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M AY 2 3–2 9, 2 013 | F R EE | VOL . 3 2 NO. 47 | PI T CH.COM

ART

Barry Barr y Anderson makes hi hiss As Asce cension. PAG E 1 5

F AT C I T Y

Thirsty? Get Ripped! d! Get Strong! PAG E 20


Sunday, June 9th, 2013

at The Midland by AMC Enter to win two tickets at

M AY 2 3 –2 9 , 2 0 1 3 | V O L . 3 2 N O . 4 7 E D I T O R I A L

Editor Scott Wilson Managing Editor Justin Kendall Music Editor David Hudnall Staff Writers Charles Ferruzza, Ben Palosaari, Steve Vockrodt Editorial Operations Manager Deborah Hirsch Events Editor Berry Anderson Proofreader Brent Shepherd Contributing Writers Tracy Abeln, Theresa Bembnister, Jonathan Bender, Liz Cook, April Fleming, Leslie Kinsman, Larry Kopitnik, Dan Lybarger, Chris Milbourn, Dan Savage, Lucas Wetzel Editorial Intern Katie Miller

A R T

Art Director Ashford Stamper Contributing Photographers Angela C. Bond, Barrett Emke, Chris Mullins, Lauren Phillips, Sabrina Staires, Brooke Vandever Intern Lynn Collins

KCY

P R O D U C T I O N

Production Manager Christina Riddle Multimedia Designer Vu Radley

Does the city need a new, billion-dollar

A D V E R T I S I N G

Kansas City International?

Sales Manager Erin Carey Senior Classified Multimedia Specialist Steven Suarez Multimedia Specialists Michelle Acevedo, Collin Click, Page Olson Director of Marketing & Operations Jason Dockery Digital Marketing Manager Keli Sweetland

B Y S T E V E VO C K R O D T

7

C I R C U L A T I O N

Circulation Director Mike Ryan

B U S I N E S S

Accounts Receivable Jodi Waldsmith Publisher Joel Hornbostel

THE STORY OF HIS LIFE

S O U T H C O M M

Burt Bacharach looks back —

Chief Executive Officer Chris Ferrell Chief Financial Officer Patrick Min Chief Marketing Officer Susan Torregrossa Chief Technology Officer Matt Locke Business Manager Eric Norwood Director of Digital Sales & Marketing David Walker Controller Todd Patton Creative Director Heather Pierce Director of Content/Online Development Patrick Rains

N A T I O N A L

FROM THE LEGENDARY STUDIO GHIBLI CREATORS OF SPIRITED AWAY AND THE SECRET WORLD OF ARRIETTY

bREATHTAKING!

-Peter Debruge, VARIETY

VISUAL MAGIC!” “STUNNING! AS bEAUTIfUL A HANd-dRAWN

-AO Scott, THE NEW YORK TIMES

HHHH

ONE Of THE SHIMMERING HIGHLIGHTS Of THE YEAR!” -Michael Phillips, CHICAGO TRIBUNE

A MUST-SEE!”

-Peter Rainer, CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR

WRITTEN BY HAYAO MIYAZAKI DIRECTED BY GORO MIYAZAKI

STARTS FRI 5/24 2

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M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X

THE PITCH

2


QUESTIONNAIRE

COURTNEY COLE

May Safety Tip:

Executive director, Greater Kansas City Women’s Political Caucus

Hometown: Excelsior Springs Current neighborhood: Elms Boulevard in

Excelsior Springs

Instead of carrying your keys in your purse, carry them on you, such as in your pocket or clipped to a belt loop. This way, if your bag is ever stolen or lost, you will still have the keys to your residence and car!

Who or what is your sidekick? My 5-year-old

daughter, Mackenzie

What career would you choose in an alternate reality? I would be a professional political

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Where do you drink?

Westport Coffeehouse or Brio … depends on the drink.

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What was the last local restaurant you patronized? Ventana

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What’s your favorite charity? Good Samaritan

Center

Favorite place to spend your paycheck: New York & Company

What local phenomenon do you think is overrated? Power & Light District

What local tradition do you take part in every year? The Fringe Festival Celebrity you’d like to ride the Mamba with at Worlds of Fun: Samuel L. Jackson Favorite person or thing to follow on Twitter: The Onion

Where do you like to take out-of-town guests? Wabash restaurant

Finish this sentence: “Kansas City got it right when it …” Elected Emanuel Cleaver mayor in

1991 and has continued supporting him ever since.

“Kansas City screwed up when it …” Stopped

hosting the Kansas City Blues & Jazz Festival.

“Kansas City needs …” An NBA team.

Person or thing you find really irritating at this moment: Kim Jong-un What subscription do you value most? Utne Reader and Radiolab’s podcast

PRE-MIXED SYNTHETICURINE KIT

Last book you read: Robert Ludlum’s The Bourne Identity

Favorite day trip: Love going to Lawrence with my husband, walking Mass Street and eating at Free State Brewery.

Kit Contains:

BECOME A

“People might be surprised to know that I …”

Ran for state office in 2010.

“On my day off, I like to …” Sleep in and spend time with my family.

“In five years, I’ll be …” Continuing my work

politically and working to further rights for women.

What TV show do you make sure you watch?

Parks and Recreation

take(s) up a lot of space in my iTunes:

Fiona Apple

What movie do you watch at least once a year? The Royal Tenenbaums

What is your most embarrassing dating moment? I went to the restroom, and he had a cacti

collection on the back of the stool. I bumped it just right, and one rolled off and got stuck to my backside. He had to help me pull the thorns out. Good thing he still married me!

Interesting brush with the law? I worked for Sheriff Sharp’s campaign, so I probably better not say.

Describe a recent triumph: In last year’s elec-

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tion cycle, I did work for 11 different candidates who were all successful in their campaigns. Cole became executive director of the Greater KC Women's Political Caucus in mid-April.

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3


NEWS

THE BOXER

BY

S T E V E V OC K R OD T

A consultant tells KC that big retail could save Citadel Plaza.

I

n the retail industry, there’s an old adage that “retail follows rooftops.” Which means: Retail stores such as Walmart and Target open in places where people already live, and where they expect those with good earning prospects to move in the future. But a consultant hired by Kansas City, Missouri, seems to buck that analysis, suggesting that the blighted corner of 63rd Street and Prospect is ripe for four or five big-box retail stores. It makes you wonder whether Philip Boname, president of Vancouver-based Urbanics Consultants, has read about the history of the old Citadel Plaza site. Has he even read his own study? Boname stands to make up to $32,700 from Kansas City for his analysis of how to redevelop the contaminated 25-acre site that the Community Development Corporation of Kansas City botched. His solution: retail. It’s a familiar idea. CDC-KC had retail in mind a few years back when it set out to develop a grocerystore-anchored project across the street from Research Medical Center. That project, the Citadel Plaza, became Kansas City’s most infamous development flameout. CDC-KC received an advance from the city to start work. But all that the corporation managed to do was stiff businesses and property owners on sale contracts and direct a subcontractor to bury asbestos. CDC-KC developers Anthony Crompton and William Threatt were eventually brought up on federal charges of improper asbestos remediation. That didn’t stop Threatt and Crompton from suing Kansas City, Missouri, resulting in a $15 million settlement. Kansas City officials maintain that the settlement was a good deal because they got control of the Citadel property. City Hall has insisted that those indicted would not see a dime from the lawsuit’s outcome. But Arvest Bank is now suing Threatt, claiming that he made off with settlement funds. Surely Boname knew all of this when he showed up to a public meeting at the Southeast Community Center May 16, his market study in hand, to say that someone someday would make the Citadel site a retail success. Anything is possible, but facts belie Boname’s optimism. For one thing, Boname’s own report points

out that Kansas City’s retail scene is stagnant. The Citadel’s primary trade area, generally defined as a one-mile driving radius from the site, is losing population — it fell 17 percent from 2000 to 2010. One in every five homes is vacant. The median household income in this primary trade area is $28,055, far less than the Kansas City median of $44,113. About a third of the trade area’s residents live below the poverty level. So, yes, there’s a reason that there’s very little retail in this area of Kansas City. But Boname translates this data differently. He showed several maps of big-box retailers (such as Lowe’s and J.C. Penney) in the Kansas City area that aren’t anywhere close to 63rd Street and Prospect, suggesting that the Citadel site presents an opportunity for one of those retailers to capitalize on the surrounding area’s absence of chain stores. A Lowe’s or a J.C. Penney would take its own look at the neighborhood before committing, and it would note the troubles that nearby shopping centers have experienced. Case in point: Pener Plaza, just a few blocks west on 63rd Street from the Citadel site, which is about 30 percent vacant. And a few blocks west of Pener Plaza, the Landing is 60 percent vacant. One woman at the May 16 meeting said the area used to have big retailers. “We watched it inch away,” she said, “little by little.” Boname deflected skepticism about his recommendations with the insistence that, if only the city found a developer sophisticated enough, his study findings could be brought to life. “A lot of this is dependent on the marketing skills of the city,” Boname said at the meeting. And there is at least some encouraging news about the Citadel site. Environmental workers have found only one parcel, among the 154 that make up the development spot, to have asbestos within the initial 4 inches of topsoil. But city planners still plan to dig several feet deep on 69 of those parcels to see if asbestos, a mineral that causes mesothelioma, remains buried underground. Meanwhile, soil analysis has found strong concentrations of arsenic deep below one of the parcels.

“A lot of this is dependent on the marketing skills of the city.”

4

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KCY Does the city need a new, billion-dollar Kansas City International? BY STEVE VOCKRODT | PHOTOGRAPHY BY SABRINA STAIRES

N

ovember 12, 1972, marked the middle of a terrifying 32-hour jet hijacking, one of the more remarkable such air-industry ordeals in U.S. history. A trio of hijackers, one of them a prison escapee, commandeered a Southern Airways DC-9 leaving Alabama with 27 passengers and four crew members. At one point, they threatened to crash the plane into a nuclearweapons plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, unless authorities met their demands — chiefly $10 million in cash. They got some of their cash and had the pilot steer the plane to Havana, where the hijackers thought they would get a soft landing and a warm welcome in Cuba. Instead, Fidel Castro greeted the weary passengers and crew and then tossed the hijackers in prison. The same day, Kansas City International Airport opened. That day’s edition of The Kansas City Star played the hijacking above the fold, higher than the hometown debut of the facility’s three terminals. The hijacking, one of many during the 1970s and among the first to suggest that a passenger plane could be used as a weapon,

also hinted that KCI’s security outlay may have been outmoded from Day One. Almost 30 years later, 9/11 happened, and KCI’s design further accelerated toward obsolescence. There are reasonable cases to make in advocating for a new, single-terminal airport design, with security being perhaps the foremost. But Kansas Citians shouldn’t be confused about what a new terminal will not bring: more airline business and more travel options. The experience of other new terminals over the past six years shows that, as airlines consolidate and eschew consumer options in favor of profitability, $1.2 billion of construction at KCI’s Terminal A is no guarantee of an increase in flights, passengers or revenue.

M

ark VanLoh laughs when he’s shown a copy of a May 11, 1994, New York Times article characterizing the then-new Denver International Airport as a “Field of Dreams.” That airport, beset by long construction delays and big cost overruns, was and has remained a widely panned example of a major development project not delivering on buildit-and-they-will-come promises.

VanLoh, an unabashed supporter of the new single-terminal KCI, is careful not to promise what only airlines can deliver. “Some would want me to guarantee if we build a new terminal, we will get new flights,” VanLoh told a City Council committee on April 4. “And no one in this room is going to do that. No one on Earth can guarantee what the airlines are going to do next week. But we can guarantee you now that we simply don’t have space for some of our larger airlines to add flights.” But literature produced by KCI veers toward that promise. “The new terminal will include common use gates and open possibilities for additional domestic, international and direct flights that KCI currently can’t accommodate,” reads a question-and-answer sheet published by the Kansas City Aviation Department in April. “Fewer connections and more direct flights will increase business and personal travel options, increasing Kansas City’s appeal for all travelers.” About 10 years ago, some 500,000 passengers connected on flights through KCI. Today about half as many do.

VanLoh blames the decline on the difficulty of connecting flights through KCI. “These people are connecting somewhere, but they’re not doing it here,” he tells The Pitch. “Because it’s so hard to connect here.” A new terminal would include common-use gates, which allow several airlines to use the same gate at different times of the day, rather than the clumsy lease arrangements now in place at KCI. Mineta San José International Airport, for example, allows a Japanese airliner to use a gate there for a half day to send its one daily flight out across the Pacific Ocean, rather than leasing on a permanent basis for mostly unused space. KCI requires new and existing carriers to lease gates in three- to five-gate increments. The way the airport is laid out, other deals could undercut existing leases, causing other carriers to cry foul. Alaska Airlines figured out a way around this, for what airport officials say was a premium. That company replaced Southwest Airlines’ Kansas City-to-Seattle route but did not want to lease three gates for one flight, so it subleased one of Delta continued on page 8

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7


KCY continued from page 7 Airlines’ gates. And it’s reportedly paying a steep price for that luxury. Despite the addition of Alaska Airlines, though, KCI’s travel options have steadily eroded since 2007. From that time through last year, departures dropped from 87,976 to 61,421 — a 30-percent swoon that’s higher than the average 26-percent drop experienced by similarly sized airports over the same span, according to data from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The decline has more to do with the airline industry than it does with airports. “You don’t build a new terminal to get new air services,” says Mike Boyd, founder of the Denver airline consulting firm Boyd Group International. VanLoh agrees with that assessment — mostly. “We’re not building this for next week,” he says. “We’re building this for the future. It’s cyclical. We want to have the option for them [airlines] to add [flights] effortlessly.” Ed Ford, a Kansas City councilman whose Northland district includes KCI, was against a single-terminal design before he was for it. “Southwest can’t expand [at KCI],” he says. “If Southwest has a business decision to expand in four of five years, it isn’t going to be at KCI.” The mergers of major carriers over the years, such as United Airlines and Continental, or Northwest and Delta, has reduced competition and, thus, the number of departures and arrivals at KCI and airports like it. Fewer seats are bad for consumers but good for airlines — lower operating costs and higher demand (with corresponding higher prices) for seats. Which is why city officials like Ford may want to get comfortable waiting for Southwest to expand. Kansas City’s average fare was $292.75 in the third quarter of 2006. Its 18 percent growth to $345.69 in the third quarter of 2012 outpaced the national average increase — 10 percent — over the same period. A study released this month by MIT says this dynamic hits airports like KCI the hardest. When, for example, Southwest Airlines — KCI’s primary carrier — cuts domestic departures, “medium-hub airports [are left] in a precarious position,” the MIT study says. It goes on: “With both network carriers and Southwest cutting service, these ‘secondary airports’ are often no longer able to compete on service or price with larger, nearby hubs.” For proof, just ask the folks at Indianapolis International Airport. That airport opened a $1.1 billion terminal in 2008, just in time for a global financial crisis. The year before that new terminal opened, Indianapolis International Airport had 65,539 departures. Last year, it logged just 49,641. “Airlines are tending to appreciate profits more than market share, where in the past, if one airline initiated service, you’d see the other airlines have a knee-jerk reaction,” says Carlo Bertolini, a spokesman for the Indianapolis 8

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airport. “After years of losses, we’ve seen them be smarter in how they dole out capacity.” Ticket costs have grown in Indianapolis, too, reaching an average fare of $376.24 in 2012, up almost 20 percent from $314.94 in 2006. KCI is also losing market share to smaller airports that used to connect to other destinations through Kansas City. Airports like those in Manhattan, Kansas, and Columbia, Missouri, are subsidizing carriers to draw business rather than have their customers drive to KCI for a flight. Wichita residents who used to drive to Kansas City if they wanted to take advantage of Southwest’s lower airfares are about to save some gas money; on June 2, the airline introduces five flights from Wichita. And that city is in the middle of building a new $101 million terminal, a decision primarily motivated by improving security concerns. Is the new terminal what lured Southwest? “I don’t think that was a consideration,” says Valerie Wise, an air service and business development manager for Wichita Airport Authority.

W

hat do airlines care about, with respect to airports? Mainly the cost of doing business at them. “At this point, we’ve had some high-level conversations with the Kansas City airport about the new terminal and we’ve seen a design concept,” Whitney Eichinger, a Southwest spokeswoman, writes in an e-mail to The Pitch. “Keeping costs low is of utmost importance to Southwest Airlines and we want to ensure this project keeps our costs in line, so we look forward to continuing our conversations and learning more about the project.” The airline isn’t signaling an appetite for expansion. “We currently have enough gates to satisfy the operation we have [at KCI] and anticipate it staying that way with the new design,” Eichinger adds. Costs would almost certainly increase with a new terminal — for parking, for a cup of coffee and for landing an airliner on a runway.

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In Indianapolis, some costs went up after its new terminal opened. Indianapolis International Airport charges a $1.88 landing fee for every 1,000 pounds of weight on an aircraft that’s landing on one of its runways, compared with $1.73 for the same measure in 2006 — an increase driven partly by the lower traffic at the airport since the new terminal opened. Costs are critical to a new terminal in Kansas City because of airlines’ sensitivity to expense and because financing the project would mean the issuance of up to $1.2 billion in bonds. It’s the cheapest form of financing because interest rates tied to bonds are usually low. Kansas City’s finance team estimates that a single terminal could fetch 2.8 percent in interest rates. They would be lucky to find single-digit interest rates among private-equity financiers or pension funds looking to invest in municipally owned airports. Bonds are sold to investors to drum up quick cash. The upfront money would pay for the airport’s construction. Buyers would be repaid by airport revenues — from coffee, parking spaces, landing fees. The city would not be on the hook to make up the difference if the airport didn’t produce enough revenue to cover bond payments. Bondholders would be screwed on their investments, but so would the airport’s reputation when it wanted to issue bonds in the future. Kansas City last issued KCI bonds, worth more than $250 million, for cosmetic and security upgrades in 1999. City officials say that bond issuance bought the airport 10 years of useful life, but that’s about it. VanLoh compares KCI today with driving around in a clunker. Does KCI keep doing $250 million maintenance-type work to the old-bones airport, or does it get a low-interest loan in order to eliminate all those pesky upkeep costs? “You can keep paying your own money or you can take out a loan and buy a new one,” he says. KCI is more like an old house than a 150,000mile car. On a tour of KCI, VanLoh points to a number of cracks and patches in the walls of the aging facility, as well as some flooding in underground parts of the airport. The wear ap-

VanLoh checks out airport construction. pears largely superficial and is the type of thing that critics of a new airport seize upon: Can’t these things be corrected at a lesser expense? “How many of these problems can be fixed with a long-term fix without spending $1.2 billion on an airport,” asks Kevin Koster, a marketing executive in the Northland who started savekci.com, sort of an online meeting place for opponents of the new KCI terminal. Airport officials acknowledge that engineers have not estimated costs for repairing some of KCI’s nagging issues, like the cracks in the walls and the flooding underground. (“Is it dangerous? No,” VanLoh says. “Houses settle, so they will leak.”) New-terminal boosters are also counting on federal money to help defray project costs. But waiting on the feds these days is a fool’s errand. “You can’t put together a financing plan that’s dependent on the federal government,” Kansas City Manager Troy Schulte tells The Pitch. The Airport Improvement Program, a pot of grant money, was initially thought to have emerged unscathed from federal sequestration. But earlier this year, the federal government decided to raid the AIP for $250 million in order to fund air-traffic controllers at smaller airports who were at risk of missing a paycheck. That move annoyed airport officials around the country. They were mindful of the possibility that Congress, like a black-sheep uncle with a hip flask, would get a taste of that new pool of money and keep drawing on AIP for other purposes. “Our trade organizations have been working in Washington and saying, ‘If you start to do this, it’s not fine, but give airports an increase in passenger facility charges,’ ” VanLoh says. And grants from the AIP tend not to be that large. During fiscal year 2012, the largest such grant was a $70 million payout to Chicago O’Hare International Airport to fund runway work. Nearly all other AIP grants were a few


million here, a few hundred thousand there — nothing that would go far in defraying the cost of a $1.2 billion project. KCI during that fiscal year got nearly $3 million in entitlement grants. In any given year, KCI gets between $5 million and $15 million in discretionary funding from the federal government. That puts pressure on airport officials to find new ways to make money while fending off substantial increases in costs to airlines. Right now, KCI’s biggest moneymaker is parking. At $43 million a year, that haul represents about 43 percent of the revenue side of the airport’s ledger. Schulte wants to balance that equation with more revenue from other sources, such as concessions. A new single-terminal airport could put more food and beverage options beyond security checkpoints, countering the existing KCI layout, which offers scant options for beer and chicken wings. They’re nearly all outside the Transportation Security Administration curtain, another vestige of a pre-9/11 airport design. KCI stoops below national averages for concession sales, fetching $3.90 per passenger. The national average for similarly sized airports was $5 in 2012, according to a report by Airports Council International. It’s the same song for retail sales: KCI picks $1.20 off each passenger, compared with the $3.06 national average. Combined, KCI makes just 66 cents in net sales after operators absorb their costs and profits — the lowest in the country, according to VanLoh. VanLoh says a practical haul on concessions and retail, which he believes is attainable with a new terminal, is $2 of net revenue per passenger. Schulte adds that lease arrangements with food, beverage and retail operators could drum up quick cash to help finance the new terminal. Concession revenue bloomed in Indianapolis with its new terminal, going from $5.3 million in 2006, two years before the terminal opened, to $8.6 million last year.

But Ford says the concession argument is dead on arrival for local travelers, who typically migrate beyond security before they have a need for nice restaurants and bars. “It’s real, but I don’t think local people care,” Ford says. “I think passengers with layovers care … [but] I think it’s a nonstarter, and the opponents are able to use that as a straw man.”

T

he new terminal wouldn’t actually cost $1.2 billion. Estimates peg the terminal bill itself at $700 million. Another $300 million would go toward new parking, with $200 million thrown in for a new de-icing platform. Kansas City officials say keeping KCI as it is would require two new de-icing platforms — areas where planes sit on cold or snowy days while getting sprayed down with chemicals that prevent ice buildup. Schulte said that cost would approach $500 million. It’s costs like that, they say, that make the plan for a new terminal a relative wash, over time. But even if the new terminal stalls, Kansas City plans to redo its de-icing pads, likely with a bond issuance. The Missouri Department of Natural Resources and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency have already browbeaten the Aviation Department for too much runoff from the old de-icing pads, which send chemicals seeping into nearby ponds. KCI has never been fined for these transgressions, but city officials fear that the EPA could do to the airport what it did to Kansas City’s sewage-spewing sewer system. It was just a few years ago when the EPA got a federal judge to order a consent decree: basically a coerced promise that Kansas City would spend what will eventually amount to at least $4 billion fixing its nasty, ramshackle sewer infrastructure. “The EPA has been very heavy-handed on us in these issues,” Kansas City Councilman Russ Johnson said during a council hearing. “I’d hate for them to come in and dictate to us when we can get in front of the problem. We could have probably gotten in front of our

“We’ve got all these other problems to fix. Why are they tackling this?”

Cracks are forming at old-bones KCI. sewer problem and didn’t. Let’s not make the same mistake twice.”

O

ne of the biggest mistakes by new-terminal proponents was hawking the idea that an airport could be built near Missouri Highway 152 before realizing that doing so would cost an extra $500 million. That dent in the city’s credibility has lingered in the airport discussion. Ford has suggested that the Aviation Department be governed by an airport authority that’s separate from the City Council, similar to how Indianapolis and Wichita run their airports. “Maybe it would be better to have people more attuned to the industry,” Ford says, “and can be more strategic in governing the airport.” Ford was the chairman of a City Council in charge of transportation matters during Mark Funkhouser’s term before he found himself sideways with the unpopular mayor. Funkhouser replaced Ford with Russ Johnson. Johnson himself has leveled some poor public relations in the airport discussion. On April 4, during a Transportation and Infrastructure Committee hearing on the new airport, he shunted questions from Patrick Tuohey, ShowMe Institute field manager, and insisted that public hearings were for comments only, not questions. He also infamously bolted from television reporter Micheal Mahoney’s attempts to question him about airport matters. Johnson’s office responded to an interview request with instructions to call Global Prairie,

a PR firm that the Aviation Department hired in March for up to $117,000, for comment and information about the terminal proposal. Since last year, the single-terminal concept has faced opposition not just from the City Council but also from what might be a majority of the public. Polls suggest that most Kansas Citians don’t want a new airport. (Pollsters have not released the verbiage of the questions asked, though, which tempers the results somewhat.) Besides savekci.com, a citizens group tried to start a petition against the project, only to be beaten back by the city charter. Now, Friends of KCI is opting for a petition drive in order to stall a new terminal without a public vote on it first. Spokesman John Murphy says his Brookside-based group would prefer that City Hall stick to issues such as education, crime and infrastructure. “We’ve got all these other problems to fix,” Murphy says. “Why are they tackling this?” Crime and local air traffic aren’t mutually exclusive, though. Money used for a new terminal would not come from the Kansas City Police Department’s budget. Friends of KCI’s efforts seem to stem more from their mistrust of City Hall and its misplaced sense of priorities than from the technical aspects of a revamped terminal. “Our concern at the airport is, they will try an end around on the voters,” Murphy says. That’s possible. Issuing bonds would require a public vote, but if such a ballot didn’t go the city’s way, it could seek funding from private equity (at a much higher borrowing cost). Schulte, the city manager, cautions City Hall skeptics that a new terminal is not a done deal. Mayor Sly James appointed a 24-member advisory committee on May 14 to research whether the current airport is suitable and, if not, how to find the best option for a future airport. “The deal is not cooked one way or the other,” Schulte tells The Pitch. “We’re going to give it an honest look … and be as transparent as we can.” The co-chairman of that advisory group is Bob Berkebile, the BNIM architect who helped design the original three-terminal model.

E-mail steve.vockrodt@pitch.com

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WEEK OF MAY 23–29 | BY BERRY ANDERSON

15

PAG E

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Y S U N DA

Barry Anderson lights up.

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PAG E

5 . 26 t it. Jus Jiggle . t bi a little

PAGES It’s not unusual to love Bacharach.

17

PAG E

FILM Fast & Furious 6 : still no recall.

KIDDIE KINGDOM People often ask: What is Jiggle Jam? When that happens, we just reach into our billfold and produce a folded-up clipping of what Chris Packham wrote in these pages in 2011: “And lo, a drear fog did descend upon the land. And Dora the Explorer was in reruns, and Grandma did embark on a Carnival cruise, and the prophesied

T H U R S D AY | 5 . 2 3 | DEMOLITION MEN

Once a summer entertainment staple, demolition derbies are now in the twilight of popularity. “They’re passing by the wayside, unfortunately,” says Patrick Sumner, director of the new documentary Civil War on Wheels, a retrospective about demolition-derby subculture in eastern Kansas and western Missouri in 2004. “So many of the old-school cars are gone now. Some of the excitement has diminished, but the sport does continue.” Supported by a soundtrack of some of KC’s grungiest bands — Sin City Disciples, Molly Gene, Split Lip Rayfield, Snuff Jazz and more

second coming of Lightning McQueen was yet a fortnight hence. The Pokemon had lost its allure, and the Fruit Roll-Ups tasted bitterly of the sandbox. The children beseeched Mommy: Have mercy, for this dullness tortures us! And verily did Mommy say, If thou hast boredom, I shall give thou something to do. Thence shone from the gleaming castle of Crown Center Square (2425 Grand, 816-274-8444) the brightness

of merriment. In wonderment, the children did say, Hark! ’Tis a jam that jiggles! And so it was: two days of family gaiety on Saturday (9 a.m.–7 p.m.) and Sunday (10 a.m.–5 p.m.), encompassing edifying activities, the assemblage of crafts, and the jollity of music performed by national entertainers of children, sweetened by the balm of amusement.” Got that? See kcjigglejam.com for more information.

took part in the brutal Kansas versus Missouri battles of long ago. The film’s local premiere screens at the Tivoli (4050 Pennsylvania, 816-561-5222) at 7 p.m. Donations are accepted in lieu of ticket charges. Search “Civil War on Wheels trailer” on YouTube for a preview.

Center). LaChiusa, who has been nominated for multiple Drama Desk and Tony awards, is here not only to see the 8 p.m. show but also to talk with the audience afterward. Take advantage of this opportunity to hear him discuss his work and, in particular, this play, by making a reservation at 816-842-9999 or spinningtreetheatre.com. — DEBORAH HIRSCH

F R I D AY | 5 . 2 4 | HI HI HI Crash! Bang! Vroom! — the documentary introduces viewers to We Ain’t Stupid, a derby team from the early days of the Crossroads Arts District scene that

The award-winning composer, lyricist and librettist Michael John LaChiusa visits KC tonight for a performance of his 1993 Obie Award–winning musical Hello Again, getting its KC premiere at Spinning Tree Theatre (Off Center Theatre, 2450 Grand, Crown

THE KING OF KANSAS CITY

Here’s to hoping that we can be as badass as Millage Gilbert when we turn 75. The downhome Mississippi blues guitarist and singer has been playing around KC since 1963, and he marks the big continued on page 12

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Topics of panels at this year’s ConQuesT 44 — KC’s longest running science-fiction convention — include “How to Throw a Successful Con Party,” “The Fandom Way of Life” and “Men and Women’s Magic — Gendered Forms of Magick.” In addition to cosplay, tournament gaming and displays of realistic weaponry are an art show, a dealers room and a masquerade ball. ConQuesT really does have something for everyone. Experience the magic all weekend at the Holiday Inn Kansas City SE (9103 East 39th Street, Independence, 816-737-0200), starting today at noon. The cost is $35 for a single-day pass or $65 for three days. For more information, see conquestkc.org.

FARMERS MARKET VENDOR SPOTLIGHT: MIKE MARTIN AT OVERLAND PARK

TEACHER the pitch

FANTASY WORLD

S AT U R D AY | 5 . 2 5 |

ENGLISH

12

continued from page 11 seven-five this month with a local tour that makes a stop at B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ (1205 East 85th Street, 816-822-7427). And tonight is his actual birthday, so buy the man one of those barbecue sundaes with the beans and coleslaw! Additional appearances include the Hideout (6948 North Oak Trafficway, 816-468-0550) Saturday and Knuckleheads Saloon (2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456) Sunday. Tonight’s gig starts at 9.

pitch.com

KC Pitch

Mike Martin, of 4 D Acres farm, outside Louisburg, has been raising emus for 17 years and selling emu products for 15. “I sell every part of the bird, even the bones,” he says, adding that it takes 14 to 16 months before an emu can be processed into food, pet treats, skincare products and dietary supplements, such as emu-oil soft-gel caps. “You don’t burp up emu oil like you do fish oil,” he says when asked about the benefits of the omega-3 and omega-6 essential fatty acids that come from his birds. See for yourself after making a purchase from Martin, who sells exclusively at the Overland Park Farmers Market (7950 Marty) from 6:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. every Saturday. For more information, see 4dacres.com.

GET RIGHT, GET TIGHT

Looking hot is a lifestyle, amirite? GTL all you want, but it takes a lot more than Hitch Fit, laser hair removal and protein powders to make it to the throne of hottie kingdom. See the best in show at today’s WBFF 2013 Central U.S. Fitness Show when competitors show off their taut bodies, golden abs and hair-free lasered armpits at the Midland (1228 Main, 816-283-9921) at 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Tickets cost $37.75 for the early show and $62.75 or $72.75 for the later show. See midlandkc.com.

TWINKLE TOES

Local dancer and instructor Billie Mahoney never got the chance to perform with tap legend Bill “Bojangles” Robinson, who predated Mahoney’s 1950s NYC performances. But she honors him today on his birth date, which E R O M also falls on National Tap Dance Day. She invites all tap dancers and jazz T A INE ONL .COM musicians to the Uptown H PITC Arts Bar (3611 Broadway) for a jam of sorts, complete with live music and a two-hour open dance beginning at 7 p.m. Afterward, scheduled performers take to the stage for solo dances. “2001 was the last time we did this event,” Mahoney says, “and I’d like to revive it.” For more information, see uptownartsbar.com.

EVENTS

S U N D AY | M AY 2 6 | ROCK YOUR CHAKRAS

Do your chakras need balancing? Is it time to break out your new yoga pants? Do you need to get your kids out of the house and into a hula hoop? Yes, yes and yes! Get to today’s Yoga Rocks the Park, a new series of outdoor yoga classes for all ages and levels that are set to DJs and live music. Local instructors teach the weekly sessions, through the end of June, at Roanoke Park (3701 Roanoke). Move and stretch in unison for free (normally, classes cost about $15) with Gina Caputo from the Sage Center for Yoga & Healing Arts. Registration begins at 9 a.m. See yogarocksthepark .com and click on the KC link for information.


T U E S D AY | 5 . 2 8 |

SPIN CITY

’MERICA!

Break out the lawn chairs and a vintage boxed wine. Celebration at the Station is on again in front of Union Station (Pershing Road and Main) at 8 p.m. Watch the fireworks and other people’s children behaving badly, but make note of this year’s featured performers joining the Kansas City Symphony: MusiCorps, a band made up of wounded veterans from the Iraq and Afghanistan wars, and soul diva Oleta Adams. Parking is scarce, but admission is free. See kcsymphony.org/ celebration for more information.

M O N D AY | M AY 2 7 | FALLING UP

Before CGI and 3-D, the movies gave you cold-sweat vertigo honestly: by dangling the hero a dozen stories off the ground (give or take a little optical trickery and a lot of expert stuntwork). Ninety years after silent-film audiences first saw Harold Lloyd hang off a tall building’s enormous clock face, Safety Last still makes your stomach lurch — and remains one of the most entertaining American comedies ever made. See a pristine restoration of it for just $5 at Tivoli Cinemas, and take up to two children with you for free. Just don’t let the kids attempt to re-create any of Lloyd’s moves in the lobby afterward. Safety Last plays at 1:30 today (and yesterday) at the Tivoli (4050 Pennsylvania, 816-561-5222, tivolikc.com). — SCOTT WILSON

W E D N E S D AY | M AY 2 9 | WET HOT AMERICAN SUMMER

If you were so inclined, you could plop your fat ass in a tube and just ride all day long at Schlitterbahn (9400 State Avenue, Kansas City, Kansas, 913-312-3110). But if you do that, you won’t be able to enjoy the Black Knight (a dark, enclosed, coiled slide) or the Boogie Bahn, a new surf ride that sends 55,000 gallons of water per minute across a padded surface. But, hey, it’s your $37 admission fee. We just recommend that you hit up Henry’s Hideout, the swim-up bar, for at least one piña colada. The park is open from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. today; see schlitterbahn.com/kc for details.

I

n a city where the mic is king, the DJ is a loyal servant to its followers. And to the early-in-the-week beat. Names: Ben Hargis and Lawrence Bryant DJ Aliases: Sigrah (Hargis) and NMEZEE (Bryant) Hometowns: KCMO (Harg is), Cape Girardeau (Bryant) Previous residencies: Riot Room and Elements in the Power & Light District (Hargis), Gusto Lounge (Bryant) Current residencies: Low End and Futuro at the Riot Room, Spectra and Super Mega Rage Face Party at the Union (Hargis); Low End and Futuro at the Riot Room (Bryant) Beat vehicle: Two Technics 1200 MK3Ds and an AEM100i scratch mixer, all tied together with Serato (Hargis); two Technics MK2 turntables, four-channel mixer and a Serato SL3 (Bryant) Description of set: “A medley of different genres and styles complementing the current feel or mood in the room,” Hargis says. “Thick, rich and full of dedication,” Bryant adds. Current top 5: Hargis — “Shadow Child” by 23 featuring Tymer, “Flarelight” by I Believe (Deejay Theory remix), “AlunaGeorge” by Attracting Flies (Shift K3Y remix), “Kastle” by Timeless featuring Armanni Reign and Domonique Porter, “Overgrown” by James Blake. Bryant — “Disclosure” by Latch, “Sincere” by M.J. Cole, “Insatiable” by Kastle featuring Ayah Marar, “Antiserum & Mayhem” by BayTL Dub, “Brookes Brothers” by Loveline featuring Haz-Mat. DJ Sigrah and NMEZEE, aka the Low End, spin every Tuesday from 10 p.m. to close at the Riot Room (4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179).

• Taste and purchase handcrafted KANSAS wines! • Live music by The Cathy Hunt Trio, Mistura Fina and Rod Fleeman & Dan Bliss! • Chef prepared cuisine • Beautiful local art • More info on facebook.com/WinesongAtRiverfest

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BLOW HARD

L I Z C O OK

Hurlyburly: Coke is tough, being a man tougher.

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he Living Room’s electric revival of Hurlyburly caps a spring theater season that has hummed with masculine energy. Director Bryan Moses’ production exposes a male angst so manic and so thick that you picture the stage crew hosing testosterone off the walls after every performance. David Rabe’s unwieldy endurance test of a play follows four 1980s film-industry professionals and the women they pass around like joints. In the sparse Los Angeles bungalow where all the action takes place, the diet is simple: cocaine, liquor and self-loathing. That lifestyle has taken a toll on Eddie, an emotionally infantile casting director who rants about Vegas and the Middle East while snorting a heroic amount of blow. It’s hard to Hatley and Gilchrist do a line. find much in Eddie to love, but veteran Kyle Hatley captures a paranoid vulnerability that Gilchrist brings dignity and strength to the role; Bonnie might be the gang’s go-to goodboth lures and repels. He’s enthralling. Screenwriter Artie (Tim Ahlenius) overcom- time girl, but she’s able to match their energy and eloquence without sacrificing humanity. pensates for his insecurities with confident airs and “gifts” like Donna (Alice Pollack), an (There’s also great work by Natalie Liccardello, up-for-anything teenager he delivers to his as Eddie’s “dynamite bitch” of a girlfriend, and friends as a “care package” for them to treat by promising newcomer Pollack.) like a blow-up doll. Bonnie’s entrance marks a turning point in Forrest Attaway is brilliant as Eddie’s friend Rabe’s script, and as the booze flows, tempers Phil, a struggling actor who swaggers around boil. Eddie gets steadily drunker (and crueler) the bungalow, looking for blood whenever he over the course of the act, and Hatley captures perceives a slight against him. He’s violent, his slurred speech and ambling gait perfectly. particularly toward women, but he still longs “We all know we don’t mean shit in one anothfor his ex-wife and coos over his new daughter. er’s eyes, finally,” he says, desperate to wound. Mickey (Rusty Sneary) is Eddie’s fellow Hurlyburly depends on the strength of its casting director, the yin to his yang. He alone performances, and the cast here hits so hard among these fractured men seems immune in the first two acts that the final third of to the anxiety that racks the group. Nothing the play is a bit of a letdown. This is largely shakes his deadpan cynicism and practiced built in: Rabe’s script doesn’t really take the ease. Sneary delivers Mickey’s lines with the characters anywhere new. Eddie starts the smooth, confident air of a play as a coke fiend falling pickup artist — this guy beto pieces and ends the play Hurlyburly longs in Hollywood. … as a coke fiend falling to Through May 26 The sparse, intimate set pieces. Rabe riffs on a few at the Living Room on the Living Room’s first potential sources for Eddie’s 1818 McGee, 816-533-5857 f loor keeps the focus on existential angst — the neuthelivingroomkc.com these four personalities, tron bomb, infant-formula and Moses keeps Rabe’s slick dependency in the Third speeches from flagging. Hurlyburly plays out World — but nothing coalesces satisfactorily. like a coke-fueled fever dream, and the actors The result is a finale that feels unfocused and mostly keep up with the grueling pace that it muddled, with an energy like the weapon he demands. Saturday’s show ran three hours and rails against: indiscriminately destructive. 45 minutes, with two 10-minute intermissions. By then, though, the Living Room’s proNot that you’ll be checking your watch. Act duction has churned out big laughs and raw II, especially, races along. Eddie has called on emotions at furious speed, kicking up an intelBonnie, self-proclaimed “drug person” and lectual and emotional whirlwind. If nothing exotic “balloon dancer,” to be with Phil. She else, this Hurlyburly is a potent reminder that saunters around with a drink in one hand and cocaine is a hell of a drug. a joint in the other, flirting and doing lines with an alacrity that even Eddie might admire. Katie E-mail feedback@pitch.com PA U L A N D R E W S

STALK US! WE DARE YOU

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ART

A LOOK AROUND

Barry Anderson’s The Janus Restraint: The

BY

Ascension chips off some Iceland for summer.

T R A C Y A BE L N

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arry Anderson is known for his bright, colorful video works: bars and diagonals and bubbles, light-rich abstractions that act as moving collages. His art features regularly in group exhibitions around the country and is in a number of museum and private collections, and recently he has collaborated with bands such as the U.K.’s Written in Waters, making abstract videos for their music. With his new The Janus Restraint: The Ascension, at Studios Inc., Anderson expands beyond what he has called “a video mindset.” Yes, there’s video here, as well as sound and still photography and sculpture. It’s the beginning of a bigger project (including some online-only aspects, visible at thejanusrestraint.com), he told a group gathered for a gallery talk May 11. And part of the impetus for it is simple enough: His son, Finn, is growing up. We see that for ourselves just inside the cavernous exhibition space, where a singlechannel video plays on a movable wall. In “Finnean,” a portrait of Anderson’s 9-yearold son, the boy looks directly at the camera, at us, and we see him split prismatically into patterns, mostly horizontal diamonds moving downward. Sometimes layers from other scenes of him slide by, and the green of a lawn in the background suggests summer afternoons of play. There is a vision of him sleeping, onto which Anderson has painted a few glimpses that suggest the unknown thoughts behind an innocent gaze, the changes to come. At one point, the vivid green of a Halloween mask is spliced in — a Frankenstein’s creature set upon the world to find an identity. A narrative about the passage of time is universal, but Anderson spares us what could have been, under less skillful orchestration, so intensely personal as to be irrelevant. Janus isn’t someone foisting family photographs on you or hijacking a conversation with rambling stories about his child’s accomplishments. For one, the sheer beauty of Anderson’s crisp images is seductive. And we identify with the boy, imagine what he might be thinking (the direction effectively takes us to the idealized rather than to the actual — this version of Finn is a fiction), remember what it was like on the cusp of adolescence. Janus is the Roman god of beginnings and transitions, usually represented with two faces, one looking to the past and the other anticipating the future. It’s a symbol that Anderson uses to straddle, among other things, that cusp, that middle ground between youth and adulthood.

while finding a way to spend time with his In this show’s four “Totemic Sonar” singleson, is not new for Anderson, but much of the channel videos, for example, circular screens are set into solid wooden box frames and raw visual material he’s using here is. Almost all of this work was created in the past two arranged vertically on the wall, and we see months, thanks to the experimental freearrow shapes and expanding circles pulse dom afforded by the Studios Inc. program. by quickly. Catching the images in the bits Part of his recent palette is Iceland itself; he behind the more solid-colored shapes offers spent February at the Nes Artist Residency its own intrigue. Is this the Earth from orbit? in Skagaströnd. the woods? The arrows split the space, and the Geologic time is self-evident in Iceland, circles corral it back again, endlessly. where the landscape has been shaped by Tinged by ambient music coming from “Fragments of Space [ST2],” which is pro- thousands of years of volcanic activity. It jected hugely on another wall, are the chant- has the world’s oldest known geyser and as recently as June 1967 added a new, mile-wide ing tones of a child reading … something. island to its southern coast, the result of an That voice, in an effect that, at least in terms underwater eruption that lasted more than of sound, recalls Hugo Ball’s lobster-suit dada three and a half years. It also bears the marks performance, is reciting Icelandic historian of human time. When settlers arrived in the and poet Snorri Sturluson’s 13th-century late 800s, the place was one-fourth trees; toProse Edda Gylfaginning. The child’s voice, day only 1 percent of the land is forested, and played through 24 little round speakers erosion caused by farming piled together on the floor, and grazing over the years is charming but also feels a The Janus Restraint: makes it difficult to add to little distant, perhaps owThe Ascension those numbers. ing to the language and the Through June 21 For non-natives, though, mythology outlined in the at Studios Inc., 1708 Iceland’s vast rocky sweeps, story. Sturluson composed Campbell, 816-994-7134, volcanic peaks, ocean cliffs his Gylfaginning to reconstudiosinc.org and glaciers offer inspiracile the Icelandic Christian tion. And the metaphors society of the time with its inherent in the landscape gave an outline to earlier culture; its narrator talks about the Anderson’s quest. journey from the mainland, about gods and Three of Anderson’s single-channel kings, and he quotes the older sagas. videos here use only his Iceland footage. One of the stories recounted is about Hjúki and Bil, two children taken up into the sky “Kristalsform” addresses transience by dramatizing the melting of ice. “Mývatn” by the gods as they were coming from a well called Byrgir. This could be an origin of the (named for the shallow lake created by a Jack and Jill nursery rhyme. For Anderson, volcanic eruption 2,300 years ago) shows a fissure spewing geothermic steam in symit’s a piece of the prism through which we metrical formations manipulated by the artfind contemporary rites of passage. The urge to capture and repurpose myth, ist. “Spákonufell,” named for the mountain it

Left: the gallery; above: “Finnean” depicts, recalls a character in Skagaströnd’s sagas, a prophet-witch who climbed the peak daily and hid her gold there using a spell. Anderson centers the mountain in the frame and splits it into a blue, snow-capped reflection of itself, shimmering under a layer of surreal water droplets. There’s also a periscope titled “Bifröst,” a large white viewing apparatus that requires you to kneel on a silver pillow and look up into the green, zooming Northern Lights. Anderson believes that everyone should see the aurora borealis. (“It’s transformative,” he told the May 11 audience.) Even captured on video, it’s stunning. Leaning closest to narrative is the video “Entries,” which begins with a boy (Finn, in acting mode) chipping at a tree stump. He and another boy dig with sticks in the mud. Images of Finn entering an overturned hollow tree suggest a journey. Later we see him asleep as Icelandic landscapes sweep by, and then swinging a baseball bat before the foggy fields and the sea return. The actual baseball bat is installed, midswing, in a surreal interaction with a mirror. Called “9 Is the Key,” it acts as a “through the looking glass,” “break into the next thing” summary. And whatever Thor’s-hammer notion might be at work, baseball includes its own mythology, one that includes the ties between father and son. Anderson says he plans to continue the project over the summer. Steep yourself in this introduction, this enchanting thoughtscape, to be ready for the next chapter.

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PAGES

THE STORY OF HIS LIFE

Burt Bacharach looks

BY

back — but keeps going.

D A N LY B A R G E R

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urt Bacharach turned 85 this month but did almost nothing to lighten his still hectic schedule. When The Pitch contacted the producer-composer-pianist by phone, he was about to leave a New York hotel to catch a flight, on to the next event.  It has been this way for him since the late 1950s, when the Kansas City native launched a career that would yield 73 Top 40 hits and various Grammys and Oscars. His work on the road now is to promote his new memoir (cowritten with Robert Greenfield), Anyone Who Had a Heart: My Life and Music. Naturally there’s a six-CD boxed set, too, with the same title, and it’s rich with those very familiar songs: “Walk on By,” “Raindrops Keep Fallin’ on My Head,” “Arthur’s Theme,” “On My Own,” “This Guy’s in Love With You,” “I’ll Never Fall in Love Again,” “What the World Needs Now Is Love,” “What’s New, Pussycat?” and “That’s What Friends Are For” among them. (Figuring prominently in the track listing: singer Dionne Warwick and another frequent Bacharach collaborator, lyricist Hal David.) Set against all that pop lightness, Bacharach’s book also recalls some painful memories. He talked with The Pitch about some of them, and about how he has been able to write catchy songs, challenge musicians and woo generations of listeners.   The Pitch: During our research, we found the house where you lived as a toddler. Do you remember the address? Bacharach: No kidding? I left when I was 1 year old, so I have no memory. Warwick Boulevard Wow. How about that for a coincidence? I did play with the Kansas City Symphony, maybe in the last 20 years. [He was here in February 1997 and October 2002.] It was maybe the first time I was back in Kansas City. I was going onstage, and I started talking to the orchestra about how I was born here and my dad worked at [department store] Woolf Brothers. It kind of caught me off guard. I really got emotional onstage, and I didn’t see it coming. In the book, you said two fellow Kansas City pianists led you to stop seeing your piano lessons as drudgery: Count Basie and Mary Lou Williams. What was it about those two that made you change your mind about music? She was from Kansas City? [She recorded six of her early songs here in 1929.] I loved the Basie band. Mary Lou Williams was just a great jazz pianist. She was a judge at a jazzpiano festival competition that I had entered in New York. She wasn’t one of the original judges. There were eight judges. First prize was going to be 14 lessons with Teddy Wilson. Second prize was going to be

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with Joe Bushkin. It ended up with a split decision. Four voted for me, and four voted for a pianist named Warren Vaughan. So Mary Lou Williams walked in, and she became the deciding vote. Warren Vaughan played his song, and I played my song, and she opted for Warren Vaughan.  Instead of Teddy Wilson, I got Joe Bushkin, who was a great guy. I learned a lot from him, nothing about music. Fourteen lessons on life from Joe Bushkin when you’re a kid is real. [Laughs.] When you put chords together, it’s like you’re taking a square peg, putting it into a round hole, and somehow it magically fits. Why do you think you’ve been able to pull that stuff off where it doesn’t sound awkward or dissonant? That’s interesting. You do it unintentionally. You just do it. It’s a natural process. I don’t try to make it more unusual or more difficult for the player or the listener. Never beat up the listener. Never overwhelm them. Never exhaust them. You’ve worked with Dionne Warwick, who’s conservatory trained, but you coaxed great vocal performances from Marlene Dietrich, who could barely get past an octave, and Herb Alpert, a moonlighting trumpeter. Why do you think you did such good work with them? You try to, certainly with Marlene, try to get the best out of her. You try to teach her about not rushing. I used to use the expression, “Sit back on the tempo, sit comfortably in the song instead of that knee-jerk discomfort.” Herbie, while not a great singer, is a tremendous musician, a tremendous trumpet player, a very musical guy. He gets by on musicality.

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Bacharach lived in this home on Warwick Boulevard as a toddler. Your stuff still gets covered a lot. The White Stripes did a fascinating reworking of your 1962 song “I Just Don’t Know What to Do With Myself.” I really liked what Jack White did with that. It’s primal, whereas yours is orchestral. I think a good song is a good song. I’ve started doing it in concert more and more. How did you get to where you could write about your daughter’s death?  I think it’s a process. It goes on, and you try to understand it. When it happened, I’d just had surgery on my shoulder. Then, all in a 48-hour period, my son (Christopher) had ruptured his spleen in a snowboarding accident up in Aspen, so [my wife] Jane had to fly up to Aspen. I was just coming out of the hospital, on Vicodin. I went by the house to see her [actress Angie Dickinson, his ex-wife and the mother of his daughter, Nikki]. It was like sleepwalking. You’re in terrible physical pain. Your arm’s in a sling, and you’re stoned out of your mind, and you can’t believe what just happened. That’s two days in your life that indelibly stick in your mind, and you don’t get away from it. And you shouldn’t get away from it. You should be conscious of it, but you shouldn’t dwell on it. You shouldn’t let it overtake you and overwhelm you and take you down to dark places constantly. It’s stuff you have to learn. Nikki had those kind of odds stacked up against her. Nobody was talking about that [autism and Asperger’s]. Now you hear this

talk about out how one out of every 50 kids has it. Maybe it’s a larger number. And you wonder: Was it always this way? Or have they just been able to diagnose it? Or is there something going on that’s changing the environment to produce more young people with a form of autism? I just don’t know. Clearly autism has existed or been known about in psychiatric terms for years and years and years. They just didn’t know about it in the hospital or in the treatment center [where Nikki was treated].  In the final chapter of the book, you list several projects that you’re working on. Why do you think that people like you and, say, Woody Allen have kept working for so long?  It’s important to keep on going. It’s part of living. It’s what you do.

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Femmes fatales fire up Fast & Furious 6.

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f the entirety of the nitro-burning delirium that is Fast & Furious 6 were just Gina Carano fighting Michelle Rodriguez, it would be the best movie of the year — a new-millennium Faster, Pussycat! Kill! Kill!, something nobody’s been able to deliver since Russ Meyer died. Regrettably, though, Furious 6 comes loaded with a bunch of other intrigue — something about a renegade heister trying to assemE MOR ble a device that would k noc k out a n ent ire country’s power infraT A E IN ONL .COM structure for a day. Not PITCH that you need to worry about the plot, which is about as essential here as an operating manual is to a dam burst. Wait, you say, wasn’t Rodriguez killed off in the fourth installment? The answer: sort of, but yeah, but no. The fi lmmakers have brought back her character, Letty Ortiz, which is good; in a healthy sign for our culture, every franchise that has killed off Rodriguez has also brought her back to life. Yet it’s unfortunate that the Fast & Furious series couldn’t pick up the more progressive attitudes of the Resident Evil franchise, because this movie’s gender issues are all messed up. Letty functions mostly as the movie’s pivot, an objective for Dominic (Vin Diesel, just as you remember him) and his crew to recapture. Four more women are on the

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periphery of this endeavor. Two are devoted The unkillable Michelle Rodriguez to their respective men and send them off to At times, Furious 6 starts to feel like a do man stuff, like infi ltrate prisons or track down amnesiac ex-girlfriends, while they Saw fi lm (which is funny given that James tend to the children. The other two kick a Wan, who directed the fi rst Saw, is at the significant amount of ass and have just as helm of the seventh FF movie) or one of much agency and power in their relationthe Star Wars prequels. Those associations ships as their respective partners. Guess come to mind not because of special effects which ones die? or tone, though, but because screenwriter Granted, the cast seems to be having a Chris Morgan (who has written every film in blast, for the most part. Paul Walker looks the series since the third installment, Tokyo tired. That’s just an observation — he’s play- Drift) makes a point of connecting all the ing a new father, so perhaps it’s a method characters’ backstories. It’s a big problem approach. Similarly, Vin — the franchise is now so Diesel looks off, as though entrenched in its “family” Vin Diesel looks like he’s an unstable fusion of racers and scoff laws of a Greek statue and the that it can’t introduce new an unstable fusion of Pillsbury Doughboy, concharacters that matter. No a Greek statue and the effort seems to have been stantly shifting so you Pillsbury Doughboy. never see him the same made to figure out the last way twice. (Get this man reel’s big twist, a developa David Cronenberg bodyment that could have been horror extravaganza.) Ludacris and Tyrese earthshaking, were it not rendered in such have a breezy rapport as the comic relief, but an obvious and perfunctory way. they aren’t ridiculous when called upon to That said, the coda tucked away just after get serious. the end credits start is a mother of a scene, Carano takes a chickenshit role and turns one that sets the stage for mayhem in that it into chicken salad. Building on her lead seventh film. It almost makes up for the overin Steven Soderbergh’s deconstructed acload of exposition and the muddled climax. tion masterpiece Haywire, she kicks, flings, And the series still hasn’t lost sight of what it punches and whoops the ass of your heart. does best: attractive people, the destruction The moment when Dwayne “The Rock” of property, fast cars, betrayal, forgiveness, Johnson brings down a tractor of a man with intrigue. For the sixth time, it delivers. his elbow elicited an ooh of awe at my screening, but Carano’s fight scenes got at least four. E-mail feedback@pitch.com

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LEAWOOD • PARK PLACE • 913.850.6260 • RASUSHI.COM


CAFÉ

MMM BAP

Waldo’s Kokoro Maki House makes decent sushi — and good Korean food.

BY

CHARLES FERRUZZA

Kokoro Maki House • 340 West 75th Street, 816-363-0678 • Hours: 11 a.m.–9 p.m. Monday–Friday, noon–9 p.m. Saturday, closed Sunday • Price: $$–$$$

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CAFÉ

ANGELA C. BOND

here are not four Korean restaurants in Kansas City,” said a friend of mine who is something of an expert in the cuisine of the Korean peninsula. “There are seven.” My mind scanned the places I knew: Choga Korean Restaurant, Chung’s Rainbow Restaurant, Chosun Korean BBQ, Sobahn. Where were the others? How had I missed them? My friend explained that the three I’d failed to recall aren’t exclusively Korean but serve select dishes from that country’s culinary reperE MOR toire. At the Red Snapper, on Ward Parkway, chef Casey Chao prepares T A E IN ONL .COM a few entrées from his PITCH native Korea. And Café Vie, a coffeehouse in Overland Park operated by the Ahn family, offers an incredibly good bulgogi taco — an overto the mounds of bland white rice served stuffed wrap, really — in addition to its pho with the sizzling plates of stir-fried spicy bowls, rice bowls and bubble teas. pork (more sweet and gingery than hot) or Then there’s Kokoro Maki House, a small the marinated short ribs. Those ribs seem sushi emporium in Waldo where patrons order to be sliced rib-eye at Kokoro, marinated in at a counter from a collection of traditional a brassy soy-and-brown-sugar sauce, then maki (California and caterpillar rolls, for exflash-grilled. They’re tasty but a bit chewy. ample), nigiri sushi, ramen bowls and plates of White rice in any dish is the culinary equivfried rice. A lot of the traffic in this storefront alent of a blank canvas until it’s given a kind of restaurant is carryout, but if you choose to eat de Kooning treatment with chili paste, tissueinside the lilac-colored dining room — shielded thin sheets of pungent cabbage kimchi, and from the traffic and grime of 75th Street with pickled vegetables. The selection of banchan translucent shoji screens — the employees will presented here isn’t as elaborate as the condibring out your meal on a tray. ment assortment at other Korean restaurants, That’s the best way to enjoy Kokoro’s eight but it’s serviceable. Besides, the meals at Kofine Korean dishes, which demand a certain koro qualify as inexpensive, and none of the amount of drama that is best conveyed inside Korean dishes costs more than $13. the dining room rather than at your kitchen If American diners have a favorite Korean table. The serving of the banchan, those little dish, it’s probably dolsot bibim bap. Kokoro’s dishes of condiments, is done with aplomb version requires a certain here. The servers patiently amount of tactile attention — explain why each little bowl Kokoro Maki House or, as I prefer to call it, work. is an important component Kokoro Maki roll ...........$10.95 Unlike regular bibim bap, to the bigger picture: a modBanana tempura roll .....$5.95 which is simply a bowl of rice est but appealing assortment Dolsot bibim bap ...........$10.95 (with, perhaps, a little beef) of grilled meats, a bubbling Spicy pork ......................$10.95 topped with tiny mounds of bowl of tofu soup, or the LA short ribs ..................$12.95 vegetables and an egg, the Korean comfort food bibim Bulgogi .............................$11.95 dolsot bibim bap is served bap (mixed rice, according in a white-hot stone bowl, to my Korean friends, often which cooks the raw egg and slightly crisps prepared as a way to use leftovers from the the rice to give it a delicious crunch. Mixprevious night’s meal). ing up the concoction with a spoon blends A full range of tastes — salty, sour, sweet, together the firm matchsticks of carrot and bitter — is encompassed in these coastersquash with the mushrooms and radishes size dishes: a clump of fiery and briny and steamy lettuce. The result is a supple kimchi, ribbons of garlicky fi sh cake, tart do-it-yourself stir-fry that can be eaten as is pickled vegetables. These condiments and a or punched up with kimchi and chili paste. discreet dab of Kokoro’s sinus-clearing chili There are so few places around here that paste, gochujang, are necessary additions

Sushi is the house specialty at Kokoro Maki, but Korean dishes are the big surprise. serve bibim bap — or any of the more asskicking Korean dishes, such as the headspinning stew kimchi jjigae that blends slowsimmered pork, garlic and red-pepper paste — that Kokoro deserves more attention. If, like me, you’ve driven past the place for years and dismissed it as just another midtown sushi joint, then it may be time to pull over. Kokoro’s sushi is the restaurant’s calling card, and it’s fresh, if solidly average. The signature maki roll here is a prettily constructed cylinder of crispy shrimp tempura, spicy “crab” (the crabmeat used by the sushi chef is clearly imitation) and cream cheese. A New York roll has pieces of apple. But the oddest assemblage at this restaurant is a savory roll wrapped around banana tempura and served with a sweet chili sauce. If you’ve ever wondered what banana bread might taste like in a rice wrapper, this is your roll. But don’t confuse it with the banana tempura offered on the dessert menu. (There’s fried cheesecake, too, because of course there is.) There’s no alcohol served at Kokoro Maki House. If a diner longs for a cool swig of Taedonggang beer with his or her bowl of sun dubu, well, that’s what takeout is for. But there are free refills on the fountain drinks. And Pepsi products, like cream cheese and imitation crab, are compatible with the culinary traditions of any country.

Have a suggestion for a restaurant The Pitch should review? E-mail charles.ferruzza@pitch.com pitch.com

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FAT C I T Y BY

Northland’s beer universe.

JON AT H A N BENDER

A L I S TA I R T U T T O N P H O T O G R A P H Y

B E E R TI M E

Big Rip Brewing Co. expands the

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Feldt (left) kick-starts the brewing process.

A L I S TA I R T U T T O N P H O T O G R A P H Y

osh Collins flips open the lid of a white 5-gallon bucket to reveal the lustrous red juice inside. “This is what we got from 60 pounds of organic raspberries and three hours with a juicer,” he says. “Our first juicer broke, so we just fired up the spare. This is for a glutenless raspberry brew we’re working on.” These are the chances you can take when you’re a two-man brewing operation. Just eight months ago, Collins, 32, and Kipp Feldt, 37, were standing in this same spot, staring at a Volkswagen Beetle that had taken up a permanent parking spot on the concrete floor. On their search for a place to make beer, the business partners had come to what was then a disused warehouse in an industrial section of North Kansas City, a place geared for processing metal, not malt. They’d found the future home of Big Rip Brewing Co., which had its grand opening this past weekend as a stop on the Tour de Brew. In 2012, Feldt brewed the beer for Collins’ wedding. Collins made the wine. “We were talking, and we just realized how great it would be to do this on a large scale,” Collins says. The scales tipped in favor of the old warehouse, at 216 East Ninth Avenue, when the duo found out that Kansas City SmokeShack BBQ would open at 900 Swift Avenue, a space in the same building that faces the corner where Ninth meets Swift. Big Rip’s Ninth Avenue entrance opens into its tap room, a red-painted concrete block with bar tables, a corner with a blackleather couch and matching armchairs, and bar stools arranged on the far wall in front of a viewing window that looks onto the production floor. The bar, set up to stock wine and spirits, has nine taps. “We’re a long way from having nine beers,” Collins admits. “But we’ve been

A L I S TA I R T U T T O N P H O T O G R A P H Y

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letting people follow us throughout the process, so it only seemed right to open as we’re still getting going.” Wood shelves are arranged to hold engraved mugs for the founders (those who contributed $500 to support the fledgling brewery) and Mug Club members (regulars entitled, for $50, to special tappings and larger pours). Collins notes a chalkboard to one side of the bar, ready to list Big Rip’s brewing schedule. The brewery is behind a simple wooden door next to the blackboard. It’s a heartening mix of home-brewer ingenuity and gleaming metal, outfitted with three 22-barrel kettles capable of making four to six kegs of beer at a time. The kettles in which the beer is brewed are chilled by a system that resides inside an Igloo cooler. The cold room — where the

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kegs are stored and beer is conditioned (the suspended yeast settles to the bottom of the tank, allowing the beer to clear) — is kept frigid by a window air conditioner. The nine taps are on the other side of the wall from a Kenmore Elite freezer, which has been reborn as a keg cooler with nine tap lines. On a recent Friday morning in May, Collins walks between the three brew kettles (christened Ripley, Ash and Mulder, a nod to characters familiar to sci-fi fans) as he explains what’s coming up: a coffee porter and a vanilla-cream ale, with plans for a cherry hefeweizen, a sweet brown ale and a pale ale. He points to the middle kettle, near a wooden sign that lists beer styles by color, and suggests that it may be retired in the future and used to cask wine.

“We decided to focus on beer initially,” Collins says. “But we’d like to move toward wine in the future.” With that in mind, Big Rip Brewing Co. has nine separate permits, including a 22 Percent Manufacturer Solicitor License, which allows the brewery to make beer and wine with an alcohol content of up to 22 percent by volume. The brewery’s name is drawn from the theoretical alternative to the big bang, which centers on the idea of an infi nitely expanding universe. “The zombie apocalypse isn’t going to happen,” Collins says. “It’s our way of telling people to lighten up and enjoy their life.” Big Rip’s own expansion plans are a bit more finite. Over time, Collins hopes to add picnic tables outside and schedule regular tours to help people realize what’s brewing in North Kansas City. “We can do a lot of experimental batches with really expensive ingredients,” he says. “We want to take people on a journey.”

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FAT C I T Y

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W

hile the other suburban fathers in The strong man in front of Strong Vodka Parkville tend their lawns each weekend, Steve Strong is heading 65 feet below the fourth microdistillery in Missouri, jointhe ground. The former rocker (most recently ing Copper Run in Walnut Shade, Pinckney of Steve Strong and the Jackknife Truckers) Bend Distillery in New Haven, and Square and father of three has been toiling in the One Brewery & Distillery in St. Louis. And caves below Park University for the past Strong is part of a regional mini boom that two years. Strong, 44, is the pitchman and has seen Dark Horse Distillery, Good Spirits distiller for S.D. Strong Distilling, which reDistilling (which makes Clear 10 vodka) and cently began selling its fi rst spirit: vodka. Sharkbite Cocktails launch on the Kansas side “Microdistilleries look like the beginning over the past five years. stages of the microbrewery thing about 20 S.D. Strong Distilling held its official launch years ago,” Strong says. “And I thought it party March 29 at Gomer’s in Parkville. It’s now would be cool to be in on something like this.” on shelves at Gomer’s Midtown (3838 BroadHis interest in producway) and at Red X. The vodka ing spirits began with a is also used in cocktails at former bandmate, who was Nick & Jake’s, Trezo Mare, “I knew our vibe was making moonshine in his the Rusty Horse Tavern going to be vintage, garage. Curious, Strong at(where the Parkville Coffeeand this fit right in.” tended a conference of the tini is made with Parkville American Distilling InstiCoffee espresso and vodka) tute, began researching the and the Kill Devil Club. licensing process and scouted for potential The microdistillery doesn’t yet offer tours, sites in his hometown. Stumped by local fi re but Strong may consider them in the future. codes, he asked the city’s fi re marshal for For now, he’s focused on barrel-aging his advice; he recommended the caves, which whiskey, made with rye and malted barley, have an intensive sprinkler system. in 15-gallon barrels. He’s numbering those “That kind of coverage meant that I could small batches based on the barrel. Strong is have a lot more stuff in progress,” Strong also working on perfecting his gin recipe. says. “And the caves are so bootlegger. I “I hope people are excited about what knew our vibe was going to be vintage, and we’re doing,” he says. “We don’t only want this fit right in.” Parkville to embrace us. We want Kansas City He ordered a still and a mash tun from a to embrace us.” still maker in Maine and received his license in August 2012. S.D. Strong Distilling becomes E-mail jonathan.bender@pitch.com


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WHERE THE BEST MUSICIANS IN THE WORLD PLAY

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28: John Fullbright Band

For more info & tickets: knuckleheadskc.com 2715 Rochester, KCMO

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STREETSIDE

CLUED IN

Surviving the Mystery Train’s murder-mystery dinner theater.

T

here was a time, and it was not that long ago, when the promise of a free meal was enough to persuade people to accompany me to just about any event, no matter how stupid. But lately, everybody seems to have a little more money and a lot less time. My offers are now regularly declined. Nobody wants to hang out with ol’ Dave anymore? Fine. You can all burn in hell. I’ll go it alone without you assholes. That’s been my attitude recently, anyway. But it’s not always a sustainable position. Last Friday afternoon, I decided that this column would be about the Mystery Train, a local murder-mystery dinner-theater company. The group was staging its latest performance, Baldknobbers and Backstabbers, at the Golden Ox that evening. I had always kind of wanted to attend a mystery dinner, possibly because of a Saved by the Bell episode I once watched. I had two tickets. There was a steak dinner from the Golden Ox involved. How hard could it be to rustle up a date to this thing? I blew it on my first attempt by texting the invitation. In doing so, I forfeited the element of surprise: A text affords sufficient time to engineer a believable excuse. Lesson learned. I phoned my next friend. I cast the lure of the free meal. He was intrigued but sensed that a catch was forthcoming. “It’s this thing at the Golden Ox, kind of a performance,” I said. “What do you mean, a performance?” “It’s this thing called the Mystery Train,” I said. “It’s like you watch an Agatha Christie– type of murder-mystery thing while you eat.” “You mean like a murder-mystery dinner?” he said. Then he laughed. I didn’t care for the tone of his laugh. “You’re trying to get me to go to a murder-mystery dinner?” “Sort of,” I said. I tried a different tack. “What are you gonna do, hang out in Westport like you have for the last 400 weekends of your life? You’re not curious at all about what happens at a murder-mystery dinner?” “Maybe a little, I guess,” he said. “But there is no way in hell I’m going to a murder-mystery dinner with you.” “God damn you,” I growled, and hung up. I dialed up another friend, a fan of musical theater. “How’d you like to have a dinner … to die for?” I said. He cut me off with an excuse about his wife getting back in town. They’d already made dinner plans. Then he suggested that I invite the friend I’d called before him. Running out of time and aware that most everybody who works in print media these days could use a hot, free meal, I tried Ashford, a co-worker. He wrinkled his nose at the murder-mystery part, but I could sense that he was hungry, and I seized on this weakness.

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A real whodunit I downplayed the theater part, emphasized the steak (repeating words like “juicy” and “succulent”) and bought him a beer at the Bulldog. “Are we going to have to, like, be part of the performance?” he asked. “Will I have to do any public speaking?” “No way,” I said. “We just sit, eat and watch the show. I bet we get a big, buttery baked potato with it, too. Plus that big, free steak ...” “All right, fine,” he said, and off we went to the West Bottoms. I was lying about the public-speaking part. I wasn’t sure how interactive the dinner would be. I was hoping for a passive experience, kind of like seeing a movie at Alamo Drafthouse, except maybe the actors occasionally wade out into the crowd a little bit. I was disabused of that notion shortly after walking into the Golden Ox, an iconic restaurant that has lived through the boom and bust and now, arguably, the renaissance of the West Bottoms. We walked past a half-empty dining room of old couples and men in cowboy hats — oldschool cattleman’s steakhouse is the general vibe at the Ox; there’s no other place remotely like it in Kansas City — and into a partitioned backroom, where the dinner was being held. There were six tables, four chairs at each. We were seated next to two women: A 50-ish Army colonel from Leavenworth, and her mother, who lives in Butler, Missouri. I made chitchat and took stock of the surroundings. There were a few couples who looked to be in their late 30s, and a woman in her late 20s with her mother, but otherwise the median age of the guests was probably around 65. There were also three people in costume — the show was set on a train car during the Depression — circulating around the room, talking to the tables while in character: a blustering, heavyset guy by the name of Ed Barnes; a prim-and-proper middle-aged woman named Connie Parker; and a younger airhead type named Barbara Shepard. Barbara stopped by our table, said some-

BY

D AV ID HUDN A L L

thing about the Dust Bowl, and asked us where we were heading. What? Oh, you mean on this fake train ride? I took a long sip from my 16-ounce aluminum Budweiser bottle and looked across the table at Ashford. It was beginning to dawn on him that this dinner was more than he had bargained for. He mumbled something about going to Indianapolis. Barbara said she’d never heard of Indianapolis. “Barbara is a foolish woman, mentally incapable of carrying out a murder,” I wrote on the small packet of materials we’d been given on the way in. Right before the performance began, the actors wrangled people from some of the tables and took them behind the partition. They returned with new name tags, costume props and a script of the play. The Army colonel, for example, returned with a ’30s-style hat, purse and necklace; her new name was Mama Miller, and she was a folk singer. So, in addition to the three actors, four guests would also have speaking parts in Baldknobbers and Backstabbers. I don’t want to spoil the plot, but before the steak is served, there is a murder. The dialogue is full of humorous misunderstandings, wordplay and colorful language — “That’s loopier than a cross-eyed cowboy’s lasso,” etc. There are clues, and you can bribe the actors with fake money to get information out of them. For reasons that were never entirely clear to me, we were given crossword puzzles and word searches whose answers were words like “moonshine” and “depression.” My favorite part was when the guest actors had to read their lines, like the bald man in his 60s whose performance was so square and devoid of emotion that I wondered whether it was some kind of genius parody of bad acting. It was like watching Hank Hill from King of the Hill try to act. He was wearing a turquoise polo shirt but had been given a bow tie as part of his character’s wardrobe. I looked over once and half of the bow tie was hanging off his collar. After dessert, we all filled out a form and guessed who the killer was, how he or she did it, and why. Ashford guessed correctly and was awarded a large magnifying glass and the title of Grand Master Gumshoe. I congratulated him and then informed him that technically the magnifying glass belonged to me because I had brought him to the event. Outside, in the Kemper Arena parking lot, a Rave Run was going on — people run a 5k and then dance to electronic music, apparently. We walked over for a closer look. “This is pretty weird,” I said. “But is it weirder than murder-mystery dinner theater?”

E-mail david.hudnall@pitch.com


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MUSIC

R AY TOWN

T

Nineties KC-Lawrence club fixture DJ Ray

BY

Velasquez returns home for a few shows.

D AV ID HUDN A L L

the creative vision and concept of the space. hose tuned in to the local club scene in the So at Riot Room, I’ll be doing Sabotage, 1990s will remember Ray Velasquez. In which has a harder edge. I had a drum-andaddition to hosting Nocturnal Transmissions, bass night in the late ’90s that always had a Saturday-night, electronic-music program kind of a punk-rock ethic to it, but also with on the much-loved Lawrence station KLZR some big beat and rock. I’d throw in, like, the (the Lazer) 105.9, Velasquez was a pioneering Clash or something. So this will be similar DJ at venues in KC and Lawrence from 1983 to that — more dance-oriented. Sabotage until 1999, when he moved to New York City. was created out of my interest in not being There, he has kept up the pace, with regular linear when it comes to music and emotion. DJ gigs at Manhattan clubs and lounges, and Do you know what I mean by linear? has performed alongside such names as Paul Like, not varying tempos over the course Oakenfold, Paul Weller and Suicide. of the set? Velasquez returns to Kansas City this Right, exactly. At the time I was developweekend for shows at the Jacobson on ing Sabotage, a lot of club nights would be Thursday and the Riot Room on Saturday. DJs doing the same BPM for, like, six hours The Pitch dialed him up last week at his straight, and I fi nd that incredibly uninterhome in Brooklyn. esting. There’d be no swelling or diminishThe Pitch: What are your regular gigs in ing of energy, little emotional exploration. New York at the moment? So I wanted to explore drum and bass, downVelasquez: My regular Saturday night is at tempo, and these other styles that were not Mono + Mono, which is a jazz-themed place in steady house music. I wanted to mess with the East Village. It’s this huge, cavernous, gorpeople’s perception of what dance music geous restaurant, and there are something like is, and kind of try to prove that electronic 30,000 jazz records that line the walls of the music can have a punk-rock feel to it. place. But it’s closed for the next two months. Groove is in the heart: Velasquez. You’ve been a DJ for more than 30 years. About three weeks ago, the roof of the place Are there any trends in DJ culture now that literally caught on fire at the end of my set. I Indigo is now all those elements, mixed with you’re particularly fond of or disgusted by? even more stuff: jazz funk from early to midwas packing up and climbing down from the DJ culture is — well, for one, I’m really ’70s, some really gorgeous, brand-new deep DJ booth when they evacuated everybody. house, lots of which has a European flavor. happy that you used that term. “DJ culture” I walked across the street and saw flames What I really care about is emotional con- was not a term that existed when I was comshooting 60 feet in the air. The DJ booth was ing up, and I think it’s retent — I’m not really interthe first to go because it’s elevated. ally great that the world of ested in genre. But yeah, Do you tend to spin at lounges and trendy DJ Ray Velasquez DJs has come so far. But I Groove Indigo works best restaurants? Thursday, May 23, think the culture has also in a sophisticated cocktail, Lately I’ve been spinning at Sen, which is at the Jacobson reached an odd place. And a nice Japanese-cuisine type of place in the dining environment — it’s Saturday, May 25, at the Riot Room I wrote about this a long conducive to cocktails, dinFlatiron District. But I’d say hotels and lobtime ago. In the mid-’90s, bies and lounges are probably my specialty. ing, dancing. There’s even I said, “In the future, evan element of seduction I’m hoping to find a rooftop gig somewhere erybody will want to be the DJ. Everybody involved, I think. It’s kind of like a sort of in Manhattan this summer. I think that’d will want to be behind the decks instead of social lubricant. I want it to make it easier be a good fit. in front of them.” I mean, we’ve reached a On Thursday, you’re doing a set at the Jacob- for people to relate to each other and enjoy point where everybody has access to the each other’s company. son, which is kind of a trendy restaurant downtechnology that allows them to express Then on Saturday, you’re at Riot Room. town. Can you talk about how you approach a themselves. But just because you have a Did you ever play there room like that? stethoscope doesn’t make you a doctor, you when it was the Hurricane? Yeah, so at the Jacobson, know? The tools are readily available, but a One of my early gigs was I’ll be doing Groove Indigo, “About three weeks ago, lot of people aren’t taking the time to really on that patio when it was which is a format I’ve been the roof of the place figure out how best to use them. the Hurricane, in 1986 or doing every week here in As for trends in the actual music, I think New York since around literally caught on fire at so. I would have been playEDM is to techno as Olive Garden is to Italing stuff like New Order, 2000. The roots of it actuthe end of my set.” ian food. EDM is basically bad pop music Cure, OMD, Simple Minds ally go back to playing in from bad pop stars being remixed by global back then. It was quite fun. KC way back when. I had a This is the first time I’ve performers and DJs. There are, of course, night called Blue Monday, good remixers and bad remixers. A good which was kind of acid-jazz-oriented. By played there since then, I think, which is the mid-’90s, it had evolved to include jazz- like, what, 25 years? So all this stuff is fun. one will hopefully enhance a song for the dance floor, and a bad one will make it forIt’s crazy — I can’t believe how long it’s been. flavored house and downtempo breakbeats How will that set differ from the Jacob- mulaic. And we’re getting a lot of the latand even some drum and bass. I would do ter. But there’s an amazing amount of great it at Liquid Lounge, which is this club that son’s? Probably edgier, I would think.   electronic music out there right now. The Yes, I always try to adjust my format to used to be on Southwest Boulevard. Groove 26

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new-disco trend of the past few years, I’ve thought, has been pretty fun — making the vibe of traditional disco more contemporary. And I’m still massively into ambient music. It’s wonderful how someone like Brian Eno is still releasing ambient albums that are really quite good. How tough is it right now in New York to make a living as a DJ? I’ve been very fortunate ever since I got up here. At this point, my schedule is basically that during the day, my work is getting work, and at night, my work is performing. I’ve got a place in Brooklyn, in Carroll Gardens, that I’ve had since I moved up here, so I’ve been able to keep affordable rent. And the neighborhood is beautiful. Smith Street, the main street through the neighborhood, actually reminds me a lot of Mass Street in Lawrence. And really, the neighborhood overall reminds me a lot of Lawrence. There’s an anchor of families that have lived here for generations but also this influx of young creatives that have moved in over the past 10 years. But the young people aren’t intolerable like they are up in Williamsburg or whatever. So it’s cool. I sometimes say I’ve always been a New Yorker, I just didn’t live here until 1999. But at the same time, I’m fiercely proud of my KC and Lawrence roots, and I draw upon that a lot in my creative life.

E-mail david.hudnall@pitch.com

J A Z Z B E AT THE JAZZ DISCIPLES, WITH BOOK OF GAIA

The hard-driving, in-your-face, contemporary jazz of the Jazz Disciples (Gerald Dunn on sax, Everett Freeman on piano, Bill McKemy on bass and Michael Warren on drums) anchors a couple of the Blue Room’s most popular monthly shows. This Saturday night, the Jazz Disciples are joined by Book of Gaia, a sharp ensemble featuring three of Kansas City’s finest jazz singers: Angela Hagenbach, Pamela BaskinWatson and Nedra Dixon. The trio practices classic and pop tunes with wickedly intricate vocal harmonizing, layered with an attitude of let’s have some fun. The pairing should make for a rather intriguing evening at 18th and Vine.  — LARRY KOPITNIK 8:30 p.m. Saturday, May 25, at the Blue Room (1616 East 18th Street, 816-474-2929)


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MUSIC

RADAR

M U S I C F O R E CA S T The power-pop pride of Rockford, Illinois, is still touring 40 years into its career. Cheap Trick knows no other way — or, at least, its members have no other marketable skills. It ain’t the same as it once was. Singer Robin Zander appeared on The Tonight Show With Jay Leno a few weeks ago, puttering around the microphone in full-on modern-Ozzy mode: circular ’60s sunglasses; long, thin hair; and vaguely post-electroshock daze. But guitarist and primary songwriter Rick Nielsen still looked sprightly, bopping around the stage in a baseball cap and a bow tie. And the band’s garish arena rock has aged surprisingly well. On balance, Cheap Trick is still a pretty fucking cool band. Saturday, May 25, at VooDoo Lounge (Harrah’s Casino, 1 Riverboat Drive, 816-472-7777)

Japandroids

Sonic Spectrum Tribute to Lou Reed and the Velvet Underground

political idiot-college-boy-stoner stuff that pollutes the genre. Friday, May 24, at Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club (3402 Main, 816-753-1909)

Deal’s Gone Bad

Classic soul grooves — a little Sam Cooke, a little Stax — mingle with reggae and rocksteady in the music of Deal’s Gone Bad. The Chicago group’s leisurely jams tend to emphasize boozy parties over weed, and there’s a delightful lack of fake Rastaman vocals. In other words: all the good parts of reggae and none of the faux-

D AV ID HUDN A L L

T H U R S D AY, M AY 2 3

El Ten Eleven

Los Angeles’ El Ten Eleven crafts an artful, instrumental mix of looped electronic music and post-rock ideas. It’s not sweeping and huge in the vein of Explosions in the Sky or Godspeed You Black Emperor — the driving rhythms, melody and borderline-cheery quality of the songs are closer to a band like Six Parts Seven. Opener Nude Pop is on the roster of El Ten Eleven’s new label, Fake Record Label; the group traffics in the dreamy indie rock common to its native Pacific Northwest. Saturday, May 25, at RecordBar (1020 Westport Road, 816-753-5207)

Japandroids

Japandroids’ Celebration Rock was rightly one of the most, er, celebrated records of 2012. The Canadian duo (fact: 80 percent of Canadian bands today are duos) reinforces its minimalist, drum-and-guitar structure with an aesthetic that values maximum strength: power chords, emo bluster, anthemic choruses. There are also some killer lines, like Remember that night you were already in bed/Said ‘Fuck it’/ Got up to drink with me instead? Imagine if the Replacements were weaned on ’90s punk, and you’re in the ballpark. Noisy shoegaze group A Place to Bury Strangers opens. Wednesday, May 29, at the Granada (1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390)

Drive-By Truckers, with the Old 97’s

I’ve never had a bad time at a Drive-By Truckers or an Old 97’s show, which is somewhat remarkable considering that it seems nary a summer has passed in KC without one of

F O R E C A S T

28

Other shows worth seeing this week.

the two acts coming through town. They’re touring together this summer, and between the Old 97’s’ poppy, rollicking country rock and the Truckers’ literary Southern rock, this ought to be a winner for anybody who likes songs that kick up a little dust. With John Henry and the Engine. Saturday, May 25, at Crossroads KC at Grinders (417 East 18th Street, 785-749-3434)

Cheap Trick

What’s the old saying about the Velvet Underground? That it sold only a couple of thousand records, but everybody who bought one started their own band? That old chestnut still rings pretty true today, for better or worse. A lot of pseuds are out there trying to obscure their lack of talent and work ethic by frontin’ like they’re Lou Reed. But a lot of your favorite bands probably wouldn’t sound the way they do if they hadn’t eaten up and absorbed four VU records, the live one and Reed’s solo stuff from the ’70s. Here, a handful of local performers — Anna Cole, the Conquerors and Sterling Morrison’s Ghost — have a go at the discography. Sunday, May 26, at RecordBar (1020 Westport Road, 816-753-5207)

BY

Dawes

It’s good to be Dawes these days. The Southern California group toured with wildly successful band Mumford & Sons last year and spent this past spring opening for Bob Dylan. Dawes is a natural fit for both bills: The band channels the easy-listening vibe of ’70s Laurel Canyon artists like Jackson Browne, but presents it with the big-tent accessibility of such contemporary acts as the Avett Brothers. (There’s a little Warren Zevon and Paul Simon in there, too.) The sound is still a little too derivative and watered-down for my tastes, but they seem like curious musicians underneath it, so I’m holding out hope that they’ll come around. In the meantime, I’ll take them over any of their folky contemporaries. With Star & Micey. Tuesday, May 28, at Crossroads KC at Grinders (417 East 18th Street, 785-749-3434)

K E Y

..................................................Pick of the Week

........................................ Black Leather Jackets

...............................................Upstroked Guitars

............................................ Checkered Patterns

............................................ Sunglasses Indoors

........................................................... Road Dogs

..........................................Multi-necked Guitars

..........................................Calculated Aloofness

.................................................................. Twang

..................................................... Fists Pumping

....................................................Drinking Songs

............................................. Tasteful Indie Rock

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Antiseen, Hellstomper: 9 p.m. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club, 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Filligar, Monzie Leo & the Big Sky: 8 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483.

F R I D AY, M AY 2 4 The Color Morale, Glamour of the Kill, Sweet Ascent, Wiseguy, Ten Thousand One: 6 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Kelly Rowland and the Dream: 7 p.m. The Midland, 1228 Main, 816-283-9900.

S AT U R D AY, M AY 2 5 David Lindley: 8 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Lauren Mann and the Fairly Odd Folk: 10 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Sabotage! with DJ Ray Velasquez, Monta At Odds DJ set: 11 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Southern Hospitality & Lil Ed: 7:30 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456.

S U N D AY, M AY 2 6 Eric Benet, Avery Sunshine: 6:30 p.m. Uptown Theater, 3700 Broadway, 816-753-8665. Marquise Knox, Samantha Fish: 8 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456.

M O N D AY, M AY 2 7 Abstract Rude, DJ Zole, Burnell Washburn, B. Squid, Johanna Phraze, Sephiroth: 8 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Falling in Reverse, American Fangs, Enemies Laid to Rest, Conflicts: 7 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390.

T U E S D AY, M AY 2 8 Chelsea Crowell: 8 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. John Fullbright: 8 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456.

W E D N E S D AY, M AY 2 9 Afrolicious, Kimbarely Legal: 9 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483. Detroit Cobras, Pangea, Katy Guillen Trio: 9:30 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Sea Wolf, Savoir Adore, Tiny Horse: 7:30 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Torche, Kenmode, Cherokee Rock Rifle: 7:30 p.m. Czar, 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300.

FUTURECAST JUNE SATURDAY 1 Chris Mann: The Midland SUNDAY 2 Guns N’ Roses: The Midland TUESDAY 4 The XX: Uptown Theater MONDAY 17 Mumford & Sons, Michael Kiwanuka, Mystery Jets: Cricket Wireless Amphitheater, Bonner Springs FRIDAY 28 Grand Marquis CD-release show: Knuckleheads Saloon Kanrocksas: Kansas Speedway, Kansas City, Kan.


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NIGHTLIFE Send submissions to Berry Anderson by e-mail (berry.anderson@pitch.com), fax (816-756-0502) or phone (816-218-6775). Continuing items must be resubmitted monthly.

T H U R S D AY 2 3 R O C K / M E TA L / P U N K Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Well Hung Heart, 9 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. The Casualties, Violent Affair, American Dischord, U.S. Americans, 9:15 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. CS Luxem, Julie Byrne, Real Live Tigers, the Ovaries-eez, 10 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Arsis, Whoracle, Meatshank, Sequoia, 8 p.m. Tomfooleries: 612 W. 47th St., 816-753-0555. Gov’t Cheez, 10 p.m.

B L U E S / R O C K A B I L LY B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. John Paul’s Flying Circus. Danny’s Big Easy: 1601 E. 18th St., 816-421-1200. Millage Gilbert Big Blues Band, 7 p.m. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Grand Marquis. Jazz: 1859 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-3280003. Billy Ebeling. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Coco Montoya with Cassie Taylor. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Lonnie Ray Blues Band, 7 p.m.; Brody Buster Band, 9 p.m. Trouser Mouse: 410 S. Hwy. 7, Blue Springs, 816-220-1222. The Bluz Benderz.

EASY LISTENING/ACOUSTIC

JAZZ/LOUNGE

Bulldog: 1715 Main, 816-421-4799. Brodioke, 9 p.m. The Chesterfield: 1400 Main, 816-474-4545. Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz, 8 p.m. The Levee: 16 W. 43rd St., 816-561-2821. AZ-One, 9:30 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Trivia Clash, 7 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Dante with Rebekah Kochan, 8 p.m.

EASY LISTENING/ACOUSTIC Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. Laura Lisbeth’s songwriter night with Gerry Monks, Gregory Canseco and Jason Beers, 7 p.m. Fuel: 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park, 913-451-0444. Drew Six. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Jason Kayne, 9 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Dan Doran, 7 p.m. RJ’s Bob-Be-Que Shack: 5835 Lamar, Mission, 913-2627300. The Road Ahead, 6:30 p.m.

F R I D AY 2 4 R O C K / M E TA L / P U N K Aftershock Bar & Grill: 5240 Merriam Dr., Merriam, 913-3845646. The Dreaming, Shoot for Wednesday, 7 p.m. Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. Brimstone Crow, the Mad Kings, the New Lost Souls, 9 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. The B’dinas, Til Willis & The Erratic Cowboys, Kink Alfred, You Me and Apollo, 9:30 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Marasmus, Gornography, Garoted, A Plague in Faith, 8 p.m.

pitch.com

CLUB

JAZZ/LOUNGE

VA R I E T Y

m ay 2 3 - 2 9, 2 0 1 3

The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. The Kuhls, Mat Shoare, 10 p.m. Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Wrong Kata Trio, Janet the Planet, Parts of Speech, the Jorge Arana Trio, 9:30 p.m. INGS LIST E AT MiniBar: 3810 Broadway, 816IN ONL 326-8281. Scammers, Meat Mist, M PITCH.CO Curtains, 10 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Muscle Worship LP release with Truck or Dead Horse, Monsoon Lazer, 10 p.m.

MORE

Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Pretty, Something & the Whatevers, the Rackatees, 9 p.m. MiniBar: 3810 Broadway, 816-326-8281. Fake Surfers, Lazy, Jocks, Thugees, 10 p.m.

The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. Sons of Brasil. Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Laura Chalk & Michael Pagán, 6 p.m. Green Lady Lounge: 1809 Grand, 816-215-2954. Eddie Moore and the Outer Circle, 8 p.m. The Kill Devil Club: 61 E. 14th St., 816-877-8312. Brandon Draper, 9 p.m. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Paul Shinn and Joe Lisinicchia, 6 p.m.

the pitch

I N D I E / P O P / E X P E R I M E N TA L

Bar West: 7174 Renner Rd., Shawnee, 913-248-9378. Dan Brockert. The Brooksider: 6330 Brookside Plz., 816-363-4070. Adam Thomas, 9 p.m. The Kill Devil Club: 61 E. 14th St., 816-877-8312. Brad McTighe & Brian Brooks, 8 p.m. MiniBar: 3810 Broadway, 816-326-8281. Margo May & Brian Klein, 10 p.m. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Rick Bacus, 5:30 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. The Winston Apple Show, 7 p.m.

I N D I E / P O P / E X P E R I M E N TA L

30

B L U E S / R O C K A B I L LY B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Millage Gilbert’s 75th birthday show, 9 p.m. Jazz: 1859 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-328-0003. Valentine and the Ticklers. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Brody Buster Band, 9 p.m. RJ’s Bob-Be-Que Shack: 5835 Lamar, Mission, 913-2627300. Ernest James duo, 8 p.m. Trouser Mouse: 410 S. Hwy. 7, Blue Springs, 816-220-1222. Jason Vivone & the Billybats.

The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. Indigo Hour with Lady D., 5:30 p.m.; Wild Men of Kansas City, 8:30 p.m. Green Lady Lounge: 1809 Grand, 816-215-2954. Kathleen Holeman, 5:30 p.m.; Mark Lowrey, 9 p.m. The Kill Devil Club: 61 E. 14th St., 816-877-8312. The MGDs, 10 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Lonnie McFadden, 4:30 p.m.; Eboni & the Ivories, 9 p.m.

COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483. Dumptruck Butterlips, the Vine Brothers, 9 p.m. The BrewTop Pub and Patio: 8614 N. Boardwalk Ave., 816584-9292. Hazard County, 10 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. StonyHogg, 8 p.m.; Deadstring Brothers with Dollar Fox and the Rumblejetts, 8:30 p.m.

COVERS Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Shedding Watts, 10 p.m. The Landing Eatery & Pub: 1189 W. 152 Hwy., Liberty, 816792-5230. Dolewite, 9 p.m. The Levee: 16 W. 43rd St., 816-561-2821. Groove Agency, 10 p.m.

VA R I E T Y Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Lion, Electric Theory, the Phase, Grimoire, Reduced, 1,000,000 Light Years, Fpoole, Sack Lunch, 8 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Music and Art Show with Cary Ryan, 6 p.m. Uptown Theater: 3700 Broadway, 816-753-8665. The Schwag.

S AT U R D AY 2 5 R O C K / M E TA L / P U N K Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. Vehicle’s Farewell CD-release show with Chris Tady, Terrence Moore, the King Devilles. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-7497676. KTP, Jabber Josh, 10 p.m. Trouser Mouse: 410 S. Hwy. 7, Blue Springs, 816-220-1222. The Filthy 13.


#17 – The Pitch – 05-23-2013

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the pitch

31

5/15/13 5:09 PM


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B L U E S / R O C K A B I L LY

M O N D AY 2 7

Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Dan Bliss; Lonesome Hank. The Kill Devil Club: 61 E. 14th St., 816-877-8312. Grand Marquis, 9 p.m. The Levee: 16 W. 43rd St., 816-561-2821. Kyle Elliott & Voodoo Soul, 5 p.m. RJ’s Bob-Be-Que Shack: 5835 Lamar, Mission, 913-2627300. Cadillac Flambe, 8 p.m.

I N D I E / P O P / E X P E R I M E N TA L

FOLK/ROOTS/JAM BAND Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Ashes to Immortality, 10 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. The Blackbird Revue, She’s A Keeper, 7 p.m.

I N D I E / P O P / E X P E R I M E N TA L Aftershock Bar & Grill: 5240 Merriam Dr., Merriam, 913-3845646. Battle for Red, White and Boom, 8 p.m. The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483. Sona, Tangent Arc, Justin Klaas, 9 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. The ACBs, the Empty Spaces, 8 p.m.

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The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. Jazz Disciples with Book of Gaia, 8:30 p.m. Green Lady Lounge: 1809 Grand, 816-215-2954. Ed Pharr, 5:30 p.m.; Shay Estes Trio, 9 p.m. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Rick Bacus Trio. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Billie Mahoney’s Celebration of National Tap Dance Day, 7 p.m.

COVERS The BrewTop Pub and Patio: 8614 N. Boardwalk Ave., 816584-9292. The Transients. The Brooksider: 6330 Brookside Plz., 816-363-4070. Dolewite. Danny’s Bar and Grill: 13350 College Blvd., Lenexa, 913-3459717. Chapter 5. The Levee: 16 W. 43rd St., 816-561-2821. XParte’, 10 p.m.

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B L U E S / R O C K A B I L LY

Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Instant Empire, Bloom, Mike Borgia & the Problems, 9 p.m.

THURSDAY:

Live Band Karaoke 9pm-3am

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FRIDAY AND SATURDAY: Dueling Pianos

Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. The Telephone Line, the Bus Company, Matt Clothier, 6 p.m.

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Folk and Country night with AJ. Gaither and Tyler Gregory 10pm-3am

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the pitch

S U N D AY 2 6

B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Lee McBee and the Confessors, 6-9 p.m. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Dan Bliss.

WEDNESDAY:

32

The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Brick Prom with DJ Lawrence Burger. Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Strings on the Green with Mistura Fina, 4 p.m. Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Earth To Abram, Uncountable Kings, Amsterdam, Beating Woolybully, 5:30 p.m. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Japanese Gameshow, Good Time Charlie, Travel Guide, 9 p.m. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Winners Circle, Killa KP, Dom Chronicles, KB, 9 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Burlesque in Wonderland with Sophie Sassafras and Beth Byrd, 10 p.m.

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The Granada: 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Goodbye 99, Safe for Consumption, Vaughn and the Billionaires, Acadia, To the West Coast, Avenue 17, Josey Milner, Clint Michaellson,Young Gemini, Legit Clik, Flamed Out, KiNG O$iRi$, Ricky Skarfo, k-9 , Influence, 4:45 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Daft Punk patio party tribute, 10 p.m., free. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Dante with Rebekah Kochan, 7 p.m.

Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Idyl, Instant Karma, 9 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Kurt Vee, Palace Neapolitan, Doby Watson, 10 p.m.

HIP-HOP/RAP The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Abstract Rude, DJ Zole, Burnell Washburn, B. Squid, Johanna Phraze, Sephiroth, 8 p.m.

VA R I E T Y The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Taking Back Mondays with Sovereign States, 9 p.m. Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Clay Hughes, Shantel Leitner, Timothy Israel, Landon Leist, 8 p.m.

T U E S D AY 2 8 R O C K / M E TA L / P U N K Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-832-1085. Sedlec Ossuary, Conflicts, Reaping Asmodeia, Hot Knives, 9 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. An Unfortunate Woman, Black on Black, 10 p.m. Tomfooleries: 612 W. 47th St., 816-753-0555. The Transients, 9 p.m.

JAZZ Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Joe Cartwright Jazz Duo, 6 p.m. Green Lady Lounge: 1809 Grand, 816-215-2954. Christy Meinhardt and Wayne Hawkins, 7 p.m. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Hermon Mehari Trio, 6 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Open Jam with the Everette DeVan Trio, 7 p.m.

VA R I E T Y The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Horror Remix, 9 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Good Time Charley, sami.the.great, Young William & the River Siren, 10 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Technicolor Tone Factory, Missouri Homegrown, Born In Babylon, 7:30 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Ensemble Tuesdays — R&B jam and open mic, 7 p.m.

W E D N E S D AY 2 9 R O C K / M E TA L / P U N K Aftershock Bar & Grill: 5240 Merriam Dr., Merriam, 913-3845646. Otherwise, Breaking Even, 7 p.m. Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Gashcat, Ghostfoot, 6:30 p.m. Tomfooleries: 612 W. 47th St., 816-753-0555. Flannigan’s Right Hook, 9:30 p.m.

B L U E S / R O C K A B I L LY B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Shinetop Jr., 7-9 p.m. The Levee: 16 W. 43rd St., 816-561-2821. The Lonnie Ray Blues Band, 8 p.m. Trouser Mouse: 410 S. Hwy. 7, Blue Springs, 816-220-1222. Kris Lager Band. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Blues Hour with Briar, 5:30 p.m.

COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Hooten Hallers, Rachel Brooke, Adam Lee (full band), 9 p.m.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Singer-songwriter jam session with Tyler Gregory. Tonahill’s 3 of a Kind: 11703 E. 23rd St., Independence, 816833-5021. Blues, country and classic rock hosted by Rick Eidson and friends. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Poetic Underground poetry slam, 9 p.m.

VA R I E T Y Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. An Evening of Bob Dylan with Billy Ebeling, Dave Nace, Knock Kneed Sally and more, 8 p.m.


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CLOSURE Dear Dan: Twenty-one-year-old female here. When we were both 14, my first boyfriend took advantage of me. I wanted to explore my sexuality a little, but things went further than I wanted. One day, we were kissing with him on top of me. We were both fully clothed, and he started rubbing up against me. I didn’t realize he was dryhumping me until after he had to leave to clean himself up. Once I understood what happened, I felt violated. He also groped my boobs on another occasion without asking. He broke up with me a couple of months later. I haven’t spoken to him in seven years. For the most part, this hasn’t scarred me too much. I’m comfortable with my sexuality. However, it’s painful for me to think about what happened. I avoid having sex with someone on top of me, because it reminds me of what happened and I start panicking. I want closure so I can move on. I don’t want to report him to the police — it happened so long ago. It wasn’t rape. But I feel like I was exploited, and it was not consensual. I want to contact him and ask him to apologize because I feel that a sincere apology would help me get over this. But he lives on the other side of the country, and I have no way of contacting him besides looking him up on Facebook. I don’t think FB is the right place to talk about this, but it’s not possible to talk in person. How can I get in touch with him in a way that’s appropriate without having to see him?

Would’ve Said No Dear WSN: While it’s possible your ex-

boyfriend did this on purpose — he knew you wouldn’t agree to it, and you feel violated because you were — it’s also possible that this was an accident. I’m not excusing his behavior, but I feel obligated to toss this out: Very few boys have achieved complete mastery over their dicks by age 14. You were there, and I was not; you dated this dude, and I did not. If your boyfriend was a generally decent guy, and if there’s a chance this was an accident, contacting him — even via Facebook — will probably get you the apology you want. But if your ex-boyfriend was a selfish, manipulative piece of shit at age 14, odds are good that he remains a selfish, manipulative piece of shit. Ask yourself how you’ll feel if he responds to your request for an apology with GIFs of people laughing their asses off. If the answer is “infinitely worse,” don’t contact him. P.S. Two more tips to avoid feeling worse: Don’t go to the police with this, and stay out of the comments.

Dear Dan: I’m a straight, 45-year-old, monogamous male. I’m married for the second time, to

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BY

D A N S AVA G E

a wonderful 42-year-old woman. The few times I shared fantasies with my first wife, she used them as weapons in our many battles. She also betrayed my trust by sharing these fantasies with others. Wife No. 2 is fabulous. We can talk about anything. She’s respectful of my trust issues and has helped me get over much of them. When she says, “I’ll think about it,” she does. I never feel dismissed. And the sex has been amazing. We’ve explored things I only dreamed about: anal sex, public sex, sex toys, and video cameras. She asks me for things, and I try them. I ask her for things, and she tries them. But I can’t bring myself to ask for two things that are more than bucket-list issues. I’m a closet cross-dresser. I want to make love to her in stockings and a teddy. I made this request to my ex, and it resulted in humiliation. She even shared it with my son out of spite. And I want us to try watersports. During marriage counseling with my first wife, the counselor accused me of degrading my marriage. How do I ask wife No. 2, to let me dress up in women’s underwear and make love to her and then have her pee on me? I won’t die if these wishes go unfulfilled, but I would die if my second wife stopped respecting me.

Pretty Under Normal Things Dear PUNT: You held your two biggest kinks back from the new woman in your life, and now you’re sweating the reveal because the stakes are so high. This is why I urge people to lay those kink cards on the table early. The longer you wait, the more emotionally invested you become in the relationship, the higher the stakes. Instead of having an open and honest hereare-two-things-I-wanna-do conversation, go with an indirect here-are-two-things-somepeople-do conversation. Find a way to broach the topics without having to admit that they turn you on — go see a drag show (drag isn’t cross-dressing, but it will allow you to broach the men-in-dresses subject generally) and find a porn film with one brief, not-too-hardcore piss scene in it and watch it together. Pay attention to her response. If she reacts in a neutral or positive way, lay those kink cards on the table. If she reacts negatively, you might just die with those wishes unfulfilled. Pro tip: Nervous kinksters can screw up the indirect conversations by telegraphing disgust. Keep your reactions — at the drag club, during the porn — as neutral as possible. Hear Savage Lovecast at savagelovecast.com.

Have a question for Dan Savage? E-mail him at mail@savagelove.net


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