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BOWLING FOR DOLLARS Making Johnson County’s King Louie a suburban museum won’t be a bargain. B Y S T E V E VO C K R O D T

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QUESTIONNAIRE

JERRY RAPP

President, CinemaKC

E al  S aY On riD F

Hometown: Kansas City, Missouri Current neighborhood: The Crossroads Who or what is your sidekick? My beagledachshund mix, Maddie

What career would you choose in an alternate reality? Astronomer

Where do you drink? I’m an aspiring teetotaler, but when I do, it’s typically the Jacobson, Retro, Green Room Burgers, Nara, Anton’s Taproom, Nica’s 320, RecordBar, the Farmhouse, Brick or Green Lady Lounge. Very often there’s some kind of karaoke or live music involved — of which KC has LOTS to offer! What’s your favorite charity? The Animal

Rescue Site

S A B R I N A S TA I R E S

What was the last local restaurant you patronized? Open Fire Pizza

to have a successful career in the entertainment industry.

What TV show do you make sure you watch? What local phenomenon do you think is overrated? The P&L

The Daily Show

Where do you like to take out-of-town guests?

The Beatles, Marvin Gaye and Bob Marley and film soundtracks. (Though my player device of choice is the turntable.)

take up a lot of space in my iTunes:

The aforementioned establishments, as well as the Nelson, the Kauff man Center, Opera House café, City Market, the Living Room Theatre, the Crossroads, Grinders, Screenland theaters, the Bottoms.

Finish this sentence: “Kansas City screwed up when it …” Didn’t try harder to save the

Screenland Crossroads theater. That was one of the few single-screen classic venues left, and its departure has left a considerable void.   “Kansas City needs …” To give its populace and its arts contributors a greater education about — and appreciation of — film, television, animation and their ilk as indelible, cinematic art forms. We also need to recognize the growing surge of quality cinema emerging from the region and make sure it thrives and is funded.

“People might be surprised to know that I …” Feel just as strongly about music as I do

about fi lm and have produced a variety of compositions and music projects I’m quite proud of.

“In fi ve years, I’ll be …” Screening my latest feature film produced in KC with mostly local crew and actors, working under the auspices that you don’t have to transplant to the coasts

What movie do you watch at least once a year? I Am

What local tradition do you take part in every year? Artopia, the Fringe Fest and KC

FilmFest

Celebrity you’d like to ride the Mamba with at Worlds of Fun: Conan O’Brien What subscription — print, digital, etc. — do you value most? The Onion Last book you read: Running With Bonnie and Clyde: The Ten Fast Years of Ralph Fults, by John Neal Phillips

Travis september 29, 2013

Favorite day trip: Weston Describe a recent triumph: The CinemaKC

organization (co-founded with John Shipp) successfully helped create new awareness of the quality of filmmaking and unique stories generated out of this region. We are currently prepping to do a third season of our television program of the same name, which we are proud to be airing in the fall on KCPT Channel 19. I love meeting a stranger and hearing them say, “CinemaKC — I know that show!”

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City’s illegal dumpers.

BE N PA L O S A A R I

Above, from left: Ashurst says tire shops are among the worst illegal dumpers; discarding 500 pounds of tires (about 23 tires) is a felony. Needles are a common hazard.

Motion-activated trail cameras (above) are hidden near popular dumping locations. Ashurst camouflages them with tape and leaves. Ashurst (left) uses discarded mail to build a case against dumpers.

C

ode Enforcement Officer Alan Ashurst asks me if I have insurance. I chuckle. “That’s a serious question,” he says. As I’m about to step on a pile of heroin needles, he adds, “Watch your step.” Ashurst cruises the East Side in a cityissued, white Ford Focus, looking for signs of illegal dumping. He stops at a woodsy intersection of two dead-end roads, at East 33rd Terrace and Oakley. The bald, 6-foot former Marine gazes through his black sunglasses at a pile of trash and yard waste. Since March, Ashurst has been searching out makeshift landfills like this one, with its three couches; tree branches; household trash; and a rat king of plastic cables, each stripped of copper wire. A used condom bakes in the sun. “Illegal dumping knows no race, and it knows no gender,” Ashurst says. “And it doesn’t have a tax bracket. I have caught people, in the ricketiest beat-up truck to a 2012 Humvee, illegal dumping.”

A steep path near this junk heap leads to an uninhabited two-story house surrounded by a moat of roofing materials and dozens of car and construction-vehicle tires. “This kind of stuff is contractors,” Ashurst says. “These are businesses. These are tire shops.” “What’s your strangest discovery?” I ask. “A dead horse,” he says. “What really disgusts me, in medieval times, you flip a dead horse over a castle wall into an awaiting army, you’ve got biological warfare.” Ashurst spends most of his time sleuthing. He relies on 25 motion-activated trail cameras to catch dumpers in the act. He hangs the cameras on trees and light poles and in bushes at sites that are known to attract illegal dumpers. (He won’t identify their locations.) A typical dumping case begins with the cameras capturing someone throwing their trash where they shouldn’t. An ideal photo captures the scofflaw’s license-plate number,

which Ashurst uses to issue a court summons to the vehicle’s owner. Since Ashurst started the job, his investigations have led to 35 citations, averaging $750 in fines. The cameras have proved so effective that city leaders have allocated an additional $5,000 to the program. In alleys and dead ends, Ashurst sees a lot of household garbage. He estimates that 70 percent of it is left within six blocks of the home from which it originated. “You wouldn’t believe how common diapers are,” he says. In an alley between East Seventh and East Sixth streets, he finds three TVs (all have been smashed open and stripped of copper) and three bags of household trash. Ashurst looks at the dagger-size shards of TV screens. “There are kids in this neighborhood.” He slips on a pair of blue needle-stick gloves and rips open the trash bags. He needs three pieces of mail from the same address to send the homeowner a notice saying they are being investigated for illegal dumping.

He pulls from one bag a piece of junk mail addressed to a woman. “This is where my anxiety, my OCD, kicks in,” Ashurst says. “If I find one, I won’t stop.” Ashurst finds a grocery mailer and a shredded bank statement also addressed to the woman. He pieces the paper together with her name and address — it’s a block and a half away on Eighth Street. He puts the evidence in a brown folder and drives to the listed address. The house in question has a neatly kept lawn and a blue Hyundai in the driveway. Soon, in the home’s mailbox, will be a warning letter from Ashurst. The letters usually lead to fines. Ashurst drives off, heading back to his office to start the paperwork. “There’s good people that live down here in the inner city that don’t deserve to live next to these kinds of people,” he says.

pitch.com

E-mail ben.palosaari@pitch.com. june 20-26, 2013

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M

indi Love has an encyclopedic memory of Johnson County’s history. Off the top of her head, she can say what year Country Club Plaza developer J.C. Nichols completed his studies at the old Olathe High School. As she leads a tour through the narrow corridors of the Johnson County Museum of History’s cramped Shawnee house, she summons facts about Johnson County and offers context for its suburban past, from the time it was settled through the post–World War II development boom that would eventually make it one of the country’s most affluent counties. Some exhibits in the museum are generic — the faux raspberries and potatoes that demonstrate the once-agrarian nature of Johnson County. Some are sobering — the exhibit that covers deed restrictions, which sought to keep out blacks and Jews and Syrians in some of Johnson County’s developing neighborhoods unless they were there as servants. Love has been the director of the Johnson County Museum since 2000, and for all of that time she has worked in its 19,000-square-foot building at 6305 Lackman Road. It’s not as easy to spot from the road as the nearby Target-anchored shopping development, off Shawnee Mission Parkway and Interstate 435, but it attracts about 30,000 visitors a year. Many of those museumgoers are children, whose smaller size is an advantage here. Exhibits line hallways not much wider than those found in an average residence. “You can’t give a tour to a large group of people,” Love says. “Can you imagine a group of 90 thirdgraders in here?” On the day she leads The Pitch through the museum, her voice competes with the din of children clattering through various interactive exhibits designed to give young people a simulation of 20thcentury suburban life. But the museum has more problems than a high decibel level. For one, it’s largely static. Its main feature is an exhibit called “Seeking the Good Life,” which was erected in the late 1990s after a fundraising campaign. It remains mostly unchanged. The gallery devoted to rotating exhibitions is a space the size of an average home’s dining room. At the moment, it’s taken up by a show of editorial cartoons by Bob Bliss, of the defunct Johnson County Sun newspaper. (One of them takes a jab at Johnson County’s bus system, depicting a Jo bus with two people in it and the caption “The Jo’s ridership doubles!”) It also has flooding problems. The building’s foundation kept rainwater out during a modest May 30 storm, but a 2009 downpour damaged exhibits and records in the basement. That event accelerated the county’s search for a new Johnson County Museum space. Love may be on her way to getting that wish, if the county remakes the museum in the old King Louie West building, in Overland Park. Johnson County bought the dormant bowling alley in 2011, and the proposed budget for the 2014

fiscal year contemplates spending more than $5 million to ready the dilapidated building for use. The museum is calling for another $5 million in the following year’s budget to remake King Louie in the museum’s image. The Johnson County Museum Foundation also wants to raise $2 million for new exhibits in time for a Johnson County Museum opening at King Louie in 2017. That’s a big goal for a small foundation. The nonprofit fundraising arm of the Johnson County Museum has raised $23,000–$38,000 a year since 2007, according to the most recent tax records available. Love says those records don’t include grants that flow through the county books. One such grant: a $120,000 stipend to study a 2011 interpretive plan for what a future museum would look like. Another study was done to explore the feasibility of raising $2 million in time to get the museum moved into King Louie by 2017. That study purports to describe how the foundation might grow from a five-figure fundraiser to a seven-figure one. Larry Meeker, president of the foundation, declined to share that study with The Pitch. He says: “The bottom line is, we’ve settled on a very doable plan for moving in, building a base for further fundraising starting with a base of $2 million to freshen things up, get us moved in [to King Louie] and, if all goes well there, begin the fundraising for expanding the fundraising.” The expanded fundraising that Meeker is talking about would move the foundation toward a much bigger goal: Putting together another concept museum that backers want at King Louie, the National Museum of Suburbia and Suburban Policy Forum. The museum would pay homage to the phenomenon of suburban sprawl, cul-de-sacs, The Feminine Mystique author Betty Friedan, and other testaments to the out-migration from urban centers. To do that — and to develop a museum that may have to sustain itself — the museum would have to raise almost $10 million on its own. The Johnson County Museum today receives more than $600,000 a year from the county to support its operations. “I’m firmly convinced, no doubt in my mind whatsoever, that this is a good idea,” Meeker tells The Pitch. “That it is something that will be acted upon at some point in the future, here or somewhere else.” Others don’t envision a Johnson County–based national suburbia museum as a slam dunk. “If activities can be fully funded by the private sector, that’s good,” says Johnson County Chairman Ed Eilert. “I think it’s a concept that, if it were to happen, needs a lot more work. I hate to discourage somebody who is thinking outside of the box. There are realities to making those kinds of concepts come to pass. It’s going to be very, very difficult.”

“I’m firmly convinced, no doubt in my mind whatsoever, that this is a good idea.”

E

ilert insists that Johnson County didn’t buy King Louie to house a national museum of suburbia. But the county’s decision continued on page 9

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Bowling for Dollars

An icon?

continued from page 7 to buy the property at 8788 Metcalf raised eyebrows among those who pay attention to Johnson County politics. Built in 1959, the 70,000-square-foot King Louie is the sort of structure that local officials call, perhaps euphemistically, “iconic.” Its architecture, then and now, seems more like a ski chalet in Loveland, Colorado, than a bowling alley. But, with its dozens of lanes and its ice-skating rink, the place was a popular suburban destination for decades, until it fell on hard times in the late 2000s. The building was owned by Western Development Co., a Shawnee real-estate entity controlled by John Mitchell, who lives near the Country Club Plaza. By the end of its life as a teen hangout, the building was riddled with codes violations, ranging from an assortment of electrical hazards to frozen sprinkler pipes to chicken wire covering exterior windows. It closed for business in 2009 and went up for sale. Not long after, Johnson County staffers started looking around for a new museum site. King Louie was on the county’s shortlist, but Mitchell’s $3.5 million asking price seemed exorbitant. The bargain shoppers at the county crossed the bowling alley off the list and moved on, exploring dozens of possibilities for the new museum site, mostly in the 20,000- to 30,000-square-foot range (with an eye to an eventual expansion). Among the six locations toured by county officials was the developing Lenexa City Center at 87th Street Parkway and Renner Boulevard. Former Johnson County Commissioner Doug Wood wanted to combine the museum with the Oak Park Branch of the Johnson County Library. None of the ideas gained consensus. Then King Louie’s sellers, who were represented by real-estate firm Kessinger/Hunter, lowered the asking price to $2.5 million and indicated a willingness to perhaps go down even further. Joe Waters, director of facilities for Johnson County, brought the idea of buying the discounted King Louie to the Johnson County Board of Commissioners in November

2011. He said the sellers wanted to close the deal by the end of 2011 for tax purposes. So the Johnson County Commission did Western Development Co. a solid and voted to have the building purchased by the end of 2011 — just one week after the deal was first presented. Commissioners, concerned that the upcoming holidays would prevent a December quorum, quickly voted November 17 to buy the building for $1.95 million; they also voted to allocate another $1.6 million to protect the building from the elements. Then–Johnson County Commissioner David Lindstrom, whom Kessinger/Hunter employed in the 1970s and ’80s, was among those who voted to approve the purchase. Western Development’s $193,000 mortgage on the property, dating back to 2003, was paid off shortly after Johnson County Commissioners voted to approve the deal. The $1.95 million initially came from the county’s reserve fund, basically a savings account for the county government to pay for unexpected costs such as, say, a damaging ice storm. A loan was later taken from UMB Bank to replenish the reserve fund, as rating agencies were warning governments about keeping up adequate reserve levels. Michael Ashcraft, a Johnson County commissioner whose district largely covers Olathe and Lenexa, had reservations about the way the building was bought and the county’s plans for it. Johnson County was still in belt-tightening mode from a deep recession. Officials had begun publicly contemplating closing libraries and cutting staff across various departments — only to throw seven figures at a building for a possible county museum. “I really have become much more ardent and much more concerned about the acquisition,” Ashcraft tells The Pitch. “Before, I was willing to talk about it and learn and see what the deal was. I had hesitancy at first. I’m just not in the game in terms of being a supporter of it. I think there are continued on page 11

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Bowling for Dollars continued from page 9 lots of other things we can do to support the museum and the history of Johnson County. The acquisition of a facility like that — because we had no plan and we’re trying to make a plan, we’re trying to rationalize the acquisition now to put a bus stop there or a bus park there and move other agencies in there. It’s like, no wonder people question how we do government when we make acquisitions like this and we don’t have a clear direction and clear utility for precious resources.” Ashcraft would rather send resources to Johnson County Developmental Supports, which assists people with intellectual or developmental disabilities (IDD). The cost to serve someone needing that type of assistance is $35,000–$40,000 a year, with 60 percent covered by the feds. The waiting list for services is a lengthy six to eight years. “I like museums,” Ashcraft tells The Pitch. “We’ve got limited resources. That [IDD] population is the gold standard.” Eilert says the county bought the right building at the right price. “I had a chance encounter with a local realestate developer on an airplane flight to D.C.,” he says. “This individual was going to look at some property on the East Coast, and the story was in the newspaper a day or two earlier. He said, ‘I’ve been watching that property,’ and he said, ‘You got a heck of a deal.’ ”

T

he old King Louie building won’t house just the Johnson County Museum. It’s expected to become the new advance voting center, replacing the location at Metcalf South Mall, which is due to be razed for redevelopment. It’s also expected to have space for the Enterprise Center of Johnson County, a business incubator hosted by the county that pays $200,000 in rent to Lenexa. Other county agencies might move in, too. It’s not certain whether the proposed National Museum of Suburbia, coupled with a scholarly Suburban Policy Institute, would take space in King Louie. Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York,

Exhibitions in the existing Johnson County Museum of History remain intimate. is home to the National Center for Suburban Studies. It’s seen as the pre-eminent location for academic research into suburbia and related issues, such as problems associated with planning and redeveloping aging suburban towns. Few other academic programs for suburban studies exist outside Hofstra other than an on-again, off-again center at the University of California–Riverside. Christopher Niedt, academic director for Hofstra’s center, says the concept of a suburban museum has to extend beyond sentimentality. “It also needs to be about more than suburban nostalgia,” he says. “It has to ask hard questions about what was good and what was bad about suburban living.” There hasn’t been a market study or a feasibility study to determine the demand for a national museum of suburbia in Johnson County. A 2011 master plan for the idea envisions theatrical exhibitions; re-creations of old suburban model homes, such as Sears & Roebuck houses; and maybe an “interpretive car wash experience.” Installing all of this would cost, the plan says, about $7.7 million.

The plan predicts 60,000 visitors a year and goes on to describe that figure as a conservative estimate. But no source is cited for that guess. Ticket prices would range from $2 to $6 a person (the Johnson County Museum doesn’t charge for admission), with projected revenue of $193,000. Food sales, museum-store income and fundraising events — and $1 million in county operational support — raise the plan’s total projected revenue to $1.5 million a year. Steve Klika, a Johnson County commissioner whose district covers the southeastern corner of the county, doesn’t see the concept as viable. Klika, who was elected to the commission after the purchase of King Louie, says, “I know when I ran for election … there was zero support for trying to promote this.” Museum officials say they’re not really analyzing the prospects for a national-scope museum yet. They’re more focused on raising the $2 million necessary to help move the current museum out of Shawnee and into the King Louie building. “I wouldn’t say we’re on the back burner,” says Love, director of the Johnson County Museum. “It certainly wouldn’t be realistic for us to raise $10 million in three years.”

“It certainly wouldn’t be realistic for us to raise $10 million in three years.”

The last major fundraising campaign for the Johnson County Museum, from 1996 to 1998, to build the current “Seeking the Good Life” exhibit, raised $800,000. And though the Johnson County Museum’s fundraising drive to move to King Louie hasn’t started in earnest yet, it’s likely to face competition from another museum in Johnson County. Fred Merrill Jr. is developing the Museum of Prairiefire, at LionsGate, a mixed-use project at 135th Street and Nall Avenue that includes a museum. It would book traveling exhibitions from New York’s American Museum of Natural History. Merrill has established a foundation to support the museum via donations. Its campaign aims to raise $5 million–$6 million. Merrill says the campaign has reached about 20 percent of that goal. “It just takes a lot of work when you’re raising money for something,” he says. Whether the work would be worthwhile for a national museum of suburbia, given the absent analysis of demand, is anyone’s guess. But Ashcraft and other county commissioners remain ambivalent. “Is that a venue that would draw me or my family repeatedly?” Ashcraft says. “I’m not seeing that. I may be surprised.”

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WEEK OF JUNE 20–26 | BY BERRY ANDERSON

17

PAG E

MOND

AY

6. 24

QUEER LIKE FUNNY

rvie Ian Ha up. stands

FILM World War Z: Brad Pitt meets the undead hordes.

The 14th annual Kansas City LGBT Film Festival started Thursday and continues tonight with comedy selections. Ian Harvie Superhero, a 2013 gay-film-fest darling showing at 5:30 p.m., tells the story of female-to-male gender transformation through stand-up, and Birthday Cake, at 7:30 p.m., is a mockumentary about the days leading up to the first birthday party of a gay couple’s child. Tivoli Cinemas (4050 Pennsylvania, 816-561-5222) hosts the fest, which runs through this coming Thursday. Tickets cost $6.75 for Ian Harvie Superhero and $8.50 for Birthday Cake. See outherenow.com for a full list of shows.

22 PAG E

FAT C I T Y Boulevard teams with Sierra Nevada on a new brew.

26 PAG E

MUSIC Blue Collar Distro sets up its merch table.

T H U R S D AY | 6 . 2 0 | RAISING THE FOURTH WALL

The renovated Just Off Broadway Theatre (3051 Central, 816-784-5020) is owned by the KC Parks and Recreation Department and is availE R MO able to those needing a place to perform. This week, the doors are T A E IN open to the public for ONL .COM PITCH all-ages activities, building tours and networking events. Tonight, the theater’s fundraising week continues with a staged reading of local playwright Harvey Williams’ The Session,

EVENTS

about five women in a court-ordered angermanagement class. This preview comes two months before the play opens in August at the theater. See it — and the new building — at 6:30 p.m. Admission is $5.

F R I D AY | 6 . 21 | TRUCK STOP

Last year’s Pretty Sweet, a video featuring Sean Malto and members of the Girl and Chocolate team skateboarding in China, Nicaragua, Berlin and other international locales, is by all accounts pretty sweet. Today, 17 of the skateboarders (plus continued on page 14

F R I D AY | 6 . 2 1 |

GAY WRITES

T

he Writers Place (3607 Pennsylvania, 816-753-1090) holds a Celebration of Queerness, a reading-series event featuring eight local gay and lesbian writers, with 10-minute segments of rainbow-colored fiction, nonfiction and poetry from 7 to 9 p.m. “We’ll be hearing from two African-American females, one Latino and three old white guys, so it’s definitely a diverse group,” says Wayne Courtois, a co-host of the event. The suggested donation is $5 for non–Writers Place members. For the backstories of the authors, see writersplace.org. pitch.com

june 20-26, 2013

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DAY SATUR

6 . 22

s! matey Ahoy, irates. p e Here b

continued from page 13 Malto) are at Escapist (405 Southwest Boulevard, 816-842-2504) for a 4 p.m. in-store autograph session and photo op. Afterward, the tour moves to the Penn Valley Skatepark (West 29th Street and Pennsylvania) for demos and more photo ops. Both events are free. See escapistskateboarding.com and click “Blog.”

MIDTOWN CRAIC

Browne’s Irish Marketplace (3300 Pennsylvania, 816-561-0030) has been in operation for 126 years. Enough said, amirite? Celebrate with it this weekend when the store/deli/ gathering place sets up its annual Irish Street Faire on Pennsylvania. Tonight’s events, from 6 to 11 (which cost $8 at the gate), include performances by local Irish dancing schools and the Celtic folk-rock cover band Flannigan’s Right Hook, and an outside showing of the 1998 comedy Waking Ned Devine. Over both days, look for lots of beer, Jameson, Roasterie vodka bars, and a Best Legs in a Kilt contest. Saturday’s tickets are $12 (kids 12 and younger get in free). See brownesmarket.com for more information.

SMOKE AND FIRE

FOR MORE INFORMATION

VISIT THECITYMARKET.ORG Brought to you in part by the Neighborhood Tourist Development 14

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june 20-26, 2013

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The saucy dreams and smoky aspirations of 185 teams from across the Midwest are realized during this weekend’s Great Lenexa BBQ Battle, at Sar-Ko-Par Trails Park (87th Street and Lackman Road, Lenexa). “We don’t really plan on changing too much this time around, but we may have a new trick or two up our sleeve,” says last year’s grand champion and returning participant Frank Lichtenauer, of Leawood’s Smokers Purgatory team. Judging starts Saturday. Tonight is reserved for individual team parties and gatherings. A $5 fee gets you in. See lenexa.com for more info.

S AT U R D AY | 6 . 2 2 | BLACK SAM’S BOAT

Just two years after the Whydah was commissioned as a slave ship, the vessel was attacked and taken over by pirates in

February 1717. Two months later, 500 feet off the coast of Cape Cod, the pirate ship hit a sandbar, destroying it and killing all but two crew members. Found in 1984 under 14 feet of water and 5 feet of sand, the ship now reappears — with 200-plus objects found inside it — as the star of Real Pirates, at Union Station (30 West Pershing Road, 816-460-2020). The exhibit opens to the public at 9:30 a.m. Tickets start at $18.95 for adults and $14.50 for kids. Call 816-460-2020 or see unionstation.org/realpirates.

EFFING HOSTILE

No longer just for what Snooki and JWoww label “gorilla juiceheads,” mixed martial arts is as mainstream as yoga and Zumba. At Cricket Wireless Amphitheater (633 North 130th Street, Bonner Springs, 913-721-3400), E R O M MMA fights in the caged pit run alongside perT formances by Opiate, A INE ONL .COM Township Rebellion H C PIT and Far Beyond Driven (tribute bands of Tool, Rage Against the Machine and Pantera, respectively) in what’s being billed as Rock ’N Rage. Because we completely endorse letting loose personal demons in a public forum, you can buy half-price tickets at mypitchdeals.com for $7.50 (click on the “Living” link). Thank us later. Doors open at 6:30 p.m.

EVENTS

AU NATUREL

You don’t have to be in shape to run today’s Dirty Girl 5k Mud Run, but some muscle would be good to get through adventure obstacles such as the 8-foot “Get Over Yourself!” wall, the “H2OMG” muddy-water pit, and the “Down and Dirty” 40-foot-long crawl. Organizers are stressing camaraderie, safety and giggles at the untimed, noncompetitive event. The only drawback is the ticket price: $100 per entry. The Dirty Girl takes place at the National Agricultural Center & Hall of Fame (630 North 126th Street, Bonner Springs, 913-721-1075). See godirtygirl.com for more details.


T U E S D AY | 6 . 2 5 |

this weekend’s Art of the Car Concours on the Kansas City Art Institute campus (4415 Warwick). The event, a fundraiser for KCAI, focuses on racing in the 1950s and ’60s and features more than 200 vehicles. The expo runs from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. For information and to purchase tickets, see kcai.edu.

ODELAY!

SPIN CITY

I

n a city where the mic is king, the DJ is a loyal servant to its followers. And to the early-in-the-week beat. Name: Michael Onwumere DJ alias: DJ Mikey Mike Hometown: Toronto Previous residencies: Sol Cantina, RA Sushi, Quinton’s Waldo Bar, Icons Restaurant & Lounge Current residencies: John’s Big Deck, Bar Louie (Power & Light District), Ernie Biggs (Wichita), Firefly Lounge Beat vehicle: Technics 1200s and a Rane TTM 57 mixer Description of set: “If I’m not sweating, I’m not working!” All-time top five: “Rappers Delight” by Def Squad, “Music” by Erick Sermon, “Loungin’” by LL Cool J featuring Total, “Rosa Parks” by OutKast, “Paid in Full” by Eric B. and Rakim DJ Mikey Mike spins Tuesdays at John’s Big Deck (928 Wyandotte, 816-255-3396) from 10 p.m. until close.

Many local Cinco de Mayo events were rained out. Make up for that this weekend when the Hispanic Chamber of Commerce of Greater KC hosts the 14th annual Fiesta Kansas City, a three-day celebration at Crown Center (2450 Grand, 816-472-6767), with comida auténtica, two entertainment stages and a Margarita Cove. Admission for adults costs $10 after 4 p.m. (kids under 10 get in free). Hang out for this final day from noon to 11 p.m. See fiestakansascity.com.

W E D N E S D AY | 6 . 2 6 | CANNIBAL’S DELIGHT

There’s no sadist in cinema history with tastes more discerning than Hannibal Lecter. The Alamo Drafthouse (1400 Main, 816-474-4545) celebrates the palate of the fictional serial killer with dinner and a movie at 7 p.m. The Silence of the Lambs Feast, a fourcourse meal, features the Alamo’s Signature Wines, including “The Cannibal Chianti” and “Suit Yourself Pinot Grigio.” Besides the obligatory fried chicken liver and fava-bean puree, enjoy Buffalo Bill’s Skinless Chicken Wings in Bacon Fat & Sriracha “Lotion” (and other delicacies). Tickets to the 1991 blockbuster film and accompanying dinner cost $65 per person; see drafthouse.com/ kansas_city/mainstreet.

Cultivate Kansas City’s Urban Grown Farms & Gardens Tour. See 60 urban farms and gardens.

AROUND HEAR

The four-day HEAR Now: the Audio Fiction and Arts Festival features live and scripted storytelling performances that include experimental narrative, classic radio dramas and other forms of auditory delights. The event hits its climax at 7:30 tonight with a live broadcast of Right Between the Ears, featuring performer and voice master Phil Proctor and singer-actress Barbara Rosenblat, at UMKC’s Spencer Theatre (4949 Cherry, 816-235-6222). Tickets for individual listening sessions, which begin Thursday at several area locations — Tivoli Cinemas (4050 Pennsylvania) and Cinemark Palace at the Plaza (500 Nichols Road) among them — start at $8. See hearnowfestival.org.

S U N D AY | 6 . 2 3 | GO CAR ARTS

Unless you are a serious autophile, you’ll never have the time or money to restore a 1964 Shelby 289 Cobra or a 1915 Model T Race Car. But you can see one of each up close at

ExpEriEncE all THE wayS good food iS bEing grown in your ciTy! Cultivate the Change! Self-Guided Tours | Saturday & Sunday: June 22 & 23 | 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. weeklong urban grown activities start June 15 Tickets & Information: cultivateKc.org/urbangrownTour | 913.831.2444 Follow Us: @farmsTourKc www.facebook.com/KcurbanfarmsTour

“A census taker once tried to test me …” E-mail submissions two weeks in advance to calendar@pitch.com. Search our complete listings guide online at pitch.com.

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FILM

ENGULF AND DEVOUR

Hollywood goes full zombie with

BY

the apocalyptic World War Z.

BIL GE EBIRI

Z

ombie movies are, at heart, disaster movies. The horror they exploit is not so much of the “Boo!” variety, but rather that of society in full collapse. So it’s perhaps surprising that Marc Forster’s World War Z feels, at times, like the first zombie movie to go full apocalypse on us. Rather than confi ne its story to one representative corner of the world — a E R MO shopping mall à la Dawn of the Dead or a corner of Britain à la 28 Days Later T A INE — it gives us the spectacle ONL .COM PITCH of a world in total, bloody, horrific ruin. Maybe that’s why it’s so compelling, even as it often drifts into the generic. The elaborate, expensive production, adapted (loosely) from Max Brooks’ acclaimed episodic 2006 novel, World War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War, starts off with an eerie, intense scene set in Philadelphia, where former U.N. inspector Gerry Lane (Brad Pitt) and his family, stuck in a traffic jam, begin to hear, and then see, the first signs of slowly spreading chaos. These early scenes are enormously effective at establishing the Lanes’ vulnerability — one of the daughters has asthma, and they have to loot a pharmacy to get her some medication.

FILM

As a result, the audience quickly becomes committed to these characters’ survival. So much so that when the Lanes are whisked off to an aircraft carrier, where what’s left of the U.S. government and military has set up a mobile unit, and Gerry is enlisted to track down the zombie epidemic’s origin in hopes of finding a cure, we’re genuinely concerned.

Those aren’t photographers, Brad. For a while after that, the fi lm subsists mostly on apocalyptic set pieces: a journey to Korea, then Israel, where the country’s walls and tight security have helped it ward off the swarming hordes of zombies. (Yes, these Israel scenes come off just as politi-

cally loaded as that description makes it sound — though I wonder if the fi lmmakers are even aware how troublesome this section of the fi lm is.) Along the way, Gerry’s various companions repeatedly give him much-needed information … before they’re inevitably eaten. Even amid the repetitiveness, though, the fi lm captures sights of horror that feel right. At one point, Gerry and some others fly over a mushroom cloud. Their faces initially register quiet shock, but they don’t dwell on it much — of course somebody used nukes on the undead. You’d think all this epic zombie spectacle would lead to one giant scene to rule them all, but think again: World War Z’s final act is smaller, quieter and a lot more suspenseful than the film’s trajectory might lead you to expect. Reportedly, a much bigger finale was shot and then scrapped, and this new ending is the result of rewrites and reshoots. That should bode ill for the movie, but somehow it doesn’t. A fi lm that begins with the predicament of one family ends on a similarly minor note, and the gargantuan World War Z recaptures the element that makes it so initially alarming: the intimacy of global horror arriving on the doorstep, all rage, bared teeth and hunger. ■

OUT THIS WEEK THE BLING RING

B

y the time Harvey Levin sat down on the cultural toilet to drop TMZ on us, Sofia Coppola’s career as a writer and director was well under way. But the three movies she has made since the celebrity-gossip clearinghouse’s 2005 arrival, starting with the next year’s Marie Antoinette, are oddly difficult to imagine in a world without TMZ — not to mention, now, Gawker and Facebook and Instagram. As Coppola has painstakingly chosen and plumbed the rarefied places where privilege and alienation poison the well, the ground has grown shallower and shakier and drier under her. And her audience … well, her audience might be, to look at The Bling Ring, too drunk on Red Bull and Grey Goose to worry about the water. Coppola’s latest air-conditioned, plasticcovered dispatch from the thirsty fields of entitlement is as terse as a telegram, and it conveys an all-capital-letters message daringly stripped of narrative and nuance: The only thing worse than the zircon-crusted, realityTV-fying of our infotainment moment are the people who want into it and have somehow been denied admission.

That’s not much of an insight, but Coppola’s mission seems to be an almost documentary flattening of her true-story material (even as she spikes it with typically adroit use of pop songs). So Bling is both a snapshot of the world’s most stupid in-crowd and a cold valentine to it. Cinema is rich with gang-thatcouldn’t-shoot-straight stories; this is probably going to stand for a while as its best gangwith-too-many-Rolexes tale. Her screenplay — minimal even by the pointillist standards of 2010’s hypnotic Somewhere: “Omigod!”

Don’t hate. “Oh. My God.” “Shut up!” Repeat — takes no real liberties with the credited source, a 2010 true-crime Vanity Fair article (Nancy Jo Sales’ razor-sharp “The Suspects Wore Louboutins”), and her direction eavesdrops on the action instead of driving or responding to it. What we overhear, what we see through grimy surveillance cameras and under nightclub neon and by moonlight and in white California sunshine, is a greedy coven of girls (and

one boy, not quite the sociopath his friends turn out to be) stealing money and clothing and jewelry from several C-list celebrities. They do this by figuring out that Paris Hilton (whose gaudy home and face are here as themselves) and others don’t bother to lock their homes when they leave for the party, or else leave a key under the mat. The girls do this because they can, because it’s there, because it’s as natural as friending them on Facebook. And then they get caught because they show off the haul on Facebook. The actors — mainly Israel Broussard as the boy (Marc) and Katie Chang as his klepto BFF (Rebecca) — make themselves believably airy and nonconflicted. Taissa Farmiga and Emma Watson are pulling faces more than giving performances, but that’s the idea, and they’re both funny. No one is sympathetic, but no one annoys. As the characters say, often and about nearly everything they bother to comment on, it’s all chill. There has been some carping among critics that The Bling Ring is too chill, that it’s the most there’s-no-there-there of Coppola’s IMDB credits. The inevitable countersuit is that she has again set out to continued on page 19

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continued from page 17 show us the dangers (and, perhaps more, the pleasures) of a society with so little will to allow much there in the first place. But Bling is something else. It sets aside the boredom of Lost in Translation and Somewhere, a boredom trying to reach escape velocity. Instead, Coppola follows the low, decaying orbit of characters who appear clinically incapable of introspection, who don’t know what they’d leave behind even if they could generate momentum. The slim but glossy result is a film that plays like a GIF of gimme — one that refuses to deliver. If you don’t reject it right back, if you don’t immediately weary of its purposely vapid figures, then you might read it as the driest, meanest American comedy in a while (and one that seems more dangerous than its violent, cross-eyed stepsister, Spring Breakers). At first that refusal feels like an accident, as though some assistant editor wiped a hard drive that contained a couple of crucial, motivation-establishing scenes. But the most revealing and entertaining quotes and descriptions from Sales’ reporting are all onscreen, and even at the movie’s most dreamlike and lustrous (this was the last work by the gifted cinematographer Harris Savides, to whom the movie is dedicated), Coppola packs her frames with witty detail. Like her other movies, Bling is also a cross-section of a larger verge moment, of characters in a bubble watching other people trying to live outside the bubble. It invites us to project our headline anxieties and class hostilities onto its young, pretty, easily resented population. In the background of this one, though, is a national bubble: the 2008 financial meltdown. The thefts start in the fall of 2008, just as Lehman Brothers boils over. The big banks go without mention here, as do the government and the bailout and the election and everything not related to The Hills or the Hiltons. But the pains about to be dealt the rest of the country, at just this short remove, feel like something seen the wrong way through a telescope: tiny, insubstantial. The foreclosures had begun, but the girls were waiting for bottle service, and Coppola has made that amusing without making it cheap. It helps, of course, that everybody goes to jail. — SCOTT WILSON

Nathan Fillion (right), forsooth

MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING

I

n its best moments, Joss Whedon’s moderndress movie version of Much Ado About Nothing seems most like what it is: a house-party lark among old friends who have decided to perform Shakespeare rather than dust off the Twister or find the croquet mallets. That’s pretty much how it seems in its worst moments, too. Shot in 12 days just after principal photography wrapped on Whedon’s The Avengers, it might have benefited from a framing device that emphasized the performance — something like Louis Malle’s Vanya on 42nd Street, which shows us the actors arrive, slip into their roles, and gradually envelop us within the play. As it stands, the contemporary garb and gadgets are affectations that work against the play’s archaic language and plotting. That problem is partly with Shakespeare’s jarring shifts from comedy to melodrama. Much Ado sets up the kind of exasperating farcical complications that could be cleared up instantly with direct communication — with, say, an iPhone, which everyone here seems to have. Yet the results of Much Ado’s confusion are too ugly and potentially lethal for the film’s happy ending to be completely enjoyable. The uneven acting fluctuates from wholly at ease (Clark Gregg’s Leonato and Reed Diamond’s Don Pedro are particularly good) to “Hey, I went to this house, and somebody handed me some lines to read” — sometimes in the same scene. The on-the-fly staging, which keeps treading on the illusion of the world within the play, also doesn’t help, though the black-and-white digital camerawork adds a jolt of you-are-there verisimilitude. Those issues notwithstanding, the movie’s let’s-put-on-a-show spirit is infectious. And for Whedonites, the casting of veteran players and fan favorites supplies extra layers. Longtime Buffy and Angel fans aren’t just watching Amy Acker’s Beatrice and Alexis Denisof’s Benedick bicker and woo; they’re seeing the reunion (and romance) of Fred Burkle and Wesley Wyndam-Pryce. — JIM RIDLEY

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CAFÉ

THE GOLD STANDARD

Debbie Gold opens her Red Door Grill in Leawood.

BY

CHARLES FERRUZZA

Red Door Grill • 11851 Roe, Leawood, 913-227-4959 • Hours: 11 a.m.–10 p.m. Sunday–Thursday, 11 a.m.–11 p.m. Friday and Saturday • Price: $$–$$$

ot long after the Red Door Grill opened in Leawood last month, chef Debbie Gold — the James Beard Award winner and reality-TV star — overheard two customers talking about her in the dining room. “Debbie Gold left the American Restaurant,” one woman said to her dining companion, “to make hamburgers?” It’s not quite that simple, but yes, at her new place, Debbie Gold is making burgers. And taco platters. And hot wings. The Red Door, you see, is the template for a chain of similar dining spots. She and her business partners, Jason Gleaton and Gary Zancanelli, have envisioned it as a “neighborhood grill,” an appealing but not very sophisticated menu with affordable prices. If the concept takes off, it could make Gold wealthy. For now, though, she isn’t rich; she’s tired. Since she left the most high-profile culinary position in Kansas City earlier this year, as executive chef of the glamorous American Restaurant (a job she shared with her former husband, chef-restaurateur Michael Smith, from 1994 MORE to 2001), Gold has dedicated herself to finding T an identity for the Red A E IN ONL .COM Door. That has meant PITCH working long hours, seven days a week, tweaking a menu that did not, as late as last Tuesday, include a printed list of entrées. (What the menu does have is something I detest: cutesy categories. Appetizers are listed under the heading “A’Teezer,” and you can guess what comes under “H’Burgers” and “S’Wiches.”) “My life keeps traveling in circles,” Gold says. She worked at the American twice, and this is her second foray into the restaurant scene at 119th Street and Roe. The Red Door Grill is across the street from the space that held Gold’s previous restaurant, 40 Sardines, which she opened with Smith just over a decade ago and that closed in 2008, after the couple divorced. By then, the place had developed a strong following, but the imperiousness of the serving staff (well, most of it, anyway) sometimes trumped the creativity and quality of Gold’s cuisine. That’s not the case at Red Door, where the young servers and bartenders are so cheerful, you might wonder if Gold is keeping them medicated. She may want to adjust the dose; everyone here is likable, but the collective intuition is running a little low. Details that would catch the eye of a veteran waiter or waitress (missing flatware, empty water

CAFÉ

ANGELA C. BOND

N

on a blue-cheese dressing that was a vivid orange, thanks to the gratuitous addition of smoked paprika. The wings, like several other dishes here, come scattered with wilted arugula (even glasses, a dirty plate) aren’t yet resonating with this front-of-the-house staff, who seem the squid arrives with the stuff, flash-fried). The leaves are lifeless and flavorless, but that to be learning on the fly. doesn’t spoil things. I even found something And flying is how you keep up with Gold, mercifully arugula-free: the flatbread. The vawho remains among the metro’s most talriety I sampled, anyway, was ented chefs but may not tasty: a jade-colored creation have been quite ready to Red Door Grill with an artichoke puree and open Red Door. Squid and chips .............. $9.75 a garlicky chimichurri. Most of the dishes I’ve Red-rub wings, Gold makes her five coutried here are very good. half order ......................$11.25 ture hamburgers using a (Young, redheaded Jacob The Secret burger .........$9.50 McGonigle’s Meat Market Moeller is the chef, and Sirloin steak .......................$26 blend of beef brisket, short Gold sings his praises, but Miso salmon........................$23 Sarsaparilla rib and chuck tenderloin. I the menu is her invention.) doughnuts..................... $6.75 tasted only one, which the But Gold’s reputation comes menu says is made with a with baggage. So stellar is it “secret” sauce. I don’t know that, when a dish fails to be if the recipe is exactly the stuff of Freemason a showstopper, its taste is a disappointment. rites — the secret seems to be the snappy onion The servers one night talked me into a jam that dresses the meat — but it’s a good squid-and-chips platter, but it was soggy and burger. I prefer the roasted-pork-and-tomatillogreasy. (Most of Red Door’s dishes are served in metal trays that look like Teflon-coated cake salsa tacos, the closest thing to real Wyandotte pans.) The meaty, muscular chicken wings County street tacos that you’ll find in Leawood. Gold and Moeller have been slowly add(so bulky as to suggest steroids) were moist, and the rub was delicious and spicy, but the ing dinner items to the menu, and the three dishes slated to become permanent are texture wasn’t crisp enough. And I wasn’t sold

Clockwise: Red Door’s metal trays overflow with doughnut holes, chicken wings and the Remedy burger.

great: a sirloin steak that drips with bonemarrow butter; a fantastic slab of misoglazed salmon, delicately smoky from the wood-fired grill and served on a swirl of soba noodles and bok choy; and an autumnal, beautifully prepared brined pork chop chunked up with an amber-apple chutney. The chop’s chutney would be as good on ice cream as it was on the pork, but there’s nothing that fruity among the desserts yet. The signature sweet is a quintet of sugar-dusted sarsaparilla doughnut holes, served in a blackiron pan and topped with two dainty scoops of Christopher Elbow sweet-cream ice cream. There are also a layered red-velvet cake — served too cold here, the creamy icing as dense as caulk — and a pound cake that our server warned we wouldn’t like. But the desserts, like almost everything else behind the Red Door, are still in the preview stages. Gold confesses that she has been so busy working on everything else, the sweets aren’t quite up to her standards. I’m sure they’ll get there. Gold is a perfectionist, after all, and she left the American Restaurant to do more than just make burgers.

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Have a suggestion for a restaurant The Pitch should review? E-mail charles.ferruzza@pitch.com june 20-26, 2013

the pitch

21


FAT C I T Y

TAG TEAM

H

umankind can finally swallow the earth with this week’s release of Terra Incognita, Boulevard Brewing Co. and Sierra Nevada Brewing Co.’s barrel-aged collaboration. The dark-brown ale is named after uncharted lands and the California Trail, which separates the breweries. Boulevard brewmaster Steven Pauwels says the dry, hop-forward Smokestack Series brew has a funky finish (via Brettanomyces yeast added during bottle conditioning) that imparts notes of oak and bourbon as it warms. Terra Incognita is the second in a trilogy of Boulevard–Sierra Nevada beers. The breweries’ first collaboration was an ale for the Brewers Association’s SAVOR conference in 2012. The third release, another barrel-aged brew set for 2014, will be made at Sierra Nevada’s Chico, California, brewery. Pauwels and Sierra Nevada brewmaster Steve Dresler discussed their creation with The Pitch during a recent conference call. The Pitch: How did the collaboration come about? Pauwels: So we were at a bar — there’s always a bar story — and I asked Nancy [Johnson, SAVOR event director] how we could get involved, and she said, “Well, you can make the beer for next year.” And then Ken [Grossman, Sierra Nevada founder] said, “Sure.” Dresler: I remember we were on the patio ordering oysters at Jax [Fish House in Denver] after the Great American Beer Festival. It was the first of a lot of conversations. Pauwels: Our version had a lot of wheat. What we were trying to do is that we have two brewers, one in the middle of the country and 22

the pitch

june 20-26, 2013

Boulevard and Sierra Nevada join forces for

BY

Terra Incognita, which hits shelves this week.

JON AT H A N BENDER

one on the West Coast. So we thought, How could we connect them? One of the brewers came up with the name for Terra Incognita. Pauwels: We were making beer that tastes and smells like dirt. Dresler: Well, we succeeded. [Laughs.] Pauwels: I should say we made it earthy. The Pitch: Steve, you came to Boulevard this February for the blending of the new beer. What was that process like? Dresler: Blending is exceptionally fun and challenging. The folks on Steven’s staff perform exceptionally well. Pauwels: We had three portions ready. One was aged in whiskey barrels, one had been in wine foudres and the other was fresh beer. The wine just adds so much complexity. You’re standing there for a couple of hours trying to create the best blend. And you go back and forth until you have that aha moment. Dresler: The dialogue is critical as you’re drinking together. You’re putting beer components in different proportions, and there are lots of descriptors. You come to a verbal understanding of positives and negatives. The original blend took the better part of an afternoon. You kind of create as you go, and that’s what makes it fun and a challenge. Then you have one, and it’s delicious when you’re done. Pauwels: We’ve known each other for quite a while. I have a lot of respect for Sierra Nevada beers, and I know what Steve has in his mind. He knows what makes a great beer, and if you find people in the industry with the same perception of beer, you know you can go in the same direction.

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Above left: The blending process for Terra Incognita at Boulevard. At left: Dresler (left) and Pauwels share a moment over their brew.

Dresler: In the end, the barrels that got slightly soured were the ones that we liked. Barrel aging is relatively new for us at Sierra Nevada, and blending is something new to me. I picked up different things from the different wood. That was the most eye-opening part of the process. Oh, and Steven taught me how to dry hop with wet hops. Pauwels: His name is in all the books, but I taught him how to do it. The Pitch: How does this year’s version compare with the original batch at SAVOR? Dresler: We had this year’s version in San Francisco side by side with last year’s. And last year’s bottle has developed beautifully. Pauwels: That’s the whole idea about Terra Incognita — it’s the unknown. This is probably one of the first beers that I would say buy and hold onto it. Buy two. There are some edges to it and, as it matures, they’ll play nicely together. Dresler: The aromas and flavors meld so well with additional time. This is new stuff for me. I’ve spent most of my career in the realm of very traditional brewing systems

and traditional yeast. It’s exciting now to have beer projects that evolve over time. Pauwels: The spikiness of the young beer mellows out over time. I hope the same thing happens to this one. The Pitch: Do you see more collaborations in the future for your breweries and the craft-beer industry? Dresler: I don’t think people were collaborating five or six years ago. It’s a relatively new thing, and I think it speaks really nicely to the people in the craft-brewing industry. I’ve been doing this for 30 years, and there weren’t many players. But now there are 2,300 to 2,400 breweries. That way that craft brewers work together is unique in a competitive industry. We’re vying for market share, and yet we want to co-create. Have collaborations played themselves out? I kind of hope not. Pauwels: We’ve done three and will do one this year. I think one per year is a good speed. There’s some breweries that are doing almost one every month. You want to make it a project, create something unique that you can stand behind and not just another IPA. Dresler: I don’t look at it as a flavor-of-themonth club. Pauwels: I want people to say, years later, “This is fabulous.”

E-mail jonathan.bender@pitch.com


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23


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FAT C I T Y

ON YOUR GROWN

BY

JON AT H A N BENDER

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e can go ahead and mark 2013 as the year when urban agriculture reached a tipping point in Kansas City. Because this is the year when it has become pretty much physically impossible to actually visit every site on MORE Cultivate Kansas City’s Urban Grow n Farms & Gardens Tour. In an T A INE ONL .COM effort to help you choose PITCH from among the tour’s 59 sites this weekend, here’s Fat City’s must-see half-dozen. Tour admission costs $8, and the hours are from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. See cultivatekc.org.

FAT CITY

SATURDAY

City Bitty Farm 9615 Grandview Road

Greg and Jen Garbos run the demonstration farm at the headquarters of Four Season Tools, a company that designs and builds high tunnels and greenhouses and has the latest in year-round farming gadgets. The microgreens and edible flowers grown here are on restaurant menus around town, including Room 39’s.

Contemporary Regional Missouri Cuisine Dinner: Tues - Sat, Lunch: Wed - Fri Happy Hour: Wed - Fri, 4 - 5:30

Krostadir 7807 East 68th Street

Some people dabble in their backyards; Randall Munden has transformed his into what he calls Krostadir. Here, he can teach you how to create raised beds from rotting wood in a process known as hugelkultur. And he can show you the art of raising bees and chickens without irking the neighbors, which should also have its own German word.

900 W 39th St. Kansas City, MO 64111 24

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june 20-26, 2013

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Herb’n Gardener/Switzer Neighborhood Farm, Westside Community Gardens 921-B West 17th Street/1842 West Pennway Boulevard

If you’re a would-be farmer, you should fi nd an apartment on the West Side. First, though, stop by the Switzer Neighborhood Farm, where you’ll find salsa samples every two hours, beginning at 10 a.m., and a small worm-farm demonstration (so you can learn how to make compost and liquid fertilizer using the wriggly garden dwellers). Drive up the street around noon, when Lew Edmister is set to bake sourdough bread in the wood-fired clay oven at Herb’n Gardener. Buy a loaf for lunch and look at his shiitakemushroom plot.

SUNDAY

Huns Garden 4730 Metropolitan, Kansas City, Kansas

The City Market would have a hard time running without Pov Huns and his family, who have been on the urban-farm tour since its inception, in 2005. The Huns use low- and no-irrigation growing practices, and Pov, the family’s patriarch, can talk to you about traditional Hmong methods of growing. They’ll also have fresh-cut flowers for sale.

Gibbs Road Farm 4233 Gibbs Road, Kansas City, Kansas

The 2-acre farm is the home of Cultivate Kansas City, and it includes Bob Burns’ Bee Farm. That means honey for sale. And Prairie Fire Oven, a mobile wood-fired pizza kitchen, is cooking up pies today.

E-mail jonathan.bender@pitch.com


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25


WHERE THE BEST MUSICIANS IN THE WORLD PLAY

KNUCKLEHEADS F re e S h u tt le in S u rr o u n d in g A reth e a

MUSIC

DISTRO INFERNO

Lawrence’s Blue Collar Distro, the Internet’s merch table

BY

A PR IL F L EMING

JUNE:

19: Duke Robillard & Popa Chubby

JUNE 20TH, 2013 cody canada

& the departed

w/ outlaw jim & the whiskey benders

Poster boys: Blue Collar co-owners Sean Ingram (left) and Jim David

cody is former front man for

But Blue Collar’s original DIY spirit is still strong. Employees take turns on DJ duty. Watching Riff Raff videos online qualifies as keeping up with the client base. The business is also working on a platform that will enable users to build custom bikes, and one of Blue Collar’s employees, Craig Bolivar, is working on a special limited-edition vinyl release of the music from the Star Wars trilogy, for which he managed to acquire the vinyl rights. (Ingram jokes: “Soon, I’ll be working for him.”). And judging by how full the company’s current space is, a move to an even larger building seems imminent. Ingram shrugs. “The thing is, nobody knows what a distro is anymore,” he says. “It’s just a carryover from the punk days.”

S cross canadian ragweed

20: Curtis Grimes 22: Leon Russell 22: Indigenous LR 23: Slaid Cleaves 24: Ray Babgy’s Birthday Party 26: Johnny Lee (The Urban Cowboy) & Tom Ramey 26: Simo 26: The Farewell Drifters

For more info & tickets: knuckleheadskc.com 2715 Rochester, KCMO

816-483-1456

26

the pitch

june 20-26, 2013

potify, iTunes, Pandora, SoundCloud and the like have made discovering new music easy, but it wasn’t so long ago that the process took real effort. You had to visit a record store, maybe pore over some music magazines. Or, if you were into punk rock, you’d keep an eye on your favorite distro. Distros were mail-order repositories of independent music and merch. They also functioned as tastemakers of sorts. There still are a handful of distros out there, but times have changed. For Lawrence’s best-known distro, Blue Collar Distro, the cultural shifts hit a boiling point in 2008. The phone stopped ringing. “When the stock market crashed,” owner Sean Ingram says, “we saw an immediate effect here. … Business stopped. Immediately. Done. Seriously, I had my guys cleaning presses for two weeks. It was horrible.” When The Pitch checked in with the youthful Blue Collar in early 2005, the business was somewhat nascent but already printing T-shirts for well-known bands, including Linkin Park and Dashboard Confessional. The press was operating in downtown Eudora, Kansas, and just beginning to expand into poster printing, principally for local bands and businesses. It later relocated to a larger (and more expensive) space in Lawrence and continued to grow, adding bigger touring bands and distribution for more and more labels and artists. “Back then, the music scene was different, what was selling was different, how people bought things was really different,” Ingram says. “Music was the big driver.” When the crash hit, Ingram recognized that it was time to adapt. And he has. Today, if you go to Blue Collar’s website, you still find local music well represented, with merch available from such acts as Coalesce (Ingram is the frontman), Cowboy Indian Bear, Matt Pryor, Mac

pitch.com

Lethal, RecordBar and more. But you also see a much wider range of products and customers, including distribution and merchandise for such record labels as Kill Rock Stars and Mad Decent (Diplo’s label), the Hold Steady, and a slate of stand-up comedians. Blue Collar even sells sports equipment for the underground sport of bike polo. (It manufactures proprietary equipment for the mallets and bikes.) “We started the promotions — things like whistles, lighters, weed grinders, the bike stuff — pretty soon after then [2008],” Ingram says. “I remember we were reading an AP article about one of our bands, a band that accounted for, like, 40 percent of our business that year or the year before. And it’s about how they were dealing with drug issues and had broken up without announcing it. I was reading it like, ‘Oh my God, I was out of a job like five times and didn’t even know it.’ ” In search of another revenue stream, Burton Parker, a co-owner at Blue Collar, began pursuing comedians and podcast hosts as potential customers. Blue Collar’s comedy ranks now include Denis Leary, Jonah Ray, Pete Holmes, Maria Bamford and Marc Maron (host of one of the Web’s most successful podcasts, WTF with Marc Maron). Perhaps the biggest change of all for Blue Collar is the one that will take the longest to implement: The name “Blue Collar Distro” is eventually going away, to be subsumed by merchtable.com, a format for an artist’s merchandise that integrates directly onto the artist’s website (rather than originating at Blue Collar’s site). “For example,” Ingram says, “when you go to Mad Decent or Diplo’s websites, you’re not even going to know that we’re doing it. They’ve got the customer’s own undivided attention.” (Blue Collar’s T-shirt press will retain its name.)

E-mail feedback@pitch.com

J A Z Z B E AT HERMON MEHARI TRIO AT THE MAJESTIC

The space is a speakeasy that has hosted jazz since politicians gathered here for drinks during Prohibition. The trumpeter is one of KC’s young jazz lions, expanding the music’s reach with sounds from an earlier generation: hip-hop and Michael Jackson. Hermon Mehari’s trumpet — blowing an Ellington standard, a Charlie Parker bebop or a more contemporary tune — breathes fresh, inventive ideas about what jazz can be. Every Tuesday, Mehari’s Hermon Mehari Trio builds on KC’s jazz tradition in the downstairs club at the Majestic. It’s the future and the past, all wrapped up into one show. Hermon Mehari Trio, 6–10 p.m. Tuesdays, downstairs at the Majestic (931 Broadway, 816-221-1888) — LARRY KOPITNIK


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june 20-26, 2013

the pitch

27


EAT DRINK PLAY LIVE MUSIC SATURDAY NIGHTS HAPPY HOUR TUES-SAT 4-6:30PM ALL DAY HAPPY HOUR SUNDAY & MONDAY! DARTS•POOL•POKER PATIO•CARRIEOKE

MUSIC

SOME KIND OF CHANGE

BY

new album that may be their best.

D A NN Y A L E X A NDE R

I

t feels like a purely objective statement to say the Pedaljets’ two-fisted new album, What’s in Between, is the band’s best. THEPARKWAYSHAWNEE It has all the studio sophistication that the band might have wished for on its promising 1987 debut, Today Today, and it recovers the pop sensibility left behind on its self-titled 1990 follow-up, after which the group disbanded. The Pedaljets reunited to fi x the latter, aided by new guitarist Paul Malinowski (formerly of Shiner and Season to Risk), in 2008. On Between, Malinowski again joins Mike Allmayer (principal singer, songwriter and guitarist), Matt Kesler (bass) and Rob Morrow (drums). In conversation, it quickly becomes apparent that today’s Pedaljets feel as unified as this new record. The Pitch: You’ve made two records in a row now as this band, if you count one made up of 20-year-old material. What’s in Between is almost all new material; besides that, what A. O. Scott strikes you as most significantly different about the two albums? Allmayer: Pedaljets was a transitional record. We were no longer the brash kids who were going in and making a record, but we also didn’t have a completely cohesive vision of what we wanted to do. We’ve gotten to the point where we’re confident enough to know what we want. Malinowski: I love that there are both Detroit-type rockers here and songs that are much more spacious, like “Some Kind of One” and “Change.” As a whole, this album feels more complex to me. Pedaljets was a little disjointed. These songs live together much better. Morrow: At various points, I’ve probably counted every song as the best one, which I think is a sign of a great record. The Pitch: What accounts for that? Kesler: We were able to spend a lot more SHAKESPEARE KNEW HOW TO THROW A PARTY time trying different ideas and instruments. Back in the day, we had limited time and resources. All the recording and mixing had to be done quickly due to budget and studio availability. Now digital recording can be done almost anywhere, and time becomes less of a Facebook.com/MuchAdoMovie factor. With that said, my favorite times this Follow @JossWhedon and @MuchAdoFilm on Twitter go-around were in Westend Studios, running straight to 2-inch tape, old school. Allmayer: Communion was a well-respected label, but they gave us $1,000 to record an album, which translates into about three days in the studio. This time, I wanted to take some songs I’d written and explore them fully with KANSAS CITY PITCH WEEKLY_MAA_0620 the guys. We had the time and we had the resources to do it the way we wanted and do KANSAS CITY OVERLAND PARK Cinemark Palace at The Plaza Fine Arts Glenwood Arts it right. I approached things like, if this riff (800) FANDANGO #1120 (913) 642-4404 wears on us, let’s lose it. CHECK THEATRE DIRECTORIES OR CALL FOR LEAWOOD SOUND INFORMATION AND SHOWTIMES The Pitch: What are some examples of songs AMC Town Center 20 SPECIAL ENGAGEMENTS NO PASSES OR DISCOUNT COUPONS ACCEPTED (888) AMC-4FUN you kept going at until you got them right?

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Talking with the Pedaljets about the

“PERHAPS THE LIVELIEST AND MOST PURELY DELIGHTFUL MOVIE I HAVE SEEN SO FAR THIS YEAR.”

BASED ON THE PLAY BY WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE ADAPTED FOR THE SCREEN AND DIRECTED BY JOSS WHEDON

SELECT ENGAGEMENTS START FRIDAY, JUNE 21

28

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june 20-26, 2013

pitch.com

KANSAS CITY PITCH WEEKLY

The Pedaljets get in sync. Allmayer: I had some concerns about my vocal on “Conversations,” but they all talked me out of changing it. Kesler: I think Mike was concerned because we used his original vocal track, which was a scratch track from the 1989 sessions. Malinowski: We started working on that first. There were lots of missing parts. But no matter what we did with the vocal, no other version seemed to have the right amount of energy. The Pitch: I couldn’t tell it was Mike’s voice recorded 20 years apart from the other stuff. Malinowski: Yeah, that’s what’s great about it. It doesn’t matter! Morrow: We had recorded the song “Change,” but it was a little bit lifeless compared to the other tunes. And we were on the verge of having to decide whether to keep it. One night, Mike and I came up with this brilliant chorus, which happened quickly. Suddenly we were generating one good idea after another, and we immediately switched on the mics and recorded the new things so we wouldn’t forget them. The original recordings we made that night were so inspired that those are the ones you hear now, on the record. That was an incredible session, magical. From there, that burst of creativity cascaded into rehabbing the middle bit, and then later adding this really beautiful ending. Malinowski: “Some Kind of One” ended up being the hidden gem. It has this interesting retro feel. Matt had been talking about how we ought to try some old-fashioned hard panning [complete separation of sounds in the

stereo mix], and when we played it for John [Agnello, the Sonic Youth and Dinosaur Jr. producer, who mixed the record], he immediately got it. It was the last of the basic tracks we finished, the very last one we decided to add to the group we were going to mix, and it came alive when we heard what John did. He knew just where to take it. Kesler: “Some Kind of One” is interesting because it is not your typical Pedaljets song. The Beach Boys harmonies were a result of me singing an idea for a string section. We never brought in the orchestra. The Pitch: I think this is the most moving of the Pedaljets’ albums. Any thoughts about why? Allmayer: As a kid, the world is a massive place that can push you around, and that gives you an attitude, a shell. I always had this persona as a rock-and-roll singer. Now, when I write, I’m singing as a human being who has serious doubts about his own capabilities. I’m looking back at the things that didn’t destroy me, and by embracing them, I think what is happening in the song becomes real. There are lots of goodbyes and a few hellos here. That middle eight in “Change” sort of gets to the heart of it. He’s singing, Here’s to winter’s sorry end, almost like he’s sorry it wasn’t tough enough. Morrow: We’ve come to acknowledge and embrace the chemistry that we share. We believe in each other, and there is a certain musical trust involved. And the songs for the next record are starting to take shape, so I can say with confidence that the next one will be equally as good, if not better. See, we’re starting to get pretty good at this!

E-mail feedback@pitch.com


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june 20-26, 2013

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MUSIC

RADAR

M U S I C F O R E CA S T

BY

Other shows worth seeing this week.

D AV ID HUDN A L L

T H U R S D AY, J U N E 2 0

Huey Lewis and the News

Is it truly, as Huey Lewis and the News once declared, hip to be square? This event might shed some light on the matter. The group is celebrating the 30th anniversary of its (classic?) album Sports. Here, it plays the UMB Big Bash, a benefit for the Drumm Farm Center for Children and the Turner House Children’s Clinic. Thursday, June 20, at the Midland (1228 Main, 816-283-9921)

Butch Clancy, Mayhem, Getter: 8 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Cody Canada & the Departed: 10 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Forgetters: 10 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Gloriana: KC Live! Stage at the Power & Light District, 13th St. and Grand. Curtis Grimes: 9 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Paper Route, HalfNoise: 9 p.m. Jackpot Music Hall, 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-832-1085. Turnpike Troubadours, Jason Isbell & the 400 Unit, American Aquarium: 7 p.m. Crossroads KC at Grinders, 417 E. 18th St., 816-472-5454.

F R I D AY, J U N E 21 Matt and Kim: KC Live! Stage at the Power & Light District, 13th St. and Grand. O.A.R., Andrew McMahon, Allen Stone: 6 p.m. Crossroads KC at Grinders, 417 E. 18th St., 816-472-5454. Snowden, No One in Control: 8 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390.

Fall Out Boy

The solo outings and side projects of Fall Out Boy members Patrick Stump and Pete Wentz haven’t set the world on fire, so after a fouryear hiatus, a reunion has been arranged. To accompany the tour, Fall Out Boy has released a new album, the modestly titled Save Rock and Roll. This show is sold out, but if you want to pony up, you can still find tickets on Craigslist and StubHub. Tuesday, June 25, at the Uptown (3700 Broadway, 816-753-8665)

Cursive

One of Saddle Creek’s anchor acts, Omaha’s Cursive excels at dark, literary, conceptual emo rock. I Am Gemini, its most recent album, is one of the heaviest the group has released since forming all the way back in — Jesus — 1995. Monday, June 24, at RecordBar (1020 Westport Road, 816-753-5207)

The Grisly Hand, with the ACBs

Both the Grisly Hand and the ACBs have released fi ne albums this year: the folksy Country Singles and the modern-pop LP Little Leaves, respectively. Their styles are miles apart, but both bands throw a pretty good party. Saturday, June 22, at Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club (3402 Main, 816-753-1909)

Cayucas

In the market for some summertime jams? Bigfoot, the debut album from Santa Monica, California, band Cayucas, is a strong candidate. Pitchfork says it’s a Vampire Weekend rip-off, but I’m not really hearing that beyond some vocal tics and a few aesthetic overlaps. It’s got a lot of sweet melodies and percussive island tones, and its charms outweigh whatever preciousness and derivative qualities may be present. I’ve got a road trip coming up, and it’ll be high in the rotation. Monday, June 24, at Riot Room (4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179)

Widespread Panic

In case you’ve been tuned out of the scene for a while, Athens, Georgia’s Widespread Panic is still one of the biggest draws in the jam-band world. After taking a one-year break, the group is back on the road, playing three-hour sets that draw from the sounds of Southern rock and funk. If you can’t afford the ticket, consider paying the $7 parking fee to hang out in the lot, drink Fat Tires and people-watch. Saturday, June 22, at Starlight Theatre (4600 Starlight Road, 816-363-7827)

Cursive

Missouri Chainsaw Grassacre

If you can’t make it in September to the annual Walnut Valley Festival in Winfield, Kansas, this daylong bluegrass smorgasbord is a sort of mini version. Among the performers: Mountain Sprout, Deadman Flats, Whistle Pigs, Hillbenders, Tragic Prelude, Tyler Gregory, Cowgirls Train Set. The show starts at 2 p.m. See the full schedule at crossroadskc.com. Saturday, June 22, at Crossroads KC at Grinders (417 East 18th Street, 785-749-3434)

Kansas City Techno Fourth Anniversary Party

Kansas City Techno, a local crew devoted to electronic music, is celebrating its fourth year in existence Saturday evening on the patio at the Riot Room. The party goes from 10 p.m. to 3 a.m. and features a rotating cast behind the decks, including Andrew Boie (from Portland, Oregon), Mr. Nuro, Todd Howard, Josh C, Z-Sonic, Uun and more. See kansascitytechno.com for more info. Saturday, June 22, at the Riot Room (4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179)

S AT U R D AY, J U N E 2 2 Indigenous: 9 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Outsides, Jake Briscoe, Saint Lux: 7:30 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. The Pedaljets, Ghosty, Sons of Great Dane: The Brick, 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Leon Russell with the Belairs: 8:30 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456.

S U N D AY, J U N E 2 3 Slaid Cleaves: 8:30 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. CSS, IO Echo: 7 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Front Bottoms, A Great Big Pile of Leaves: 9 p.m. Jackpot Music Hall, 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-832-1085. Purple, the Dead Girls: 10 p.m. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483.

T U E S D AY, J U N E 2 5 Jonathan Richman with Tommy Larkins: 8 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Streetlight Manifesto, Rodeo Ruby Love, Empty Orchestra: 7 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Valient Thorr, Gypsyhawk, Ramming Speed, Brimstone Crow: 8 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179.

W E D N E S D AY, J U N E 2 6 The Uncluded, Hamell on Trial: 10 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207.

F O R E C A S T

30

FUTURECAST

K E Y

..................................................Pick of the Week

..................................................... Summer Jams

.......................................................On the Beach

.................................................................... Dads

.........................................Hot Topic Accessories

..................................... Big Sweaty Dance Party

................................................................ Hippies

......................... Chocolate-Covered Mushrooms

......................................................Worthy Cause

........................................................Cornhuskers

.................................................. Locally Sourced

..............................................................Emo Kids

the pitch

june 20-26, 2013

pitch.com

THURSDAY 27 Marilyn Manson, Alice Cooper, Picture Me Broken, Hammerlord: Cricket Wireless Amphitheater, Bonner Springs FRIDAY 28 The Depth & Whisper, John Velghe & His Prodigal Sons, Adam Marsland: RecordBar Grand Marquis CD-release show: Knuckleheads Saloon


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31


NIGHTLIFE Send submissions to Berry Anderson by e-mail (berry.anderson@pitch.com), fax (816-756-0502) or phone (816-218-6775). Continuing items must be resubmitted monthly.

T H U R S D AY 2 0 R O C K / M E TA L / P U N K Club 906: 906 W. Liberty Dr., Liberty. Rocker Lips, Lot 44, FuzzBeater, 9 p.m. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Bif Tannens, Itching Regret, Donner Diaries, American Discord, the Uncouth, 9 p.m. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Psychic Heat.

B L U E S / R O C K A B I L LY B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Samantha Fish Band, Levee Town, 7:30 p.m. Danny’s Big Easy: 1601 E. 18th St., 816-421-1200. Millage Gilbert Big Blues Band, 7 p.m. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Grand Marquis. Jazz: 1859 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-328-0003. Billy Ebeling. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Jimmie Bratcher, 8 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Damon Parker, 7 p.m.

I N D I E / P O P / E X P E R I M E N TA L Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Jocks, Dry Bonnet, Berwanger, 10 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. The Royalty, the Late Night Callers, the Silver Maggies.

I N D I E / P O P / E X P E R I M E N TA L Gusto Coffee Bistro: 3390 S.W. Fascination Dr., Lee’s Summit, 816-767-1100. Euphorics. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. The Noise FM, the Empty Spaces, Rooms Without Windows, 7 p.m.

JAZZ/LOUNGE

WORLD/REGGAE

Fuel: 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park, 913-451-0444. Drew Six, 8 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Thrift Store 45s, 10 p.m.

Browne’s Irish Market: 3300 Pennsylvania, 816-561-0030. Browne’s Irish Street Faire with Flannigan’s Right Hook, 6 p.m. Club 906: 906 W. Liberty Dr., Liberty. Sky Minor, El Libra, Ligande. VooDoo Lounge: Harrah’s Casino, 1 Riverboat Dr., North Kansas City, 816-472-7777. Flirt Friday, 9 p.m.

EASY LISTENING/ACOUSTIC Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Jason Kayne, 9 p.m. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Jacknife Jones, 7 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. M-Bird Songwriter’s Showcase with Megan Birdsall, 7:30-10:30 p.m.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS The All-Star Rock Bar: 7210 N.E. 43rd St., 816-452-2660. Shut Up and Rock Jam, 7:30 p.m. Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. Free Form Free for All Open Mic with Teague Hayes, 8 p.m. The Landing Eatery & Pub: 1189 W. 152 Hwy., Liberty, 816792-5230. Thursday Night Patio Jam, 8 p.m.

VA R I E T Y RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Trivia Clash, 7 p.m. The Red Balloon: 10325 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-962-2330. Karaoke for the Okies, contest with $10 entry fee, $100 first prize, 7 p.m.-midnight. Sherlock’s Underground Coffeehouse & Pub: 858 S. 291 Hwy., Liberty, 816-429-5262. Karaoke. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Brett Morin, 8 p.m.

pitch.com

B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Blue 88. Paul and Jack’s Tavern: 1808 Clay, North Kansas City, 816221-9866. Samantha Fish. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Old Crows, 5:30 p.m.; Monsters Inc., 9 p.m.

COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS

WORLD/REGGAE

june 20-26, 2013

B L U E S / R O C K A B I L LY

Green Lady Lounge: 1809 Grand, 816-215-2954. Stan Kessler Latin Trio. The Levee: 16 W. 43rd St., 816-561-2821. Live reggae with AZ-One, 9:30 p.m.

The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. Matt Hopper Band, 7 p.m. The Kill Devil Club: 61 E. 14th St., 816-877-8312. Brandon Draper Experience, 9 p.m.

the pitch

R O C K / M E TA L / P U N K Aftershock Bar & Grill: 5240 Merriam Dr., Merriam, 913-3845646. Slamdown, Armed 4 Vengeance, 7 p.m. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Death Vendor, Pyriadial, Severed Path, Sibyl, 9 p.m. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Faux Reality, the Travel Guide, Tides 0f Aviation, 9 p.m. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Filthy 13. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Carswell & Hope, Vic G. Trio. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. The Doo Dads, 6 p.m., $5; Illphonics, Brain Food, 10 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. In Aeona, Existem, Leering Heathens, Actors & Actresses, 9 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Deviator, 9:30 p.m.

The Beacon Tavern: 5031 Main, 816-960-4646. Blue Note Four featuring Charles Perkins, 7 p.m. The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-4748463. Indigo Hour with Lady D., 5:30 p.m.; Matt Otto Quintet, 8:30 p.m. MORE Green Lady Lounge: 1809 Grand, 816-215-2954. Mark Lowrey, 9 p.m. The Kill Devil Club: 61 E. 14th St., 816-877-8312. Rich Hill, 7:30 p.m. INGS LIST E AT The Majestic Restaurant: 931 IN L N O Broadway, 816-221-1888. Patrick M PITCH.CO Gilbert, 4 p.m.; Joe DeFio, 5 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-2215299. Lonnie McFadden, 4:30 p.m. Thai Place: 9359 W. 87th St., Overland Park, 913-649-5420. Jerry Hahn.

JAZZ/LOUNGE

32

F R I D AY 21

CLUB

COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS Bar West: 7174 Renner Rd., Shawnee, 913-248-9378. The Outlaw Junkies.

COVERS The BrewTop Pub and Patio: 8614 N. Boardwalk Ave., 816584-9292. Jeremy Nichols Band. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. KC Groove Therapy. The Landing Eatery & Pub: 1189 W. 152 Hwy., Liberty, 816792-5230. Dolewite, 9 p.m. Slow Ride Roadhouse: 1350 N. Third St., Lawrence, 785-7492727. Steamroller.

EASY LISTENING/ACOUSTIC The Brooksider: 6330 Brookside Plz., 816-363-4070. Pat Woolam, 6 p.m.

VA R I E T Y The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Brandun DeShay, Les Paul, Ebony Tusks, Greg Enemy, 8 p.m. Cronin’s Bar and Grill: 12227 W. 87th St. Pkwy., Lenexa, 913322-1000. Karaoke with Jim Bob, 9 p.m.


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6/14/13 2:51 PM


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Club 906: 906 W. Liberty Dr., Liberty. Johnny Switchblade, Deco Auto, Rev Gusto, Mr. and the Mrs., 8 p.m. Cricket Wireless Amphitheater: 633 N. 130th St., Bonner Springs, 913-721-3400. Rock ’N Rage with Opiate, Township Rebellion and Far Beyond Driven, 6:30 p.m. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Mid-Life Crime Scene. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. The official Widespread Panic Afterparty with 3 Son Green, 11 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Valency, 7 p.m.

B L U E S / R O C K A B I L LY

I N D I E / P O P / E X P E R I M E N TA L

THEATRE

28 JUNE

Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Wells the Traveler, 9 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Evangelicals,Companion, the Caves, 10 p.m.

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S AT U R D AY 2 2 R O C K / M E TA L / P U N K

B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Mama Ray’s Jazz -Meets-Blues Jam, 2-5:30 p.m.; Jeremy Butcher and the Bail Jumpers, 9 p.m. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Lonesome Hank. Jazz: 1859 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-3280003. The Late for Dinner Band. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Sticky Clutch with Jabberjosh. Paul and Jack’s Tavern: 1808 Clay, North Kansas City, 816221-9866. Allied Saints. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Danny McGaw Band, 9 p.m.

IMAGINE DRAGONS

34

Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Raqs Boheme, A Kansas City Bellydance Soirée, 6-9 p.m. Helen’s Just Another Dive: 2002 Armour Rd., North Kansas City, 816-471-4567. Trivia Riot with Roland, 7:30 p.m. Johnson County Community College: 12345 College Blvd., Lenexa, 913-469-8500. Light Up the Lawn with the Latenight Callers and the Starhaven Rounders, 8 p.m., free. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Brett Morin, 7:45 & 9:45 p.m. Tengo Sed Cantina: 1323 Walnut, 816-686-7842. Thrift Shop Challenge Party, 8 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Freaky Friday Variety Show with Rod Sipe, 7 p.m.

june 20-26, 2013

pitch.com

City

Ambassador Hotel: 1111 Grand, 816-298-7700. Gossip Saturdays at Reserve Bar, featuring weekly residents:, Paul DeMatteo, Jeffrey B., Adam Bryce, Scott Kaiser, 8 p.m., free. The BrewTop Pub and Patio: 8614 N. Boardwalk Ave., 816584-9292. DJ Pure. The Gusto Lounge: 504 Westport Rd., 816-974-8786. Superb! Bass Party with Brent Tactic, NMEZEE, DJ B-Stee & DJ Archi. Hotel: 1300 Grand, 816-226-3232. Trentino, Eric Coomes. Milieu: 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park. DJ Mike Scott. The Quaff: 1010 Broadway, 816-471-1918. DJ Chris. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Dirty Stomp, 10 p.m. Slow Ride Roadhouse: 1350 N. Third St., Lawrence, 785-7492727. Retro 80s and 90s Party with Video Jerry & DJ John.

HIP-HOP/RAP Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. CJ Thy Glorious, Larreal, Drew Barker, Dom Chronicles, Rashiyd Ashon, BATI, KANVAS, 9 p.m. Qudos Cigar & Cognac Bar: 1116 Grand, 816-474-2270. Grown & Sexy Saturdays.

JAZZ/LOUNGE The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. James Ward Band. Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Max Groove Trio, 7 p.m. Green Lady Lounge: 1809 Grand, 816-215-2954. Candace Evans Trio, 5:30 p.m.; Molly Hammer Trio, 9 p.m. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Rick Bacus Trio. The Kill Devil Club: 61 E. 14th St., 816-877-8312. Mark Lowrey’s Jazz & Hip-Hop. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Tim Whitmer & KC Express, 4:30 p.m.

WORLD/REGGAE Browne’s Irish Market: 3300 Pennsylvania, 816-561-0030. Browne’s Irish Street Faire with the Elders, She’s a Keeper, Eddie Delahunt, Scarlet Town, St. Andrews Pipe & Drums, 4 p.m.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Coyote Bill’s open blues jam, 5:30 p.m. Woodsweather Café: 1414 W. Ninth St., 816-472-6333. Amanda Wish Open Mic, 1-4 p.m.

VA R I E T Y Aftershock Bar & Grill: 5240 Merriam Dr., Merriam, 913-3845646. KC Rock and ComicCon with, 5 p.m. Cronin’s Bar and Grill: 12227 W. 87th St. Pkwy., Lenexa, 913322-1000. DJ Dance the Night Away, 9 p.m. The Granada: 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Evolution Music Tour, 11 a.m. The Midland: 1228 Main, 816-283-9900. Bill O’Reilly & Dennis Miller, 8 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Cadillac Flambé, Heartfelt Anarchy, Capsules, Knife Crime, 9 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Brett Morin, 7:45 & 9:45 p.m.

S U N D AY 2 3 B L U E S / R O C K A B I L LY B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Lee McBee and the Confessors, 6-9 p.m. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Dan Bliss. Slow Ride Roadhouse: 1350 N. Third St., Lawrence, 785-7492727. Blue 88.

FOLK/ROOTS/JAM BAND Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Leo Rondeau, Tyler Gregory, 6 p.m.

JAZZ/LOUNGE Green Lady Lounge: 1809 Grand, 816-215-2954. Bram Wijnands stride piano, 7 p.m.; Paul Shinn Trio, 10 p.m. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Rich Hill’s jazz brunch, 11 a.m.; Mark Lowrey jazz jam, 6 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Jeff Harshbarger Presents an Alternative Jazz Series, 8 p.m.

EASY LISTENING/ACOUSTIC Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Les Mengel Duo, 5-9 p.m. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Lauren Anderson, 9 p.m. Johnny’s Tavern: 13410 W. 62nd Terr., Shawnee, 913-962-5777. Chill with Phil. The Landing Eatery & Pub: 1189 W. 152 Hwy., Liberty, 816792-5230. Bob Harvey, 6 p.m. Riverwood Winery: 22200 Hwy. 45 N., Rushville, 816-5799797. The Boomerz, 1-4 p.m. Tomfooleries: 612 W. 47th St., 816-753-0555. Phil and Gary, 8 p.m.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Groove Station: 9916 Holmes, 816-942-1000. KC Blues Jam with Crosseyed Cat, 2-6 p.m. The Hideout: 6948 N. Oak Tfwy., 816-468-0550. Open blues jam, 7 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Open Jam with Levee Town, 2-7 p.m., free. R.G.’s Lounge: 9100 E. 35th St., Independence, 816-358-5777. Jam Night with Dennis Nickell, Rick Eidson and Jan Lamb, 5 p.m. Thirsty Ernie’s: 1276 W. Foxwood Dr., Raymore, 816-322-2779. Rockin’ Blues, Brews & BBQ Jam, 4-8 p.m.

VA R I E T Y The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483. Smackdown Trivia and Karaoke, 8 p.m. Cronin’s Bar and Grill: 12227 W. 87th St. Pkwy., Lenexa, 913322-1000. Prestige Poker League, 7 p.m. Gaslight Gardens: 317 N. Second St., Lawrence, 785-856-4330. Benefit for Moore, Oklahoma with the Brody Buster Band, Floyd The Barber, Marty Hillard, Rachael Perry, Psychic Heat, Voodoo Stew, John Jervis, Gilbert Moten, Ebony and more, 5-10 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Brett Morin, 7 p.m. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. Texas Hold ’em, 3 & 6 p.m.

M O N D AY 2 4 R O C K / M E TA L / P U N K Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Foreverlin, Of Course Not, Tangent Arc, Sick of the Day.


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35


B L U E S / R O C K A B I L LY

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OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Taking Back Mondays with Sovereign States, 9 p.m. Californos: 4124 Pennsylvania, 816-531-7878. Open Mic Night, 7 p.m. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Open Mic with Jon Theobald, 7 p.m. Thirsty Ernie’s: 1276 W. Foxwood Dr., Raymore, 816-322-2779. Acoustic open mic with Brad Allen, 7-10 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Jonny Green and Jake Stanton open mic and jam session, 8 p.m.

VA R I E T Y The BrewTop Pub and Patio: 8614 N. Boardwalk Ave., 816584-9292. Trivia Bingo, 10 p.m. The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Rural Grit Happy Hour, 6 p.m.; karaoke with Kelly Bleachmaxx, 10:30 p.m. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Karaoke Costume Night, 9:30 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Sonic Spectrum Music Trivia, 7 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Sam’s Club Karaoke, 10 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Uptown Comedy Night with Norm Dexter, 10 p.m.

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To find out more, check out or send your resumé to streetteam@pitch.com 36

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June 20-26, 2013

(STARTS MAY 1ST)

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R O C K / M E TA L / P U N K Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Folkicide, Major Matt, 8 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Bob Walkenhorst, 7 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Judson Claiborne, 10 p.m. Tomfooleries: 612 W. 47th St., 816-753-0555. Flannigan’s Right Hook, 9:30 p.m.

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The Gusto Lounge: 504 Westport Rd., 816-974-8786. Bring It Back Tuesdays with DJ G Train, 10 p.m., no cover. Sol Cantina: 408 E. 31st. St., 816-931-8080. DJ Highnoone and DJ Ashton Martin.

Fuel: 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park, 913-451-0444. Colby & Mole. Jazz: 1859 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-328-0003. Brendan MacNaughton. Nara: 1617 Main, 816-221-6272. Ladies’ Night with Matt Shoaf. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Brandon Miller, 7 p.m.

Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Joe Cartwright Jazz Duo, 6 p.m. Green Lady Lounge: 1809 Grand, 816-215-2954. Kathleen Holeman, 7 p.m. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Hermon Mehari Trio, 6 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Open Jam with the Everette DeVan Trio, 7 p.m.

COVERS RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Rock, Paper, Scissors, 7 p.m., free. Tomfooleries: 612 W. 47th St., 816-753-0555. The Transients, 9 p.m.

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The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Horror Remix. Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. Team Trivia with Teague Hayes, 7 p.m., $5 buy-in. Flying Saucer: 101 E. 13th St., 816-221-1900. Trivia Bowl, 7:30 & 10 p.m., free. 403 Club: 403 N. Fifth St., 913-499-8392. Ladies’ Night. Hamburger Mary’s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-842-1919. Trivia Slugfest, 7 p.m. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Karaoke.

B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Shinetop Jr., 7-9 p.m. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Billy Ebeling. Jazz: 1859 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-328-0003. Salty Dawg. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. SIMO, 8 p.m. The Levee: 16 W. 43rd St., 816-561-2821. The Lonnie Ray Blues Band, 8 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Rick Bacus unplugged, 7 p.m.

T U E S D AY 2 5

monday

VA R I E T Y

The All-Star Rock Bar: 7210 N.E. 43rd St., 816-452-2660. Songwriter Showcase with Scott Ford, 7 p.m. Californos: 4124 Pennsylvania, 816-531-7878. Jonny Green, 8:30 p.m. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Joel McNulty.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Danny’s Big Easy: 1601 E. 18th St., 816-421-1200. Open jam with El Barrio Band, 7 p.m. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Dave Hays’ Open Blues Jam. Slow Ride Roadhouse: 1350 N. Third St., Lawrence, 785-7492727. Open jam with the Lonnie Ray Blues Band, 6-10 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Open Mic Night. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Ensemble Tuesdays — R&B jam and open mic, 7 p.m.

JAZZ/LOUNGE The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483. Lex Norwood Group, the Phantastics, 8 p.m. Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Max Groove Trio, 6 p.m. Green Lady Lounge: 1809 Grand, 816-215-2954. Organ Jazz Trio with Ken Lovern, 8 p.m.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Black & Gold Tavern: 3740 Broadway. Bourbon & Bands Open Jam. Ernie’s Steakhouse & Kross Lounge: 605 N. Sterling, Independence, 816-254-9494. Blues jam hosted by Rick Eidson. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Acoustic jam session with Tyler Gregory, $2. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Jam Night, 9 p.m. Woodsweather Café: 1414 W. Ninth St., 816-472-6333. Blues Jam with the Dave Hays Band, 7-10 p.m.

VA R I E T Y Charlie Hooper’s: 12 W. 63rd St., 816-361-8841. Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz, 7:30 p.m. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Open Mic Comedy Night, 10 p.m. Kanza Hall: 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park, 913-451-0444. Country dance lessons, 8-9 p.m., free. The Quaff: 1010 Broadway, 816-471-1918. Karaoke. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Erotic poetry reading, 8 p.m. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. Trivia, 8 p.m.


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S AVA G E L O V E

D I A L ‘I ’

No Acronym Seems to Yodel Dear NASTY: The incest fetishists you meet in chat rooms and get on the phone? For all they know, you could be alone in a room stirring a jar of mayonnaise with a slotted spoon. And for all you know, the incest fetishists you’re meeting in chat rooms could be police officers looking to bust men who are actually raping their daughters. Just sayin’. As for your problem, most people with incest fantasies insist that they’re not turned on by the idea of having sex with their actual parents, siblings or children. Incest scenarios turn them on abstractly, but they have ZERO interest in their own siblings or parents or children specifically. That can’t be true for all incest fetishists — statistically speaking — but any incest fetishists who are turned on by the thought of actually fucking their sibs/parents/ children would have a motive and/or the good sense to lie. But let’s set your specific fantasy aside for the moment — which is an upsetting one for most people to contemplate (because ick), particularly those who were sexually abused by family members (because rape) — and focus on the underlying question: Does exploring something taboo through fantasy make someone likelier to go and do that thing in real life? The evidence we’ve got about porn points to no. “Perhaps the most serious accusation against pornography is that it incites sexual aggression,” Melinda Wenner Moyer wrote in the July 2011 issue of Scientific American (“The Sunny Side of Smut”). “But not only do rape statistics suggest otherwise, some experts believe the consumption of pornography may 38

the pitch

june 20-26, 2013

pitch.com

D A N S AVA G E to fewer people acting on taboo desires in real life, not more.

Dear Dan: I’m a straight guy in my early 30s with an amazing girlfriend of two years. A few months ago, I felt open enough to share my taboo fantasy: father/daughter incest. My GF, to my delight, not only understands the fantasy but enjoys participating in it! Quickly: I have ZERO interest in this kind of thing actually happening. I understand the kind of damage that sexual abuse can do and has done to many, many women, and I would never pursue something like this in real life. Now the problem: We’ve added the “wrinkle” of my talking to another man on the phone while my GF fellates me. The man — a stranger, someone we found online — has been led to believe that I’m being fellated by my daughter while we speak. Of course, he can hear the noises associated with said activity while he and I are talking. We do not in any way lead these guys to believe that they have a chance to meet us. We want to enjoy our sexual fantasies, but we worry that we could be inadvertently encouraging someone to make their fantasies a reality. Any advice?

BY

Dear Dan: I’m a 40-year-old gay man who has

his life fairly together (career, home, etc.). But I’ve never had an LTR. I’ve dated this guy “D” three times, and I broke it off three times. I feel like such an ass. I’m attracted to D. He’s sweet, hot and funny, but he’s obviously gay. I worry that my mom might not like him — she has made snide comments about obviously gay guys “advertising it” — and I’m very close to my mom. D and I have started hanging out again. He’s not mad at me. The plan is to just hang out, and I just don’t know WTF I’m doing. Should I just see how things go?

Messed Up Dude Dear MUD: Let me see if I’ve got this straight: actually reduce the desire to rape by offering a safe, private outlet for deviant sexual desires.” What you’re producing for the men you get on the phone is a kind of pornography, and Moyer demonstrates that the wider availability of Internet pornography has correlated strongly with falling rates of sexual violence — and incest between an adult and a minor is sexual violence. “Within the U.S., the states with the least Internet access between 1980 and 2000 — and therefore the least access to Internet pornography — experienced a 53 percent increase in rape incidence, whereas the states with the most access experienced a 27 percent drop in the number of reported rapes, according to a paper published in 2006 by Anthony D’Amato, a law professor at Northwestern University,” Moyer writes. “It is important to note that these associations are just that — associations. They do not prove that pornography is the cause of the observed crime reductions. Nevertheless, the trends ‘just don’t fit with the theory that rape and sexual assault are in part influenced by pornography,’ [Professor Christopher J.] Ferguson [of Texas A&M] explains. ‘At this point, I think we can say the evidence just isn’t there, and it is time to retire this belief.’ ” The complicating factor here, of course, is that you’re leading these men to believe that you’re actually doing it, i.e., the noises they’re hearing are your daughter blowing you and not you stirring a jar of mayo. So will the men you talk to want to rape their daughters in real life because you’ve led them to believe that you’re raping your daughter? Hard to say … and even harder to get data on. But the people doing taboo shit in porn are actually doing it, and the data suggests that watching others do it, i.e., living vicariously through porn performers (who are sometimes faking it, but still), leads

You like D, you’re into D, and D is sweet and hot and funny. But you’ve dumped D three times because your mommy wouldn’t approve, and you’re really close to your mommy … and you’re worried that D is the gay stereotype in this relationship?

Dear Dan: I am a 23-year-old female devotee of

disabled men. I have a strong desire to be with men with all types of disabilities, but I mostly gravitate toward severe CP and quadriplegics. But my passions in life involve travel, sports, my bike, camping, overseas disaster aid, and a whole load of other things that are made either difficult or impossible when you can’t walk. I have always dated able-bodied men as a result. I would feel guilty fucking a disabled guy — I would see an “expiration date” on our relationship. Would it be wrong for me to seek out disabled guys just for sex? I don’t feel guilt for my sexuality being what it is, but I do feel guilty when I think about using disabled men for sex.

Some Chick Who Likes Wheels Dear SCWLW: Maybe you should let disabled

men decide if they want to be used for sex. Some won’t mind, just as some gay guys don’t mind being used for sex by bisexual and/or closeted guys. Disabled adults are free to make their own choices. So long as they’re making informed choices — you’re not misleading anyone to get into his pants and/or up on his wheels — you’re not doing anything wrong. Hear Savage Lovecast at savagelovecast.com. Dan’s new book, American Savage: Insights, Slights, and Fights on Faith, Sex, Love, and Politics, is available now!

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The Pitch: June 20, 2013