. What inspired you early on? I wrote my first rhyme at the age of 13 as a way to break the monotony of yet another black history program at church. It was mostly mortifying. Rap in a church with an elderly membership roll is thankless to say the very least. Still, I enjoyed those precious few moments enough to keep writing and performing. The first local show I ever did was in Olathe at Club 301, an afterparty for the Okayplayer Tour in 2000. How has the hip-hop scene changed in your eyes over the years? I think the window of opportunity is wider now than it’s ever been. There are a number of venues in town amenable to rap. When I started out, the Vine district’s Club Mardi Gras was one of the select few places that would open their stage to rap acts. You’re in Soul Providers, which is sort of a sprawling hip-hop collective. Can you talk about your role in that group? I’m not sure I have a defined role within the crew. I do a little bit of everything. I’m basically “Carl the Janitor” from The Breakfast Club. I’m essentially a wiley old custodian who probably knows more than he lets on and makes it his business to mind his mundane maintenance responsibilities. You are one of the most community-minded rappers in town. What areas are you most passionate about? Arts education has been my primary focus over the past four years. I’m on the roster as a teaching artist for Kansas City Young Audiences. I teach hip-hop writing and performance for young people. On occasion, I work with organizations like Niles Home and Synergy Services using artistic expression as a form of therapy for the kids they serve. Tell us about what you’ve got coming on the horizon. I currently have two projects in the works. One of them, tentatively titled Perfect Strangers, is an EP I’m doing cooperatively with a producer from New York named Brady James. Together we have a group called The Strangers. The other, still untitled, is a full-length album I’m doing with Canadian underground production legend Marco Polo (Talib Kweli, Pharoahe Monch, KRS-One, Masta Ace, Torae, J-Live, and Large Professor). pitch.com

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Music WED 11/6 D REW BLACK AN D DIRTY EL FRI 11/8 JOKENTUCKY KNIFE FIGHT - 9PECTRIC, HN MCKENNA, M BLACKBIRD R JA M ES EVUE TH O M AS FRI 11/15 - 9PM SAT 11/16 ADMOLLY GENE, AMY FARRAN SAT 11/23 B MIRAL OF THE RED D AND 13 ALB BARRON VON UM RELEASE, SWAGGER (TU LSA), WED 11/27 THRED VELVET CRUSH E H FRI 1129 TH EARERS, THIS IS MY C ONDITION E ACB’S

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This is kind of a last-minute gig for the Chicago-via-Nashville singer-songwriter, who spent 2012 opening for Americana hero Justin Townes Earle. Tristen’s “matinee” gig at the Replay Lounge isn’t on her official tour schedule, but the impromptu nature of the stop should serve Lawrence audiences well. Tristen is on the road in support of Caves, released earlier this year, a vibrant pop album that matches sexy synths to folk pleasantries. The disc plays as though Tristen took the Nashville twang out of her sound and substituted a little bit of Sia. She’s a pretty charming live act, too. Friday, November 8, the Replay (946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676)

Pink

It’s hard to believe that it has been 13 years since Pink strutted into the spotlight, flaunting her trademark pink pixie cut and her tough-girl attitude with the TLC-worthy hit “There You Go.” As international superstars go, she is among the hardest to find fault with, largely avoiding the gossip rags, the celebrity feuds and the usual highly publicized freakouts. Her fans say she has stayed true to her music and her style, and her arena gigs are hailed as proper spectacles.

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OPENDAILY SUN. 12PM-12AM MON.TUES.SAT. 4PM-1:30AM

WED-FRI 12PM-1:30AM KITCHEN OPEN LATE

Portland dream-pop duo Pure Bathing Culture has earned plenty of comparisons with the hazy sounds of Beach House, but on its debut fulllength, Moon Tides, it also drops a little Laurel Canyon folk into its music. Sarah Versprille has a voice straight off some California dreamer’s 1970s B-side, dusted off and dressed up with some 1980s-style electronics. If you like yearning, synthy shoegaze, you will love this band. Wednesday, November 13, RecordBar (1020 Westport Road, 816-753-5207)

Heyrocco

the pitch

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Iron & Wine Expect Pink to swing from the rafters and pull out some Cirque du Soleil moves. Tuesday, November 12, Sprint Center (1407 Grand, 816-949-7000)

Keith Urban

Keith Urban is one of those huge international stars of “modern country.” Aside from his affected U.S. Southern accent (dude was raised in Australia) and his tight jeans, there’s very little that is actually country about Urban. The production and lyrical content of his songs are much closer to those of, say, Miley Cyrus. Still, I’m sure he’s a very nice guy. This year, between judging contestants on American Idol and sexting wifey Nicole Kidman, Urban had time to record and release his most recent album, Fuse, and that’s what he’s bringing to KC. Friday, November 8, Sprint Center (1407 Grand, 816-949-7000)

f o r e c a s t

Heyrocco makes me believe that indie poprock is a thing, a thing with a future, a thing with a real place in the world. The Charlestonbred trio of boys released its debut full-length album, Comfort, last year, and there’s already a new album on the way. Strong shows of support have risen up around the band, now that it has toured to support acts such as Surfer Blood and Miniature Tigers. And though its sound is dark and fuzzy, it’s also surprisingly polished and mature for being so, you know, indie. This is absolutely a band to watch. Monday, November 11, FOKL (556 Central, KCK, foklcenter.com)

Iron & Wine

The last time I saw Sam Beam live — two years ago, when he was touring in support of Kiss Each Other Clean — his set stretched near the two-hour mark and devolved into something dangerously reminiscent of a Christopher Cross adult-contemporary jam session. The show reviews for Beam’s latest tour, in support of his recent Ghost on Ghost, suggest that Beam has reeled himself back in. This comes as a relief. Also: Beam continues to have an amazing beard, a fact that I feel is always worth mentioning. Saturday, November 9, the Midland (1228 Main, 816-283-9921)

K e Y

Pick of the Week

Band to Watch

 Indie Rock

 ’80s Hair

Retro Revival

Acrobatics

Synth Pop

 Aussies

 Super Famous

Surprise Show

Cowboy Hats Galore

Bearded Beauties

WWW.THERECORDBAR.COMFOR FULL SCHEDULE

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n ata l ie G a l l a Ghe r

Pure Bathing Culture

I’m as over this whole retro-revival thing as the next person, but I can’t get enough Gold Magnolias. This is an act that isn’t simply trying on genre hats to fit the zeitgeist. The Brooklyn five-piece (tenor-sax player Ryan Anselmi is a Kansas City native) is serious about the intersection of rhythm, blues and soul, and it was born the old-fashioned way, with members cultivating material over yearlong club residencies. It’s unlikely that these guys are going to stay under the radar much longer. Friday, November 8, Czar (1531 Grand, 816-421-0300)

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Each week, Pitch Street Team cruises around to the hottest clubs, bars and concerts. You name it, we will be there. While we are out, we hand out tons of cool stuff. So look for the Street Team... We will be looking for you!

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AGENDA

continued from page 11

Thursday | 11.7 |

THE FOUND FOOTAGE FESTIVAL

PERFORMING ARTS

Bach’s Own Choir: Thomanerchor Leipzig and Leipzig Baroque Orchestra | Folly Theater, 300

W. 12th St.

City in Motion dance showcase | 7-9 p.m. Uptown

Arts Bar, 3611 Broadway

Shanghai Ballet, the Butterfly Lovers | 7:30 p.m. Yardley Hall at JCCC, 12345 College Blvd., Overland Park FILM

Gathr Preview Series presents JFK: A President Betrayed | 7:30 p.m. Glenwood Arts, 9575 Metcalf (east side of Metcalf South Shopping Center), Overland Park

Red carpet premiere of We the People: civics education for all ages | 7 p.m., $35, Union Station, 30 W. Pershing Rd., wethepeoplemovie.com

UMKC’s Movies About Making Movies: Living in Oblivion | 7 p.m. Tivoli Cinemas, 4050 Pennsylvania,

Found Footage Festival’s Best of the Midwest | 10 p.m. Friday, Alamo Drafthouse, 1400 Main, foundfootagefest.com

UMKC Saxophone Studio | 7:30 p.m. Take Five Coffee + Bar, 5336 W. 151st St., Leawood

tivolikc.com

Trivia | 9 p.m. Westport Flea Market, 817 Westport Rd.

Friday | 11.8 |

Found Footage Festival: Best of the Midwest | 10 p.m., $10, Alamo Drafthouse, 1400 Main,

NIGHTLIFE LECTURES MUSIC

Tone Bell | 8 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner

Theater, 7260 N.W. 87th St.

Ava Bella, KCPL, James Christos, DJ Rob G |

MORE

EVENTS

ONL

INE

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10 p.m. Czar, 1531 Grand

AT

M

Crosseyed Cat | 7:30 p.m.

B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ, 1205 E. 85th St.

Decker, My Oh My, the Silver Maggies | 7:30 p.m.

KMBZ Business Luncheon featuring Newt and Callista Gingrich | 11:30 a.m., $55 plus tax. RitzCharles, 9000 W. 137th St., Overland Park

Brodioke | 9 p.m. Bulldog, 1715 Main Chippendales “50 Shades of Men” | 8 p.m. Stan-

COMMUNITY EVENTS

DJ Modrey Hepburn | 10 p.m. Replay Lounge, 946

Heartland Campus Safety Summit | 8 a.m., $69, $49 (students), UMKC, 5000 Holmes, heartlandsummit.org

ford’s Comedy Club, 1867 Village West Pkwy., KCK

Massachusetts, Lawrence

FILM

KC Bachelor/Bachelorette Auction benefiting MO Wolverines Nonprofit Youth Organization | 6:30 p.m. Hotel, 1300 Grand, wolverinesauction

foundfootagefest.com

HAUNTED HOUSES

The Beast | 7:30 p.m., 1401 W. 13th St. The Edge of Hell | 7:30 p.m., 1300 W. 12th St. MUSIC

An American Legacy Tour starring Ronnie McDowell, Nadirah Shakoor, Doyle Grisham, Amy Lee, Matt Hoggatt and the Legendary Florida Boys | 8:30 p.m., $25, Knuckleheads Saloon,

The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

DJ Tequila Bear | MiniBar, 3810 Broadway

Dessa, Approach, No Bird Sing | 8:30 p.m. Jackpot Music Hall, 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Luxury Bump | 10p.m.FireflyLounge,4118Pennsylvania

.webs.com

2715 Rochester

Playe | 10:30 p.m. Uptown Arts Bar, 3611 Broadway

One Homeless Night | 7 p.m. Youth Resiliency Center,

Black on Black, the Sluts, Muddy Udders, DJ Proof | 10 p.m. Replay Lounge, 946 Massachusetts,

Hot Caution | The Kill Devil Club, 61 E. 14th St.

2201 N.E. Parvin Rd., synergyservices.org

ALL IS LOST

Just Animals, Dain Griffin, Josh Allen | Black & Gold Tavern, 3740 Broadway

Desmond Jones, Zen, Mary Jane Wonda | 6 p.m.

Czar, 1531 Grand

Stephen Kellogg, the Saint Johns | 8 p.m. The

FRIDAY

1 1 .8

Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence

Micky & the Motorcars with Mockingbird Sun | 8:30 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester

rd: out Redfo to sea.

Eddie Moore & the Outer Circle | 9 p.m. Green Lady Lounge, 1809 Grand

Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester

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The Gold Magnolias, the New Riddim, Project H | 9 p.m. Czar, 1531 Grand John McKenna, Blackbird Revue | The Brick,

Robert Randolph & the Family Band | 7 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Peter Schlamb | 8 p.m. Green Lady Lounge, 1809 Grand

26

Mark DuFresne Band | 9 p.m. B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ,

1205 E. 85th St.

1727 McGee

Ori Naftaly Band: A Living Room Session | 8 p.m.

Simple Lines, Janet the Planet, Jorge Arana Trio, Chromafrost | 9:45 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd.

Lawrence

All Is Lost | The stunning second movie by Margin Call writer-director J.C. Chandor, pits Robert Redford against nature. It opens Friday.

pitch.com

Scroat Belly, Godzillionaire | 8 p.m. The Bottleneck,

737 New Hampshire, Lawrence

104025.3 | The Pitch | 11-07-2013

BRIAN REGAN FRIDAY

11.8

an be let Reg . Don’t s im elf all by h

Brian Regan | 7 & 10 p.m. Uptown Theater, 3700 Broadway

So Many Dynamos, Me Like Bees, Bears and Company, the Travel Guide | 7:30 p.m. The Riot

Reflection presented by Kacico Dance | 7:30 p.m.

Starhaven Rounders | 7 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 West-

PA R A N O R M A L

Room, 4048 Broadway

port Rd.

Jon Theobald, Mr. Marco’s V7, Jesse Torrisi and the Please, Please Me | 9 p.m. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club, 3402 Main

Tristen | 6 p.m. The Replay Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence

H&R Block City Stage Theater, Union Station, 30 W. Pershing Rd., kacicodance.org

STONE TEMPLE PILOTS WITH CHESTER BENNINGTON

November 14, 2013

THEATER Ain’t Misbehavin’: The Fats Waller Musical Show | Spinning Tree Theatre, Just Off Broadway

Philip Wakefield Trio | 8 p.m. Take Five Coffee + Bar,

Andrew Lloyd Webber’s Tell Me on a Sunday | Egads Theatre, Off Center Theatre, 2450

Grand, egadstheatre.com

NIGHTLIFE

Dinner Theater, 7260 N.W. 87th St.

BLUE OCTOBER

November 30, 2013

Dates and times vary.

Theater, 3051 Central, spinningtreetheatre.com

Tone Bell | 8 & 10:30 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and

THUNDER FROM DOWN UNDER

Pursuing the Paranormal | 6-9 p.m. Fort Osage Education Center, 107 Osage, Sibley continued on page 28

Keith Urban | 7 p.m. Sprint Center, 1407 Grand

5336 W. 151st St., Leawood

HOT COUNTRY FREE CONCERT SERIES FEATURING: NO JUSTICE, JOHNNY COOPER, & THE BRYANT CARTER BAND

December 8, 2013

December 12, 2013

Forever Plaid | Chestnut Fine Arts Center, 234 N. Chestnut, Olathe, chestnutfinearts.com

Comedy showcase with Norm Dexter (two shows) | 8-11 p.m. Uptown Arts Bar, 3611 Broadway

How I Became a Pirate | Theater for Young America, H&R Block City Stage Theater, Union Station, 30 W. Pershing Rd., tya.org

Dan Cummins | 7:45 & 9:45 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy

Les Misérables | White Theatre at the Jewish

UPCOMING SHOWS: 11/8

11/16

SIP: Special Edition

Community Center, 5801 W. 115th St., Overland Park, jcckc.org/lesmis

Project Backstage Presents: Solus CD Release Event

11/9

Sexy Saturday

11/21

RAWards

Flirt Friday

Love Pump

The Mystery of Edwin Drood | The Barn Play-

11/15

11/22

Broadway

Young Friends of Art Second Friday Happy Hour | 6-8 p.m. Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, 4525 Oak

Seminar | Unicorn Theatre, 3828 Main,

Club, 1867 Village West Pkwy., KCK

Margo May and Brian Klein | 10 p.m. MiniBar, 3810

ers, 6219 Martway, Mission, thebarnplayers.org

Saturday | 11.9 | PERFORMING ARTS

The Magic Flute | 7:30 p.m. Lyric Opera, Kauffman Center, 1601 Broadway, kcopera.org

unicorntheatre.org

Three Viewings | Muehlebach Funeral Home,

1-800-745-3000

§ VooDooKC.com

Know When To Stop Before You Start.® Gambling Problem? Call 1-888-BETSOFF.

Subject to change or cancellation. Phone and online orders are subject to service fees. Must be 21 years or older to gamble, obtain a Total Rewards ® card or enter VooDoo ®. ©2013, Caesars License Company, LLC.

6800 Troost, kcactors.org

The Wiz | The Coterie, 2450 Grand, Crown Center, thecoterie.org

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11/1/13 1:50 PM

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PINK

SPORTS

MUSIC

Brew Jam | 8 p.m., 75th Street Brewery, 520 W. 75th St. Donnelly Dash 5k & 1-mile Family Run/Walk | 9 a.m. Donnelly College, 608 N. 18th St., KCK

AY TUESD

11.12

KC 15k | 8 a.m. CommunityAmerica Ballpark, 1800

Village W. Pkwy., KCK

lass at your g r. Raise n Ce te Sprint

We Can Hear You Now: a Run/Walk for Children’s Hearing, benefiting Children’s Mercy Hospital Audiol-

ogy Clinic and the Hartley Family Center at the University of Kansas | 8 a.m. KU Edwards Campus, 12610 Quivira, Overland Park

Chance the Rapper | 8 p.m. Liberty Hall, 644 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Guitar Shootout | B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ, 1205 E. 85th St.

Rich Hill’s jazz brunch | 11 a.m. The Majestic, 931 Broadway

The Isley Brothers, Urban Mystic | 7:30 p.m. The Midland, 1228 Main

SHOPPING

Mark Lowrey jazz jam | 6 p.m. The Majestic, 931 Broadway

Holiday Market | 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Holmeswood Baptist

Church, 9700 Holmes

Mengel Brothers Duo | 5-9 p.m. Chaz on the Plaza,

325 Ward Pkwy.

Saturday swap meet | 1 a.m.-4 p.m. Cowtown Mallroom, 3101 Gillham Plz.

The Nace Brothers | Trouser Mouse, 410 S. Hwy. 7, Blue Springs

Weston’s Second Saturday Holiday Open House | Downtown Weston, westonmo.com

The Regrets, Accordian Crimes | 6 p.m. Replay

Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence

HAUNTED HOUSES

The Beast | 7:30 p.m., 1401 W. 13th St.

Dominique Sanders Trio | 10 p.m. Green Lady Lounge,

1809 Grand

The Edge of Hell | 7:30 p.m., 1300 W. 12th St.

Stick to Your Guns | 6:30 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence

MUSIC

Bram Wijnands stride piano | 7 p.m. Green Lady

Be/Non, Ezra Furman, the Philistines, Tim Schweiger & the Middlemen | 9:45 p.m. RecordBar,

Lounge, 1809 Grand

1020 Westport Rd.

NIGHTLIFE

Broken String | 5-8 p.m. Green Lady Lounge, 1809 Grand

Cold Sweat | 9 p.m. The Phoenix, 302 W. Eighth St. DJ Approach | 10 p.m. Replay Lounge, 946 Massa-

chusetts, Lawrence

Evergreen Grass Band | 9 p.m. Jackpot Music Hall, 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Max Groove Trio | 9 p.m. Green Lady Lounge, 1809

Grand

Steven Roth, Ben Meyers, Felix Greene | 9 p.m.

Live Stage at the Power & Light District, 14th St. and Grand

Shawn Holt and the Teardrops | 9 p.m. B.B.’s Lawn-

side BBQ, 1205 E. 85th St.

Iron & Wine, Jesca Hoop | 8 p.m. The Midland,

1228 Main

KC Sound | 8:30 p.m. Take Five Coffee + Bar, 5336 W. 151st St., Leawood

Club, 1867 Village West Pkwy., KCK

30th-anniversary and grand-reopening celebration | 11 a.m. Mass Street Music, 1347 Massachusetts,

DJ Candlepants | The Eighth Street Taproom, 801

Lawrence

2715 Rochester

28

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New Hampshire, Lawrence

Tim Whitmer & KC Express | 4:30 p.m. The Phoenix,

302 W. Eighth St.

Bram Wijnands Trio | 7 p.m. The Majestic, 931 Broad-

way

Wild Men of Kansas City | 8:30 p.m. The Blue Room, 1616 E. 18th St.

Marilyn Wood | 7 p.m. Californos, 4124 Pennsylvania

Dropout Boogie | 10 p.m. MiniBar, 3810 Broadway Gossip at Reserve Bar | 8 p.m. Ambassador Hotel, 1111 Grand

Dave Stephens’ Gangster’s Ball | The Kill Devil Club, 61 E. 14th St.

PERFORMING ARTS

Blue Monday poetry and open mic | 8-10 p.m. Uptown Arts Bar, 3611 Broadway

Broadway

Sunday | 11.10 | ANIMALS

Tone Bell | 7 & 10 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner

Wild Kingdom with Peter Gros | 7 p.m. Yardley Hall

Theater, 7260 N.W. 87th St.

MUSIC

The Blind Pets, Super Rats, Clear Views | 8 p.m. Czar, 1531 Grand

Thomas Dolby | 7 p.m. Liberty Hall, 644 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Holy Grail, Vanlade, Brimstone Crow | 8 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

The truTV Impractical Jokers Tour featuring the Tenderloins | 7:30 p.m. Uptown Theater, 3700

NIGHTLIFE

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Monday | 11.11 |

DJ E | The Quaff, 1010 Broadway

Broadway

Midtown Quartet | Jazz, 1823 W. 39th St. Moreland & Arbuckle | 9 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon,

Dan Cummins | 7:45 & 9:45 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy

Jackpot Music Hall, 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Butch Walker, Marc Scibilia, JoJo Longbottom and Cameron Hawk | 7:30 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048

The Hero Show with New Vinyl Love, Noe Palma, Clay Walker, Travis Marvin, the M80s | 6 p.m. KC

Tone Bell | 7 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater, 7260 N.W. 87th St.

Pink | 7:30 p.m. Sprint Center, 1407 Grand

at JCCC, 12345 College Blvd., Overland Park

Interstring | 7 p.m. Take Five Coffee + Bar, 5336 W. 151st St., Leawood KCKCC jazz recital | 7-10 p.m. Green Lady Lounge, 1809 Grand

Mark Lowrey Trio | 6 p.m. The Majestic, 931

Broadway

ART EXHIBITS & EVENTS Marc Bosworth & Eric Dodson: mixed-media works | Kiosk Gallery, through November 8, 3951 Broadway

Celebrating Picasso: Through the Lens of David Douglas Duncan | Nelson-Atkins Mu-

seum of Art, 4525 Oak, nelson-atkins.org

Charlotte Street presents We’ll Make Out Better Than Okay, by Danny Orendorff | Esquina, 1000 W. 25th St.

Millie Edwards & Friends | 7 p.m. The Phoenix, 302

A NIGHT OF HANK WILLIAMS

W. Eighth St.

Rural Grit Happy Hour | 6-9 p.m. The Brick, 1727 McGee

The Bluz Benderz | Trouser Mouse, 410 S. Hwy. 7,

Uptown Ramblers Club, 3402 Main

Blue Springs

ESDAY

1 1 .1 3

WE D N

Singer/Songwriter open mic with host Jon Theobald | 7 p.m. Davey’s

Dan Bliss | Jazz, 1823 W. 39th St.

Waldo Jazz Collective | 7-10 p.m. The

Carl Butler’s Gospel Lounge with Tony Ramey | 7:30 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester

at Hank Salute s. d a e h le Knuck

Exmortus, Hatchet, Dogs of Delphi, Koktopus | 8 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway

Piano Room, 8410 Wornall

Max Groove Trio | 6 p.m. Chaz on the Plaza, 325 Ward Pkwy.

NIGHTLIFE

Charlotte Street Foundation and ArtSounds present MicroChromatic | 6-10 p.m.Tuesday, Paragraph Gallery, 23 E. 12 St.

Double Visions Lecture + Happy Hour: Victorian Hair Braiding | 5 p.m. Friday, Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art, 4420 Warwick Blvd.

Dressed Up | Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art, 4420 Warwick Blvd., kemperart.org

Room Burgers & Beer, 4010 Pennsylvania

and Booze, 423 Southwest Blvd.

Karaoke with Baby Brie | 10 p.m. RecordBar, 1020

Westport Rd.

Edgar Degas Pastels | Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, 4525 Oak, nelson-atkins.org

8 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence

Kaws • Ups and Downs; Dylan Mortimer • Illuminate | Nerman Museum of Contemporary Art, JCCC, 12345 College Blvd., Overland Park

KC Swing: Jazz Photography, by Diallo Javonne French | Box Gallery, 1000 Walnut

Taking Back Mondays with Sovereign States |

Trivia with Matt Larson | 8 p.m. Bulldog, 1715 Main

Tuesday | 11.12 |

Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester

19100 E. Valley View Pkwy., missourimavericks.com

Mortals, Melting Point of Bronze, Vanlade | 8 p.m.

Organ Jazz Trio with Ken Lovern | 9 p.m. Green

Karaoke with Paul Nelson | MiniBar, 3810 Broadway

Lady Lounge, 1809 Grand

Pure Bathing Culture | 10 p.m. RecordBar, 1020

Open-mic comedy night | 9 p.m. Hamburger Mary’s,

Westport Rd.

DJ HoodNasty, Brent Tactic & DJ B-Stee | 10 p.m.

85th St.

101 Southwest Blvd.

Gusto Lounge, 504 Westport Rd.

Team Trivia with Teague Hayes | 8:30 p.m. Coda,

Dinner on Ice for Boys & Girls Club of Greater KC | 6-9 p.m., $100, Independence Events Center,

Ramblers Club, 3402 Main

The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence

COMMUNITY BENEFITS 1744 Broadway

Shinetop Jr. | 7-9 p.m. B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ, 1205 E.

Drew Six | 6-9 p.m. Cactus Grill, 11849 Roe, Leawood Us, Peasants, Josh Allen, Sean Egan, Robert Paulson | Black & Gold Tavern, 3740 Broadway

Wednesday | 11.13 |

NIGHTLIFE

| UMKC Gallery of Art, 5015 Holmes (Room 203)

9 Plus 1 | 9 p.m. Green Lady Lounge, 1809 Grand

Second Friday Troost Art Hop | Ubuntu Vil-

Anarchy Movement presents Rico, Kush, EEMS | 9 p.m. Czar, 1531 Grand

Test Patterns and Floor Samples: New Work by Garry Noland | Opening reception, 6-9 p.m.

Billy Beale’s blues jam | 10 p.m. Westport Saloon,

lage Community Center, 6-10 p.m., 4327 Troost

Hank Williams: A Night of His Songs | 8 p.m.

NIGHTLIFE

MUSIC

Knock Loud, I’m Home + Dog and Pony Show

Miss Tess and the Talkbacks | 8 p.m. Davey’s Uptown

Sonic Spectrum Music Trivia | 7 p.m. RecordBar,

1020 Westport Rd.

of Art, 4525 Oak, nelson-atkins.org

Jess Klein | 7 p.m. Czar, 1531 Grand

Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz | 7:30 p.m. Rhythm

Echoes: Islamic Art and Contemporary Artists | Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, 4525 Oak

Impressionist France | Nelson-Atkins Museum

Jam Night | 9 p.m. Jerry’s Bait Shop, 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa

Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz | Mondays, 8 p.m. Green

PERFORMING ARTS

The Magic Flute | 7:30 p.m. The Lyric Opera, Kauff-

man Center for the Performing Arts, 1601 Broadway, kcopera.org

Margaret Cho, John Fugelsang, Judy Gold, and Jim Short | 7 p.m. Folly Theater, 300 W. 12th St. DJs Mike Scott, Spinstyles and Bill Pile | MiniBar,

3810 Broadway

FILM

Friday; gallery talk, noon-1 p.m. Saturday, Studios Inc., 1708 Campbell

4112 Pennsylvania

Hermon Mehari Trio | 6 p.m. Majestic, 931 Broadway

Tosca | 1:30 p.m., $10-$15, Tivoli Cinemas, 4050 Pennsylvania, tivolikc.com

Girlz of Westport | 8 p.m. Californos, 4124 Pennsylvania

Karaoke | The Quaff, 1010 Broadway

LITERARY EVENTS

James Turrell: Gard Blue | Spencer Museum of Art, 1301 Mississippi , Lawrence

MUSEUM EXHIBITS & EVENTS American Sabor: Latinos in U.S. Popular Music | American Jazz Museum, 1616 E. 18th St. Music Is My First Love: Lupe M. Gonzalez Dance Orchestra | Kansas City Museum, 3218 Gladstone Blvd., kansascitymuseum.org

Real Pirates | Union Station, 30 W. Pershing Rd. Take Five Tours | 6 p.m. Thursday, American Jazz Museum, 1616 E. 18th St.

Melismatics, the Lucky, NowHere | 10 p.m. Record-

Bar, 1020 Westport Rd.

Mark Montgomery | Jazz, 1823 W. 39th St. Naughty Pines Happy Hour Band | 6-8 p.m. Coda, 1744 Broadway

Open jam with El Barrio Band | 7 p.m. Danny’s Big

Easy, 1601 E. 18th St.

Open Jam with the Everette DeVan Trio | 7 p.m. The Phoenix, 302 W. Eighth St.

Those Crosstown Rivals, Four Arm Shiver | Replay Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence

Jared Diamond discusses “The World Until Yesterday: What Can We Learn From Traditional Societies?” | 7 p.m., $18, Unity Temple on the Plaza,

Ladies’ Night Karaoke and VJ Show with DJ Mc Lovin | 8:30 p.m. One Eyed Jacks, 5044 N.E. Parvin Rd.

707 W. 47th St.

MOKAN Twang Vinyl Country Night | 8 p.m. Frank James Saloon, 10919 N.W. Hwy. 45, Parkville

Divergent Book Series by Veronica Roth | Noon,

Trivia | 8 p.m. Westport Flea Market, 817 Westport Rd.

Miller Nichols Library, UMKC, 800 E. 51st St.

Poetic Underground open-mic series | 9-11 p.m.

Uptown Arts Bar, 3611 Broadway

Trivia | 9 p.m. Lew’s Grill and Bar, 7539 Wornall You’re Retro with DJ Ashton Martin | Gusto Lounge,

504 Westport Rd.

MUSIC

Acoustic jam session with Tyler Gregory | Jazzhaus, 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence

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29

KC’S #1 CHATLINe

S ava g e L o v e

MEET SEXY

Senior KinKSter

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*Free INTrO. 7 3 3 9 - 4 2 5

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Dear Dan: I’m a kinky, youthful 72-year-old guy.

I grew up in the Pleistocene era, when there was virtually no way to meet a kinky woman. I’ve had two vanilla marriages, and three months ago I ended a four-year vanilla relationship with the best woman I’ve ever met. I just couldn’t take not being a BDSM person anymore, and I broke up with this wonderful woman so I could do BDSM. I’ve had some fun, but no candidate for a possible LTR has come along. In the meantime, my most recent ex (I’ll call her “Mel”) and I have been bereft over our split. It is like a death, and we grieve it every day. But I need the BDSM lifestyle, and I figured that sooner or later I would meet someone else and get over Mel. Two days ago, Mel called me and said she wants me back. She says she’s willing to do what I need if it will make it possible for us to be together. Because I’m a switch, it would be perfectly acceptable to me to have her abuse and torture me. I’m functioning as a Dom in the BDSM world at the moment because there are so few female switches around and virtually all female subs turn green at the idea of being with a switch. Also, the competition for female dominants is fierce, and it’s too much for me — especially at age 72. However, if I had to choose to be one or the other, I would choose to be a sub to a dominant woman. Can Mel be that woman? Is it possible for a vanilla person to adapt to BDSM? Also, she does have a few weirdo fantasies of her own, such as making it with a chimp. But she stresses these are not very intensely compelling, as mine are. If it is possible for her to make this change, are there any good books on this?

Wants Helpful Insight, Please! P.S. My son turned me on to your column recently!

Dear WHIP: “Good for you for being honest

about the importance of kink in your life,” says Joan Price, author of Naked at Our Age: Talking Out Loud About Senior Sex. “At our age, we often realize that life is too short for bad sex. Sometimes it takes a series of unfulfilling relationships to make sexy, silver-haired folks like us say, ‘If not now, when?’” And if not Mel, who? You’re a new reader, so you missed this insight the first 10,000 times it appeared in my column, which is that you’ll meet two kinds of people at leather/fetish/BDSM contests, play parties and street festivals: people who were always kinky — men and women who’ve been jacking/jilling off about their kinks since they hit puberty — and formerly vanilla people who fell in love with someone who was kinky, gave their partners’ kinks a try (sometimes to save the relationship), and grew to love their partners’ kinks.

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Dear Dan: I’m a bisexual or pansexual or omni-

“It’s absolutely possible for your vanilla lady to shift into kinky sex, especially since she’s in love with you,” Price says. “Whether she’s doing it just to please you or she’s open to kinks herself, give her a chance.” But you’re going to need to take it slow, and you’ll need to use your words. “Tell her what turns you on,” Price says. “Whisper your fantasies into her ear, share erotica or porn featuring your favorite activities. Solicit her fantasies about dominating you, if she has them, or suggest some scenes to her and see what she responds to. Once she’s ready and willing, start with small steps rather than full-blown scenes, so she can ease into this new world.” And if Mel isn’t traumatized or disgusted by BDSM sex, if she enjoys dominating you or is GGG enough to go there for you on a regular basis, don’t be a stupid, selfish kinkster. Don’t neglect Mel’s desire for vanilla sex. If it helps to think of vanilla sex as a horrible ordeal that you have to submit to — because you’re a good slave — then ask Mel to order you to have vanilla sex. As for books, Price and I recommend The Ultimate Guide to Kink: BDSM, Role Play and the Erotic Edge (Cleis Press, 2012), an informative collection of essays by a diverse group of writers that was edited by the indispensable Tristan Taormino. And if you’re hoping that Mel will join you at public fetish events — parties and contests and street festivals — get her a copy of Mollena Williams and Lee Harrington’s Playing Well with Others: Your Field Guide to Discovering, Exploring and Navigating the Kink, Leather and BDSM Communities. Joan Price blogs about sex and aging at nakedatourage.com.

sexual — or whatever the kids are calling us these days — woman in a monogamish marriage to a great, GGG straight man. Both of us are in our early 30s. Since getting married, we’ve traveled around the world and done whatever the hell we wanted. It was a crazy exciting life, but we decided it was time to stop living paycheck to paycheck, so we came back to the States. We recently bought a house and were planning to have a kid next year. But now my husband says he’s not ready. He says there are things he wants to do that he will never get to do if we have kids now. I asked for a time frame, and he couldn’t answer. What he has said is, “We’ve always said we’d never be one of those couples that stop adventuring because we have a nest and kids and stuff.” I want to be a mom. I’m ready. I don’t want my husband to feel resentment that he never got to live the life he wanted — more travel? more crazy sexual adventures? — because I stuck him with a kid, but at the same time, he can’t even give me a time frame. I love him dearly. He’s my best friend, he’s hot, he’s a wonderful person and funny as hell. They don’t make many men like him. What should I do?

Childless H Dear CH: First, get to a couples counselor. Second, relay this message to your husband from me: Travel and adventure — sexual and otherwise — don’t have to stop after you become parents. They become more difficult, logistically speaking, and you won’t be able to go adventuring on impulse. But you can have adventures as a couple and as individuals. (It’s good for married people, including parents, to spend time apart.) It’s true that most parents stop adventuring, but that’s usually because they were ready to stop or they weren’t that adventurous in the first place. You can do it differently. Pro tip: It’s easier to make time for adventuring if you have one kid. And traveling with a small child — even to live in a foreign country for a year or two — is easier than Parentlandia propaganda would have you believe. Adventurous people can choose to be adventurous parents. DEAR READERS: You were probably expecting me to comment on that “making it with a chimp” detail in WHIP’s letter. But I had nothing to say except, “Really? Holy crap. Chimp fantasies? Damn.” This week on the Savage Lovecast: Do bisexuals need a new label? Savagelovecast.com.

Have a question for Dan Savage? E-mail him at mail@savagelove.net

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The Pitch: November 7, 2013