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A R T

Art Director Ashford Stamper Contributing Photographers Angela C. Bond, Barrett Emke, Chris Mullins, Lauren Phillips, Sabrina Staires, Brooke Vandever Intern Tessa Canon

P R O D U C T I O N

FALLEN STAR Preservationists try to keep Film Row

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off the cutting-room floor.

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TH E DUTCH DESTR OY ER Marloes Coenen wants to play spoiler to Cristiane “Cyborg” Santos’ comeback. B Y J U S T I N K E N DA L L

17 3 5 6 11 15 17 19 21 22 27 28 30 34 38

QUESTIONNAIRE NEWS FEATURE F I LT E R ART SPORTS FILM CAFÉ FAT CITY THE MUSIC SHOWCASE BALLOT STREETSIDE MUSIC NIGHTLIFE SAVAGE LOVE

MEANW H I LE AT PI TCH .CO M

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ERIC “MEAN” MELIN wins U.S. Air Guitar’s New York semifi nal. FOO’S FROZEN CUSTARD is 25 years old … and still fattening. FLYWHEEL COFFEE has closed in Kansas City, Kansas.

M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X

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QUESTIONNAIRE Photography

S A B R I N A S TA I R E S

KRISTINA CARLSON

Owner, Kristina Carlson

Hometown: Overland Park Current neighborhood: Olathe What I do (in 140 characters): I am a wedding and portrait photographer, with a background in art education from KU.

What’s your addiction? KU basketball and Walt Disney World; if you could somehow combine the two, it really would be the happiest place on Earth. What’s your drink? Pinot grigio, preferably at

Young Friends of Art Second Friday happy hours

personal and professional life was impacted in a truly positive way.

Worst advice: My high school counselor told

me I shouldn’t take art classes. She said having a creative profession as an adult was not a reality for most people. It’s a good thing I didn’t take her advice.

My sidekick: My awesome 5-year-old son My dating triumph/tragedy: I recently celebrated my ninth wedding anniversary; when I met my husband, he said he wasn’t looking for anything serious. #triumph

My brush with fame: I was in a Worlds of

Finish this sentence: “Kansas City got it right when …” They decided to embrace the arts,

thus putting Kansas City on the international map of acclaimed fine-art communities.

Fun commercial with my dad when I was 7. Apparently looking terrified while riding down the Viking Voyager doesn’t get you a talent agent.

“Kansas City screwed up when …” They didn’t

My 140-character soapbox: I am saddened

put a rolling roof on Arrowhead Stadium. Without the roof, we will never get the opportunity to host the Super Bowl or the NCAA Final Four.

“Kansas City needs …” An NBA team. “In five years, I’ll be …” Having a gallery show of my personal artwork.

“I’ve been known to binge-watch …” Weeds and

Prison Break.

“I can’t stop listening to …” Adele. “I just read …” The Art Forger, by B.A. Shapiro. The best advice I ever got: To network, network, network! Once I started networking in KC and other professional communities, my

by how many people don’t enjoy the actual moment anymore but instead try to capture the perfect Instagram/Facebook/Twitter version of the moment. Life is sadly being experienced through the back of a screen.

My recent triumph: Being the chairwoman of

the YFA’s annual Summer White Party, and selling the event out over a month and a half ago. My amazing co-chair and subcommittee have helped in planning the best party of the summer. The YFA is an amazing group that supports the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art by hosting Second Friday happy hours, Party Arty, and other fun programs that engage the city’s young professionals. I feel blessed to be a part of it! The Young Friends of Art Summer White Party is Friday night, July 12, and is sold out.

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NEWS

BLOX HEAD have a disease,” Weston Bergmann says. He makes this confession underground, 120 feet below Mercier Street. “I mean ‘disease’ in such a good way.” The point man and founding investor of BetaBlox actually looks pretty healthy, even sitting in this neon-green conference room, under the unforgiving bulbs that illuminate his company’s subterranean hive of offices. His red hair is combed to perfection, his jaw so square it could beat you at Dungeons and Dragons. The sleeves of his plaid shirt are rolled to the elbows, exposing meaty forearms with raised, pipeline veins. He explains his condition: an acute case of entrepreneuritis. And he’s had it at least since he appeared on MTV’s The Real World (in its 2005 season, the one in Austin, Texas). Back then, MTV described the Arizona State University student as “bright and entrepreneurial.” But wait, is it a disease or does Bergmann have some heroic gift, a sixth sense for sniffing out fellow visionaries? “I’m trying to think of a good movie metaphor where somebody with some sort of superpower can just find out the other ones,” he says. “It’s like that. We think so differently, we act so differently, we want so much different from our lives than the average person does. The cream rises to the top.” Right, the average people — those schoolteachers and pediatricians who have failed to start their own companies while they’ve mastered a profession. Might they feel insulted by Bergmann’s idea of success? “Yeah, and they’re not our customer, so insult away,” he says. Recall that, when Bergmann was on The Real World, MTV’s website also called him “the kind of guy you love to hate … an obnoxious, super-competitive jock.” Reality TV is in his past, though, and today he wants to be known as one of the business

mentors behind BetaBlox, a startup incubator that this month welcomed its fourth group of businesses. After an application process, BetaBlox accepts 10 new startups each cycle. The people who get in receive business training and six months to collaborate with their fellow startups. During that time, the hopefuls use the cave offices and its Wi-Fi for free. (BetaBlox itself isn’t paying rent for the space.) In exchange, the startups give the incubator 5 percent ownership of their companies. Bergmann started digging his way to the BetaBlox lair in high school, with his best friends. “I met these three other guys that are just clones of me,” he recalls. “We’ve been friends since elementary school.” The biz buddies started a lawn service and website-building companies that, by their standards, boomed. “By the time we had graduated from high school, we had made more money than all of our friends,” Bergmann says. “And, in a weird way, we were making more than a lot of our parents’ friends. It was an exciting time. “And we went off and did a bunch of cool things in college, most of which was entrepreneurial in nature — spread out by bouts of partying and girls.” After Arizona State, he reunited with his friends in Kansas City to start a frozen-yogurt store at Town Center Crossing. But Mochi-Yo didn’t make it, and in 2011 the partners gave up their lease and sold off the equipment. “We just didn’t want to be part of the yogurt wars of Kansas City,” Bergmann says. “We had better things to do with Ivy League educations and all this background and stuff.” In January 2012, BetaBlox accepted its first startups. Four of the initial 10 companies dropped out of the program, and none of the startups were pushing million-dollar ideas. “As much as I don’t want to say it, the first batch was an experiment,” Bergmann says.

Bergmann, BetaBlox’s alpha male.

C O U R T E S Y O F B E TA B L O X

I

Going underground with Weston

Bergmann: real-world entrepreneur “We didn’t want anything good in here because we knew how many mistakes we were going to make.” Since then, he says, BetaBlox has been revamped. Instructors now teach the popular “lean startup” philosophy, and he says there were more than 100 applications for this latest round. Among those now toiling in the cave is Autoswaprz.com, a car-sales website. And Bergmann has high hopes for FlexPro Meals, an athlete-oriented diet service that mails meals to customers. Hannah Rues says 5 percent of her company, in exchange for what might be its most crucial six months, isn’t too steep. She’s the founder of ConciergeCare Inc., which matches seniors with local caregivers. Rues was a social worker before she went through BetaBlox’s second batch. Last August, she left her job to start the company, which she says is now in revenue. She had her idea but she wanted help learning what to do with it.

BY

BE N PA L O S A A R I

“Being a social worker, I had no idea about business structure,” she says. “Building a website would be like building an atomic bomb for me.” That 5 percent, she adds, is a small price for the guidance she says BetaBlox gave her. “The 5 percent wasn’t a big deal for me. I think, honestly, it’s the only way I could make it happen.” Even with the company’s help, though, a success like Rues’ isn’t easy to replicate. “I’m just saying the people that aren’t prepared to give up their entire life, time and money and values, then you’re not going to succeed as an entrepreneur, and you will not do well in this program,” Bergmann says. BetaBlox, after all, isn’t for people of merely average ambition. “I read an article very recently that said that $75,000 was the perfect amount of money to make you as happy as you need to be throughout your life,” Bergmann says. “And I felt like vomiting throughout the entire article because it was all about making enough money to be able to provide for your friends and your family and take your kids to college, and not so much money that you’re constantly worrying about work. I wake up every day and I don’t care about money. But what I do care about is, I want to change the world. I want to create jobs. I want to feed those families that want those $75,000-a-year things.” He goes on: “I can’t help but build things. I’m constantly forcing myself to learn. I want to have my name and my companies and my employees and my investments stretch across the entire globe. And that attitude is not taken on by the average person. They might want it in the same way that I wish that I was an NFL quarterback. But I didn’t do what I needed to do to become an NFL quarterback because I didn’t have that disease.”

E-mail ben.palosaari@pitch.com

THURSDAYS 7pm pitch.com

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With the Orion Pictures Building toppled, preservationists try to keep the rest of Film Row off the cutting-room floor. ——————— By Ben Palosaari Photography by Brooke Vandever

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school-bus-yellow excavator breaks the bones of the Orion Pictures Building on an overcast late-April morning. The digger claws the building’s interior walls and nudges the ceiling, each blow releasing drifts of 57-year-old dust — final gasps from an architectural carcass. By late morning, piles of mangled metal, brick and plaster litter the lot at the corner of 17th Street and Wyandotte, where the oneplus-story brick building once stood. From the 1940s until the late 1970s, the Orion was among 17 Kansas City outposts for Hollywood studios, including MGM, Fox and United Artists. Studios would send film prints to Film Row, and theater owners would travel from as far as 100 miles away to pick up and drop off reels. Publicity tours brought celebrities — Clark Gable, Roy Rogers, Gene Autry — to the studio buildings, linking Kansas City to the stars of Hollywood’s golden age. Shirley Helzberg owned the Orion Building. She directed the historic building’s demise, and now she is orchestrating its future: a one-story retail structure with three floors of parking that she hopes will boost her Webster House restaurant and antique shop across the street. (She also owns Film Row’s Vitagraph Film Exchange Building, home to the Kansas City Symphony’s offices.) Backlash to the Orion’s demolition was swift on social media. “Nice one Shirley! Happy earth day!!!!!” one person wrote on the Save the Orion Pictures Building Facebook page. “Hey I thought they were going to salvage the materials...I knew that was a bunch of empty words...typical!” Cyd Millstein says losing the Orion Building tears a hole in Kansas City’s architectural fabric. Millstein, the owner of Architectural and Historical Research LLC, says the Orion was worth saving because it was believed to be the last Film Row building constructed. The Orion was also a departure from the district’s squat, fireproof brick, utilitarian structures. “That was a perfect example of the Art Deco slipping out and the Streamline Moderne coming into fashion,” Millstein, who has worked in preservation for 30 years, says of the Orion’s curved surfaces and metal accents. “That was the beauty of the Orion. It didn’t just march off into another era without conforming to the buildings that were already there.” The Orion’s final flicker has left neighbors, history buffs and preservationists scrambling to recognize Film Row’s past and save the remaining buildings. But Film Row’s future is in question without an organized effort and vision.

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rossroads developer Brad Nicholson says he had a plan for the Orion’s future. Nicholson (who is The Pitch’s landlord) says he wanted to make the building his office and home. However, Helzberg convinced him, he says, to sell her the building, saying she wanted to

convert it into the office of the Kansas City Symphony. In 2007, satisfied that Helzberg’s cause was worthy, Nicholson agreed. “I would not have sold the property if it was not going to be redeveloped for the symphony,” Nicholson says. Nicholson is still angry, two months after the Orion was turned into a crater. “The cut is deep, and I’m still healing now,” he says. “I’m pissed off. I haven’t been this mad in a long time.” Two years before Nicholson sold the Orion to Helzberg, Kansas City politicians were pushing to create a special district called “Old Film Row” in order to preserve and “enhance Kansas City’s Hollywood Connection.” The city commissioned a 23-page urban-design plan — the same month that ground was broken on the Sprint Center — that called for informational plaques, which would explain each studio’s history and be placed in front of each Film Row building, plus informational kiosks, customized “Old Film Row” street signs and wrought-iron fencing around parking lots.

saying, ‘Oh, you’re going to make this Hollywood. You’re going to make this touristy.’ ” Not wanting a tourist trap in the burgeoning Crossroads Arts District may have made sense in 2005. But without a neighborhood organization pressuring building owners to keep up their Film Row properties, or a unified push to get the district on the National Register of Historic Places, buildings like the Orion became endangered. Film Row advocates are now taking a more measured tack than the 2005 blueprint. Kirk Williamson, the owner of a massage studio in Brookside and a film-history enthusiast, plans to start a nonprofit, Friends of Film Row, to chart the district’s future. “There were concerns about it becoming cheesy or a little too flashy,” Williamson says of the original plan. “Those kinds of design considerations started to split the camps.” Williamson plans to keep modest the initial goals of Friends of Film Row, hoping to unite businesses, building owners and preservationists in an effort to bring more film-production and film-industry companies to the area.

Williamson hopes that his new nonprofit will educate people about Film Row.

“What if Film Row had a functional vision versus just a historical vision?” Williamson asks. “That could be something that’s done right away. To me, the ideal Film Row is, whether or not the illumination of the historical aspects of Film Row that were outlined in the 2005 plan take place — to me, the other layer is, it’s got to be this functional entity.” Williamson has since applied with the Missouri Alliance for Historic Preservation to have Film Row recognized as “at risk.” He cited the Orion’s destruction as the main reason to place the district on Missouri Preservation’s annual Watched List. “Since the owner of the Orion building owns three other Film Row buildings … has pursued the purchase of others, and has demonstrated every intention to not be a team player with the spoken interests of the Crossroads Community Association, the Historic Kansas City Foundation, and others regarding the Orion, we have no choice but to mobilize continued on page 8

But the plan faded from memory as city leaders focused on the arena and the Power & Light District. Former Kansas City Mayor Kay Barnes tells The Pitch that she doesn’t even remember the Old Film Row plan. “Regrettably, I don’t recall the history of the 2005 concept,” she writes in an e-mail. Butch Rigby, owner of Screenland Theatres, says the Crossroads’ slow, organic growth into a hip arts district made many in the Crossroads leery of any proposal to commercialize the neighborhood. “That was right at the time when the Crossroads was really starting to bloom,” says Rigby, who first bought property there in the 1990s when the neighborhood was filled with vacant buildings. “And you had a lot of artists, who were pioneers themselves, who liked the organic growth. What you had was a lot of people

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OLD FILM ROW

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Fallen Star continued from page 7 every tool possible to come to the defense of our beloved Film Row buildings,” he writes. Missouri Preservation added Film Row to the list in late May. Most of the buildings in Film Row are cared for and occupied by a variety of tenants, from printing companies to yoga studios. But Historic Kansas City Foundation Executive Director Amanda Crawley says a decent occupancy rate now doesn’t mean the district’s long-term future is secure. “Some of these buildings probably are immediately threatened,” she says. “Most of them are in use, but there’s no guarantee to say that in 10 years some of these buildings won’t be threatened. Really it’s about devising a long-term protection strategy.” Crawley says without the Orion going down, people might not have thought about protecting the old buildings. “The loss of the Orion building, I think it called to people’s attention the possible need for a protection strategy for the rest of Film Row,” she says. Rigby says he would welcome some elements of the Old Film Row plan. The theater owner has refurbished several buildings in the area, including the old Commonwealth Theatres Building, at 215 West 18th Street. For that project, he placed four star-shaped plaques in the sidewalk outside the building to honor Joan Crawford, Walt Disney and other Kansas City film luminaries. The concrete around the stars is now crumbling, with hard gray scraps jutting from the sidewalk. Standing outside the Commonwealth Theatres Building, which he sold several years ago, Rigby points across 18th Street to the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Building. “That building right there could be stunningly beautiful with a little work,” he says. The building’s windows are blacked out, walls are covered in graffiti and the foundation is cracked. But Rigby has his own vision of a refurbished MGM building: “MGM would be restored to look like a beautiful, grand Art 8

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Above left: United Artists’ West 18th Street offices; above: Rigby, in the Commonwealth Theatres Building (shown at right) Deco building of the ’30s, and we would talk about how Clark Gable and people like that, when they came through Kansas City, would stop at that office.” Don Omer earned minimum wage working with his grandfather in the Commonwealth Theatres Building in the late 1960s. Omer, who is now 72, and his grandfather prepared orders of popcorn and candy for the Midwest’s Commonwealth Theatres. However, Omer missed Film Row’s heyday as a part of Hollywood machinery. “According to my grandfather, it was not as busy as it had been years earlier,” he says. But his grandfather did share stories of the area’s glory years. “He had been there so long, he was kind of a character down there,” Omer says. “He said that Roy Rogers and Dale Rogers [Evans], they’d always stop in to say hi.” Omer says Film Row should be added to the National Register of Historic Places. “As I understand it, it’s one of the largest still-surviving film-row areas in the country,” Omer says. “Let’s face it: It’s not very surviving. But we ought to protect what’s there.”

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he razing of the Orion has caused a rift among Helzberg, building owners and preservationists. Helzberg, who didn’t respond to interview requests from The Pitch, has long championed preservation in the city. She turned the Vitagraph Building, across the street from the Orion, into an iconic Crossroads structure. She also added a bell tower to the Webster House when the property was restored. Millstein has worked with Helzberg on past preservation projects, including the Vitagraph Building’s application to the National Register of Historic Buildings. “Shirley has a pretty good track record in Kansas City of preservation,” Millstein says. But she doesn’t understand Helzberg’s deci-

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sion to topple the Orion. “If you look at the properties and the amount of money she has put into renovation, it’s very impressive. This one perplexes me.” Rigby also says Helzberg’s preservation record is laudable, even if he disagrees with her Orion decision. “She has done so many cool, incredible projects,” he says. “I am not going to ever demean Shirley for what she did. I don’t like it. I don’t agree with it. But you know what? I don’t always agree with what my girlfriend does, either.” Rigby says it’s time for Kansas Citians worried about the future of Film Row to move beyond the Orion. “Blossom House, Stover House, Webster House, Vitagraph Building, the Universal Building — when I think of all of those buildings that are now prepared for another 100 years of use because she put more money into them than was practical, more money than any developer could have for a profit margin,” he says, “I have to at least look back and say, ‘OK. That’s done. But what do we do now as a community to agree that we have an important asset here?’ ”

E-mail ben.palosaari@pitch.com

n 2005, Kansas City was going through a phase of serious self-improvement. No longer satisfied with tumbleweeds being the only things hanging around downtown after 5 p.m., city officials went on a spending spree to make people — and their dollars — linger under the skyscrapers. In May ’05, the construction euphoria reached its zenith. Then-Mayor Kay Barnes and City Council members wore hard hats, held shovels and posed for photos on the Sprint Center’s future site. That same month, city elders’ minds were on another plan: an urban-design concept to memorialize Film Row. Architecture firm Gould Evans Goodman Associates prepared the report. “The architectural character and the unique history of the Old Film Row buildings are the key features to the overall urban design concept,” the report declares. The ambitious plan called for a plaque on each building outlining the studio’s history, fencing called “screening” around parking lots, and an informational masonry kiosk. “Common elements recommended for interpretive plaques include the original studio or business name, property address, and interpretive information,” the plan reads, in part. “It should be mounted on the building in a manner and location that is accessible to the general public, and should include a studio logo for film industry-related buildings.” In a resolution, the City Council declares: “The Old Film Row Urban Design Concept Plan is hereby recognized as a guide for the future development and redevelopment for that area.” But the plan was probably too expensive. The commemorative plaques alone were estimated to cost $2,500–$4,000, the kiosks $10,000–$20,000 apiece, and street signs $1,000–$1,800 each. The only celebration of Old Film Row remaining in the district are crumbling star plaques honoring Joan Crawford, Walt Disney and Robert Altman. They were installed by developer Butch Rigby in front of the Commonwealth Theatres Building, at 215 West 18th Street, when he owned the building. — BEN PALOSAARI


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C L O S I N G I N J U LY

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LEFT | Bowery Nation, Brad Kahlhamer, Exhibition Installation View (detail), The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art. RIGHT | Ruth Thorne-Thomsen, American (b. 1943). Dot-Lady, Wisconsin, 1983, from the series Door. Gelatin silver print. Gift of the artist, 2012.38.16.

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WEEK OF JULY 11–17 | BY BERRY ANDERSON

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T H U R S D AY | 7. 11 | FARMERS MARKET SPOTLIGHT: LA CHALUPA

The last time we drove east on Independence Avenue, we counted very few grocery stores. Good thing the Northeast satellite of the Mattie Rhodes Center (148 North Topping Avenue, 816-241-3780) sets up the La Chalupa farmers market from 3 to 6 p.m. every Thursday. “We want people to continue to cook their cultural foods but with healthier products,” says Anna Bazan, Mattie Rhodes’ community services specialist. “We also have a community garden that is at full capacity with a wait list.” Regular vendors include aquaponic farmers Urban Harvest KC

R A N D Y PA C E

Marloes Coenen: out to short-circuit Cyborg.

STILL FIGHTING The Kansas City Roller Warriors took a huge hit June 21 when a large electrical fire ripped through their new practice space at 79th Street and Troost, rendering a portion of the building unusable. “We really need a lot of community support for this bout,” says Melody “Mary Lou Wretched” Alexander, KCRW’s public relations manager. “Now that we are temporarily displaced from our home, a packed house would be and Panaderia de Las Americas. Call Bazan at 816-581-5657 for more information.

F R I D AY | 7. 12 | KAN DO SPORTS

Attention, amateur athletes who have lived in Kansas 30 days before July 12–28: The Sunflower State Games want you. This year’s recreational festival features 46 sports — now including cricket and orienteering — for people of all ages and activity levels. “I’m excited in general about the 2013 games,” says Mitch Gross, SSG executive director. “Registration is up, and some of our events, like the 5k and 10k road races and cycling, have really

a big step in helping us get on our feet again, and we hope Kansas City will come out in full force.” Tonight’s season closer is also the championship bout, pitting the undefeated Knockouts against the Black Eye Susans. Tickets at the door cost $16 for adults and $8 for kids (ages 6–12), at Municipal Auditorium (301 West 13th Street, 816-513-5000). Doors open at 5 p.m., and the bout begins at 6. See kcrollerwarriors.com.

taken off.” Some registration deadlines have passed, but those for bowling, mountain biking, sand volleyball and others are still pending. (Same-day registration is not allowed.) Find out more on how to participate at sunflowergames.com.

BEACH BLANKET BINGO

Loosely based on the plight of the residents of South Florida’s Briny Breezes mobilehome community, The Bikinis: a new musical beach party is the final production for the American Heartland Theatre (2450 Grand, third floor, 816-842-9999). “The Bikinis was selected as our summer musical for the 2012–13 season in February 2012, over a full

year prior to our announcement that the theater was closing on April 4, 2013,” says Lilli Zarda, AHT’s executive director, who had been with the theater company for more than 22 years. “At the time, we did not know that the theater would be closing with The Bikinis. However, we are delighted to have four wonderful actresses with us for our final production: Cathy Barnett, Molly Hammer, Cindy Baker and Nancy Nail. And the creative team is complemented with many artists that have been affiliated with AHT for many years.” Say farewell to the Crown Center institution when The Bikinis goes on at 8 p.m. Adult tickets start at $35; see ahtkc.org or call 816-942-9999. continued on page 12

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S AT U R D AY | 7. 13 | BASIC TRAINING

When the cyber bubble bursts, life as we know it will not end. Thanks to places like the National Agricultural Center & Hall of Fame (630 Hall of Fame Drive, Bonner Springs, 913-721-1075), we can be reminded that America’s most important industry might keep us afloat. Visit today and get reacquainted with the countryside during the annual Tractor Daze & Touch-a-Truck event. Expect dairy milking, blacksmith and farrier demos, hayrides, a tractor show, a tractor pull and a petting zoo — all two miles west of the Kansas Speedway. Admission is $6 for adults and $4 for kids 4–16 years old. The learning begins at 10 a.m. See aghalloffame.com.

SOUL GLOW

Everyone can use a little more soul in their lives. Put down the latte, pick up your smartphone and hit the voice-search app and say, “Soul Food Festival Kansas City.” Most likely, you’ll be directed to ilovesoulfood.com/ kansascity, the website for the Kinsfolk’s Soul Food Festival that’s going down at E.H. Young Park (1001 Northeast Argosy Parkway, Riverside). You’ll see a lineup of soul superstars, including Gladys Knight and Lyfe Jennings. Tickets start at $35 and go up to $75 for VIPs. The event is rain-or-shine. Food isn’t included with admission price, and coolers are not allowed. See the website for tickets and more information.

ARTCRANK

KC Sprints organizer Ryan Jones seems to have found a crack formula for the second event of his Summer Race Series. Teams of three bicyclists begin (and end) at the Slap-nTickle Gallery (504 East 18th Street), touring downtown art galleries while drinking beers and listening to local music. “The loop is approximately five miles and will send the riders north through the River Market,” Jones says. “The goal is to see how many loops a team can make in the six-hour time limit.” Featured bands include Whiskey for the Lady, Train Wreck Trio and Death Vader. It’s free to ride, but bikers must register at 2 p.m. at Slapn-Tickle. Search “KC Sprints” on Facebook.

FETISH FETE

Dark Heartland — a collective of artists, actors, entertainers and other creatives — is what organizer Brandon Mohn calls “a tool for sharing and exchanging information and events that are geared toward the darker side of music, art, fashion, fetishes and beauty in general.” Dark Heartland hosts Splinter, a fetish ball that he refers to as a free-for-all. “Expect a variety of performance pieces through the night, featuring Shibari (Japanese rope work) and furries (people who have a like for the animal-human hybrid form),” Mohn says. Tickets for the event cost $15 for singles, $20 12

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See Deere in captivity at the Ag Hall of Fame. for couples (meaning two real people, not blowup dolls — leave those at home). The 18-and-older party starts at 8 p.m. at the Foundation (1221 Union, 816-283-8990).

S U N D AY | 7. 1 4 | VIVE LA FRANCE

One doesn’t need to speak French to celebrate Bastille Day, although it’s La Fête Nationale (or French National Day) in France. In Kansas City, it’s a good excuse to sip French wines and indulge in the cuisine of the country that gave us foie gras, champagne and Audrey Tautou. Two local restaurants have festivities planned. Le Fou Frog (400 East Fifth Street) honors the holiday July 12–14 with a special menu and performances by celebrity guests. Reservations are required; call 816-474-6060. The Brookside Aixois (251 East 55th Street, 816-333-3305) hosts its own festivities July 14, beginning at 4 p.m. and featuring cocktail specials, picnicking on the grassy lawn, traditional French music, and a “Let Them Eat Cake” cakewalk for adults and children. — CHARLES FERRUZZA

TIME AND SPACE

So crystal skulls and mediumship readings aren’t your bag. But what about jewelry, artwork and natural body-care products? “We think if anyone is searching spiritually or just looking for something fun and new, this is a perfect place to check out,” says Sylvia Vallotton, one of the organizers of this weekend’s KC Metaphysical Fair. The twoday expo at the Holiday Inn (8787 Reeder, Overland Park, 913-888-8440) features 15 different workshops, with subjects ranging from “herbs for healing” to “charting your own life path.” The event runs 10 a.m.–8 p.m. Saturday and 11 a.m.–6 p.m. Sunday. Admission is $7 a day and includes all workshops. See kcmetaphysical.com.

KANSAS CITY NOIR

Detective Lang Peoples does police work because “he loves righting wrongs,” says author G.E. Washington of the protagonist in


W E D N E S D AY | 7. 17 |

KKFI Presents

The Almanac Trail Concert Tour Recreating the music of the historic 1941 Almanac singers, Woody Guthrie, Pete Seeger, Lee Hays

Starring:

Rik Palieri, George Mann, and Bob & Diana Suckiel SPIN CITY: JODY HENDRIX AND PATRICK BROWN AT FRANK JAMES SALOON

I

n a city where the mic is king, the DJ is a loyal servant to its followers. And to the early-in-the-week beat. Names: Patrick Brown and Jody Hendrix DJ Aliases: DJ Jabberock and Jody Hendrix Hometown/neighborhood: Brown: KCMO/ Long fellow/Dutch Hill; Hendrix: KCMO/ Parkville Current residencies: Brown and Hendrix: MOKAN Twang Vinyl Country Night at Frank James Saloon, in Parkville, Wednesday nights; Brown: Stone Cold Creamery at Johnnie’s on Seventh, ’50s and ’60s Sock Hop Party, every first and third Saturday Beat vehicle: Two turntables, no microphone and a mountain of vinyl records Description of your set: Pure country of all

her debut romantic-suspense novel, Strange Connections. “He wants to even the playing field, but he’s no-nonsense.” The first in a trilogy of works called “the Small Man Mysteries,” Strange Connections follows Peoples through downtown, midtown, the Power & Light District, the Legends and other locales as he attempts to solve the murder of an influential Baptist pastor’s son, who was found dead in a KC flophouse. Washington introduces Peoples and her book at a signing at the Gem Theater (1615 East 18th Street, 816-474-6262) from 3 to 6 p.m. Strange Connections is available on Amazon; see gewashington.net.

M O N D AY | 7. 15 | FOREVER JONES

Did you recommit yourself to Sunday Funday patio drinking after an 11-hour shift slinging tapas or RumChata shots? Woof! Reset life today at the Jones (1271 Main, 816-686-8960, on the roof above Cosentino’s Downtown Market), when the trendy ultra pool hosts Service Industry Mondays from 1 to 6 p.m. Coddle your hangover with $3 UV cocktails and select beers while downtown’s working schlubs enviously peer at you in your cabana. If you need another excuse to hang out, this

varieties, but the record must at least be of drinking age. Current top five: Brown — “Gris-Gris Gumbo Ya Ya” by Dr. John, “Jones (Oh Jones)” by Blind Blake Higgs, “Games People Play” by Dizzy Gillespie, “Little Boy Blue” by Bobby “Blue” Bland, “Burn the Honky-Tonk Down” by George Jones; Hendrix — “Honky Tonk Blues” by Hank Williams, “Honky Tonk Heroes” by Waylon Jennings, “Honky Tonk Moon” by Randy Travis, “Honky Tonk Night Time Man” by Merle Haggard, “Honky Tonk Crowd” by John Anderson MOKAN Twang Vinyl Country Night at Frank James Saloon (10919 Northwest Highway 45, Parkville, 816-505-0800) begins at 8 p.m. Wednesdays.

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T U E S D AY | 7. 16 | MAXIMUM DAMAGE

Trainer Zach Brunner says someone who is being physically assaulted probably won’t remember what to do to take down his or her aggressor. “You must drill the moves and make them a reflex, like hitting with your elbows instead of your hands and using your shins like a baseball bat,” Brunner says. The soft-spoken 38-year-old teaches self-defense classes four days a week at his Sweet Z’s Gym (2416 South 34th Street, Kansas City, Kansas, 913-708-3930), and stresses self-confidence and breaking the barriers that come with personal-space issues. “What we do is a little painful,” he says about the Muay Thai– inspired, body-toughening drills that are run in three-minute intervals. “But if it hurts, you are doing it right.” Classes are 6–6:50 p.m. Monday–Thursday and cost $10 a week to participate. See sweetboxing.webs.com. E-mail submissions two weeks in advance to calendar@pitch.com. Search our complete listings guide online at pitch.com.

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ART

BUILDING HISTORY

Glen Hansen crafts his

BY

Kansas City Project.

L I Z C O OK

G

len Hansen’s representational paintings convey a straightforward premise: that the soul of a city is reflected in its architecture. On his canvases, the Manhattan, New York, artist has captured the iron-and-concrete identities of New York City, Paris, Venice, Prague — and now, Kansas City. His latest collection, E R MO at the Central Library, culls 30 graphite and oil drawings featuring T A INE ONL .COM iconic KC architecture, PITCH from the TWA Building’s cartoonish rocket ship to the crisscrossing street signs at 18th and Vine. The Pitch visited Hansen at the Central Library’s gallery as he prepared to open Kansas City Project. The Pitch: You’ve painted buildings in New York and Paris. Why turn to Kansas City? Hansen: Why not? It’s a great town. Fischbach, my gallery in Chelsea, New York — their biggest client is Commerce Bank. They have a museum in the bank with some of my work: Jonathan and Nancy Lee [Kemper] commissioned a piece for the bank’s entrance. We kept in contact over the years, and Jonathan called two years ago and asked me to do an inaugural poster for the Kauffman Center, designed by Moshe Safdie. I looked him up, and he’s an amazing architect. I came down and shot 12 rolls of film in one week. I really got obsessed With taking photos and with painting, I’m with the project and did 10 or 12 pieces. I asked thinking: How do I put that in a square and for a sample of the metal on the Kauffman Cencreate a tension? ter’s roof, and I did a painting on that. I painted I’ve been in photorealism shows, but I so the steel would peek through the sky. don’t know if I want to be considered as one What first drew you to architectural forms of them. We all work from photographs now. and features? I’m flattered, but at the end of the day, I’m You go to art school, you get influenced, you just a representational artist wondering how end up copying your instructors — they paint to manipulate the surface. the figure, so you paint the figure — but then Is your work influenced by you realize that’s not really any particular architects or you. I asked myself, “What Glen Hansen artists? do I know really well?” And Kansas City Project Early on, I loved Edward my family’s a family of buildThrough September 13 at the Hopper and Maxfield Parers and craftsmen. I’ve done Kansas City Central Library rish. The old masters, too, some bricklaying and car14 West 10th Street particularly Caravaggio and pentry. They say paint what 816-701-3400, kclibrary.org Ingres. Ingres was a neoclasyou know, and I know archisicist who distorted the body tecture from the inside out. in figures, but in subtle ways, like a back with Your paintings and drawings are precisely two extra vertebrae. He predated Picasso in rendered, and some of your work has had an a weird way. And I wondered: Why did he do almost photorealistic look. that? Here’s a guy who can draw anything, and I work from photographs, but when I’m he decides to move things around and distort looking through the camera, I’m thinking them. The camera can do that, too. Some lenses square. My work is based on the square. It distort a lot. I don’t want my paintings to seem started with a Victorian house with a widtoo much like a photograph. ow’s walk. It’s a box on top of a box. They Caravaggio dealt with really dramatic lightwork together. Working within a square is ing, and he would manipulate you into seeing part of that process: It’s like the camera lens.

ART

the painting, placing the viewer so far down on the picture plane, for example. I like to do that kind of thing. Did you discover anything unique about Kansas City through your work on this exhibit? It’s a great town with great museums. The people here are really nice. They’re not as stressed as New Yorkers. As far as the architecture, yes and no. There are European influences, for sure, just like New York City. Like the Power & Light Building. I saw it and thought: That’s like our Empire State Building. Everything’s coming from the past. But then you have oddities, like the Town Topic sign. How quirky is that? It almost relates to the Moshe Safdie design. To complete the cityscape of Kansas City, you can’t forget about those: the TWA Building, the Strahm sign, Winstead’s. It’s not just historic buildings. With this exhibit, I focused on drawings, little vignettes. I wanted to just get the essence of the building. In some of them, you can see that I’m building up the lead on the edges, so you have a little process captured within the drawings. If there’s interest, I wouldn’t mind doing paintings from some of these. The Majestic, especially — that’s

defi nitely a Hopper-style painting. I started putting color in, and it became a painting more than a drawing. A lot of your work focuses on architectural elements set against the sky: a cupola instead of the whole house, for example, or the Town Topic sign. What does isolating those features allow you to do? It’s about building against sky, juxtaposing nature and the man-made. It’s about light and space and tension between the two, how a cloudscape relates to certain angles in a building. I’ve tried to add other things in before, organic materials or figures. I did a painting of a Victorian turret with a cat curled up in the window, and I rendered the shit out of it — its whiskers, its fur. And then I thought: Is it really about the cat? Or is it about the architects who built the building? So I painted over it. I know architecture, I love architecture, and to me, it’s about the craftsmanship: these craftsmen who don’t get attention. There’s a human element in this stuff. My family were craftsmen. They worked with their hands, and I think they’re underappreciated.

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SPORTS

THE DUTCH DESTROYER

Marloes Coenen wants to play spoiler to

BY

Cristiane “Cyborg” Santos’ comeback.

JUS T IN K E NDA L L

M

arloes Coenen will be out for revenge when she enters the cage July 13 against Cristiane “Cyborg” Santos at Invicta FC 6, at the Ameristar Casino. That’s more than hype-video fodder — though it is the title of one video — for the 32-year-old Dutch submission specialist. In March 2010, Coenen lost to Cyborg by a third-round TKO. Cyborg lived up to her moniker, attacking Coenen like a Terminator. Coenen would later say she had never been hit harder. She admittedly underestimated Cyborg’s strength. She won’t this time around. “I know what to expect right now,” Coenen tells The Pitch in a Skype interview during a break from her training in the Netherlands. “So I won’t be overwhelmed by her and the terror she brings upon me.” Coenen has increased her training regimen. Focused on improving her strength and conditioning, she has entered “War Camp,” twice-a-day group training sessions. “It’s really starting to pay off,” says Coenen, who has built a 21-5 career record (three knockouts, 15 submissions and three decisions) and held the Strikeforce women’s championship. “It’s really exhausting, but I feel like I’m getting really, really much stronger.” Cyborg vs. Coenen II: for revenge and a belt The potential payoff is a big one. On the line is not only redemption but also the vacant during the Brazilian’s Invicta debut in which she pounded Coenen’s last opponent, Fiona Invicta FC featherweight title. Also at stake is Muxlow, on the way to a first-round TKO. a chance to play spoiler to Cyborg’s comeback; (Coenen submitted Muxlow in the first Cyborg served a yearlong suspension for a posiround of a New Year’s Eve fight in Saitama, tive steroid test. Cyborg’s manager, former UFC fighter Tito Ortiz, is already pushing for Japan.) Coenen asked Muxlow after the fight a matchup with UFC bantamweight champion to compare how hard her future opponent hits. Ronda Rousey. Coenen may have a say in de- Muxlow told her about 20 percent harder. “After that I really amped up my training,” railing those plans. Coenen says. “She will be stronger than me, “If I win, that scenario is out the door,” says Coenen, who doesn’t appear to be wor- but not that much stronger.” Coenen arrived in Kansas City Monday ried about Cyborg’s past steroid use. “I don’t for her fi nal fight prep and to shake off jet think she’s using the stuff anymore.” lag. After Saturday’s fight, she plans to stay But would she want to fight Rousey? a few extra days to take in “To me, a fight with the city and celebrate her Cyborg is way more interInvicta FC 6 trainers’ birthdays at Papa esting than a fight with Saturday, July 13 Bob’s Bar-B-Que, in Kansas Ronda,” Coenen says. at Ameristar Casino City, Kansas, with the “Ulti“Cyborg, for me, is really 3200 North Ameristar Drive 816-414-7000, ameristar.com mate Destroyer Challenge”: a challenge. It’s really exa 45-minute competition to citing to fight against her. clean a plateful of 7 pounds With Ronda, at the moof barbecue meats, smoked hamburgers, ment that she heard she has to fight Cyborg, she drops to 135 [pounds]. To me, you’re not a breads, fries, pickles and jalapeño peppers. Finish and it’s free (and your picture goes true fighter. Oh, yeah, I want to fight you. But on the wall of fame). Fail and pay $58 (and you’ve got to come to 135. … To me, I don’t have be added to the wall of shame). too much respect for people who act like that. But first, Coenen has to survive her own I do have respect for her. She’s an amazing Ultimate Destroyer Challenge. grappler. She knows how to play the media “Every time you have a loss, you want to really good. But for a true fighter, there’s no redeem yourself,” Coenen says. “I really want one cooler to fight than Cyborg.” to win. I really want to have the belt.” Coenen began scouting Cyborg in April,

Tommy Toe Hold: MMA satirist

TUFF TOON Knockin’ heads with MMA satirist Tommy Toe Hold

L

et’s do this shit!” Thanks to cartoon satirist Tommy Toe Hold, the catchphrase has joined the small, exclusive pantheon of combat-sports slogans: “Let’s get ready to rumble” and “It’s time.” Tommy, who keeps his true identity a secret, hosts The Tommy Toe Hold Show on YouTube. Imagine six minutes of the latest mixed-martial-arts news, heavy on satire, smart dialogue, 1980s and ’90s pop-culture references, cheap production values and F-bombs. Yeah, the only real animation is Tommy’s moving mouth — like a Canadian on South Park — but the athletes and personalities whom he roasts appear as their photo likenesses. Tommy spends from 16 to 24 hours a week writing, producing and voicing shows for Mondays and Wednesdays. And there’s plenty of material, especially after a big UFC pay-perview with wild finishes, fighters trash talking and big-fight speculation. “Pretty much as soon as the PPV is over, the show is already fi nished in my head,” Tommy tells The Pitch. “Then I wait until Wednesday afternoon to actually do something with it, and then the show gets released at 3 a.m.”

Tommy’s humor has been embraced by just about everyone in the MMA community. UFC president Dana White has followed Tommy on Twitter. Other fans include Chael Sonnen; Aussie Bec “Rowdy” Hyatt, who is fighting at Invicta FC 6; and Rousey. There is one notable exception: Former UFC champion Tito Ortiz took offense at Tommy’s “Mr. Potato Head” classification of his large cranium and blocked him on Twitter. “Most everybody has been cool with it,” Tommy says. “I’ve actually received e-mails from fighters and fighters’ managers, asking if I’ll make fun of their fighter on my show. For the most part, everybody gets the joke.” Invicta president Shannon Knapp gets it. Knapp has been a supporter of TTTHS since its March 7, 2012, debut. Tommy has returned the love, featuring Invicta’s fighters on the show. “I have been a big fan of Invicta and Shannon from the beginning,” Tommy says, “and became one of the early figures in the MMA community that was constantly pushing people to watch Invicta. Shannon was nice enough to put my face all over their weigh-ins. “Women’s MMA is just as exciting as men’s MMA, if not more,” he adds. “Not only that, but it’s more lighthearted. The overall feel of an Invicta event is less Fight Club and more Here Comes the Boom.” Invicta’s July 13 main event features one of Tommy’s favorite fighters, Coenen. “I’ll be completely biased and pulling for her during the fight,” Tommy says of Coenen. “That said, Cyborg is some kind of force of nature. Her last Invicta fight looked more like a mugging than something that was supposed to be competitive. I see Cyborg winning and then still not fighting Ronda Rousey at any point in time.” — BOONIE

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he new movie by the visionary fantasist Guillermo del Toro evaporates like seawater before you can finish wiping salt off your 3-D glasses. In CGI scale and body count and decibel peak, it’s both epic and indistinct — just this week’s enormo-budget summer leviathan, the kind of thing that sends you to Wikipedia three or four times the next morning to verify which face belongs to what actor (besides Idris Elba, whose charisma del Toro unfortunately keeps at room temperature). But its palette and its humanism — the former brilliant, the latter very wobbly — mark the picture as del Toro’s. It’s beautiful but dumb but beautiful but dumb, over and over until the credits roll and the postcredits Easter-egg gag hatches, and you stand up and leave it for the next audience. A word now about the pronoun it. I’m going to lean on that word a lot here because the people issuing the movie under discussion have stated, with some insistence, that Pacific Rim’s title no longer comprises just those two words but also includes — must include! — the studios’ names, minus any possessive apostrophes. A neutral demonstration of this preference, wielded on a familiar title: Paramount Pictures and Albert S. Ruddy The Godfather. Look, I know the name Pacific Rim is, at best, fatally nondescript or else tantalizingly porny. But guys, did we learn nothing from Precious: Based on the Novel “Push” by Sapphire? In the time it took to type that short refusal, I’ve mislaid again all but the premise of del Toro’s latest, that premise being a postmillennial riff on the kaiju genre familiar to 1970s latchkey kids as “Godzilla movies after school on Channel 5.” Here that means vaginadentata-looking monsters rising from the sea to destroy humanity, and humanity responding with an armada of Art Deco-referencing iron giants. The vagisaurs and the 25-story mechanical fighters duke it out, one bout at a time. (Muddled in del Toro’s mix is a oneworld fantasy centered on that most unifying concept, a shared enemy Other. There are hints of economic chaos and class warfare; more would have been welcome.) Among the bipeds, it’s all about duos building trust through empathy. Each big war machine runs on the shared brain power of two pilots mentally linked via computer. They share thoughts and memories. Sounds complicated, but think of it as a flashbackgenerating device. We get a couple of people with vengeance in mind, an orphan and a father figure, and a pair of scientists who make The Big Bang Theory seem like Ionesco. There’s a nicely subdued romantic inevita-

Rinko Kikuchi guns for monsters. bility. There is goo. There is Ron Perlman. And it works. I forget exactly how. So I’ve consulted Wikipedia again and ended up staring, again, at Goya’s painting “The Colossus,” the hypnotic Prado mainstay that various Internet sectors name as key inspiration for del Toro’s movie. Well, duh — the painter is all over del Toro’s canon. Pacific Rim isn’t as Goya-creepy as Pan’s Labyrinth or as grounded in wit as the Hellboy movies, but it shares enough DNA with del Toro’s previous work to achieve its own identity. And it’s not hard to imagine the director — co-writing here with Clash of the Titans vet Travis Beacham — fixating on the monstrous, acutely tactile “The Colossus.” Del Toro and his regular cinematographer, Guillermo Navarro, do vivid, color-rich work that, at its best, makes IMAXsize Goyas of Andrew Neskoromny and Carol Spier’s detail-saturated production design. Not that the look of the thing makes any more sense than the plot or the itchy, sub– George Lucas dialogue. At one point, Elba’s character — named Stacker Pentecost because fuck you, screenwriting class — has to change clothes. In his quarters, deep inside an offshore-drilling rig retrofitted to launch extradimensional nuclear strikes, he plucks a fresh shirt from a pile of identical garments, each folded razor-sharp. (“End Times Dry Cleaning, may I help you?”) But that’s how this thing gets over. In a movie that’s already daring you to reach out and touch its cold ocean and unforgiving metal and otherworldly squish, you want to feel that shirt. In the better forgettable blockbusters, we’re made to remember the lost comforts these cardboard characters are fighting for.

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Photograph: Angela Bond

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Brisket Pulled Port Sausage Chicken Ribs Turkey Ham

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CAFÉ

TANGO UP NORTH

Piropos learns a second language: pizza.

BY

CHARLES FERRUZZA

Tango Pizza • 4141 North Mulberry Drive, in Briarcliff Village, 816-741-3600 • Hours: 11 a.m.–3 p.m. Monday–Thursday, 11 a.m.–3 p.m. and 5–10 p.m. Friday, noon–3 p.m. and 5–10 p.m. Saturday, closed Sunday • Price: $$–$$$

G

Inspired by Argentina, Tango’s pizzas include La Boca (left) and the Buenos Aires.

ANGELA C. BOND

ary Worden had a problem. The Parkville businessman owns the two-story building in Briarcliff Village where he moved his popular Argentinian restaurant, Piropos, in 2007. When one of his tenants, an art gallery, closed last year, Worden and his wife, Cristina, turned the small space into a piano bar. “We thought it would be a nice place for our dinner customers at Piropos to stop in after their meal, have a cocktail or a glass of wine, and listen to live music,” Worden says. No problem. Then a retail tenant on the building’s first floor vanished. “She left in the middle of the night,” Worden says. That was a problem. Worden is a man who thinks on his feet, though, and it didn’t take him long to arrive at a solution. The freshly abandoned retail shop was next to the piano bar, so he tore out the walls separating the storefronts and expanded the lounge. This was fairly ambitious, but Worden decided that his idea needed something else, something unexpected: Argentinian pizza. “The last time Cristina and I were in Buenos Aires, we couldn’t believe all the little shops we saw selling pizza and empanadas,” he says. “It’s not really street food there. There aren’t street vendors selling things, like they do in New York City. You go into these shops and get small pizzas or a dozen empanadas.” You get them and then you leave. That’s part of pizza’s genius on any continent. Worden needed a business that would attract steady foot traffic but wouldn’t compete with his upstairs restaurant, the white-linen Piropos, even during the day. “We do a very popular $17 lunch,” he says. “If we were going to serve food downstairs, it had to be very, very simple.” Simplicity is the key ingredient at the month-old Tango Pizza, which serves modestly priced 7-inch pizzas, empanadas, soups and salads around lunchtime as well as on weekend nights, when the ivories are being worked in the piano bar. The waitress working the room on the afternoon I first dined at Tango Pizza didn’t have to do much explaining about what makes these pies — cooked in a shiny Bakers Pride oven, from Texas, not Argentina — Argentinian. Everybody knows a pizza is a pizza, right? Mostly, yes. Tango Pizza sells two varieties of its signature dish, neither of which causes you to imagine yourself on the Plaza de Mayo in Buenos Aires. There’s a thin and crispy flatbread version, and a more traditional, doughy

Yes, it’s an unappealing dining room, and crust. What’s relatively exotic, Worden says, it’s easy to spend too much time thinking are the toppings, which are meant to pull this about its visual deficits when the service — food from its Neapolitan roots and into the usually just a single person is on duty — is this realm of Eva Perón and Manu Ginóbili. But the scattershot. But I’m a fan of the pizza itself, idea of an Argentinian-style pizza isn’t necessarily much different from, say, a St. Louis– particularly a meatless creation called La Boca, style, given that Argentina has a large Italian with its bubbling goat cheese and mozzarella and generous array of spinach, mushrooms population. Pizza is as much in demand there as it is anywhere else; some estimates report and onions. And the simple “Margarita” is delectable on the flatbread. That classic trio of that it’s the nation’s second-most-popular dish, fresh basil, tomatoes and mozzarella is a sure behind the grilled meats — barbecue, if you measure of any pizza restaurant’s quality, and like — known as parrillada. it’s one of the better choices at Tango. Typical of Worden’s minimalist approach is I wish the Wordens were more adventurous the pizza he has named for his wife. Cristina’s and served the kinds of pizza that my friends has an olive-oil-brushed crust sprinkled with who have eaten in Argentina oregano and crushed red rave about. I’d like to try a peppers — aji molido — and Tango Pizza fugazzeta, for example: a comes blanketed with onions Andes pizza .....................$8.99 thick crust stuffed with and mozzarella. Like most of Cristina’s pizza...............$8.99 cheese and smothered with the pizzas here, it’s not cenEmpanadas ............ $1.50 each sweet onions. The Andes tered on a red sauce. (The Soup of the day ..............$2.99 pizza, topped with a brie fonMexicana, one of the few Ice cream .........................$3.99 due, chicken, spinach and pies that is, comes topped red bell peppers, is as odd as with chipotle peppers, queso fresco, sautéed beef, cheese and onions.) You Tango gets, but it’s very good. So is the Buenos Aires, a meaty concoction with pancetta and want ham and pineapple? Go to Minsky’s. prosciutto on a tomato-sauce base. I’ve taken three friends to Tango Pizza. One Adventure isn’t really the point, though. loved the place, one said it was “no big deal,” Tango Pizza simply can’t be compared with and the third couldn’t get past the décor. “All those awful burgundy sheers at the window,” its fancier, more sophisticated sister restaushe said with a shudder. “And the chairs are rant on the second floor, even though both restaurants sell the same empanadas and use from a banquet hall.”

similar ingredients. (All of the prep work for Tango Pizza is done in the Piropos kitchen and carried down each morning.) Maybe that has something to do with why Worden hasn’t done much to promote his latest venture. Of course, he’s still trying to explain to customers that he also recently reopened the Piropos Grille in the old Piropos restaurant space in downtown Parkville. “People still get confused,” he says. (The Piropos Grille serves a somewhat different menu from the Briarcliff Piropos and is open on Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights only. Got it?) I prefer Piropos, but who can argue with a less formal venue serving those golden empanadas with puff y, fragile crusts enfolding a center of bubbling cheese or seasoned beef sautéed with olives, onions and raisins. Order it with a salad or one of the house-made soups, and it becomes a satisfying meal. On one of my visits, the soup was a jade-green chilledavocado purée as creamy as melted ice cream. Not as good was a surprisingly mild gazpacho that had been strained until it was the consistency of tomato juice, though even it offered comfort on a sweltering afternoon. There’s only one dessert offered — vanillabean ice cream, drizzled with thick, honeycolored dulce de leche — and it’s not for me. After eating all that dough, who wants a slice of cake or a cookie? Well, I do. After paying the tab one day, I walked to the bakery a few steps away. La vida no es una pasta frola, they say in Argentina: Life is not a piece of cake. Maybe, but what about flan?

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21


FAT C I T Y

OFFICE SNACKS

This week:

BY

doughnuts and beer

S C O T T W IL S ON

MORE

FAT CITY ONL

INE

AT

M PITCH.CO

HANA’S DOUGHNUTS

Ring. Ring, ring, ring, ring, ring, ring. “Hana’s Donuts. Best doughnuts in the city.” Beep. So it goes when you dial 913-362-0244 late in the afternoon to ask what tomorrow’s hours are. You need to know how early a sour-cream old-fashioned can be had. The voice on what sounds like the city’s last analog answering machine is a man’s, low and comically flat but unironic about the declaration. (A couple of days later, the greeting has been changed to a fast sentence in Spanish.) At 10:30 the next morning, there are still several plain and chocolate-covered old-fashioneds at Hana’s (2131 South 34th Street, Kansas City, Kansas). The thumbnail-sized bakery took over its prime spot — next to a police station — last year from 22

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previous doughnut purveyor Poston but hasn’t yet changed the sign outside. Inside, there’s just enough room up front for a couple of diners to sit and talk as they finish their food. The woman working the counter loads up a box and helpfully points out that the dozen doesn’t yet include any glazed. Well, then, 13 doughnuts it is. At about $12, the box buys a fair amount of office satisfaction. A couple of people note that the chocolate atop some of the doughnuts tastes, as Zagat might put it, “real.” The word moist comes up a few times, always in its positive sense. The glazed earns less favor than the various cake varieties, with highest enthusiasm expressed for the hotter sectors of the doughnut color wheel: red velvet, cherry-frosted, rainbow-sprinkled.

GRADE: HIRED!

BOULEVARD REVERB

“Tastes like good yard beer,” says the first drinker after opening a bottle of Reverb, Boulevard’s rebooted summer Smokestack Pilsner. “It’s better than that,” the second drinker says. “Sweet, with a creamy smoothness. Honeylike.” Third drinker: “I’d buy a six-pack if it were less than $9.” None is left for the fourth drinker, who is late. There’s still a doughnut, but the doughnut would be better with beer. There’s some agreement about picking up another bottle of Reverb soon.

GRADE: TEMP E-mail feedback@pitch.com


Comfort Food For Thought

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Open Tues-Thurs & Sun 6am-3pm, Fri & Sat Open 6am-9pm for Great Dinner Specials

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25

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23


FAT C I T Y

MAKE ME …

BY

M A R K DE N T

… a Kansas City Ice Water

New Menu! New Ownership! LUNCH BUFFET - $9.99

Contemporary Regional Missouri Cuisine Dinner: Tues - Sat Happy Hour: Wed - Fri, 4 - 5:30

Open Everyday

11am - 3pm, 5:30pm - 10pm Contact: (913)381-1234 or (913)381-4567 7301 W 91st St. Overland Park KS 66212

www.masalaskc.com

900 W 39th St. Kansas City, MO 64111

• WE SERVE HALAL MEAT ONLY •

DUBLINER THE

Irish Ale House & Pub

13 LUNCH

HAPPY HOUR MON-FRI 4-7

I

had to move to State College, Pennsylvania, to taste the Kansas City Ice Water. The concoction mingles vodka and gin with a splash or two of Sprite and enough lime juice to make it cloudy. (This murkiness is the source of the cocktail’s name; East Coasters apparently believe that KC’s water comes straight from a dirty river.) Shaken and poured just right, it quenches your thirst on a summer night but is stiff enough to erase the memory of the hot evening when you accidentally drank seven of them. But does anyone in Kansas City actually make this namesake beverage? I stopped by three savvy bars, ordered a Kansas City Ice Water without further explanation, and waited to see what the bartender made.

CHOICES for $ (M-F)

7

LIVE MUSIC

THURS-SAT

MENTION THE PITCH FOR A 1/2 PRICE APPETIZER

170 E. 14TH ST. KCMO IN P&L DISTRICT • 816.268.4700 THEDUBLINERKC.COM •

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Introducing

15

$

LUNCH & MOVIE

Choose one menu item (excluding entrées) for lunch and receive one matinee movie ticket for $15!*

The Village Shops | Prairie Village, Kansas | www.standeeseatery.com | 913.601.5250 *Lunch can be consumed before or after a movie. Ticket purchase must be same day as lunch, for any movie starting before 6 p.m. Valid seven days a week, before 6 p.m., including holidays. Tax is included in the price of the admission ticket, however, tax will be charged on food purchase. Drinks not included.

24

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Standees_Pitch_4.776x3.158_aV1.indd 1

pitch.com

7/8/13 5:12:48 PM

From left: Manifesto and 12 Baltimore Memorable line: “Do you have a backup? Our bartender has no clue. He is giving me the death stare.”

12 BALTIMORE BAR & CAFÉ

(at Hotel Phillips, 106 West 12th Street)

Initial response: “Do you mean Kansas City

Tea?”

What happens: Multiple bartenders and waiters congregate without reaching consensus. One of them suggests using Google. What I get: A perfect, properly translucent Kansas City Ice Water — not too limey, not too sweet, not too strong. Thanks, Google. Memorable line: “You have to bring in all of your fancy ideas from the East Coast.”  

MANIFESTO

THE DROP

Initial response: “It’s been awhile since we’ve

Initial response: “I’m familiar with it. Best-

(1924 Main)

made one of those.” What happens: The waiter returns to the table and asks what’s in the drink. I tell him it has clear liquor and should be crisp, with a touch of sweetness. He leaves again and consults with both on-duty bartenders for a long minute. It’s clearly been more than awhile. What I get: A tall, narrow glass arrives. The murkiness looks promising, and the twistedlime-rind garnish earns style points. But the gin overwhelms a bit, and there’s not quite enough sweetness. This is just a gin and tonic with a tad more citrus.

(409 Ea st 31st Street)

tasting Ice Water in Kansas City.” What happens: Nothing further is said. The confidence on display is awesome. What I get: The drink arrives in an oversized glass, much larger than those given for average cocktails — totally fine. The contents are clear, though — too clear. Up through the straw comes … water. This is water. For the record, it is damn good water. Memorable line: “Most people don’t call it that.” Then what do they call it? “Water.”

E-mail feedback@pitch.com


A Classic is Always

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25


S Z

ust G u A

nd

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2—

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1

ght! i—

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2—n0ds!

& dj’S

6—cks!

Bu

Buy Tickets at any Showcase venue or call 816.561.6061 or online www.southcommevents.com/pitchmusic

the pitch

through July 19

8 through August 1 10 Day of

$ $

S-—--———————— Venues S thE Riot r0Om | C L FORNO | recordbaR | Outdoor Stage | & more ——— ----——————————-—-------------A I

26

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S


OFFICIAL BALLOT

Winners will be announced August 11 at The Pitch Music Awards at the Uptown Theater and August 15 in The Pitch. HIP-HOP ❑ Gee Watts ❑ infO Gates ❑ MilkDrop ❑ Reach ❑ Rich the Factor ❑ Stik Figa ❑ The Popper JA Z Z ENSEMBLE ❑ Alaturka ❑ Diverse ❑ The KC Sound Collective ❑ Parallax ❑ The People’s Liberation Big Band ❑ Shades of Jade JA Z Z SOLO ❑ Brandon Draper ❑ Eddie Moore ❑ Hermon Mehari ❑ Jeff Harshbarger ❑ Mark Lowrey

AMERICANA /BLUEGR ASS ❑ Dollar Fox ❑ John Velghe & the Prodigal Sons ❑ Olassa ❑ The Silver Maggies ❑ The Blackbird Revue ❑ The Grisly Hand ❑ Tiny Horse ❑ The Clementines AVANT-G ARDE ❑ Continents ❑ CS Luxem ❑ Expo ’70 ❑ Jorge Arana Trio ❑ Your Reflection ❑ Metatone

BLUES ❑ Grand Marquis ❑ Jason Vivone and the Billy Bats ❑ Katy Guillen ❑ Samantha Fish ❑ Trampled Under Foot ❑ Jeremy Butcher & the Bail Jumpers COUNTRY/ROCK ABILLY ❑ Adam Lee & the Dead Horse Sound Company ❑ Crybaby Ranch ❑ The Rumblejetts ❑ St. Dallas & the Sinners ❑ Starhaven Rounders ❑ The Blue Boot Heelers ❑ The Nace Brothers

DJ ❑ Brent Tactic ❑ DJ G Train ❑ DJ Kimbarely Legal ❑ Mike Scott ❑ Shaun Flo ❑ Sheppa ❑ Spinstyles

LIV E AC T ❑ The Beautiful Bodies ❑ Cowboy Indian Bear ❑ The Dead Girls ❑ Hearts of Darkness ❑ Making Movies ❑ Radkey

EMERGING AC T ❑ Akkilles ❑ Oils ❑ Rev Gusto ❑ She’s a Keeper ❑ Y[our] Fri[end]

ME TAL /HARD ROCK ❑ At the Left Hand of God ❑ Boreas ❑ Hammerlord ❑ Night Creation ❑ Torn the Fuck Apart

G AR AGE ❑ Bloodbirds ❑ The Conquerors ❑ The Empty Spaces ❑ Lazy ❑ Up the Academy

POP ❑ The ACBs ❑ Antennas Up ❑ Fourth of July ❑ Ghosty ❑ Hidden Pictures ❑ Shy Boys

PUNK ❑ Bent Left ❑ Nature Boys ❑ No Class ❑ Pizza Party Massacre ❑ The Rackatees ❑ U.S.Americans REGG AE ❑ 77 Jefferson ❑ Arm the Poor ❑ Born in Babylon ❑ The New Riddim ROCK ❑ Cherokee Rock Rifle ❑ Gentleman Savage ❑ Man Bear ❑ Not a Planet ❑ Soft Reeds ❑ Sons of Great Dane ❑ The Caves ❑ Claque SINGER-SONGW RITER

music showcase special issue of the pitch

Aug 1

Showcase in westport

Aug 2

voting ends*

awards at the uptown theateR

Aug 11

(FEMALE)

❑ Amy Farrand ❑ Heidi Gluck ❑ La Guerre ❑ Margo May

winners published in the pitch

SINGER-SONGW RITER (MALE)

Aug 15

❑ Ben Moats ❑ Erik Voeks ❑ Mat Shoare ❑ Ross Brown ❑ Sam Billen

#pitchmusicshowcase

M A IL T O: 17 01 Main, Kans as Cit y, MO 6 4108, OR comple te your ballot online at pitch.com *RULES: Check one choice per category. One ballot per voter. Ballot stuffing will be detected. Original ballots only (no photocopies or other

❑ Yes! Please include me on the pitch.com e-mail list so I can be the first to hear about exciting,

reproductions). Entries may be filled out online or mailed to The Pitch, or completed at any Showcase venue on the evening of August 2.

upcoming events and promotions.

Tickets to the August 2 Pitch Music Showcase cost $6 through July 19, $8 from July 20 through August 1, or $10 the day of the event. They’re available at The Pitch office and all of the Showcase venues: the Riot Room, Californos, RecordBar, Outdoor Stage and southcommevents.com/pitchmusic. Tickets to the August 11 Pitch Music Awards show are $6 in advance or $10 the day of the event, available at the Uptown Theater box

Name: Address: City: Phone:

State: E-mail:

Zip:

office, 816-753-8665 or ticketmaster.com (VIP tickets: $20 in advance or $25 the day of the event).

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27


STREETSIDE

TWO OUNCES TO FREEDOM

Loading up at the Shot Stop, the latest

BY

addition to the Waldo bar scene.

D AV ID HUDN A L L

I

f I may impart just one thing to you about the Shot Stop, let it be this: The Waldo bar serves a shot called Susie’s Asshole. In Susie’s Asshole are Bacardi 151, Tabasco and Worcestershire sauce. I ordered one. I tasted Susie’s Asshole. It tasted like shit. Those who pay attention to yuppie-foodie culture know all about mixology and limitedrelease microbrews and other such attempts to turn drinking into something smarter and classier than it actually is. I’m not hating on these efforts. But if you exclusively hang out with, and Instagram-follow, the kinds of people who sniff their own farts, I mean beers, it’s possible you’ve missed another emerging trend in the world of alcohol: That young people today be takin’ lots of shots. It has reached the point, for some, when shots don’t just supplement a larger drinking diet — they are the diet. I have sat in bars and watched young women sip ice water while steadily taking shots at 20-minute intervals. “Bombs,” Red Bull mixed with various flavors of vodka, are enormously popular, as are sweet, harshly potent liquors such as Goldschläger, Rumple Minze and Jägermeister. There are a lot of playful mixtures, too. RumChata and Fireball is like drinking the leftover milk in a bowl of Cinnamon Toast Crunch. Drop some Amaretto and Bacardi 151 into a half-mug of draft beer, and it tastes like a Dr Pepper. Lately, bars targeting these shot enthusiasts are starting to crop up. The Shot Bar debuted in downtown Columbia, Missouri, last year. And, as of June, an outpost of the Shot Stop — which opened in Manhattan, Kansas, in 2009 — is serving up 2-ouncers in Waldo, at 7439 Broadway (the space formerly occupied by Point Loco, Taco Factory, the Sweet Guy, et al.). Because the holiday swept a lot of people out of town, last weekend was a slow one for KC nightlife — unless you were at the Shot Stop Saturday night, which was like spring break

28

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on South Padre Island. Twentysomething millennials wearing pastel tones packed the joint. Party songs — “Firework,” “Get Lucky,” “Gangnam Style” — blasted at an earsplitting volume. When they played “Sweet Caroline,” just about every single person in the place joyously screamed all the ba-ba-bas and so goods, and a cold darkness descended upon my being. Don’t ever forget how incurably alone you are in this world, the darkness said. The Shot Stop doesn’t serve rat poison, so alcohol it was. I’d brought along a couple of millennials to be my Sherpas through the experience. One was my sister. The other was her friend, who regards me with thinly masked suspicion and scorn. Like most people in Kansas City, they would prefer not to be seen in public with me — I am a sad, 100-yearold man. But I was offering free booze. Sometimes, that’s enough. I wasn’t sure what I hoped to accomplish at the Shot Stop, but I figured that a challenge of some sort might liven things up. I couldn’t try every shot — there are about 70 listed on two large chalkboards behind the bar — so I decided to find the most disgusting-looking

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A lot of options, but haven’t you already made your choice? ones and order those. “I think the best-case scenario here is, I drink until I vomit,” I said. The shots are divided into categories: Bombs, Value Menu (premixed Kamikazes and Lakewater shots), Randos, I Dare You, and Double Dog Dare (which includes, in addition to Susie’s Asshole, a shot made from Bacardi 151, Jägermeister and Rumple Minze called Liquid Cocaine, and a Gorilla Fart, which is Bacardi 151 and Wild Turkey). Accompanying the name of each shot are the ingredients as well as a price icon, with a cent sign ($3), an asterisk ($4) or a dollar sign ($5). No shot costs more than $5. Domestic bottles are $2 all day and night. The majority of the shots arrive in plastic jiggers that measure 2 ounces exactly. The bomb comes in a larger plastic cup with a shot glass built into it; the shot is in the middle, and the rest is filled with the energy drink. My only stipulation was that I refused to take any bombs. I maintain my belief that sometime in the next 10 or 20 years, Red Bull and other energy drinks will be considered by the medi-

cal community the way cigarettes are regarded today. But my companions had a round of ExGirlfriend Bombs: watermelon- and bananaflavored liqueurs, UV Cherry vodka and energy drink. “Really sugary,” they reported. Here are a few shots I took, according to my itemized receipt: Black Samurai (sake and soy sauce); Pineapple Upside-Down Cake (vanilla vodka, pineapple juice, grenadine); Urine Sample (tequila, with a shot of pickle juice, or “pickleback,” as a chaser); and Incredible Hulk (Hpnotiq and Hennessy). I have never craved a cigarette as deeply as after I took the Incredible Hulk shot. I more or less quit smoking last year but fell off the wagon on vacation a few weeks ago. I’m getting things back in line, but after that Incredible Hulk, I slunk out to my car, pulled a cigarette from my secret emergency pack, and inhaled it like it was an oxygen mask. It helped. As my buzz ascended, the fratparty jams and crowd roar became more tolerable. I was briefly engrossed in one of the Fast/ Furious movies, which was playing on a plasma TV. (I never got used to the bright lighting at the Shot Stop, though. They need to turn it down, way down, in there.) I was impressed with the bartenders: one man, one woman, both very attractive. They worked fast and kept their attitudes relatively sunny despite the staggering drunkenness all around. When it was time to go and I requested Susie’s Asshole (I had saved it for last), the woman bartender even gave me an opportunity to retract my order. “Do you want Susie’s Asshole chilled, at least?” she said.  I nodded. Then I drank the shot and nearly vomited on the bar counter. But I held it in. Did I feel terrible for two straight days? Yes. But I did not vomit at the Shot Stop. Whether that is an accomplishment or a failure I still haven’t decided.

E-mail david.hudnall@pitch.com


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MUSIC

BEST BUD

Taryn Blake Miller, aka Y[our] Fri[end],

BY

is the Lawrence scene’s new BFF.

A DR I A NNE DE W E E S E

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t’s 9:30 on a recent Thursday night at the Riot Room. The crowd is sparse, but the few people in attendance seem to know one another. A verse of “Roads” by Portishead fades from the overhead speakers as the evening’s fi rst act, Y[our] Fri[end], takes the stage. Most of those in attendance appear to be there for Max Justus, who will later perform an electronic set. But when Y[our] Fri[end] starts playing, people quickly shut up and listen. Y[our] Fri[end] is principally the project of Taryn Blake Miller, a 22-year-old University of Kansas linguistics major. With her camouflage-rim E R MO glasses, minimalist hoop nose ring and calculator watch, Miller scans AT E N I ONL .COM slightly more bohemian PITCH than the majority of the R iot Room crowd — no small feat. She has the words impossible and soul tattooed on either wrist, a nod to the 25-minute Sufjan Stevens song of that name. A replica of Carl Rungius’ moose watercolor painting is on her right inner arm. Miller works with a revolving cast of musicians. In April, Y[our] Fri[end] was a quartet when it won second place and $1,000 at KJHK’s 2013 Farmer’s Ball. Tonight, it’s just Miller: hardcore songstress Miller and drummer Nicholas Stahl. She’s Miller’s fi rst major public performance quiet, bordering on shy, between songs durtook place last September at the Lawrence ing the 30-minute set. But after a few songs, Arts Center. Jordan Geiger, leader of the she tells the audience, “I’ve been working band Hospital Ships, put together the show on a record for my entire life, it seems like, featuring psych-folk act Mount Eerie. He but I think I’m fi nally going to release it.” had seen Miller play at a small house show As far as performing, though, Miller has in Lawrence and thought she would make been around the scene for only about a year. a good opener. (His instincts were correct; She grew up in Winfield, Kansas (home to the Mount Eerie frontman Phil Elverum, forpopular Walnut Valley Festival), and picked merly of the Microphones, was already an up the guitar as an adolescent. She played in idol of Miller’s, she says.) “That was your “a more hardcore band,” influenced by the fi rst show?” Stahl chimes in, a bit floored. sound of groups like As I Lay Dying. “Wow. Congratulations.” “It actually helped me Now she and Geiger are play the guitar because I Y[our] Fri[end] occasional collaborators; her was playing faster things Saturday, July 13, debut album, Jekyll/Hyde, a nd more compl ic ated at the Bottleneck was recorded at Geiger’s riffs,” Miller says, taking Lawrence home. She consida drag from an American ers Geiger a mentor of sorts. “Aesthetically, Spirit on the Riot Room patio with Stahl. there was chemistry between us, and it worked “It’s just necessary to have good coordinareally quickly,” Miller says. tion to play music like that, I’ve noticed. I’m “Taryn has a really genuine talent for not as good as I was then. It’s been a goal of songwriting,” Geiger says. “Her songs are mine to get back to that.” emotionally evocative without being maudShe took up songwriting later in high lin or sentimental, and they are absolutely school and gradually moved toward less without affect or irony. She is unafraid to aggressive music. be honest, which I fi nd to be rare.” “I wanted to do something that I could On Miller’s record — its release will be play in a coffee shop or play in someone’s celebrated later this month at Love Garden home and not disturb anyone,” she says.

lot lately in projects,” he says. “I’ve always wanted to play in a two-piece because I feel like communication between just two musicians onstage is what makes songs so interesting each time.” “Once other people get involved, it can be positive or negative,” Miller adds. “It can really go a lot of ways.” Miller is set to graduate this winter. For now, her plan is to stay in Lawrence, which suggests she wants to continue growing in what she calls “a flourishing scene.” She’s also an aspiring guitar builder and is eager to get busy crafting something. “I’ve seen her work so hard over the past x amount of months,” says Stahl, himself a former member of Hospital Ships who also plays with Lawrence’s doo-wop rock group Dean Monkey & the Dropouts. “I’ve seen her play three shows a week and go to school and work at Love Garden, which is a demanding job. I see so many people talking about how they deserve things. But nobody actually does anything. That’s all it takes — just doing it. … I’m just really happy to see Taryn getting attention when it’s a deserved kind of deal.”

B R O O K E VA N D E V E R

M US I C

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Sounds — the songs veer toward the atmospheric, with vocal effects somewhere in the Bon Iver–Justin Vernon range. The songs sound a bit like the soundtrack to a summer drive through the Upper Midwest or a lazy day at the lake with a book. Miller says her music, though often described as ambient, isn’t meant to sound especially so; she gathers most of her influence from other Lawrence musicians. She has worked part time at Love Garden for a year and says, “I listen to everything — I soak it all in.” Her songs evolve from single lines that she has written, usually inspired by specific moments or conversations. There’s an ethereal quality to the music, too: Miller won’t disclose the lyrics of her soaring, almost jammy track “Tame One,” not just because of its personal nature but also because its lyrics tend to vary from show to show. “I’m told that there is a lot of risk in my live performances,” Miller says. “I’ve had shows where I’ve called a neighbor across the street and said, ‘Hey, do you feel like playing a show tonight?’ I mean, I’ll give him the gist of it, but there’s something really nice about letting the song play itself.” It’s an approach that appeals to Stahl. “It was refreshing for me to be so spontaneous with music, since I’ve been lacking that a

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J A Z Z B E AT BRAM WIJNANDS SWINGTET AT THE BLUE ROOM

During the jazz heyday of the 1930s and ’40s, Kansas City’s Pete Johnson helped popularize a wild brand of swing — boogie-woogie, stride piano, barrelhouse blues. Today, another Kansas Citian — by way of the Netherlands — keeps the style fresh in some of the same neighborhoods where Johnson swung. Bram Wijnands’ rollicking piano opens the night every Sunday at Green Lady Lounge. Thursday at the Blue Room, his seven-piece Swingtet reimagines the sounds that 18th and Vine knew when Count Basie lived here. If you don’t like happy music, stay away. But if you want to know what Kansas City–style jazz is all about, the Bram Wijnands Swingtet will show you. — LARRY KOPITNIK   Bram Wijnands Swingtet, 7–11 p.m. Thursday at the Blue Room (1600 East 18th Street, 816-474-2929). Bram Wijnands, 7–10 p.m. Sunday at Green Lady Lounge (1809 Grand, 816-215-2954); no cover charge at either show.


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MUSIC

RADAR

M U S I C F O R E CA S T

BY

Other shows worth seeing this week.

D AV ID HUDN A L L

T H U R S D AY, J U LY 11

Matchbox Twenty, with Goo Goo Dolls

The song “Real World” by Matchbox Twenty (formerly Matchbox 20; keep it straight, y’all) hit the airwaves back in 1998. That means I’ve been doing an impression of Rob Thomas singing, in his stupid voice, I wonder what it’s like to be the head honcho for roughly 15 years. It’s been a wild ride! It continues this weekend when Matchbox Twenty and the Goo Goo Dolls, another ’90s mainstream rock act, appear at Sprint Center. In case anybody’s wondering, I’m a fan of “Real World” and “3 a.m.” I never liked “Push.” Friday, July 12, at Sprint Center (1407 Grand, 816-949-7000)

Freedy Johnston

Freedy Johnston is a 1990s one-hit wonder (“Bad Reputation”) who deserves far better than he has received from the music industry. The Kinsley, Kansas, native and University of Kansas dropout is a singer-songwriter with a terrific ear for pop melody, and all his albums are damn solid. Rain on the City, from 2010, is his most recent — an unassuming, finely tuned mix of alt-country, folk-pop and rock songs. This Czar show is an early one, 6 p.m. Wednesday, July 17, at Czar (1531 Grand, 816-421-0300)

And You Will Know Us By the Trail of Dead, with UME

If you’ve never been able to get down with the heavy, conceptual art-rock of And You Will Know Us by the Trail of Dead, give Lost Songs, the Austin group’s 2012 album, a spin. “Awestruck,” in particular, shines: It’s like Explosions in the Sky tried writing a streamlined, melodic rock song. Opener UME (ooo-may), a two-thirds-female trio also from the Texas capital, fuses hooky pop rock with heavy shoegaze. Tuesday, July 16, at RecordBar (1020 Westport Road, 816-753-5207)

The BoDeans, Tiny Horse: 8 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Brandi Carlile, the Lone Bellow: 7 p.m. Crossroads KC at Grinders, 417 E. 18th St., 816-472-5454. The Dirty Heads, the Expendables, Big B, 77 Jefferson: 6 p.m. The Midland, 1228 Main, 816-283-9900. Jamey Johnson: KC Live Stage at the Power & Light District, 14th St. and Grand.

F R I D AY, J U LY 12 Buckcherry: 8 p.m., free. KC Live Stage at the Power & Light District, 14th St. and Grand. Jon Dee Graham: 8:30 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Rydah J. Klyde, Koz: 11 p.m. Czar, 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300.

S AT U R D AY, J U LY 13 Architects, Waiting for Signal, Clairaudients, the Slowdown: 7:30 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Ian Anderson: Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts, 1601 Broadway, 816-994-7200. Protohype, Thumpur, Dreadheadedslut, Evil Bastards: 7 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390.

Above: David Byrne and St. Vincent; right: AYWKUBTTOD

The Rock n Roll Dream Concert

Hate on cover bands all you want — I used to — but their crowds rarely have anything but a blast. Yes, they’re posers. But at least they admit it, which is more than I can say for half the “serious musicians” I’ve met in my lifetime. Now, will I attend this show, which features tribute acts Last Child (Aerosmith), Houses of the Holy (Led Zeppelin), KC/DC (AC/DC) and Edge of Forever (Lynyrd Skynyrd)? Probably not, no. Should you go? Only if you want to rock. Saturday, July 13, at Cricket Wireless Amphitheater (633 North 130th Street, Bonner Springs, 913-721-3400)

Lukas Nelson & Promise of the Real

Lukas Nelson and his band, Promise of the Real, have made a couple of rock albums that touch on blues, Texas country and some jamband vibes. Nelson is 25 years old and has a fragile, nasal voice reminiscent of Willie Nelson’s. One working theory to explain this similarity — as well as his enthusiasm for marijuana — is that he is Willie Nelson’s son. Friday, July 12, at Knuckleheads Saloon (2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456)

S U N D AY, J U LY 1 4 We the Kings, Breathe Carolina, T. Mills, the Ready Set, Keep It Cute: 6 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390.

M O N D AY, J U LY 15 Night Beds: 10 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Periphery, Norma Jean, Enemies Laid to Rest, Existem, David Hasselhoff on Acid: 6 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390.

David Byrne and St. Vincent

Love This Giant, the much ballyhooed 2012 collaboration between former Talking Heads mad genius David Byrne and Annie Clark (St. Vincent), is arguably better in theory than in the old earbuds. It’s fi ne and all — very brassy and very arty — but none of the songs ever really resonated with me. I suspect that their live show will be more memorable: In addition to songs from Giant, they — along with an eight-piece band — are performing old Talking Heads songs, Byrne solo material and St. Vincent tracks. I mean, it’s fucking David Byrne. It’d be stupid not to go. Friday, July 11, at Crossroads KC at Grinders (417 East 18th Street, 785-749-3434)

W E D N E S D AY, J U LY 17 ASG: 10 p.m. Replay Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Goldenboy featuring the New Familiar, Volcano Veins and Forest Whitlow: 10 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Joe Nichols, Back Road Anthem: 7 p.m. Kanza Hall, 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park, 913-451-0444. Judy Tenuta: Stanford’s Comedy Club, 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500.

FUTURECAST AUGUST THURSDAY 1 Flobots, Taste Bud G-Spot, Brain Food: The Granada, Lawrence

SEPTEMBER

F O R E C A S T

32

TUESDAY 17 Andrew W.K., Six Percent, American Ghouls: The Granada, Lawrence

K E Y

OCTOBER

..................................................Pick of the Week

......................................................Leather Pants

........................................................... Cock Rock

.........................................The Dream of the ’90s

............................................................Austinites

.....................................................Weed-Friendly

........................... Wildly Successful Rock Bands

................................................... Extremely Loud

............................................................. Nepotism

.......................................................... Early Show

.......................................................... Pretending

......................................................Living Legend

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FRIDAY 11 ZZ Ward, the Wild Feathers, James Bay: The Midland SATURDAY 12 Tim McGraw: Kansas Star Arena, Mulvane WEDNESDAY 16 Tricky, Royal Canoe: The Granada, Lawrence


95569.6 – The Pitch – 07-11-2013

E  al  S DaY n O ri F

robert Cray

Dave Mason

eDDie Griffin

travis

august 23, 2013

september 15, 2013

september 21, 2013

september 29, 2013 E  al  S DaY n O ri F

blUe oCtober

steve vai

December 8 , 2013

october 27, 2013

UPCoMinG sHoWs: 7/12 Kilroy Presents: battle for freaker’s ball 7/13 revive 7/18 raWartist showcase 1-800-745-3000

7/19 flirt friday 7/20 Ultimate Karaoke summer series at vooDoo, round 2!

7/26 blue Corner battles   •  VooDooKC.com

Know When To Stop Before You Start.® Gambling Problem? Call 1-888-BETSOFF. Subject to change or cancellation. Phone and online orders are subject to service fees. Must be 21 years or older to gamble, obtain a Total Rewards ® card or enter VooDoo ®. ©2013, Caesars License Company, LLC.

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WHERE THE BEST MUSICIANS IN THE WORLD PLAY

KNUCKLEHEADS F re e S h u tt le in S u rr o u n d in g A reth e a

NIGHTLIFE Send submissions to Berry Anderson by e-mail (berry.anderson@pitch.com), fax (816-756-0502) or phone (816-218-6775). Continuing items must be resubmitted monthly.

T H U R S D AY 11

JULY: 10: Marcia Ball 11: The BoDeans Tiny Horse Six Market Blvd 12: Lukas Nelson & POTR Meeka Cryle Jon Dee Graham 13: The Crayons & Levee Town 17: The Nace Brothers

w/ Earl Cates 18: Buckwheat Zydeco 19: Trampled Under Foot CD Release Show The Railers 20: Chubby Carrier

I N D I E / P O P / E X P E R I M E N TA L Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Prettymouth, 8 p.m. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Groove the Masses, Hyperbore, 9 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Six Market Blvd., 8:30 p.m. MiniBar: 3810 Broadway, 816-326-8281. Why They Fight, 10 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. My Gold Mask, California Wives, Rooftop Vigilantes, 10 p.m.

JAZZ/LOUNGE The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. Bram Wijnands Swingtet, 7 p.m. Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Joe Cartwright and Duck Warner, 6 p.m. Green Lady Lounge: 1809 Grand, 816-215-2954. 9 Plus 1, 8 p.m. The Kill Devil Club: 61 E. 14th St., 816-877-8312. Max Groove. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Paul Shinn and Joe Lisinicchia.

COVERS The Landing Eatery & Pub: 1189 W. 152 Hwy., Liberty, 816792-5230. The Transients. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Found a Job, Hero Worship, 10 p.m. Tomfooleries: 612 W. 47th St., 816-753-0555. Gov’t Cheez, 10 p.m.

EASY LISTENING/ACOUSTIC Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. John Keck’s Devils and Angels with Scott Hobart and Amy Farrand, 8 p.m. Fuel: 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park, 913-451-0444. Drew Six. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Jason Kayne, 9 p.m. Lake House Pub: 27909 E. Colbern Rd., Lee’s Summit, 816-5785770. Singer-songwriter Showcase, 7 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Landon Leist. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. M-Bird Songwriter’s Showcase with Megan Birdsall, 7:30-10:30 p.m.

VA R I E T Y The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Lawrence Field Day Fest 2013, 9 p.m. Buzzard Beach: 4110 Pennsylvania, 816-753-4455. Trivia, Ladies’ Night, and DJ HoodNasty. The Chesterfield: 1400 Main, 816-474-4545. Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz, 8 p.m. Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Dinner and Drinks with Church of Lazlo, 3 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. Terence Burger, 8 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Dan Soder, 8 p.m. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. Trivia.

F R I D AY 12 R O C K / M E TA L / P U N K

For more info & tickets: knuckleheadskc.com

2715 Rochester, KCMO

816-483-1456

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Aftershock Bar & Grill: 5240 Merriam Dr., Merriam, 913-3845646. Hemlock, Hellavate, 6 p.m. The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Knife Crime, the Uzis, the Heidi Phillips Band. Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Snake Island, the Lucky, the Bad Ideas, the Pale Hearts, 8 p.m. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. John Brown Boys, Monzie Leo and the Big Sky, Good Time Charlie. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Cimino, Mad Libby, Southern Pain, 10 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Rabbit Holes, Dry Bonnet, 10 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Run With It, Austin Meek, Brown Sugar Bourbon, 8 p.m.

B L U E S / R O C K A B I L LY B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Fast Johnny Ricker, 9 p.m.

pitch.com

Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Billy Ebeling and the Late for Dinner Band. Jazz: 1859 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-328-0003. Cold Sweat. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., MORE 816-221-5299. Lonnie Ray Blues Band, 9 p.m. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., S Overland Park, 913-239-9666. ING LIST E AT Rick Bacus Trio, 5:30 p.m.; J. Love IN ONL Band, 9 p.m. M PITCH.CO RJ’s Bob-Be-Que Shack: 5835 Lamar, Mission, 913-262-7300. Diamond Eyed Jack, 8 p.m. Trouser Mouse: 410 S. Hwy. 7, Blue Springs, 816-220-1222. Kris Lager Band.

CLUB

DJ The Foundry: 424 Westport Rd., 816-960-0866. DJ Leo Night Us. The Gusto Lounge: 504 Westport Rd., 816-974-8786. I <3 Gusto. MiniBar: 3810 Broadway, 816-326-8281. DJ Nartan and the Record Machine, 10 p.m. The Quaff: 1010 Broadway, 816-471-1918. DJ E.

JAZZ/LOUNGE The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. Tyrone Clark Quartet, 8:30 p.m. Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Jimmy Dykes & the Blisstonians, 4 p.m.; Max Groove Trio, 7-11 p.m. Green Lady Lounge: 1809 Grand, 816-215-2954. Mark Lowrey, 9 p.m. Johnny Cascone’s Italian Restaurant: 6863 W. 91st St., Overland Park, 913-381-6837. Jim Mair Duo, 6:30 p.m. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Bram Wijnands Trio, Fridays, 7 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Lonnie McFadden, 4:30 p.m. Take Five Coffee + Bar: 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park, 913948-5550. Todd Strait, 8 p.m.

WORLD/REGGAE Californos: 4124 Pennsylvania, 816-531-7878. Arm the Poor, Mishaps, Pug Uglies, 9 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Stiff Necked Fools, Born In Babylon, 8 p.m.

COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS The Brooksider: 6330 Brookside Plz., 816-363-4070. Noe Palma, 10 p.m. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Bluegrass Jam, 7 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Starhaven Rounders, 7 p.m.

COVERS The BrewTop Pub and Patio: 8614 N. Boardwalk Ave., 816584-9292. Dolewite. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Nerva, 9 p.m. The Landing Eatery & Pub: 1189 W. 152 Hwy., Liberty, 816792-5230. Overdrive, 9 p.m.; Jeremy Nichols, 9 p.m.

VA R I E T Y The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Lawrence Field Day Fest 2013, 7 p.m. Club Magic: 804 W. 24th St., Lawrence. Illest Uminati, 9 p.m. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Band That Saved the World. Kick Comedy Theater: 4010 Pennsylvania. Rod Reyes, 8 & 10 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Dan Soder, 7:45 & 9:45 p.m.

Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Faceman, Alien Jones, Adam Evolving, 9 p.m. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. 3 Son Green, Stiff Necked Fools.

B L U E S / R O C K A B I L LY B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Michael Charles Band; Mama Ray’s Jazz -Meets-Blues Jam, 2-5:30 p.m. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. The Big 3. Jazz: 1859 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-3280003. Lonnie Ray Blues Band. The Kill Devil Club: 61 E. 14th St., 816-877-8312. The MGDs, 9 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Carl Butler’s Gospel Lounge with the Scott Moyer Band, 7:30 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Brody Buster Band, 9 p.m. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. The Peacemakers, 5:30 p.m.; Cadillac Flambe, 9 p.m. Trouser Mouse: 410 S. Hwy. 7, Blue Springs, 816-220-1222. The Mojo Roots.

I N D I E / P O P / E X P E R I M E N TA L The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. The Fluorescent, Root and Stem, Jared Bond and the Tornadoes. Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Spirit Animal, Andrew Bruns, Brittany Moses, 6 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Opportunist, Mr. & the Mrs., Sister Rat, 10 p.m. RJ’s Bob-Be-Que Shack: 5835 Lamar, Mission, 913-2627300. Not A Planet, 8 p.m.

DJ Ambassador Hotel: 1111 Grand, 816-298-7700. Gossip at Reserve Bar, 8 p.m., free. Black & Gold Tavern: 3740 Broadway. Downlow with DJs Z Sonic and Wstendgrl. The Eighth Street Taproom: 801 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-6918. DJ Candlepants. The Foundry: 424 Westport Rd., 816-960-0866. Tiberias. Milieu: 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park. DJ Mike Scott. MiniBar: 3810 Broadway, 816-326-8281. Dropout Boogie.

COVERS The BrewTop Pub and Patio: 8614 N. Boardwalk Ave., 816584-9292. Cherry Bomb. The Brooksider: 6330 Brookside Plz., 816-363-4070. The Baloney Ponyz, 10 p.m. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Ego Satellites. The Landing Eatery & Pub: 1189 W. 152 Hwy., Liberty, 816792-5230. Robe, 9 p.m.

EASY LISTENING/ACOUSTIC The Landing Eatery & Pub: 1189 W. 152 Hwy., Liberty, 816792-5230. Phil Vandel, 6 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. The Winston Apple Show, 7 p.m.

VA R I E T Y The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Lawrence Field Day Fest 2013, 5 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Humans, Ubi of Ces Cru, David Hasselhoff on Acid, 10 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Dan Soder, 7:45 & 9:45 p.m. Uptown Shoppes: 3600 Broadway, 816-753-8665. Kansas City Performing Arts and Spoken Word Showcase, 2 p.m. Woodsweather Café: 1414 W. Ninth St., 816-472-6333. Amanda Wish Open Mic, 1-4 p.m.

S U N D AY 1 4

S AT U R D AY 13

R O C K / M E TA L / P U N K

R O C K / M E TA L / P U N K

Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Cab 20, Bad Cop, 9 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Mouthbreathers, 10 p.m.

Aftershock Bar & Grill: 5240 Merriam Dr., Merriam, 913-3845646. Solus, D.F.D.1., Avenue 17, 7 p.m. Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. The Uzis, Filthy 13, 9 p.m. Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Cape Lions, MegaJoos, the Lucky Graves, 10 p.m. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. The Phillistines, Drew Black and the Electric, 9 p.m.

B L U E S / R O C K A B I L LY B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Lee McBee and the Confessors, 6-9 p.m.


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Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Randall Conrad Olinger, Brody Buster Band, 6 p.m.

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DJ The Foundry: 424 Westport Rd., 816-960-0866. DJ Lazy B. Hamburger Mary’s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-842-1919. Bad Music Sundays with Brett Dietrich, 3:30 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Sunday Funday with DJ G Train, 10 p.m.

HIP-HOP/RAP The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Zeale, Gobi, 7:30 p.m.

JAZZ Green Lady Lounge: 1809 Grand, 816-215-2954. Bram Wijnands stride piano, 7 p.m.; Paul Shinn Trio, 10 p.m. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Rich Hill’s jazz brunch, 11 a.m.; Mark Lowrey jazz jam, 6 p.m.

EASY LISTENING/ACOUSTIC Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Les Mengel Duo. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Rich Berry. Jazz: 1859 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-3280003. Brendan MacNaughton. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Lauren Anderson, 9 p.m.

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Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. Team Trivia with Teague Hayes, 7 p.m. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Karaoke. MiniBar: 3810 Broadway, 816-326-8281. Karaoke with Paul Nelson. Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. Gayme Night, 7:30-10 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Irie KC — reggae night, 9 p.m.

W E D N E S D AY 17 R O C K / M E TA L / P U N K

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HIP-HOP/RAP Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Shameless Management Showcase with Mooni Downz, Kaybe, Simple Steven, L.E.L of Highclass, Skee, Dose, Terry Notes, 9 p.m.

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Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Dave Hays’ Open Blues Jam, 8 p.m. Slow Ride Roadhouse: 1350 N. Third St., Lawrence, 785-7492727. Open jam with the Lonnie Ray Blues Band, 6-10 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Open Mic Night.

Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Lott 44, Bloom, Ask an Adult, 9 p.m.

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The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Flux Capacitor, 8 p.m. Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. The Blind Pets, BLKHRTS, Werewolf Nebula, Bearface, 9:30 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Carl Butler’s Gospel Lounge with the Fabulous Torques, 7:30 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Bob Walkenhorst, 7 p.m.

M O N D AY 15

HAPPY HOUR SPECIALS 4PM - 7PM . MON-SAT

Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Joel McNulty. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Strange String Summit, 7 p.m.

Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Max Groove Trio, 6 p.m. Green Lady Lounge: 1809 Grand, 816-215-2954. Organ Jazz Trio with Ken Lovern, 8 p.m. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Paul Shinn. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Brian Ruskin Quartet.

VA R I E T Y

WORLD/REGGAE

The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Lawrence Amateur Burlesque, 8 p.m. The BrewTop Pub and Patio: 8614 N. Boardwalk Ave., 816584-9292. Trivia Bingo, 10 p.m. The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Rural Grit Happy Hour, 6-9 p.m.; karaoke with Nanci Pants, 10:30 p.m. Californos: 4124 Pennsylvania, 816-531-7878. Opera Supper, 6:30 p.m. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Jazzbo, 6-9 p.m. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Karaoke Costume Night, 9:30 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Sonic Spectrum Music Trivia, 7 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Sam’s Club Karaoke, 10 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Jonny Green and Jake Stanton open mic and jam session, 8 p.m.; Uptown Comedy Night with Norm Dexter, 10 p.m.

Californos: 4124 Pennsylvania, 816-531-7878. Jah Lion, Amanuel I, Sahj Kaya, Ras Puddu & Joe Straws, 7 p.m. Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. Tango Dance Night, 8 p.m. Tomfooleries: 612 W. 47th St., 816-753-0555. Flannigan’s Right Hook, 9:30 p.m.

T U E S D AY 16 I N D I E / P O P / E X P E R I M E N TA L The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483. The Revivalists, Jet Edison, 8 p.m. Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Speedy Ortiz, Schwervon, Lazy, 7:30 p.m.

JAZZ/LOUNGE Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Rick Bacus Trio. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Hermon Mehari Trio, 6 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Open Jam with the Everette DeVan Trio, 7 p.m.

EASY LISTENING/ACOUSTIC The All-Star Rock Bar: 7210 N.E. 43rd St., 816-452-2660. Songwriter Showcase with Scott Ford, 7 p.m. Californos: 4124 Pennsylvania, 816-531-7878. Frank Rardon, 8:30 p.m.

COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Earl & Them, the Nace Brothers, 7 p.m. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. John Paul Drum & Bill Dye, 7 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. La Guerre, Arthur Dodge & the Horsefeathers, Doby Watson, 6 p.m.

EASY LISTENING/ACOUSTIC Fuel: 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park, 913-451-0444. Colby & Mole. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Ryan Harvey, Johnathan Woods, Outlaw Jake, 9 p.m. Nara: 1617 Main, 816-221-6272. Ladies’ Night with Matt Shoaf. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Jeff & Norm, 7 p.m.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Acoustic jam session with Tyler Gregory. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Jam Night, 9 p.m. Woodsweather Café: 1414 W. Ninth St., 816-472-6333. Blues Jam with the Dave Hays Band, 7-10 p.m.

VA R I E T Y Bulldog: 1715 Main, 816-421-4799. Comedy Night, 8 p.m. Californos: 4124 Pennsylvania, 816-531-7878. Westport Girlz, 8 p.m. Charlie Hooper’s: 12 W. 63rd St., 816-361-8841. Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz, 7:30 p.m. Michael’s Lakewood Pub: N. 291 Hwy. and Lakewood Blvd., Lee’s Summit, 816-350-7300. Humpday Comedy Night, 9 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Poetic Underground open mic series, 9-11 p.m.


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can be done that does not intrinsically put the recipient at risk of cardiac arrest … . I know of no reliable way to determine when such a cardiac arrest becomes imminent. If the recipient does arrest, the probability of resuscitating them, even with optimal CPR, is small.” Even if choking weren’t dangerous, being this woman’s boyfriend/assailant has to be tedious. You need to ask yourself if you wanna spend the rest of your life with someone who’s as inconsiderate, selfish and sexually limited as your girlfriend seems to be.

Truly Underestimated Risk in Sexual Tourist Adventure

Dear Dan: I am a 29-year-old lesbian. My best

Dear TURISTA: You had a one-night stand, and the dude wouldn’t let you spend the night, and now you’re having a meltdown about it. Why this reaction? Because before you could give yourself permission to fuck this guy, you had to convince yourself that it wasn’t about two people using each other. Like a lot of people who want to have one-night stands, you psyched yourself up to believe that you two had a kind of meaningful insta-connection. (“I thought he was so sweet.”) You rounded this dude up to boyfriend material, but the way he treated you after the sex was over — “OK, lady, back to the hotel” — stripped away your illusions. Was your reaction sex-negative? Yes. Are you slut-shaming yourself? Yes. You did something kind of sleazy on vacation, just like millions of other people before you, and you misjudged someone. But who hasn’t? Dear Dan: I’m a straight guy with a long-term

girlfriend who has a choking fetish. She needs to be choked during sex to get off. In the spirit of being GGG, I’ve been doing this for her. The thing is, it kind of scares me. I don’t particularly get off on it, and it brings out parts of me that I don’t like. More important, I’m really scared of hurting her. Recently, on vacation, hotel security was called because our neighbors thought I was assaulting her. (She’s a screamer and likes to struggle during sex.) It feels like every fuck needs to be a rape scene, complete with choking. She doesn’t like it any other way. I don’t want to accidentally hurt her or kill her and wind up in jail, but she’s dismissive when I share my concerns. My friends in the BDSM scene scold me and say that breath play is never OK. Your thoughts?

Throat Harm Really Obsesses This Terrific Lady Entirely Dear THROTTLE: BDSM author, educator and

activist Jay Wiseman says this in his book SM 101: A Realistic Introduction: “I know of no way whatsoever that suffocation or strangulation 38

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D A N S AVA G E

Dear Dan: I’m a 26-year-old straight female. I

just fucked a guy while on holiday in Costa Rica. I thought I was sex-positive and adventurous, so why do I feel so ashamed? I’m dating a boy back in the United States whom I absolutely adore, but we’re not necessarily exclusive. The guy was a 22-year-old local — I thought he was so sweet. But he did that bullshit “fuck her and then get her out of bed and drive her home” shit. I feel so fucking pathetic right now. Is this because I did something stupid or is it a result of some deep psychological, self-induced slut-shaming? Why would he kick me out like that?

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friend has an incredibly hot sister. Let’s call her Gladys. Gladys is about 10 years older than me and happily married to a man. We talk on Facebook and text each other frequently. Recently, things have gotten more flirtatious. I am dying to say to her, “I am super-attracted to you and I don’t want to assume anything about your agreements with your hubby. If you ever want to explore your sexuality with a girl, I would love to be that girl.” It seems like a delicate situation. I love my best friend’s family. I love their mom. I have spent holidays at their house and vacationed with them. I don’t want to embarrass myself. But I know she couldn’t ask me because I am her little sister’s best friend. Is there a way to roll this out?

Lesbian Under Straight Tease Dear LUST: Let’s do a quick risk-reward analysis. By hitting on this woman, you’re risking your relationship with your best friend, your best friend’s sister, your best friend’s mom, and all future family holiday/vacation invites. Seems like a lot to risk if you ask me, and you did. But if Gladys has an open relationship with her husband — or if they’re searching for a unicorn — it would be better if they made the first move. Keep flirting and live in hope. Dear Dan: A girl I worked with recently intro-

duced me to your podcast. You must get this e-mail all the time, but I wanted to say thank you for the Savage Lovecast. It has made me feel a lot more comfortable about some of the things I like to do with my loving GGG boy. The calls and guest experts on your podcast make me feel so much more normal, and my boyfriend loves that I’ve become more open about things I want to do.

Eager Nice Girl Living in Scottish Highlands Dear ENGLISH: Thanks for the lovely note and

tell your boyfriend hello. And, dear readers, see our brand-new site at savagelovecast.com.

Have a question for Dan Savage? E-mail him at mail@savagelove.net


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p Classifieds

Park Apartments

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APTS/JOBS/STUFF

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The Pitch: July 11, 2013