Issuu on Google+

JANUARY 10–16, 2013 | FREE | VOL. 32 NO. 28 | PITCH.COM

JANUARY 10–16, 2013 | VOL. 32 NO. 28 E D I T O R I A L

STALK US! WE DARE YOU

twitter.com/pitchstreet facebook.com/thepitch

FEARLESS!

A model of the ambitious, vitalizing activist work that exists to stir the sleeping to wake.” -Manohla Dargis, THE NEW YORK TIMES

 “

1/ 2

SHATTERING.” -Roger Ebert, CHICAGO SUN-TIMES

SEARING! One of the most important

pieces of nonfiction to hit the screen in years.” -Sheri Linden, LOS ANGELES TIMES

The war on drugs has never been about drugs.

A

EW’s GRADE

Owen Gleiberman, ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY

From Executive Producers

DANNY GLOVER, JOHN LEGEND, BRAD PITT & RUSSELL SIMMONS

A FILM BY EUGENE

OPENS FRIDAY JANUARY 11

JARECKI

TIVOLI CINEMAS

4050 PENNSYLVANIA (WESTPORT MANOR SQUARE), KANSAS CITY • 913-383-7756 • WWW.TIVOLIKC.COM

Editor Scott Wilson Managing Editor Justin Kendall Music Editor David Hudnall Staff Writers Charles Ferruzza, Ben Palosaari Editorial Operations Manager Deborah Hirsch Calendar Editor Berry Anderson Clubs Editor Abbie Stutzer Food Blogger, Web Editor Jonathan Bender Proofreader Brent Shepherd Contributing Writers Tracy Abeln, Theresa Bembnister, April Fleming, Leslie Kinsman, Chris Milbourn, Dan Savage, Abbie Stutzer, Lucas Wetzel

A R T

Art Director Ashford Stamper Contributing Photographers Angela C. Bond, Chris Mullins, Lauren Phillips, Sabrina Staires, Brooke Vandever Design Intern Chloe George

P R O D U C T I O N

Production Manager Christina Riddle Multimedia Designer Vu Radley

A D V E R T I S I N G

Sales Manager Erin Carey Senior Classified Multimedia Specialist Steven Suarez Multimedia Specialists Michelle Acevedo, Kirin Arnold, Collin Click, Page Olson Director of Marketing & Operations Jason Dockery Digital Marketing Manager Keli Sweetland

THE LAST (DIRTY) PICTURE SHOW

C I R C U L A T I O N

Circulation Director Mike Ryan

B U S I N E S S

Accounts Receivable Jodi Waldsmith Publisher Joel Hornbostel

Reeling in the Strand’s XXX years

S O U T H C O M M

Chief Executive Officer Chris Ferrell Chief Financial Officer Patrick Min Chief Operating Officer Rob Jiranek Chief Marketing Officer Susan Torregrossa Chief Technology Officer Matt Locke Business Manager Eric Norwood Director of Digital Sales & Marketing David Walker Director of Accounting Todd Patton Creative Director Heather Pierce Director of Online Content/Development Patrick Rains

N A T I O N A L

BY C H A R L E S F E R R U Z Z A

7

SQUARE MEALS Vivilore piles on the old-school style in Independence.

A D V E R T I S I N G

VMG Advertising 888-278-9866, vmgadvertising.com Senior Vice President of Sales Susan Belair Senior Vice President of Sales Operations Joe Larkin

BY C H A R L E S F E R R U Z Z A

21

B A C K P A G E . C O M

Vice President Sales & Marketing Carl Ferrer Business Manager Jess Adams Accountant David Roberts

KC PITCH_1/9_4.776x3.5

D I S T R I B U T I O N

The Pitch distributes 45,000 copies a week and is available free throughout Greater Kansas City, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for $5 each, payable at The Pitch’s office in advance. The Pitch may be distributed only by The Pitch’s authorized independent contractors or authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of The Pitch, take more than one copy of each week’s issue. Mail subscriptions: $22.50 for six months or $45 per year, payable in advance. Application to mail at second-class postage rates is pending at Kansas City, MO 64108.

CRAFT EXPRESS Bier Station taps into Armour Hills. BY J O N AT H A N B E N D E R

22

C O P Y R I G H T

The contents of The Pitch are Copyright 2013 by KC Communications, LLC. No portion may be reproduced in whole or in part by any means without the express written permission of the publisher. The Pitch address: 1701 Main, Kansas City, MO 64108 For information or to leave a story tip, call: 816-561-6061 Editorial fax: 816-756-0502 For classifieds, call: 816-218-6759 For retail advertising, call: 816-218-6702

ON T HE COVE R

3 4 7 13 16 17 19 21 22 24 26 30 34

QUESTIONNAIRE PLOG FEATURE F I LT E R STAGE ART FILM CAFÉ FAT CITY STREETSIDE MUSIC NIGHTLIFE SAVAGE LOVE

MEANWHI LE AT PI TC H. C O M

DESIGN BY ASHFORD STAMPER

2

THE PITCH

JANUARY 10-16, 2013

pitch.com

pitch.com

Kansas City is not one of the 25 DRUNKEST CITIES in America. THE BLACK KEYS, THE FLAMING LIPS play the Sprint Center in April. NICK OFFERMAN, aka RON SWANSON of Parks and Recreation, brings his ham-related one-man show to the Midland.

M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X

THE PITCH

2

QUESTIONNAIRE

HEATHER WILEY

Art director, Russell Stover Candies

RETAIL, REPAIR, SERVICE Hometown: Independence

takes up a lot of space in my iTunes:

ITunes U. I listen to lectures all day while I work. I’m sure I’ll receive my doctorate in social welfare from  Harvard soon. Right now, I’m also listening to a lot of happy music: Vampire Weekend, Two Door Cinema Club and Elbow.

Current neighborhood: I just married a hometown boy and moved back to Independence after living in Waldo for 16 years.

Who or what is your sidekick? My 11-year-

old “mini me” daughter, Avalon. I  was a single mom until recently, so she was on my hip E R O M wherever I went for 10 years. These days, I’m almost always on the T A INE ONL .COM sidelines at various local H C PIT soccer  facilities watching her play, praying she doesn’t get concussed.

What movie do you watch at least once a year? To Die For by Gus Van Sant. I love the

Q&As

for a big fashion magazine like W Magazine or Vogue. Anna Wintour without the bad bangs and no furs, and I would be really nice.

What was the last local restaurant you patronized? Beer Kitchen. The potpie is worth the un-

avoidable mouth burn. I like the Rieger Hotel, too. They make their own tonic!

Where do you drink? Governor Stumpy’s in

Waldo. I lived a few houses down the street for 11 years, so I’m embarrassingly familiar with the staff. They’ve seen me through breakups, power outages and a layoff, always there with a gin and tonic. They’re my family now, and I’ve made a point to stop by at least once a week since I moved.

What’s your favorite charity? Missouri Mission of Mercy. They provide large-scale dental clinics to people who otherwise couldn’t afford care. My husband is a dentist, and last year we spent a weekend in Springfield volunteering. Thousands of people stood in line for days to get dental care. Fantastic organization. Favorite place to spend your paycheck: I miss Streetside Records! I love Anthropologie and can spend hours in any bookstore.

S A B R I N A S TA I R E S

What career would you choose in an alternate reality? In another life, maybe an art director

Three Colors trilogy by Krzysztof Kieslowski, especially Blue. I also love anything by Paul Thomas Anderson. In case I sound pretentious, I also watch Center Stage more than anyone should.

Finish this sentence: “Kansas City got it right when …” It built the Bloch Building addition to

the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art and renovated Visitation Parish — for me the most inspired spaces in Kansas City.

“Kansas City screwed up when …” It failed to pass a light-rail plan to connect the suburbs with downtown and the airport. The downtown streetcar is cool but not quite enough.   “Kansas City needs …” To support its new professional women’s soccer team! Listening to my daughter promise that she’ll be a soccer player when she grows up just got a little less painful. I’m hopeful that, unlike the other leagues that failed, this model will work. We’ve already reserved our season tickets, and everyone who loves a female soccer player in this town should do the same. Go, Blues! “In five years, I’ll be …” Researching col-

leges for our kids and plastic surgeons for me. I don’t want to think about either today, though, thanks.

“People might be surprised to know that …” What local phenomenon do you think is overrated? I hate to admit that I’m not a huge fan

of barbecue. There’s something unsettling about a plate of meat still on the bones, covered with bright-red sauce. Maybe I watch too many zombie movies.

Where do you like to take out-of-town guests? I love showing off the art scene in Kansas City. The Kemper Museum (lunch at Cafe Sebastienne) followed by the Nelson and a long walk or picnic on the lawn. Crossroads Arts District is one of my favorite places in KC and has sentimental significance since my husband and I were married there in March. The Bloch Building at night is a must-see as well.

I am a huge boxing fan. I can’t really explain it, but I’m sure it has something to do with suppressed aggression. My poor husband has watched enough boxing matches in the last four years to last him a lifetime. Right now, I really like Nonito Donaire and Seth Mitchell. Attending a big fight in Vegas is on my bucket list.

What TV show do you make sure you watch? I haven’t been truly obsessed with a TV show since Battlestar Galactica ended. If you catch me in front of the TV now, it’s probably CNN or an HBO documentary. True Blood and Dexter both jumped the shark recently, so I had to stop watching.

WE BUY USED PHONES! Phone & Computer Repair Free Diagnostic

816-421-5300

www.goodcallwireless.com

GLADSTONE 7218 N. Oak Trafficway KANSAS CITY 2518 Vivion Road NORTH KANSAS CITY 502 Armour Road Zona Rosa 7763 Prarieview Road

What local tradition do you take part in every year? We do Fat Tuesdays at YJ’s every year. Hearts of Darkness, costumes, street dancing and the parade to 18th and Vine make it the coolest KC event of the year. It’s worth the headache at Ash Wednesday service the following day.

Person or thing you find really irritating at this moment: I can get a bit petulant when

1305 Union Ave KCMO 816-221-0711

people tell me what to do, so I don’t like being waved through intersections. I know the traffic laws, too, genius. And don’t get me started on those stupid green-plastic stoppers that Starbucks is putting into their coffee lids. And I don’t like John Boehner.

What subscription — print, digital, etc. — do you value most? I’m a designer. I  still

love print. I’ve always subscribed to Newsweek, and I’m really sad to see it go. I read Vanity Fair, Real Simple and Rolling Stone every month. I love W Magazine because it’s just plain beautiful.

Last book you read: On Boxing by Joyce Carol

kansas city service

Oates

Favorite day trip: My sister lives in Blackburn,

Missouri, which is a small farming community 13 miles north of Concordia. Once you get off the highway, it’s a gorgeous drive through rolling hills. They have a fabulous Fourth of July festival with German food; a pie stand; and, if you love to run screaming from molten falling debris, the most insane fireworks display around.

January Special

20% OFF

partial or full highlights All services are done by students with supervision

What is your most embarrassing dating moment? The night I hit on a local musician,

who turned out to be the kid I used to babysit when I was 13.

Describe a recent triumph: I recently redesigned the packaging for Russell Stover’s line of hard candy. I was really proud of how it turned out when I finally saw it in the stores. It sounds corny, but there is nothing like the pride I feel for my daughter and stepsons. They are the coolest kids in the universe, and I’m hopeful that I had a small part in that. pitch.com AN R YX 1X–X 0 - 1X6 ,, 22 0 0 1 3X pitch.com JM OU NA TH

TT HH EE PP II TT CC HH

31

Woman-owned personal protection and self-defense training, services and supplies company.

PLOG

I AM THE WALRUS

BY

BE N PA L O S A A R I

Andy Reid brings his legendary ’stache and coaching record to Kansas City.

Stick these up your stupid nose.

TRAINING CLASSES AVAILABLE 5725 Nieman Rd • Shawnee, KS

913.248.3288

ShesAPistol.com

Are you

INFORMED?

Sign up for

EDITORIAL NEWSLETTER

PRE-MIXED SYNTHETICURINE KIT

Kit Contains:

• 3.5 oz of the highest qualit y sunthetic urine available • Adjustable belt • T wo heat pads • Temperature label

1 YEAR SHELF LIFE

BEST Selection of Glass in KC! 11-8 Mon - Sat • Noon - 6 Sun 3617 Broadway KCMO 64111

816.931.7222 facebook.com/coopersbroadway

4

THE PITCH

JANUARY 10-16, 2013

T

he woeful Chiefs made a splash Friday, hiring former Philadelphia Eagles coach Andy Reid to lead the franchise’s post-Pioli era. The Eagles had fired Reid after a crappy 4-12 season, which followed 2011’s 8-8 campaign. Such blemishes were rare in Reid’s 14-year Philly tenure; Reid ended with just three losing seasons, compiling a 130-93-1 overall record. In the last four years, the Chiefs have suffered three sub-.500 seasons. So Clark Hunt handing over broad authority on football decisions G O L P E R MO INE AT — and kicking the general manager, Scott Pioli, to ONL M / P L O G the curb — was no surP IT C H .C O prise. The franchise’s future looks bright with Reid in charge and the No. 1 overall pick in the NFL Draft. Celebrate with a commemorative Andy Reid walrus mustache and a collection of facts about our new football overlord. • His roots run through Mizzou: Reid coached the Missouri Tigers’ offensive line from 1989 to 1991. Former Chiefs coach Dick Vermeil told The Kansas City Star that Reid’s

pitch.com

Goo goo g’joob time in Columbia should prove helpful. “He’s been in middle America before and knows what the people are like,” Vermeil said. Important to middle Americans: winning football games. • Reid spawns head coaches: Three of Reid’s former assistants are current head coaches — Minnesota’s Leslie Frazier, Carolina’s Ron Rivera and Baltimore’s John Harbaugh. • He can punt, pass and kick: In December 1971, a 13-year-old Reid appeared in the competition on Monday Night Football. For real. • He knows tragedy: Last August, his son,

Garrett, died of an accidental heroin overdose in a dorm at Pennsylvania’s Lehigh University, where the Eagles were staging training camp. In 2007, Garrett ran a red light and injured a driver of a different car. Garrett told police that he was high on heroin at the time of the crash. • Reid’s Eagles played in the Super Bowl: The Eagles lost 24-21 to the New England Patriots in Super Bowl XXXIX. • He is a Mormon: Reid played college football at Brigham Young University in the late 1970s. He donated to fellow Mormon Mitt Romney’s presidential campaign. He should have plenty of places to worship in the metro. • Reid is a cougar to the core: He served a season as BYU’s mascot Cosmo the Cougar, according to Wikipedia (uh, we couldn’t fi nd other confi rmation). Reid played both offensive and defensive lines on the football team, so that must have been one large cougar costume. • Reid’s mustache is awesome: Now cut yours out! It beats wearing a grocery sack on your head.

E-mail ben.palosaari@pitch.com pitch.com

MONTH

pitch.com

JANUARY 10-16, 2013

THE PITCH

5

GET YOUR FIX.

A CANDY-COATED COMPETITION TO NAME

KANSAS CITY’S SWEETHEART

P

KCMO 1621Locust, BENEFITING

FEBRUARY 21, 2013 from 6-8PM

SALE. N O W O N S $12 TICKE1T5 DAY OF, $ BILITY A L I A V A G N PENDI

LE TABLES INCLUDE:

CURRENT CONTENDERS/SAMP

IT S I V , S T CKE I T R O O

m o c . h c t i p . e r ecu

NF I E R O FOR M

s

6

THE PITCH

JANUARY 10-16, 2013

pitch.com

by Charles Ferruzza

O

|

People ill come to KC's only porn theater — but how long can the Strand ay turned on?

n New Year’s Day, two men, huddled in winter coats, were sitting in a boxy, 90-seat screening room — the main auditorium inside the Strand Theatre, at 35th Street and Troost. It was noon — and, on any other day, a busy hour at the last adult theater operating in Kansas City. Up on the screen — a stretch of vinyl the size of a diningroom table — a woman was fellating a very large penis. Nearly a century ago, a very different organ commanded attention in this space: the $10,000 Wurlitzer that accompanied the silent fi lms people arrived to see in “The newest, most luxurious theater in Kansas City,” according to a Kansas City Times advertisement. The room holding the two men on this cold January afternoon is what remains of the original, 750-seat auditorium, which has been divided and subdivided over the past three decades. There is nothing luxurious about it. In January 1917, the Strand sold tickets to thousands of people a week for Caprice, starring Mary Pickford, known as America’s sweetheart. In September 1984, the big draw at the Strand — by then a 200-seat blight — was Sunday’s “Amateur Strip Night.” In the seats closest to a burlesque-style runway, several fraternity brothers, each holding a fl ashlight, howled as

each of the strippers stepped forward, aiming the beams at the women’s crotches. A pint-sized performer going by Purple Rain used her fingers to spread herself open. Another woman slathered her nude body with oil and slid across the stage, to deafening applause. After the show was over, the lights in the auditorium dimmed, and the projector cranked to life. The porn movie that night showed straight sex. Anyone wanting to see man-on-man action retreated to the Strand’s former second-floor balcony, which had been turned into a smaller, 60-seat screening room showing hard-core gay porn. No one there that night knew it at the time, but this was the high point — if you can call it that — for dirty-movie theaters in Kansas City. By the end of the 1980s, the VCR had completed its conquest of the XXX market, rendering the experience of watching a pornographic movie in a public theater obsolete. Thanks to the videocassette, any living room or bedroom in Olathe or Raytown could instantly become an at-home Pink Pussycat Theater. The old indignities — the shameful drive to a bad neighborhood, the peril of being recognized, the constant threat of being rounded up in a raid — were now for only the most old-fashioned or

|

Photography by Barrett Emke

risk-aroused consumers. (And within another two decades, the Internet upset the marketplace yet again.) “Why do people need to rent films anymore?” wonders Dick Snow, the longtime owner of the Strand Theatre. “They can watch porn — free porn, I might add — on their iPhones.”

W

hen Snow, who owns and operates Bazooka’s Showgirls, bought the Strand Theatre in 1980, it had already been an X-rated house for nearly 20 years. Porn has always been big business in Kansas City. Just ask Jerry Medlin, who owned a percentage of the Strand in the 1970s with the late Charles Setter (who later sold the Strand to Snow). Prior to taking over the Strand in 1972, Setter and Medlin had operated a 150-seat porno house called the Astro — inside Union Station. When the Astro played Deep Throat, Medlin recalls, “We had lines from the theater to the parking lot. It was a huge hit.” Still, for a brief moment during Medlin’s tenure at the Strand, he and Setter tried returning mainstream entertainment to the theater. continued on page 9

pitch.com AN 0 - 1X6 ,, 2 20 00 1 3X pitch.com JM OU NA TR H YX1X–X

TTHHEE PPIITTCC HH

71

IS HIRING! KANSAS CITY, MO MULTI-MEDIA ADVERTISING SALES PRO NEEDED!

DO YOU LIKE A CHALLENGE

AND HAVE THE DRIVE TO STAY BUSY? IF YOU HAVE PROVEN TO BE SUCCESSFUL AT:

COME JOIN US JAN 17 6-8 PM

ENJOY FREE HOT WINGS AND COLD BEER.

ENTER TO WIN A PAIR OF OAKLEY SUNGLASSES AS WELL AS OTHER DOOR PRIZES.

•MULTI-TASKING •SELF-MOTIVATING •FULL ATTENTION TO DETAIL •ABILITY TO OPERATE ON A WEEKLY DEADLINE •ORGANIZATION & TIME EFFICIENCY Hitting the ground running 2-3 years of Media Sales Experience that includes a strong digital focus. Be able to effectively present PITCH.com and its partners to potential clients.

THIS MAY BE THE FIT FOR YOU!

Minimum expected annual income potential of $32K-$34K with no cap. Benefits include medical, dental, vision, 401K, Life, Disability 401K & more! 13020 West 63rd Street Shawnee KS 66216 (913) 631-1111

PLEASE SEND YOUR RESUME TO:

JOEL.HORNBOSTEL@PITCH.COM

NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE.

Must be eligible to work in the US for any employer. We are an Equal Opportunity Employer that values diversity in the workplace.

8

THE PITCH

JANUARY 10-16, 2013

pitch.com

COURTESY OF THE JACKSON COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY

The Last (Dirty) Picture Show continued from page 7 “I can’t quite remember why, but we stopped showing X-rated films and we played Mandingo,” he says. The R-rated 1975 movie, involving James Mason and slaves trained to fight, wasn’t exactly the return of Mary Pickford. “It didn’t do so well,” Medlin says, “so we went back to X-rated movies.” Porn had by then become something of a civic booster — it kept old, sometimes historic buildings erect. Screening dirty movies was a cheap way to profitably use what once were family-friendly neighborhood movie theaters, structures that had by the 1960s become obsolete and expensive to maintain. Places like the Strand had aged from glistening meccas to respectable second-run movie houses. Hollywood sent its hottest releases first to the big palaces in a city’s urban core, and next to smaller, neighborhood theaters — places that were, in Kansas City, built along thriving streetcar lines. KC’s busiest streetcar routes followed Main, Troost, Prospect, and Independence Avenue; dozens of movie theaters dotted those thoroughfares. But the U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling in the 1948 United States v. Paramount Pictures antitrust case leveled the old distribution platform, and within a couple of decades the second-run cinema would be a thing of the past. “We get a lot of customers who come in and remember watching movies here when they were kids,” says Michael Inman, who has worked behind the front counter of the Strand for five years. He was one of those children himself. “I grew up near here,” he says. “A relative would bring me here to watch movies in the late 1950s.” The Strand was a popular family theater for decades. A newspaper advertisement from January 10, 1953, lists that day’s shows — a double feature of The Asphalt Jungle, with Marilyn Monroe, and The Skipper Surprised His Wife, with Robert Walker — and a further incentive: “A free comic book for every boy and girl.” When the Strand Theatre opened in 1916, there were 25 other neighborhood movie houses operating in the city. Many of those small theaters are still standing, though not in use. Some have been converted to churches , 200X

pitch.com

(the Prospect, the Oak Park) or warehouses. When Snow bought the Strand, two other historic small theaters were flourishing as porn palaces: the 1912 Kimo Theater, at 3319 Main (Snow turned it into the Dove in 1979), and the 1923 Rockhill Theater (at 46th Street and Troost). Both structures have since been razed. “They didn’t show movies at the old Rockhill,” Snow says. “They had peep-show arcades and naked girls who danced behind glass windows.” There was also the Old Chelsea, in the River Market, but that structure had been built as a warehouse. Until it stopped showing adult films in 2000, it was the most glamorous place in town to see an X-rated film — relatively speaking, anyway. “It always seemed clean,” one regular customer says. “It didn’t smell like the Strand.”

T

he Strand does have its own peculiar fragrance, the smell of old arousal. It’s a suite of disinfectant, bodily fluids, cheap aftershave — and popcorn.

“Why do people need to rent films anymore? They can watch porn — free porn, I might add — on their iPhones.”

There’s a small popper at the front counter, near the entrance. The bags of popcorn are small but free for the asking, and they sit near the space where the original concession stand used to be, when this was a prouder kind of cinema. “The Strand had a wonderful candy assortment,” says a 70-something woman who attended matinee shows at the theater in the 1940s, “much better than the one at the Isis, down the street.”

A 1931 Strand ad (left) and the theater in 2013 A forlorn, coin-operated vending machine now sits near the auditorium entrance. There isn’t much of a selection — a couple of candy bars, a few bags of chips — for the patron who might feel hunger pangs after watching scenes of anal sex. Originally, two storefront businesses flanked the Strand: a barbershop to the south and a beauty salon to the north. The space once occupied by the beauty salon is now stocked with a few novelties (an easy-to-install sex swing, for example) and a modest selection of rental DVDs, including Fat Hos and Black Cock and I Like ’Em White, Volume 4. “We don’t get much rental business anymore,” Snow says. “It used to be very lucrative.” Strippers (women or gay men) haven’t performed regularly at the theater since the late 1980s. “We have occasional female strippers for special occasions,” Snow says. When the Strand auditorium was divided up again in the 1990s, the other half of the space was turned into four peep-show booths — without doors — where X-rated videos could be viewed without a lot of privacy. A former Strand regular says: “Part of the fun of the peep booths in the 1980s was that you could stumble in drunk, buy a handful of tokens, and have a lot of risky sex behind closed doors. Those days are long gone.”

VALENTINE’S DAY GUIDE

COMING: JAN 24 JAN 31 FEB 7

CALL FOR INFO

T

he Strand’s grand opening, on July 1, 1916, showcased Bobbie of the Ballet, with Louise Lovely, an event advertised in that day’s newspaper as full of “pleasing surprises.” The ad promised: “With its ventilation and fan system, cool evenings are assured.” Fast-forward 88 years: A not-so-pleasing surprise awaits a Strand patron named Dan Renzi, the Kansas City native who achieved national fame as a housemate on the 1996 season of MTV’s Real World series. Renzi was arrested for indecent exposure in the Strand’s second-floor theater in May 2004. “He was pleasuring himself, exposing his genitals,” Sgt. Brad Dumit later told The Pitch. Renzi’s TV celebrity assured that the vice bust earned plenty of continued on page 10

pitch.com

816.218.6735

JANUARY 10-16, 2013

THE PITCH

9

WEDDING GUIDE COMING FEBRUARY 28th 10

THE PITCH

JANUARY 10-16, 2013

The Last (Dirty) Picture Show continued from page 9 publicity (“Real World Housemate Pulls a PeeWee,” the Smoking Gun website reported) — something he should have known. The Strand’s gay mini-cinema had a reputation for occasional public pee-wee-pulling since the balcony theater had opened in 1981. To publicize the new gay attraction that year, Snow flew in filmmaker Joe Gage, creator of the popular X-rated Kansas City Trucking Co., which was filmed in Los Angeles and Palm Springs. “I remember my visit to Kansas City very well for two specific incidents,” Gage says. “I had just completed work on a movie called Heatstroke and I took it to Kansas City to hold its first public screening. When the print arrived at the Strand, I discovered that the fourth reel was missing. There was no time to have it sent from New York, so I gritted my teeth, and the show went on without it. No one in the audience noticed. “Afterward, everybody went to a local gay watering hole, where various fellows were brought over to the bar and introduced to me,” Gage continues. “When I asked one gentleman how he liked the film, he shrugged and said, ‘Not much. Nobody was very good.’ Just then, there was a commotion at the front entrance, and a group of uniformed policemen appeared. I turned to my host and asked, “Is this …?’ He nodded and said, ‘A raid.’ ” Gage recalls that he and everyone else in the bar were held for 30 minutes while IDs were checked. “Then the cops left, and socializing resumed.” Gage recalls his Strand personal appearance as the only one of his career outside New York and San Francisco.

W

hat makes the Strand a local cultural icon is the simple fact of its survival. Through two world wars and the changing fortunes of its neighborhood, it outlasted all of the other cinemas in the area. The Barrymore, the Bancroft, the Glory, the Mozart, the Gillham — they’re all parking lots now. But does the Strand have a future? The place isn’t nearly as fi nancially successful

pitch.com

today as it was even two decades ago. The Internet has crushed the adult-theater business. “I’m not sure what the new business model is,” says Snow, who admits that he’d consider selling the place if a buyer emerged. “It’s an old building,” he says. “They’re costly to maintain.” Jori Sackin, a 32-year-old painter, musician and video artist, loves the place. “For about a year, I was totally obsessed with the Strand,” he says. Sackin rented the Strand’s auditorium two years ago for a one-night screening of Space Thang, a short movie he made with collaborator Pat Vamos. “It was a film made specifically to be shown at the Strand, combining animation and clips of old 1970s sexploitation movies. Not the sex scenes but the parts in between. We had music and performance art that night, and we oversold the place. It only seats between 80 to 90 people, and we had 150 people show up. Everyone was so excited to be in the Strand.” Sackin sees the 96-year-old theater as a future urban multicultural arts center. “I

“The intereing ory to me about the Strand is what people think it is and what it really is.”

have considered buying it,” he says. “I go back and forth on the idea. I mean, there are issues. There’s no parking, and the location is kind of strange. It’s not that it’s a bad neighborhood — in fact, it’s almost desolate at night. But the building’s not in good shape, and it hasn’t been fully utilized in a long time. There are four apartments upstairs and the two retail spaces on each side of the lobby. You would have to imagine what the neighborhood might be in the next 20 years.

Sackin sees a porn-free future. Troost needs new businesses making money and attracting people.” For him, though, the Strand has no stigma. “The interesting story to me about the Strand is what people think it is and what it really is,” he says. “When I was putting together my project, I really got to know the place and the people who work there. The guys working in the theater are the sweetest, nicest guys. It’s this great small-business story.” But how long can this theater continue as it is? Sackin’s arts-center vision would require a kind of gentrification that seems virtually impossible for this stretch of Troost. But at least one Hyde Park resident says seismic shift is on its way. Jinx Wallace, a 25-year resident of Hyde Park, a few blocks from the Strand, points out that the redevelopment of her neighborhood from blighted to sought-after singlefamily homes “didn’t happen overnight.” “All positive changes take awhile,” she says. “Look, the evolution of the Crossroads as an arts district didn’t happen overnight, either. And now that rents in that area are so expensive, artists are looking at other neighborhoods, including Troost. One of my neighbors has already turned a building on Troost into artist studios. And with so many of the old buildings on Armour being turned into market-rate apartments, there are possibilities that we couldn’t imagine 20 years ago.” So what, she wonders, does Troost need in order to become a viable retail community again. “There’s still a lot of disagreement about that,” she says. “But yes, I’d like to see the Strand continue to operate in some fashion on Troost, especially if it brings more creative people to the neighborhood.” When the Strand marks its 100th anniversary in three years, it may not be open anymore — as a porn theater, anyway. Snow says he isn’t planning that far ahead. But after so many years grinding away in the shadows, this stubborn piece of KC history may fi nd its way into the light again. The Strand’s sexiest days might be ahead.

E-mail charles.ferruzza@pitch.com pitch.com

MONTH

GIVE THE GIFT OF 5 PARTIES

9529 Antioch * Overland Park, KS 913. 341.2021 * joslinsjewelry.com

PASSPORTS

TO ALL PITCH EVENTS ARE

NOW AVAILABLE! •HI T E V E RY •

•EV E N T I N 2013• TASTE OF KC MUSIC SHOWCASE • MUSIC AWARDS SUGAR RUSH •ARTOPIA

FIRST 100 PASSPORTS PURCHASED ARE ONLY $45 AT SECURE.PITCH.COM

Over 3000 white gold diamond engagement rings to pick from. Surely we can find a ring at Joslins and often at 1/2 the cost.

s

WE KNOW TIMES ARE TOUGH SO WE’RE MAKING OUR EVENTS MORE AFFORDABLE FOR YOU!

CALL 816.561.6061 FOR INFO pitch.com

JANUARY 10-16, 2013

THE PITCH

11

12

THE PITCH

JANUARY 10-16, 2013

pitch.com

WEEK OF JANUARY 10–16 | BY BERRY ANDERSON

SONS OF ANARCHY

16

PAG E

Y S U N DA

1 .1 3 t y up a Cowbo ter. n e C t Sprin

STAGE Wrestling icon Mick Foley does comedy at Stanford’s.

17

PAG E

ART Layet Johnson chisels into Lawrence.

19

PAG E

FILM Zero Dark Thirty choppers in.

T H U R S D AY | 1 . 10 | TRUE VALUE

Scarcity, sentimentality, imperfections — these are a few things to consider when determining an object’s value, says Colin Mackenzie, the NelsonAtkins Museum of E R MO Art’s senior curator of Chinese art. A jade pendant from Hong AT E N I ONL .COM Kong, an inlaid piece of PITCH South Korean pottery, a mounted hand scroll of Chinese seals, and pieces of Lingbi stones are a few of the items from Mackenzie’s personal collection that he’s bringing to Take 5, a new monthly series at the NelsonAtkins (4525 Oak, 816-751-1278) in which museum curators and community members share artifacts from their collections with the public. “It’s interactive to the point

EVENTS

where it becomes a discussion,” Mackenzie says. This month’s topic is value. (February’s is healing.) Participation is free, but tickets are required for the hourlong event that begins at 6 p.m. Get more information at nelson-atkins.org.

F R I D AY | 1 . 11 | TRAFFICKING PROBLEMS

Today is National Human Trafficking Awareness Day. In KC, there are approximately 1,700 victims. From 7 to 10 p.m., the Leedy-Voulkos Art Center (2012 Baltimore, 816-474-1919) hosts One Eleven Cocktails for a Cause, which One by One Project Executive Director Andrea Shelton says is “a night to honor those who have been enslaved and now have their freedom.” Support them by buying a ticket ($35 for individual, $65 for couple, or $5 more at the door) to this blackand-white event. “We continued on page 14

Dirt-bike rider Mike Mason is pretty much a badass. His Twitter profile includes a photo of his name tattooed under a woman’s breast, but we’re referring to his 2012 X Games gold medal and his spot on the Nuclear Cowboyz tour: the futuristic freestyle motocross extravaganza of pyro, lasers and female dancers (the Nuclear Cowgirlz) set to a soundtrack of heavy metal and dubstep. The Pitch caught up with the 31-year-old Las Vegas resident to talk about the show, which runs at 2 p.m. (and Saturday night at 7:30) at the Sprint Center (1407 Grand, 816-949-7000). Tickets cost $34–$75 ($10 children’s tickets are available in limited areas). Buy them at sprintcenter.com. The Pitch: How does the training differ between preparing for the X Games and your role as a Nuclear Cowboy? Mason: Both are pretty similar. With X Games, you need the seat time on your bike to feel good on all your hardest tricks. With Nuclear Cowboyz, we do a lot of technical stuff like three-wide flips, so you want to make sure you’re comfortable and confident. This is your fourth year in the show. Have you always been one of the Soldiers of Havoc? Are they the good guys? All four years I have been on the tour, I’ve been one of the Soldiers of Havoc. Yes, they are deemed as the “good guys.” We try to shut the Metal Mulisha down and make them realize they aren’t as tough as they think they are. There’s obviously a difference between the motocross of yesteryear and today. The X Games and Nuclear Cowboyz are pretty extreme. Where does the sport go from here? I think the sport is heading towards tours like Nuclear Cowboyz. The X Games is cool, but I feel like it has ran its course from a spectator’s standpoint. When you come to a Nuclear Cowboyz show, it’s awesome! You have so many bikes jumping at any given time, the pyro, the music, the lasers and riders flipping while on fire; it’s all more visually pleasing to the fans in the stands.

F R I D AY | 1 . 1 1 |

CHECKMATE CHILDREN

I

ntermediate School 318 is the setting for Brooklyn Castle, the much lauded documentary about five members of the national champion chess team. Watch them survive multiple budget cuts and the determination of their competitors at the Tivoli (4050 Pennsylvania, 816-561-5222) alongside The House I Live In, a documentary about America’s failure in the war on drugs. Tickets cost $8. Call 913-383-7756 or see tivolikc.com for showtimes and information. pitch.com

JANUARY 10-16, 2013

THE PITCH

13

n i k g c ht u b $1.00 per game $1.00 per shoes $1.00 10oz Rolling Rock or PBR Draft Beer $1.00 food specials at Strike Zone Grill

SUNDAY: MISSION

8pm to Midnight

OLATHE 8pm to 11pm

missionbowl.com 5399 MARTWAY MISSION, KS 913.432.7000

1020 S. WEAVER ST. OLATHE, KS 913.782.0279

new Year’S reSOLutiOn:

Learn to be more

Need a drink?

continued from page 13 hope that when people leave, they are not only made aware of what is happening here locally, but they felt called to action in whatever capacity that means for them,” Shelton says. For more information, see onebyoneproject.org.

S AT U R D AY | 1 . 12 | GET IN SHAPE, GIRL

This year is the 100th anniversary of Delta Sigma Theta, an internationally recognized black sorority with a commitment to physical and mental health. To this end, the Kansas City, Missouri, Alumnae Chapter is hosting today’s Total Woman: Mind, Body and Spirit Health Fair for Women and Girls at the Linwood Family YMCA (3800 East Linwood Boulevard, 816-923-5675). “To commemorate this monumental achievement, we wanted to host an event that is representative of our organization as a whole: sisterhood, service and sacrifice to the communities we serve,” says Danielle Jenkins, the chapter’s community action committee co-chairwoman. Participate in health screenings, Zumba sessions, expert talks and more from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Admission is free. For more information, see dstkcmo.org.

F R I D AY | 1 . 1 1 |

fLexibLe

Open

Our Studio program offers:

Check out P

Beginning Ballet, ZUMBA®, Jazz, Yoga & more with the best teachers in town!

Mobile HAPPY HOUR APP

Call 816-931-2299 for a class schedule:

Broadway

I-3

5

Find Happy Hours by: Time, Feature, Name or Location on your IPhone, Blackberry or Android

Union Station

Pershing Rd.

Bolender Center 500 W. Pershing Rd. Kansas City, MO

14

THE PITCH

JANUARY 10-16, 2013

pitch.com

cutline here

OOKIKU FURIKABUTTE

to possibilities

LOVERBOYS

T

here aren’t enough column inches to cover the concepts and subgenres of yaoi, the Japanese term for illustrated, homoerotic fan fiction generally written for women by women. Matt Weston and Jared Presler’s vision for the first annual Ahn!Con, the Midwest Yaoi Convention is for it to grow into a sort of “gay-geek event.” “In my experience, most yaoi takes graphic novels and fits them into the same niche as romance novels,” Weston says. “If you want it to be a substitute for porn, you can find explicit yaoi. But with the censorship laws Japan has, it’s hard to find, and most sex scenes never show much.” Explore more starting at 2 p.m. today. It goes through Sunday at the Ramada Conference Center (1601 North Universal Avenue, 816-245-5500). See ahn-con.com for more information.

get a Fabulous jump start on your Wedding planning!

Y S U N DA

1 .1 2

tion rmina d dete Dogge . ll tle Ha at Bar

SUNDAY FEBRUARY 10, 2013 10AM UNTIL 4PM OVERLAND PARK CONVENTION CENTER 6000 COLLEGE BOULEVARD OVERLAND PARK, KS

S U N D AY | 1 . 13 | I’M ON A BOAT

Want to schedule a hunting expedition in Africa? Is it time to turn your latest grizzly bear kill into a luxurious living-room rug? How about joining the International Federation of Black Bass Anglers? You can do all of this at the KC Boat & Sportshow at Bartle Hall (301 West 13th Street). For the more casual outdoor types, there are DockDogs competitions, outdoor cooking demos, a catch-andrelease fishing pond for kids, a 5,000-gallon aquarium full of native fish, and possibly the most awesome thing ever: a free scubadiving session for anyone 10 and older. Tickets cost $10 for adults, and those 15 and younger get in free. The four-day event ends today, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. See a full schedule and exhibitor list at kansascitysportshow.com.

M O N D AY | 1 . 1 4 | TAKING BACK MONDAY

The Bottleneck’s Monday-night house band, Sovereign States, remembers ’90s rock for you — and with you. If you’ve ever wanted to sing a 10- or 15-year-old pop-punk hit in person with musicians, write the words on your hand and get up there. “ ‘Devotion and Desire’ by Bayside, ‘My Friends Over You’ by New Found Glory and ‘Cute Without the E’ by Taking Back Sunday are really popular with the crowd,” says the States’ Quinn Brabender. If you’re ready to shine, e-mail Brabender at sovereignstatesband@gmail.com before Monday, or show up at the Bottleneck (737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483) a little early to sign up. Show starts at 11. Need a shot of confidence? Order a $2.50 Bud or well special.

offers eight different types of tacos (from 99 cents to $2.50) and four varieties of “overstuffed burritos” (from $4.50 to $6.50) to pair with $3 Mexican beers and margaritas, $3.50 Lime-A-Ritas and $4 Sauza Hornitos shots all day long. Moxie Bar & Grill (4011 North Oak Trafficway, 816-455-9600) hooks you up with $3 Corona bottles and $4.99 taco platters and taco salads. Tanner’s Bar & Grill (10146 West 119th Street, Overland Park, 913-345-1217) sells hard-shell and soft-shell beef tacos (99 cents and $1.49) and Lots-O-Nacho platters and Tannerito burritos for $5.99. Domestic draws, bottles and wells are half-price from 4 to 7 p.m.

GIVEAWAYS

HONEYMOON 14 WEDDING GOWNS 6 GROOM'S RINGS $3000 PWG BUCKS

2 Stunning Runway Shows!

$500

PW G BU CK S HI DD EN IN ON E OF TH E FIR ST

10 0

BR IDE BA GS AT RE GI ST R AT IO N

PRE-REGISTER & BOGO TICKETS AT KC.PWG.COM

W E D N E S D AY | 1 . 16 | FANTASY IN F MINOR

With its 5,548 pipes, the Julia Irene Kauffman Casavant Organ, Opus 3875, could easily be the crown jewel of the Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts (1601 Broadway, 816-994-7200). Tonight, Helzberg Hall resonates with sounds of the instrument, designed in the French romantic tradition, when Dr. Jan Kraybill plays her inaugural recital at 8 p.m. But first, she is joined by Michael Barone, host of American Public Media’s Pipedreams (the only nationally distributed weekly radio program celebrating the art of the pipe organ), for an hourlong discussion and Q&A session at 7. Tickets cost $25 or $35. See kcsymphony.org.

THE ULTIMATE INTERACTIVE MUSIC EXPERIENCE.

T U E S D AY | 1 . 15 |

HAPPY-HOUR HIT LIST: TACO TUESDAY

Why does Taco John’s serve Potato Olés instead of chicharrones? Is 2013 the year you try a brain or tongue taco? Is there a bigger taco gimmick than the Doritos Locos Taco? Ponder these questions and other tortillawrapped mysteries at one of these cheaptaco-and-cocktail joints. Maloneys Sports Bar & Grill (7201 West 79th Street, Overland Park, 913-385-9595)

KANSAS CITY’s largest and most popular bridal show Meet over 180 of KC’s Wedding Experts Relax & Enjoy

ONLY AT UNION STATION TICKETS START AT $8*. BUY TICKETS AT

UNIONSTATION.ORG

Some set of pipes on that one.

FOLLOW US ON E-mail submissions to Filter editor Berry Anderson at calendar@pitch.com. Search our complete listings guide online at pitch.com.

*member

pitch.com

JANUARY 10-16, 2013

price

THE PITCH

15

Need some

S TA G E

EAR CANDY? HARDCORE COMEDY

Mick Foley is in KCK to tell his funniest wrestling road stories.

BY

JUS T IN K E NDA L L

I

Sign up for MUSIC NEWSLETTER

Want to be part of the

IN CROWD? Sign up for

PROMOTIONAL NEWSLETTER

16

THE PITCH

JANUARY 10-16, 2013

n the wacky and wicked world of professional wrestling, Mick Foley is regarded as the hardcore legend. Known for his multiple personalities — brawler Cactus Jack, ’70s burnout Dude Love and maniacal Mankind — Foley left fans wondering if he felt pain as his opponents battered him with barbed-wire baseball bats and steel chairs or threw him off — and through — a 16-foot steel cage known as Hell in a Cell. Mrs. Foley’s Baby Boy didn’t just win over fans with his bloody brawls. He proved to be the funniest grappler in the game, dispatching his enemies with his tube-sock tag-team partner, Mr. Socko. His humorous autobiographies became best-sellers. So it’s no surprise that Foley’s life after competing in wrestling rings has led him to comedy festivals and clubs around the world, including a two-night, fourshow performance January 11–12 at Stanford’s Comedy Club. (Shows are at 7:45 and 9:45 p.m. Tickets cost $15–$50.) Fourteen years to the day after WWE televised his first WWE Championship victory over the Rock, Foley spoke with The Pitch. The Pitch: What’s pushing you to try your hand at comedy? Foley: I really enjoy being up onstage. It reminds me of my days as commissioner in WWE in 2000 when I had a microphone and could here, that means that it’s different. It’s not the type of show that casual comedy fans basically say anything I wanted to. I miss those wander into. So it’s really going to take some days, so I take advantage of the opportunity to participation from my wrestling audience to re-create that feeling. make these shows work. Who comes to the shows? Your name has been thrown out as the first It is predominantly a wrestling audience, but I try to make it very welcoming to those inductee in the 2013 WWE Hall of Fame class. What would that mean to you? brave enough to wander in from the cold. ProbIt would mean that the rumors that I started ably my favorite review of one of my shows was spreading about it were effrom a decidedly non-wresfective. It would be a huge tling fan, reviewing me for a Mick Foley honor, especially in Madidecidedly non-wrestling onJanuary 11–12 son Square Garden. WWE line magazine called BroadStanford's Comedy Club does a great job of trying to way Babies. Her final line 1867 Village West Parkway induct people in geographic was, “If you’re interested Kansas City, Kansas areas that mean something in wrestling, you’ll love it. 913-400-7500 stanfordscomedyclub.com to them. For me, being inAnd if you’re not, you’ll like ducted in an arena that I speit.” A lot of reviewers have cifically used to hitchhike to gone out of their way to state and take trains alone to would be a great honor. that they enjoyed the show despite not being a In wrestling, the peak is being champion or wrestling fan. I take a lot of pride in that. main-eventing WrestleMania. What is your How much of your act is wrestling stories? WrestleMania of comedy? Almost all of it. And if it’s not a wrestling I really enjoyed a couple of my Edinburgh story, I try to base it on something that I learned shows last summer, and I enjoyed my Montreal during my 27 years on the road traveling the shows. I think the idea that I could go into the world. Basically, if people have enjoyed my books, which had plenty of non-wrestling sto- two biggest and most prestigious comedy festivals in the world and impress people in the ries in them, they’ll enjoy the shows. comedy world and be accepted by people in Are you finding that you enjoy this as much that world as being a good performer, as opas wrestling? It’s not a vast departure. It’s just an exten- posed to a curiosity, was probably my WrestleMania moment in comedy so far — until I set sion of wrestling. Do I enjoy coming to Kansas City as much foot on the stage of Stanford’s. Louis C.K. has famously gone out of his way as I enjoyed winning the WWE title 14 years ago? Nothing’s going to stack up to that. But I to say how much he hates Kansas City. [Laughs.] That’s right. He had that great spot really enjoy it. I’ll be cutting way back in 2013 with the morning zoo. on the number of dates I do. I believe KC is the Do you have any reservations about comfirst show where I’m doing multiple dates. It’s usually one and out. The idea of doing four ing to KC?

pitch.com

Comedy: one giant leap for Mankind Not until you mentioned that. I don’t know. Did he single it out on any occasion other than that? Yeah, he went on The Tonight Show and told Jay Leno how much he hated coming to Kansas City, that it’s a dump and he wasn’t telling the people anything they didn’t already know. Then he worked it into an episode of his FX show with the morning zoo. But he kept plugging Stanford’s. No kidding. I met Louis years ago. He’s a big wrestling fan. And I was asked to be on the show, and I couldn’t get the time off — this was a few years ago before I went back to WWE. Wish I’d have done it. I’ll have to judge for myself. You end up making your own good time. I’ve had some of my best times in comedy with some of the smallest crowds in some of the worst places. I’m not calling Stanford’s one of the worst places by any means as I’ve never been there. They had the faith to book me for four shows in two nights, so I’m looking forward to it. Probably now more than ever.

E-mail justin.kendall@pitch.com

STONE SOUP SUPPER Help the Metropolitan Ensemble Theatre keep the heat on. For a minimum donation of $10, feed on soup and salad, prepared by MET actors and supporters, from 6 to 8 p.m. Monday, January 14, in the MET lobby (3614 Main). Call 816-569-3226 or see metkc.org for more information. Proceeds go, MET says, “directly to the furnace.” pitch.com

MONTH

ART

REVERENCE, IRREVERENCE

BY

THER E S A B EMBNI S T E R

Mark McHenry’s sculptures inspire awe, while Layet Johnson’s get laughs.

, ve sing i o t l r dve . you a , Do d .. g n n i a t ng rke nni ma a l nt p eve

P If you have an interest in marketing/advertising and are able to receive college credit, then you are in luck! P is looking for an intern who is able to handle multiple projects at once and experienced in MS Excel/ Word. If you qualify, send your resume to: jason.dockery@pitch.com

M

ark McHenry designs buildings for a Above: “X” (left) and “Fireplace 2” living, but you wouldn’t guess that by by Layet Johnson; right: “#6” by looking at his six sculptures on display at the Mark McHenry Late Show. The exhibition is so solid that it’s difficult to picture McHenry doing anything “Sculpture #5” showcases his talent for balbut making work in a studio. It’s also surprising anced design, with a configuration that’s both to learn, then, that those six sculptures make planar and angular. A post connected to a slab up his entire artistic output. of concrete supports a wishbone-shaped form, McHenry has worked as an architect in from which another post rises at a 90-degree Kansas City since 1987, but this is his firstangle. Two more posts jut forward from the ever solo gallery exhibition anywhere. A fall front of the wishbone as ropes loop in and out 2011 American Institute of Architects Art by of metal rings attached to the pole, securing Architects show included one of his sculptures, another form that resembles an upside-down which caught the eye of Tom Deatherage, sickle and hammer. Late Show gallerist, through the window of the McHenry’s Late Show exhibition is a strong AIA office. (The architect also makes furniture debut from an accomplished artist. Another and musical instruments in his spare time.) four decades would be an unfair wait to see McHenry made these big, abstract sculpmore from him. tures over the past 40 years, assembling much of the work from salvaged, rough-sawn walnut that he and his father purchased at he five sculptures and single print in Little a farm auction in the mid-1970s. The artistRock, Arkansas, artist Layet Johnson’s architect incorporates other materials colsolo exhibition are ludicrous — which is the lected from buildings, too, including metal, point. His entertaining show, Sacred Jests, limestone and rope. He reregisters as a series of quick, fashions these weathered, witty one-liners, starting Mark McHenry: Sculpture reused bits and pieces into with the conceptual play in Through January 31 sculptures large enough to its title’s two loaded words. The Late Show Gallery dominate a room, pieces Johnson likes paradox, 1600 Cherry, 816-474-1300 that would refuse to get and he finds it by combinlost even in an open, rural ing contradictory qualities Sacred Jests: landscape. to make his art. The sculpLayet Johnson His sculptures demonture “Bob Saves” consists of Through January 22 strate many qualities that the letters spelling the word Invisible Hand Gallery one would expect from an slack carved out of marble — 846 Pennsylvania, Lawrence 785-813-1803 architect: attention to decomplete with a surface texinvisiblehandgallery.com tail, a sense of scale, a sure ture that appears to include control of disparate formal chisel marks — sitting on the elements, a deep undergallery floor. But no slacker standing of his materials. The latter shines would choose to make artwork out of such a through in “Sculpture #2,” which suggests heavy, expensive, labor-intensive medium. a pommel horse in shape. Its hand-carved Some of the sculptures here rob would-be texture allows the wood’s natural color to aputilitarian objects of their usual jobs. In “Firepear underneath the darker stain, signaling place No. 2” and “Fireplace No. 3,” Johnson McHenry’s reference for the salvaged walnut’s places ceramic logs on top of grates created natural beauty. with slender steel cylinders. The clay logs have

T

If you are goIng to go out, you mIght as well get paId seen the inside of a kiln that reaches temperatures in the thousands of degrees, but that means they’re useless as fuel. They’ve been fired but won’t burn. The joke continues in “X,” an altered wheelchair with a seat as long as a church pew. It’s an aid vehicle capable of helping no one, with wheels and handles so far apart that maneuvering the contraption would take two people. With this piece, especially, Johnson suffuses his drollness with futility and disappointment. “Read Cabinet Like MAD” hits a more specific target. Johnson has taken the fall 2012 issue of Cabinet, a quarterly art and culture magazine, and creased each interior page as though toying with one of Al Jaffee’s classic Mad magazine Fold-Ins, altering the source’s sentences and photos so that they run together in nonsensical ways. An overt reference to a beloved source of juvenile humor, “Cabinet” is also Johnson’s method for subverting information in a magazine that takes itself seriously. It’s an arty gag whose ingredients — setup, punch line, callback — are well-attuned to a form with its own time-honored strictures: the joke.

E-mail feedback@pitch.com

YOU MUST: * BE RELIABLE * BE AVAILABLE NIGHTS & WEEKENDS * OWN TRANSPORTATION

To find out more, check out or send your resumé to streetteam@pitch.com

pitch.com 0 - 1 6X, , 2200103X TTHHEE PPI ITTCCHH 17 pitch.com J AMNOUNATRHY X1X–X 1

FIND MOVIE TIMES P ON

LEGENDS 1867 VILLAGE WEST • NEXT TO DAVE & BUSTERS

MICK FOLLEYJAN 11-12 7:45 & 9:45 MANKIND • STOLE THE COMEDY

2 SHOWS NIGHTLY

SHOW AT MONTREAL • LARGER CROWDS THAN CHELSEA, LEWIS BLACK & JIM JEFFERIES • MEET & GREET AFTER THE SHOW

p

COMING UP!

DOV DAVIDOFF 1/30-2/2 DAVE COULIER 2/7-2/9 JIMMY JJ WALKER 2/13-2/17 JOSH WOLF - CHELSEA LATELY STAR 2/22-2/23

SPONSORED BY HOLLYWOOD CASINO FALL COMEDY SERIES TUE-SUN 7:45PM & 9:45PM 913.400.7500 WWW.STANFORDSCOMEDYCLUB.COM

®

DRAMA

BEST Picture Best director Best actress Best screenplay

DRAMA

4

G OLDEN G LOBE NOM IN ATIONS kathRyn bigelow m a r k b o a l jessica chastain

★★★★

-PETER TRAVERS,

408 Armour Rd. NKC, MO. 64116 816.421.9700 www.Screenland.com/Armour

Stanley Kubrick Retrospective FULL METAL JACKET: JAN 14 THE SHINING: JAN 21 DR. STRANGELOVE: JAN 28

COLUMBIA PICTURES PRESENTS A KATHRYN BIGELOW FILM “ZERO DARK THIRTY” JESSIEXECUTIVECA CHASTAIN JASON CLARKE JOEL EDGERTON MUSIC BY ALEXANDRE DESPLAT PRODUCERS COLIN WILSON TED SCHIPPER GREG SHAPIRO PRODUCED WRITTEN BY MARK BOAL KATHRYN BIGELOW MEGAN ELLISON BY MARK BOAL DIRECTED BY KATHRYN BIGELOW starts friday, january 11 18

THE PITCH

JANUARY 10-16, 2013

pitch.com

CHECK LOCAL LISTINGS FOR THEATERS AND SHOWTIMES

Screenland Roasts BATMAN AND ROBIN: JAN 18 Bigscreen Classics

GONE WITH THE WIND: JAN 19 BEETLEJUICE: JAN 26

HomeGrown Comedy Tour

WITH AJ FINNEY, DUSTIN KAUFMAN AND THE CALAMITY CUBES: JAN 31

Judah Friedlander: Feb 9 Trivia: EVERY WEDNESDAY AT 7PM Sunday Night: &VIDEO GAMES ON THE BIG SCREEN BOARD GAMES 7PM

FILM

STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE

BY

MIC H AEL S I CI NS KI

INVITES YOU TO A SPECIAL ADVANCE SCREENING!

Torture isn’t what’s most troubling about Zero Dark Thirty.

TUESDAY, JANUARY 15 – 7:30 PM

Left: Chastain; above: Chris Pratt and Joel Edgerton

K

athryn Bigelow’s Zero Dark Thirty has already become a popular talking point for elected officials, smug pundits and other self-appointed guardians of our national innocence. From outraged leftist blogs all the way to the floor of the Senate, people are asking: Does ZDT make a clear case that the torture of al-Qaida–affiliated detainees provided specific information leading to the location and killing of Osama bin Laden? So many answers are floating around the contemporary Van Allen belt of bloviation that I hesitate to add any more air, hot or cold. But the media flap has forced us to overlook some MORE equally important considerations. Has the OscarT winning director made a A E IN ONL .COM work of ham-fisted, proPITCH Bushie propaganda, or is ZDT a complex, ambivalent work of art that abjures easy answers? After two viewings, I am inclined to say neither. Zero Dark Thirty chronicles various phases in the hunt for bin Laden — from roughly 2003 through the siege on his Abbottabad compound in 2011. Bigelow begins the movie with audio recordings of 9/11, and her film takes care to punctuate its bin Laden-centered detective story with clearly labeled, meticulously staged al-Qaida hits (the July 2005 London bombings, the 2008 Marriott Islamabad attack, the suicide bombing at Camp Chapman), as if to indicate by sequence and concatenation that bin Laden was behind each. It’s a narrative staged almost exclusively through the point of view of a young CIA operative named Maya (Jessica Chastain), no last name given. She is fictional, a composite of many CIA employees involved in bringing bin Laden to justice, and her lack of stated personal history and her relentless drive to get bin Laden make her ideal to Bigelow’s needs.

FILM

Maya is the perfect point of identification for a film that, without some finesse, could have bewildered audiences, stranding them in procedural arcana. Because she is essentially a blank, though, either side of the torture debate can claim her as a figure of pro-torture propaganda or poker-faced rebuke. Yes, the movie says, torture happened. And, yes, we got bin Laden. But did torture give us bin Laden? This is where our political thinking collildes with Hollywood film style, our favored means of turning complex events into easily digested storytelling. ZDT could be said to depict the transition from a Bush-Cheney doctrine to an Obama doctrine, marking a hinge, a moment when the CIA had to turn a corner into a more technological (and technocratic) form of intelligence gathering than mere torture. ZDT clearly depicts actionable intel resulting from so-called enhanced interrogation. It also depicts a CIA that grasps (not without some carping) that its day is done. Maya embodies this change. But in creating Maya, and articulating these pivotal events through the lens of Chastain’s charisma, writer Mark Boal and director Bigelow have performed a sleight of hand. Presenting this attractive composite as the face of the CIA apparatus demands an unproblematic identification with both the CIA and the hunt for bin Laden. It also lets us lose sight of the broader stakes. One of the things that ZDT takes as a given, just as Maya does, is that “getting bin Laden” was always worth it, no matter the cost. In practical terms, bin Laden had long since been sidelined in the daily activities of al-Qaida, so his killing was a function of closure. Yet while pundits and politicians get wrapped up in whether the film “defends” torture as the means to taking him out, they are failing to examine Bigelow’s filmmaking as a rhetorical method and a symbolic form.

Many film critics and intellectuals love Bigelow because she used to be a painter and has avant-garde credentials. And, as action filmmakers go, she has a better than average command of cinematic space. The fact that she has recently turned to military subjects is not all that surprising. High-tech reconnaissance devices are the endpoint of a Renaissance perspective and its abstraction of lived space into mappable patterns and fields. Nevertheless, her storytelling exhibits a fascination with power, particularly male power. On the one hand, ZDT is a kind of blank slate, much like Maya — content to show certain things that happened, without inquiring about their meaning or providing much context. But the forms of action filmmaking inevitably provide their own explanations. The 20-minute sequence in which the SEALs raid the bin Laden compound, in almost complete darkness, is masterful filmmaking, composed in the hold-nothing-back vernacular of the blockbuster combat movie. Bigelow shows a U.S. stealth craft blowing up from four different angles, a classic multiple detonation that would make Michael Bay blush. The muscular editing, the play of sickly green light across a pitch-black screen, the tense awareness of jeopardy — she uses these familiar tools to help us cope with images of Arab women being shot. Does Zero Dark Thirty tell us that torturing our enemies is OK? It has often been said that the 9/11 attacks, which bin Laden helped organize, resembled some sort of horrible real-life Hollywood action movie. If it was necessary to track and kill bin Laden, and if it was equally necessary to perform unsavory acts to do it, it is perhaps even more necessary that those acts and that killing be depicted in a Hollywood movie. Bin Laden may have dictated the terms and form of the response to his actions. He made his “movie.” And now we have made ours.

E-mail feedback@pitch.com

LOG ON TO WWW.PITCH.COM BEGINNING THURSDAY, JANUARY 10 FOR YOUR CHANCE TO WIN A COMPLIMENTARY PASS FOR TWO. MAMA has been rated PG-13 (Parents Strongly Cautioned - Some Material May Be Inappropriate for Children Under 13) for violence and terror, some disturbing images and thematic elements. No purchase Necessary. 50 passes will be distributed via a random drawing on Monday, January 14. all entries must be received by midnight on sunday, January 13. please arrive early! Theater is overbooked to ensure a full house. seats are not guaranteed, are limited to theater capacity and are first-come, first-served. everyone entering the theater must have a pass.

IN THEATERS JANUARY 18 www.mamamovie.com

WHO IS THE HOMETOWN HERO IN YOUR LIFE? THE PITCH THURSDAY 1/10/13 COLOR 2.305” x 5.291” RM ALL.MAM-P.0110.PITCH

50 webwith 2 x 7 your Email us at KANSASCITY@43KIX.COM full name, age, mailing address, and “LAST STAND” in the subject line. Tell us about the hero in your life who should win VIP seating at the advance screening on Tuesday, January 15.

Entry Deadline: Sunday, January 13 @ Midnight

THE LAST STAND IS RATED R for strong bloody violence throughout, and language. No purchase necessary. Supply limited. One winner per household. Winners will be contacted by email.

INFacebook.com/TheLastStandFilm THEATERS JANUARY 18 • @LionsgateAction

pitch.com 0 - 1 6X,, 2200103X TTHHEE PPI ITTCCHH 19 pitch.com J AMNOUNATRHY X1X–X 1 THE PITCH WEDNESDAY 01/09/13 B&W 2.305” x 5.291” RM ALL.LST-P.0109.PITCH

LOCALLY GROWN, DELICIOUSLY PREPARED! gluten-free, vegetarian, and dairy-free options Specialty Baked Goods

PITCH READERS

EAT IN • TAKE OUT 1209 W. 47th Street Kansas City, MO 64112 816.401.4483 facebook.com/JohnnyJosPizza

BUY ONE 2 PIECE MEAL GET ONE FREE!

COOKED TO ORDER

PLEASE ALLOW 15-20 MIN

WWW.FIGTREECAFELS.COM VOTED BEST DESSERTS 817 NE Rice Road, Lee Summit | 816.347.0442

816.753.8200 3605 BROADWAY KCMO

JUST SOUTH OF THE SPRINT CENTER

1501 GRAND BLVD KANSAS CITY, MO 64108

WWW.DUKESONGRAND.COM

816.527.0122

Offer expires January 18, 2013. Discounted item must be of equal or lesser value.

Hours of Operation: 5pm-10pm Mon-Sat Closed Sunday

Are you a

FOODIE? Sign up for DINING NEWSLETTER

couscous•tagines•kabobs

• HA PPY HOU R •

$2 HOUSE LIQUORS AND DOMESTIC BEERS •

• MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY 4-7 PM • • SATURDAY 11PM -1AM • SUNDAY FUN DAY ALL DAY •

M-TH 11-10PM | F-SAT 11-11PM | SUN 12-9PM

4116 Broadway Street|KCMO|816.753.7520 marrakechcafekc.com

• MENTION THIS AD FOR 10% OFF •

EXCLUDES OTHER SPECIALS. EXPIRES 1/31/13

Restaurant & Bar

Come take the chill off!

| 816 816.988.7958 8 16..98 16 988 8.79 .795 58

11867 8 6 7 SW S W SState t a t e Route R ou outt e 77,, Blue B lue Springs, S pring pringss M MOO EXTREME TRIVIA ON THURSDAY Mon-Wed 11am - 12:30am Thurs-Sat 11am - 1:30am Sun 11am - 12am

Blue Springs’ Favorite Family Restaurant Happy Hour: 3-6pm & 9pm-close

EAT

Breakfast

Catering

& Lunch

Gift Baskets

Breakfast: Mon-Sat 7:00am-Noon, Sun 8:00am-1:30pm Lunch: Mon-Sat 11-3pm, Sun 11-1:30pm

409 W. Gregory, KCMO (816) 444-1933 • www.theclassiccookie.com

LUNCH BUFFET

Monday - Friday S HUMUO GYR EL FALAFAB KAB

LOCAL withiends fr

MONDAY NIGHTS BOGO BUY ONE PIZZA GET ONE EQUAL OR LESSER VALUE 20

THE PITCH

JANUARY 10-16, 2013

pitch.com > Restaurants > Restaurant Guide

pitch.com

THE ONLY EGYPTIAN BUFFET IN KC!

LITTLE

EGYPT R e s t a u r a n t

3927 BROADWAY | KC, MO

816-753-8998

how

CAFÉ

SQUARE MEALS

Vivilore piles on the oldschool style in Independence.

BY

CHARLES FERRUZZA

Vivilore • 10815 East Winner Road, Independence, 816-836-2222 • Hours: Lunch 11 a.m.–5 p.m. Tuesday–Saturday; dinner 5–9 p.m. Tuesday–Thursday, 5–10 p.m. Friday–Saturday; closed Sunday–Monday • Price: $$–$$$

I

n a 1904 volume titled Vivilore: The Pathway to Mental and Physical Perfection, Mary Ries Melendy writes: “A complexion of cream and roses cannot be expected to result from a diet of pork, pastry and preserves.” As advice from old self-help manuals goes (this one’s subtitle: The Twentieth Century Book for Every Woman), that’s pretty sound. Keep it in mind, perhaps, at Vivilore, the restaurant (and event space, gift shop and art gallery) that brother-and-sister owners Whit Ross and Cindy Foster have opened in Independence’s MORE Englewood Arts District. They named their fivemonth-old spot with T A INE ONL .COM Melendy’s title in mind, H C PIT but maybe not her counsel: Pork and pastries are on the menu, which might present more dangers to the waistline than to the complexion. “It’s full of old wives’ tales about health and beauty and what women should do on their wedding night,” Ross says of the book. “Disappointment too deep to be expressed comes to the bride,” Melendy advises, “who has found herself in the embrace of a human gorilla.” A human gorilla, like the proverbial bull in a china shop, might be cautioned against muscling into Vivilore, where paintings in gilded frames are hung on every wall, and delicate antique china and fragile knickknacks occupy nearly every available surface. Having a meal in one of the street-level dining rooms is like eating in a set designed for a Merchant Ivory film. And though Vivilore may look prissy, it’s a terrific small-town dining room. Englewood isn’t short on quirky charm. The arts district has a 1940s movie theater that may yet reopen, a wonderful old-fashioned diner (the Englewood Café, which serves the best homemade pies in Kansas City) and a very good South American café and market. Vivilore gives the neighborhood a snazzy alternative to chicken-fried steak and green beans, and it also saves one of the more fascinating architectural artifacts in the area. Until the 1980s, the townhouselike structure, with its immense front doors and big windows, was the showroom for one of the classiest interior-design firms in the Midwest: Sermon-Anderson Inc. It was T. Sermon (the son of a former Independence mayor) and his partner, Mitch Anderson, who ripped the front off a 1928 bungalow in 1969 and replaced the façade with a brick Butler building. The entrance hall is paneled in rare pecky cypress — one of the few details left from the days when Sermon and Anderson entertained wealthy customers and celebrities (“Jim Nabors was one of their friends,” Ross says) with cocktails and decorating advice. After the decorators died, in the early 1990s, their offbeat structure fell on hard times. “It was in very poor condition when

ANGELA C. BOND

CAFÉ

Cindy and I bought the building,” Ross says. Dillon may break the rules by using chopped “The roof was leaking, the electric work was cucumber — according to a Maine chef who dined with me here, classic lobster salad can antique, there was no air conditioning and the be dressed only with mayonnaise, pepper plumbing was shot. We spent thousands of dollars just bringing the building up to code.” and salt — but her lobster salad, tucked into yeasty rolls split down the center, works. It also had no kitchen — which would have I have a couple of quibbles with Vivilore. been a problem for veteran chef Hope Dillon Meals are served with a basket of baguette (the Grille on Broadway, Poco’s Latin American slices and a little dollop of pecan butter, but the Grill), one of Ross and Foster’s first hires for their dream restaurant. But Dillon now over- tawny concoction that dominates the bread is a strange, gooey banana jam that calls for hot sees a smartly outfitted commercial kitchen, biscuits rather than Gallic crusts. And another big enough to handle both the main dining of Dillon’s French touches needs a little atroom and the sunny banquet room on the third tention. On the starters list is floor. (At least I think it’s the that 1970s favorite, coquille third floor; Vivilore seems to Vivilore St. Jacques: browned scalhave as many sets of stairs as Wild-mushroom lops in creamy wine sauce. the Eiffel Tower). cheesecake........................$10 “Is the dish made with A talented chef who has Coquille St. Jacques ..........$12 the little bay scallops or the never really gotten her due Lamb shank ........................$22 fat sea scallops?” asked one over the years, Dillon has Pork porterhouse ............. $28 Polenta .................................$15 of my dining companions. crafted imaginative but Apple cake............................. $7 “The little bay scallops,” accessible lunch and dinthe waitress assured my ner menus. Her spin on the friend. The same server was standby Reuben, for instrangely silent when she served the dish, prestance, tops house-cured pastrami with a slice pared with big scallops sliced into quarters. of creamy fontina cheese and a heap of “slaw” These are small gripes, however. Dillon’s (marinated red cabbage, apples and red onion simmered in a reduction of apple-cider and days of cooking with the late, great Lorenza “Poco” Gutierrez are reflected in several balsamic vinegars). It’s wonderful, one of the dishes, including an outstanding, fork-tender best versions of this sandwich in town. pork porterhouse, flattered by its glaze of There’s nothing more boring than a grilled bourbon-ancho-chile sauce. I also like her chicken breast, but Dillon gives her bird a steamed tamales, made with profoundly Southwestern drawl, slathering the tender assertive French Comté cheese. And the meat with a sultry, tart blanket of fresh salsalamb-shank osso buco, served with a silky verde paste and feta cheese and serving it mushroom risotto, is succulent enough to with a sweet, fluffy corn pudding. The lobster rolls are almost authentic but fully delicious. make you consider gnawing on the bone.

Seeking perfection: the pastrami Reuben (left) and lemon cake with berries (above) My favorite starter is a mushroom “cheesecake”: a hot, bubbly casserole of cream cheese, smoked gouda, mushrooms, peppers and onion. It’s an addictively fine excuse to eat more bread. It’s vegetarian-friendly, but the menu here doesn’t offer much else for meatless diners. In addition to the tamales, the other vegetarian entrée — triangles of airy baked polenta — are satisfying, thanks to a hearty mushroom sauce. And a delectable meal can be made from Dillon’s best side dish: a mash of roasted root vegetables including golden beets, parsnips, red onion, carrots, potatoes and sweet potatoes. It’s buttery and comforting. The dessert list changes frequently. I was underwhelmed by a dry triangle of an alleged “chocolate torte” but seduced by a slab of crumbly, fresh apple cake. It’s easy to eat too much at Vivilore, which must have the namesake’s author spinning in her grave. After all, she spends two chapters discussing a “beauty diet” that recommends small portions, very little meat, and lots of fruits and vegetables.” “She was way ahead of her time,” Ross says. Vivilore is not ahead of its time, and it isn’t supposed to be. It’s a throwback to a time when people wanted to eat in gracious, genteel dining rooms, places with soft music and banana jam.

Have a suggestion for a restaurant The Pitch should review? E-mail charles.ferruzza@pitch.com

pitch.com 0 - 1 6X,, 2200103X TTHHEE PPI ITTCCHH 21 pitch.com J AMNOUNATRHY X1X–X 1

A CANDY-COATED COMPETITION TO NAME

KANSAS CITY’S SWEETHEART

P p

FAT C I T Y

CRAFT EXPRESS

Bier Station taps into Armour Hills.

BY

JON AT H A N BENDER

HAWAIIAN PUNCH

T

FEB 21

2013

6-8PM

Info on tickets & sampling your sweets call

816-561-6061

NOW OPEN Any Meal. Any Time.

24/7

IN WESTPORT 3959 Broadway 816.931.3333 HuddleHouse.com

22

THE PITCH

JANUARY 10-16, 2013

S A B R I N A S TA I R E S

@

Y

ou want a taste?” John Couture asks, gesCouture mans the beer board. turing to a line of 21 taps. He reaches for “Our goal is to have fun, rotate the taps a small, silo-shaped glass. and make sure you can always find something I do. And I’m not alone — there has been new,” Isch says. a constant flow of curious drinkers at Bier “Brad has a fantastic eye for the unusual,” Station, the Armour Hills bottle shop and craftCouture adds. beer bar that Couture opened in late December. So do the customers so far. “The craft-beer “We opened on a Saturday, and when my wife pulled into the parking lot, there were demographic is much wider than I expected,” Couture says. “We had this people sitting in idling cars die-hard beer-geek grandma waiting to get in,” Couture Bier Station in here the other night grabsays. “It’s been steady dur120 East Gregory Boulevard, bing these obscure Belgian ing the day, and then as soon bierstation.com beers.” as people get off work, it’s, Hours: 11 a.m.–11 p.m. Bavarian-style pretzels like, boom.” Monday–Thursday and 11 a.m.–midnight hang from opaque pegs Part of why the place feels Friday–Saturday behind a Lucite window in busy is that the bar itself — the small kitchen just off with its meadow-green backthe bar, a display made by splash and an appealing look Farm to Market, which also makes the edidesigned to mirror Marienplatz, a train station in Munich — is the only place to get service ble pretzels that can be ordered here. A jalapeño-cheddar version is an early top seller, here. Bier Station has forsaken waitstaff in faas is a dipping sauce made with Deschutes vor of full-tilt beer geekery. A hand-lettered Obsidian Stout and Dijon mustard. (The chalkboard explains how the shop works: Draft other dips: cheese, garlic aïoli, and yellow and bottled beer are poured on-site, and botmustard.) Bier Station also has a cheese-andtled beer is also available to-go. The bottles are stored in a row of coolers, charcuterie plate, designed by Paris Brothers. Couture says he plans to add a few light lunch with laminated tags on the shelves providing options. descriptions of each beer and recommended On a January Thursday, Couture hands me food pairings. Beer by the glass is priced as it a tulip glass of Evil Twin Über Tart, a Shirley would be at most other bars around town, and Temple–colored sour beer. The half-dozen or six-packs to-go cost what they might at a liquor so patrons in the room are putting off their store, with one exception. after-lunch return to work or conducting a “We’ve really focused on trying to keep our pricing down for our bombers and 750 ml deal over a cold one. Couture and Jake Iversen bottles,” Couture says. “We want people to be are behind the bar pouring samples, eager to find out about their customers and the beers able to sample and share.” they prefer. What you sample or share falls to Brad It’s a little after 4 p.m., and Bier Station Isch. Couture has hired the former Royal Liquor manager to help curate the beer cool- is starting to get crowded. Between pours, ers and taps. Isch’s longstanding relation- Couture chats with a woman from Pittsburgh. ships with distributors and breweries have Her husband is interviewing with the Kansas already brought Bier Station limited releases City Chiefs, and she’s here on a recommendafrom regional breweries, such as St. Louis’ 4 tion from a Flying Saucer bartender. A few seats down, two men in baseball caps lament Hands Brewing Co. The 21st tap, which Isch has nicknamed “the wild one,” isn’t listed on the Chiefs’ performance this season. All of them could be sharing a bench in a busy train the rotating menu board. He intends to stock station. The men move on from football to it with small-run barrels and styles meant to push beer drinkers’ boundaries. The tap debate the hop profile of what they’re drinksystem, installed by Boulevard, is built to ing. It’s the kind of conversation you can have when there’s no train to catch. hold as many as 40 taps.

pitch.com

he days of the average wheat-threshing, meat-eating midlander pining for the craft brews of his honeymoon are over. Kona Brewing Co. is surfing onto shelves and taps across the Kansas City area over the next week. Fat City said aloha to Mattson Davis, the president of Kona Brewing, to ask what KC drinkers can expect from the Hawaiian import. The Pitch: Is there a beer that you would recommend to those unfamiliar with Kona, for them to get a sense of your brewery? Davis: Longboard Island Lager is our flagship beer, and medalwise it’s the most decorated Kona brew in our portfolio. It’s also usually craft-beer drinkers’ first taste of liquid aloha. Longboard Lager is a great session beer and goes down extra easy on a hot day. Second to Longboard would be Big Wave Golden Ale for a beer that really sums up the Hawaiian experience. For ale lovers, this beer has pronounced citrus notes and has won over locals in Hawaii since we first began brewing it. Travelers to Hawaii loved it so much that they often requested it upon their return, and this summer we made it available year-round on the mainland. We have a lot of barbecue here in Kansas City. Any recommendations on pairing smoked meats (brisket, pork, ribs) with your beers? Easy. Koko Brown Ale is excellent with smoked meats and cheeses. We serve it in Hawaii with Kalua pork and spare ribs at our restaurants and pubs. Do you have a sense of the Midwest drinkers or why Kona might appeal to them? We have similar values when it comes to family and family gatherings around food and drink in Hawaii. We hope this will come through as Midwesterners become more familiar with Kona. Many Midwesterners have traveled to Hawaii, where they have likely had their first taste of Kona beer. Tastewise, Midwesterners have a sophisticated palate for handcrafted beers. Our brewers’ use of tropically inspired ingredients like toasted coconut, 100 percent Kona coffee, and passion fruit gives our beers a taste that’s not often found in colder climates.

E-mail jonathan.bender@pitch.com

pitch.com

MONTH

pitch.com

JANUARY 10-16, 2013

THE PITCH

23

WHERE THE BEST MUSICIANS IN THE WORLD PLAY

KNUCKLEHEADS F re e S h u tt le in S u rr o u n d in g A reth e a

MUSIC | STREETSIDE

THAT SWING

A new jazz spot takes over the old Balanca’s space in the Crossroads.

BY

D AV ID HUDN A L L

JANUARY

10: IBC Send off Party 11: Atlantic Express 11: Jason Eady 12: Platinum Express 15: John Fullbright w/ full band

16: Chase Rice 17: Rick Gibson & Pacemakers 18: Billy Joe Shaver 19: Murali Coryell 20: NACE BROTHERS

UPCOMING SHOWS 2/1: The Belairs 2/2: Trampled Under Foot 2/7: Cody Canada & The Departed 2/8: Victor Wooten THE PITCH PRESENTS: 2/9: THE BODEANS

2/14: Carrie Rodriguez 2/15: Chris Knight 2/16: ROYAL SOUTHERN BROTHERHOOD

2/21: North Mississippi Allstars 2/28: Tom Russell

For more info & tickets: knuckleheadskc.com 2715 Rochester, KCMO

816-483-1456

24

THE PITCH

JANUARY 10-16, 2013

S

saw opportunity in the shuttering of the longtiff drinks, good jazz, no homicides.” This is the pitch that John Scott gave running Plaza jazz club Jardine’s in late 2011, which created a void in the city’s jazz scene. me last Thursday night, when I stopped in to “My grandmother used to sing once a week visit his recently opened jazz lounge in the on the radio station in Atchison, Kansas, and Crossroads. The Green Lady Lounge is located at dance halls with a guy named Colorado at 1809 Grand, an address you might recognize from the police blotter: It’s the former home Pete,” Scott says. “And my Aunt Carol has been a fan of Kansas City jazz for as long as I of Balanca’s. remember. I’ve grown up with a lot of music Balanca’s had been on a wild ride over the in my life, and I’m really passionate about jazz last decade. In its early years, it catered to a downtown LGBT crowd. Over time, it morphed in particular.” His original idea was to reopen a jazz lounge into more of an anything-goes swingers scene and then into a tweaked-out swingers scene. in the old Jardine’s space, but after scouting the building and crunching the numbers, he (Contributing to the block’s overall sleaziness, decided to pass. “I think it would be tough an underground sex club reportedly operated, until recently, in the alley behind Balanca’s.) In to stay in business under the circumstances recent years, the bar began to attract, on certain at that location,” he says. “It obviously has a rich jazz history, but I don’t nights, a troublemaking hiphave enough experience to hop crowd. In 2010, a fight Mark Lowrey, have made what I’m trying broke out inside Balanca’s solo piano performance to do work there.” that spilled into the street 9 p.m.–midnight Friday, January 11 Scott’s gaze turned toand ended in the shooting wa rd dow ntow n. A f ter death of Jeremy Mott, an unlooking at a few spaces, derage patron. Owner Lori Rob Fosterhe got curious about 1809 Burroughs agreed to close Kevin Hiatt Duo, Grand. Sheri Parr, owner of the club for 45 days. This past vintage swing jazz the Brick, put him in touch March, less than 18 months 8–11 p.m. Saturday, with Burroughs, who owns after the venue reopened, January 12 the building. (Burroughs 31-year-old Wayne Steward hasn’t exited the bar busiwas shot inside Balanca’s. ness; she recently bought Norm & Betty’s, in He later died. After that, the bar slowly faded Independence.) They negotiated a deal, and the away, opening only on certain nights, before Green Lady Lounge quietly opened for busifinally closing its doors for good sometime ness in mid-December. over the summer.  At first blush, not much has changed inScott, a tall, middle-aged guy with wild eyes, has never owned a bar before, but he has side since the Balanca’s days. There are redleather booths, and a sexy veil of red lighting been doing business in Kansas City for 17 years blankets the bar. But improvements have been as the owner of Scott Fitness. Last year, he sold made. For one, it’s cleaner. And a 1940s Wm. three of his gyms to Jonetta Stewart, a business Knabe & Co. vintage baby grand is plunked partner (he still operates one in Briarcliff ), who renamed them TheGymKC. (Full disclosure: I down in the center of the room, which lends some class to the joint. Right now, at least, am constantly blasting my lats, traps and delts the ambience is on-point: a little bit of that at TheGymKC, where I am a member.) Finding Grand Boulevard seediness (you can never himself with some extra time on his hands, wash that away) paired with the nostalgic, Scott started thinking about a new venture. He

pitch.com

Downtown’s new Lady of the night middlebrow aesthetic of a jazz club. And it has a 3 a.m. liquor license, which is great news for downtown residents like me, who often find themselves lamenting the lack of non-Power & Light nightcap options. Scott says he has purposely been slow out of the gate. (“We wanted to open really soft so we had time to figure out what we don’t know and make improvements.”) But last week brought a few confirmations of regular gigs. Pianist Bram Wijnands (from whom Scott bought the bar’s piano) holds court at the Green Lady Lounge for a jazz matinee every Sunday from 4 to 7 p.m., and Mark Lowrey performs every Friday night from 9 p.m. to midnight. “I’m so freaking happy to have Mark onboard. I’ve been trying to get him down here to look at the space for months,” Scott says. Drinkswise, Scott is focusing on local beers — Boulevard and Mother’s at the moment, with plans to bring Free State and Tallgrass into the fold. For food, Kelli Daniels is moving her Good You food-truck operation down the street from Czar and is serving dinner at the Green Lady Lounge from 4 to 10 p.m. Wednesday through Sunday. (General hours for the bar are from 4 p.m. to 3 a.m. Tuesday through Sunday, though Scott says those hours might expand.) The long-term goal is to work up to six nights of live music a week, but Scott says he’s not trying to replicate the formal jazzvenue business model of Jardine’s. (He’s not charging at the door, though he allows that that, too, might change at some point for certain shows.) Scott stresses the word lounge. “I think ‘lounge’ suggests a comfortable, casual, quiet tone,” he says. “We’re not stuffy. We just want people to be comfortable, listen to some music and not shout. We’re trying to impart that this is not a fraternity party. We’re here to have a drink and relax.”

E-mail david.hudnall@pitch.com pitch.com

MONTH

pitch.com

JANUARY 10-16, 2013

THE PITCH

25

MUSIC

CREATURE COMFORTS

Man Bear, back in the ’70s power-pop

BY

wild with its latest EP, Infinity Cat.

D AV ID HUDN A L L

T

B R O O K E VA N D E V E R

here aren’t really “studio bands” anymore, at least not ones that make any money. Touring is where the profit is in the music industry these days. But for a certain type of musician, the studio remains a fun place to tool around if cashing in isn’t a high priority. Alex Courtney is one such specimen. The local trio he fronts, Man Bear, performs around town infrequently but has released three EPs in the past 15 months. “I think about us more as going the Guided By Voices route,” Courtney says. “They were putting out albums for 10 years before they started really playing live a lot. A lot of it comes down to me, I guess — I don’t like playing live as much because we can’t do stuff as a threepiece that we do on our records. Also, I don’t think I’m a competent enough guitar player or singer for live playing.” He’s being modest, though self-deprecation is part of Man Bear’s charm. The group’s sense beat, happy-go-lucky half of Big Star’s catalog. “I definitely wanted it to have a ’70s rock of humor is evident in its album titles: Talking vibe to it, yeah,” Courtney says. “For us, a Drunk at 2 a.m., Feeling Kind of Lo(Fi) and, most ’70s rock record is about bands like Big Star recently, Infinity Cat. Man Bear makes what and T. Rex as opposed to, I don’t know, REO people tend to call power-pop records, though Speedwagon or something. that’s a label that increasingly Tom Petty is another guy I requires a more precise exMan Bear, with Me think we were all thinking planation. The debut, Talking Like Bees, Gentleman about, too. There’s a song Drunk, worships at the 1990s Savage and Burrowss on Infinity Cat called ‘Gotta alt-rock altar of Superchunk. Friday, January 11, Go,’ and that’s sort of our Lo(Fi) is a fuzzy homage to at the Riot Room attempt to write a song like the Replacements. And conPetty’s ‘Hometown Blues.’ ” tinuing its pattern of working Courtney has known bassist Aaron backward through the decades, Infinity Cat is Nickless for more than a decade. They recruited Man Bear’s ode to the 1970s. It’s a tight, hookfilled record tailor-made for fans of the more up- drummer Keith Howell via Craigslist about

Riding in cars with Bears. three years ago and started rehearsing on and off, mostly for fun. In 2011, they picked up the pace and readied Talking Drunk, which they recorded with Chris Cosgrove at Cosgrove Audio. “The first one was us figuring out how you record music as a band, which took awhile,” Courtney says. “The second one we recorded ourselves — five songs scattered out across five months, recorded in our drummer’s basement and at my house on a computer. Those songs, I think, are more oddball, more like B-sides, more stylistically different than what we are probably typically going for. “With this new one, I think we’ve done something that represents us more accurately,” he continues. “Although it’s not like

there’s a ton of thought put into it — really, we just had some new songs.” Courtney says to expect another Man Bear EP relatively soon. “The way the business works now, I think it’s good to keep a steady stream of content coming out, and EPs are good for that,” he says. “They’re fast and easy. We could take our time and do a full-length, but that would take 10 months, and people would completely forget about us.” What about more gigs? “I guess we’ll probably start doing more live shows,” he says. “We need to keep our drummer happy. Recording all the time isn’t as much fun when you’re the drummer.” Download at manbear.bandcamp.com.

ALBUM REVIEWS LEONARD DSTROY & KUTTY SLITZ The LennySlitz Project Part 2

DOLLAR FOX Little Mother’s Things I Am Keeping

(Self-released)

(Money Wolf Music)

I

L

n 2010, producer Leonard Dstroy and rapper Kutty Slitz released the synergistically titled album The LennySlitz Project to raves from just about every hip-hop head in midtown Kansas City. Dstroy is perhaps best known for his beats on records by Deep Thinkers and CES Cru. Slitz, a founding member of CES Cru (now composed of just the duo of Godemis and Ubiquitous), is incarcerated, but last month they teamed up again to drop The LennySlitz Project Part 2 as a free Bandcamp download. While the raw power of their first collaboration is turned down just a notch here, tracks like the hyper-political firestorm “No I in We” and the open letter to his son on “Role Model” find Slitz expanding his reach as a lyricist. He works through a range of emotions that are somber (“Role Model”: I’m sitting in my cell heart crying out, picture in my lap/Praying for him, hoping I can bring him back/ Look, son, this is the truth/The streets are not for you, just look what I’ve been through) and proud (“Bounce”: Been doing this since mama was wiping your snotty nose/Man, I’m one of the 26

THE PITCH

JANUARY 10-16, 2013

sickest spitters nobody probably knows). And Dstroy’s smoother, more polished, less brash beats this time around allow more room for these ideas to be heard. On balance, this latest effort may be overshadowed by the shock and awe of its predecessor. Still, The LennySlitz Project Part 2 is a worthy, mature sequel from Kansas City’s most mysterious and uncanny producer-rapper tandem. — CHRIS MILBOURN Download at leonarddstroy.bandcamp.com.

pitch.com

etter,” the lead track on Little Mother’s Things I Am Keeping, is about as busy as roots rock gets. A blistering banjo line, the thumping of snare drums, and the honkytonk-meets-Rubber Soul guitars swirl around in a tornado of Americana. It’s a declarative opening statement but maybe not the best example of Dollar Fox’s strengths. For that, skip to song two, “Josephine,” which gallops at a slower gait. Here, the buttery, unwavering voice of lead vocalist Tommy Donoho and the sing-along hooks are streamlined and on full display. Generally speaking, this is the lane in which Dollar Fox drives steadiest — when Donoho takes on laid-back altcountry ballads. Less compelling are tracks in which Donoho cedes the mic, as on “Don’t Remember Name,” which veers into powerpop territory (albeit with a mandolin in tow), and closer “Keep It Straight,” which runs too hot and twangy. It adds up to an uneven second album, though one that shows a lot of promise. There’s nothing wrong with trying pitch.com

on new speeds and sizes, of course, but Dollar Fox is most on the money when it slows down, strips down and mellows out.

— BERRY ANDERSON

Download at dollarfox.bandcamp.com.

E-mail david.hudnall@pitch.com M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X

THE PITCH

1

WORLD FAMOUS

GIRL’S NIGHT OUT SHOW The

FRIDAY, Jan. 11, 2013 @ 9:30 p.m.

SMUGGLERS INN 1650 UNIVERSAL PLAZA

THE ULTIMATE LADIES’ NIGHT OUT Tickets: $20/ door ~ Call for tickets & information:(816)483-0400

pitch.com

JANUARY 10-16, 2013

THE PITCH

27

MUSIC

RADAR

M U S I C F O R E CAST

BY

Other shows worth seeing this week.

D AV ID HUDN A L L

F R I D AY, J A N U A R Y 11 Mick Foley: 7:45 & 9:45 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club, 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500.

S AT U R D AY, J A N U A R Y 12 Mick Foley: 7:45 & 9:45 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club, 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500.

S U N D AY, J A N U A R Y 13 The Sharrows, Tom Skora, Tyler Gregory: Jackpot Music Hall, 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-832-1085.

M O N D AY, J A N U A R Y 1 4 Language Room, Randall Shreve and the Sideshow: 9 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207.

W E D N E S D AY, J A N U A R Y 16

CHRIS MULLINS

Convergence, Anthemous, Ace the Czar, King Kihei, and more: The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483. The Used, We Came as Romans, Crown the Empire, MindFlow: The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390.

FUTURECAST

Clockwise, from left: John Fullbright, Me Like Bees and Soul Providers

The Architects

The Architects closed 2012 strong, dropping a live album, Live in Los Angeles, this past fall. And on New Year’s Eve, the group announced a new studio LP, Border Wars, which will see release sometime this spring. This is all pretty huge news if you are a fan of the local boys’ earth-shaking, punk-inflected rawk music. And this show, with Appropriate Grammar and Drew Black and Dirty Electric, ought to be an excellent opportunity to sample some of their new tunes. Saturday, January 12, at Riot Room (4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179)

Me Like Bees

Fans of mid-’00s indie rock will warm to Me Like Bees. The Joplin quartet conjures the nervous bombast of Cold War Kids, and singer Luke Sheafer’s voice recalls Modest Mouse’s Isaac Brock at his most deranged. Openers Gentleman Savage and Man Bear traffic in Beatlesesque psych and power pop, respectively. With Burrowss.

Friday, January 11, at Riot Room (4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179)

John Fullbright

One of the new great hopes of the No Depression/alt-country scene is John Fullbright, a 24-year-old singer-songwriter wunderkind. He’s been compared with everybody from Steve Earle to Townes Van Zandt to Randy Newman to Woody Guthrie, with whom he shares a hometown of Okemah, Oklahoma. But I think his work most resembles the literary Southern wisdom you find in Mike Cooley’s songs for the Drive-By Truckers. (See: “Jericho” from 2012’s From the Ground Up.) Fullbright is playing with a full band for this Knuckleheads show; it’s a special “living room session” — high on intimacy, low on seating. Tuesday, January 15, at Knuckleheads Saloon (2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456)

Reel Big Fish

Does the pairing of juvenile punk lyrics with horns and upstroked guitars sound like a real hoot to you? Then two things: (1) You are probably a 15-year-old boy, and (2) you will totally love Reel Big Fish, which has been swerving around in this busted-ass lane for about two decades now. Following its 2009 album of ska-fueled covers of pop hits (by acts like Van Morrison, John Mellencamp and Poison — how cheeky!), the SoCal group returned last

F O R E C A S T

28

year with a new one, Candy Coated Fury, on which it is currently touring. It contains songs called “Your Girlfriend Sucks,” “I Love/You Suck” and “P.S. I Hate You.” Anybody have a noose handy? Monday, January 14, at the Granada (1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390)

FEBRUARY

Soul Providers Showcase

Will 2013 be the year of the Soul Provider? That’s what we asked back in December, when we put the local hip-hop collective on the cover of this here magazine. This Saturday, a few of the crew’s talent have their first chance in this new year to make that case. On the slate: DJ Jamel Rockwell, plus rappers MilkDrop, Dutch Newman, Stik Figa, Gage and BBP. Women get in free; for the men, it’s $5 before 11 p.m. and $7 after. The more eclectically minded among us might consider getting to RecordBar early for a 7 p.m. show featuring the rootsy sounds of Dollar Fox and the Rumblejetts. Saturday, January 12, at RecordBar (1020 Westport Road, 816-753-5207)

K E Y

.............................................. Not Recommended

................................................................... Okies

............................................ Checkered Patterns

...............................The Ghost of Michael Bolton

............................................................T-Squares

.................................................. Locally Sourced

..................................................Missouruh Pride

....................................................Possible Honey

JANUARY 10-16, 2013

pitch.com

SATURDAY 2 Morrissey: Liberty Hall, Lawrence MONDAY 4 Lady Gaga: Sprint Center SUNDAY 10 Emilie Autumn: The Granada, Lawrence FRIDAY 15 Galactic: Liberty Hall, Lawrence SUNDAY 17 Electric Six, the Dead Girls: The Riot Room THURSDAY 21 Toro Y Moi, Sinkane: The Granada, Lawrence FRIDAY 22 Talib Kweli: The Granada, Lawrence WEDNESDAY 27 Maroon 5: Sprint Center THURSDAY 28 Yonder Mountain String Band: Liberty Hall, Lawrence

MARCH

..................................................Pick of the Week

THE PITCH

FRIDAY 18 Rodney Carrington: The Midland Jeff Mangum: sold out. Liberty Hall, Lawrence Billy Joe Shaver, with Bryant Carter: Knuckleheads Saloon SATURDAY 19 Murali Coryell: Knuckleheads Saloon SUNDAY 20 Bloc Party, IO Echo: Liberty Hall, Lawrence Keane, Youngblood Hawke: The Midland SATURDAY 26 Frost: The Midland MONDAY 28 Sum 41, and more: The Granada, Lawrence

pitch.com

WEDNESDAY 6 Slightly Stoopid, Tribal Seeds: Liberty Hall, Lawrence SUNDAY 10 Alabama Shakes: Uptown Theater TUESDAY 12 STS9: Liberty Hall, Lawrence WEDNESDAY 13 STS9: Liberty Hall, Lawrence MONDAY 18 Yes: The Midland

M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X

THE PITCH

1

EVERY THURSDAY Live Reggae with AZ One

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9th Lonnie Ray

FRIDAY, JANUARY 11th Lost Wax - 10pm

SATURDAY, JANUARY 12th Serious Trouble

Stevie Ray Vaughan Tribute - 5pm

The M80’s -10pm NIGHTLY SPECIALS

FOOD AND DRINK

PATIO & DECK BANQUET & PRIVATE PARTY FACILITY

CHIPPENDALES February 9, 2013

What’s Your Remedy? LATE NIGHT HAPPY HOUR

SUN - THURS from 10PM–MIDNIGHT

WEEKEND BRUNCH 10AM-2PM HOURS: MON-FRI: 11am-1:30am SAT: 10am-1:30am | SUN:: 10am-Midnight

500 W. 75TH ST. IN WALDO

816.361.9788

FACEBOOK.COM/REMEDYFOODDRINK

WHATSYOURREMEDYKC.COM

Now open 7 days a week with drink specials nightly: WEDNESDAY:

February 17, 2013

UPCOMING SHOWS:

KANSAS CITY'S BIGGEST $1 HUMPDAY PARTY

1/11

THURSDAY-SATURDAY:

1/18

KANSAS CITY'S ORIGINAL DUELING PIANO SHOW

SUNDAY:

SINGER-SONGWRITER SUNDAY AND KANSAS CITY'S ONLY ADULTS ONLY, DRINK ALONG SPELLING BEE FROM 8-10

Visit www.erniebiggs.com for specials and line up. Like us on Facebook for upcoming promotions and special offers.

GARY ALLAN

1/19 1/25

Kilroy Presents: Elvis B-Day Bash Flirt Friday 1-800-745-3000

Saturday Night Vibrations Blue Corner

  •  VooDooKC.com

MONDAY:

MAN CAVE MONDAYS - FOOTBALL, GAMES, & CHEAP BEER

TUESDAY:

PINT NIGHT WITH DJ HIGHNOONE AND ASHTON MARTIN

Know When To Stop Before You Start.® Gambling Problem? Call 1-888-BETSOFF. Subject to change or cancellation. Phone and online orders are subject to service fees. Must be 21 years or older to gamble, obtain a Total Rewards ® card or enter VooDoo ®. ©2013, Caesars License Company, LLC.

pitch.com

JANUARY 10-16, 2013

THE PITCH

29

NIGHTLIFE Send submissions to Clubs Editor Abbie Stutzer by e-mail (abbie.stutzer@pitch.com), fax (816-756-0502) or phone (816-218-6926). Continuing items must be resubmitted monthly.

•A LITTLE SLICE OF IRELAND•

T H U R S D AY 10

IN DOWNTOWN KANSAS CITY

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL

Come Shake Your Shamrocks! THURS January 10th: Pat Lentz 8-12 FRI January 11th: Lost Wax 10-2 SAT January 12th: Retroactive

B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. John Paul’s Flying Circus. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Danny McGaw. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Kris Bruder’s Freight Train, 7 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Spongecake and the Fluff Ramblers, the Summit, Monarchs, 9 p.m.

170 E. 14TH ST. KCMO IN P&L DISTRICT 816-268-4700 • THEDUBLINERKC.COM FACEBOOK.COM/THEDUBLINERKC

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Jack Grelle and the Johnson Family. Eddie’s Lounge: 3512 S.W. Market, Lee’s Summit, 816-537-4148. Tracy Allison. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Brother Bagman, Starroy, the Associates.

HIP-HOP Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Johnny 2 Cold, the Winner’s Circle, Dizzy Fuelo, Lyric Reddick, Yung Beetle, Reyn.

JAZZ

The SPOT for The

BLUES in Johnson County

Wed JAN 9

Billy Ebeling 7-10 Thur JAN 10

Kris Bruders Freight Train 7-10 Fri JAN 11

Monique Danielle 5:30-8:30 JLove Band 9-12 Sat JAN 12

Doghouse Daddies 5:30-8:30 Cadillac Flambe 9-12 Tues JAN 15

Dave Hays Blues Jam 7-10 Wed JAN 16

135TH ST. & QUIVIRA 12056 W. 135th St. OPKS 913-239-9666 www.quasimodokc.com THE PITCH

COMEDY Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. Christina Pazsitzky.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS

JANUARY 10-16, 2013

Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Country Swing and Rock-a-Billy Party. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Tyrannosaurus Chicken.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS

Beer Kitchen: 435 Westport Rd., 816-389-4180. DJ Finius. The Eighth Street Taproom: 801 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-6918. DJ Candlepants. MiniBar: 3810 Broadway, 816-326-8281. Dropout Boogie. The Quaff: 1010 Broadway, 816-471-1918. DJ Chris. The Well: 7421 Broadway, 816-361-1700. DJ Highnoone.

Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Adam Lee and the Dead Horse Sound Company. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-7497676. Sky Smeed, Cowgirl’s Trainset, 6 p.m.

DJ

ACOUSTIC Take Five Coffee + Bar: 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park, 913948-5550. Fedora.

ACOUSTIC Take Five Coffee + Bar: 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park, 913948-5550. Dan Bliss with Rod Fleeman.

JAZZ The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816474-8463. Darcus Gates, 8:30 p.m. The Kill Devil Club: 61 E. 14th St., 816-877-8312. The Sons of Brasil. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., S G IN Overland Park, 913-239-9666. LIST E AT Monique Danielle, 5:30 p.m. IN ONL M Thai Place: 9359 W. 87th St., OverPITCH.CO land Park, 913-649-5420. Jerry Hahn.

MORE

CLUB

COMEDY Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. Christina Pazsitzky, 7:30 & 9:45 p.m. Skylight Restaurant and Sports Bar: 1867 S.W. State Rt. 7, Blue Springs, 816-988-7958. Mike’s Comedy Club, 8 p.m.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS

EASY LISTENING

FOLK

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Stand-up comedy and open mic. Double T’s Roadhouse: 1421 Merriam Ln., Kansas City, Kan., 913-432-5555. Blues Jam hosted by RocknRick’s Boogie Leggin’ Blues Band, 7 p.m.

VA R I E T Y The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. KC Songwriter Forum, 7 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. KCBS Election & Send-Off Party for Jason Vivone, Brandon and Shinetop, 7 p.m.

F R I D AY 11 Bar West: 7174 Renner Rd., Shawnee, 913-248-9378. Travelers Guild. The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. The Brannock Device, Schwervon. Great Day Café: 7921 Santa Fe Dr., Overland Park, 913-6429090. Steve Sterner, Mark Nelson. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Heidi & the Kicking Heels, Hidden Pictures, Electro Foam. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 302 S.W. Main, Lee’s Summit, 816-525-1871. Switch. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Sons of Great Dane, Hotdog Skeletons, Kill Noise Boys, Demon Lips, 9 p.m.

pitch.com

DJ

Mosaic Lounge: 1331 Walnut, 816-679-0076. Mosaic Friday hosted by Luke Rich, with DJ Allen Michael. The Quaff: 1010 Broadway, 816-471-1918. DJ E. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. DJ Todd Howard, 10 p.m. The Well: 7421 Broadway, 816-361-1700. DJ Mike Scott.

Hamburger Mary’s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-842-1919. Maryoke with Monique. Helen’s Just Another Dive: 2002 Armour Rd., North Kansas City, 816-471-4567. Trivia Riot with Roland, 7:30 p.m., $5 per person. Hurricane Allie’s Bar and Grill: 5541 Merriam Dr., Shawnee, 913-217-7665. Karaoke, 8:30 p.m. J. Murphy’s Irish Pub and Grille: 22730 Midland Dr., Shawnee, 913-825-3880. Karaoke, 9 p.m. Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. Ab Fab Fridays, 9 p.m.

Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Interactive Acoustic with Jason Kayne.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS

Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Sticky Clutch. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Atlantic Express, 8:30 p.m.; Jason Eady, 9 p.m. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. J.Love, 9 p.m.

Buzzard Beach: 4110 Pennsylvania, 816-753-4455. Trivia, Ladies’ Night, and DJ HoodNasty. Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Hot Caution Thursdays, 10 p.m. Ernie Biggs Dueling Piano Bar: 4115 Mill, 816-561-2444. “You Sing It” Live Band Karaoke. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Trivia Clash, 7 p.m. Sherlock’s Underground Coffeehouse & Pub: 858 State Rte. 291, Liberty, 816-429-5262. Karaoke, ladies’ night specials. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Uptown Heat, 10:30 p.m. The Velvet Dog: 400 E. 31st St., 816-753-9990. Skeeball League. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. Trivia, 9 p.m.

ROCK/POP/INDIE

John Paul Drum & Bill Dye 7-10

30

The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. Peter Schlamb, Hermon Mehari Group. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Addison Frei Group. Westport Coffee House: 4010 Pennsylvania, 816-756-3222. Parallax.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL

The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Lunadaz.

R O C K A B I L LY B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Jason Vivone and the Billybats.

S AT U R D AY 12 ROCK/POP/INDIE The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Phantoms of the Opry, Victor & Penny. Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Various Blonde, Baliff, Jorge Arana Trio. Great Day Café: 7921 Santa Fe Dr., Overland Park, 913-6429090. Mike Ashley. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Sixteen Penny. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. The Stolen Winnebagos. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. The Rumblejetts, Dollar Fox, 6 p.m.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Mama Ray Jazz Meets Blues Jam, 2 p.m.; Millage Gilbert, 9 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Platinum Express, 8:30 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. The Brody Buster Band, 9 p.m. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Doghouse Daddies, 5:30 p.m.; Cadillac Flambe, 9 p.m.

JAZZ The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. Jazz Disciples. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Midtown Quartet. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Tim Whitmer & KC Express, 4:30 p.m.

COMEDY Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. Christina Pazsitzky, 7 & 9:45 p.m.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Ass Jamz. The Red Balloon: 10325 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-9622330. Karaoke, 8 p.m., free. Sharks: 10320 Shawnee Mission Pkwy., Shawnee, 913-2684006. Pool tournament, 1 p.m. Westport Coffee House: 4010 Pennsylvania, 816-756-3222. The Kick Comedy Theatre: the Kick-Off Improv Comedy Show, 8 p.m.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Sherlock’s Underground Coffeehouse & Pub: 858 State Rte. 291, Liberty, 816-429-5262. Open Blues Jam with Earl Baker, 4 p.m.

VA R I E T Y The Granada: 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Thumpur, Going to Hell in a Leather Jacket, Taste Bud G-Spot, 3 Son Green. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. 1001 Arabian Nights Bellydance with A’ishah and friends.

S U N D AY 13 ROCK/POP/INDIE Californos: 4124 Pennsylvania, 816-531-7878. Victor & Penny, 2 p.m.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Lee McBee and the Confessors. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Rich Berry.

DJ Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Sunday Funday with DJ G Train on the patio.

JAZZ Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Les Mengel Duo, 5-9 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Second Sunday FUNdays: Gina and Chloe McFadden, 3 p.m.

COMEDY Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. Christina Pazsitzky.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Smackdown Trivia and Karaoke. Clarette Club: 5400 Martway, Mission, 913-384-0986. Texas Hold ’em. Frank James Saloon: 10919 N.W. Hwy. 45, Parkville, 816-5050800. Karaoke, 6-10 p.m.

pitch.com

MONTH

MON: RU RAL THU 1/10 GRIT 6-9, KARAO KE 1 BLUE BO OT HEELE 0PM JA C K R FRI 1/11 S-9 GRE THE BRA LLE, BRIAN FRAMPM, N E N O C SAT 1/12 SCHWERVON, K DEVICE - 10 VICTOR A GOSPEL HAN PM, ND DS THU 1/17 PHANTOMS OFPENNY - 10PM, CLIFF HIN THE OPRY ES FRI 1/18 HERMAN MEH,APROJECT H, RI BOX THE CO SAT 1/19 OLIVETTI LETMT PASS, MEDICIN ER, SONA E THEO WIRED SRY, TORBEN, HUT

Congrats Beau Bods! kcmo

WED. JAN. 9 RUMBLIN’ JUNE/AMANDA HUGHEY/ FASHIONABLY LATE/STEADY BREATHER THURS. JAN. 10

SPONGECAKE & THE FLUFF RAMBLERS/ THE SUMMIT/ THE MONARCHS FRI. JAN. 11

7PM KAMERA - ALL AGES 10PM SONS OF GREAT DANE/ HOTDOG SKELETONS/ KILL NOISE BOYS/DEMON LIPS SAT. JAN. 12

STREET TEAM

Each week, Pitch Street Team cruises around to the hottest clubs, bars and concerts. You name it, we will be there. While we are out, we hand out tons of cool stuff. So look for the Street Team... We will be looking for you!

7PM DOLLAR FOX/RUMBLEJETTS 10PM SOUL PROVIDERS SHOWCASE SUN. JAN. 13

ART BATTLE 3:1 MUSSMAN VS.HEINRICHS

MON. JAN. 14

LANGUAGE ROOM/RANDAL SHREVE/ HEARTSCAPE LANDBEATS TUES. JAN. 15

7PM MISS MAJOR & HER MINOR MOOD SWINGS/ 10PM CLAQUE/YAM/JORGE ARANA TRIO WED. JAN. 16

RYAN LEE TOMS/BLONDIE BRUNETTI/ DJ GENT/2ND HAND KING WEEKLY

SUN. 12-5PM BARTENDER’S BRUNCH & BLOODY MARY BAR MON. 7PM SONIC SPECTRUM MUSIC TRIVIA TUES. 7PM HONKY TONK SUPPER CLUB WED. 7PM BOB WALKENHORST & FRIENDS THURS. 7PM TRIVIA CLASH

NYE @ Uptown

NYE @ Uptown

OPEN DAILY SUN. 12PM-12AM MON.TUES.SAT. 4PM-1:30AM WED-FRI 12PM-1:30AM KITCHEN OPEN LATE 1020 westport rd. kcmo 64111*816-753-5207 www.therecordbar.com

THE HUMAN BE-IN The Art of Tease presents:

A GATHERING OF THE TRIBES

SATURDAY

Nicolette Page Kutumba Drummers Stephanie Kersely Harmony Lovellelution Dropout Boogie Revered Betty

JAN. 19th

-------2013------

$10

See more on the “promotions” link at p NYE @ KC Live

Bill Goffrier & Karlee Dean @ recordBar

Upcoming Events 1.11 - Chippendales @ Smuggler’s Inn 1.26 - Frost @ Indie 1.26 - 80s Party featuring The Zeros @ Uptown

A portion of all proceeds go to KKFI - KC’s Community Radio

Featuring poets: MissConception, Professor Nightlife Jones, William Peck, David Arnold Hughs, Paul Goldman, Sharon Eiker, Rachel & Lance Asburry,

BRING FAMILIES FRIENDS CYMBALS DRUMS CHIMES FLUTES

BRING FLOWERS INCENSE FEATHERS CANDLES BANNERS FLAGS

UPTOWN ARTS BAR 3611 BROADWAY

pitch.com

JANUARY 10-16, 2013

THE PITCH

31

KC’s Got Some Pret y Li tle Women .. And You’l Find Them at Bazooka’s!

1717 Main St. Kansas City, MO 816/421.1915

facebook.com/bazookasshowgirls bazookasshowgirls.com

Saints Pub + Patio: 9720 Quivira, Lenexa, 913-492-3900. Free pool. Wallaby’s Grill and Pub: 9562 Lackman, Lenexa, 913-5419255. Texas Hold ’em, 6 & 9 p.m. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. Texas Hold ’em, 3 & 6 p.m.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Groove Station: 9916 Holmes, 816-942-1000. KC Blues Jam with Crosseyed Cat, 2-6 p.m. The Hideout: 6948 N. Oak Tfwy., 816-468-0550. Open blues jam, 7 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Open Jam with Levee Town, 2 p.m., free. R.G.’s Lounge: 9100 E. 35th St., Independence, 816-358-5777. Jam Night hosted by Dennis Nickell, Scotty Yates, Rick Eidson, and Jan Lamb, 5 p.m.

VA R I E T Y RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Art Battle.

M O N D AY 1 4 ROCK/POP/INDIE The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Taking Back Mondays. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Sweet Ascent.

DJ Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Dark Mondays with DJ Desmodus, 10 p.m.

JAZZ The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Mark Lowrey Trio, 6 p.m.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS Bulldog: 1715 Main, 816-421-4799. Trivia, service industry night. Clarette Club: 5400 Martway, Mission, 913-384-0986. Texas Hold ’em. Green Room Burgers & Beer: 4010 Pennsylvania, Ste. D, 816216-7682. Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz. Hamburger Mary’s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-842-1919. Maryoke. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Karaoke Idol with Tanya McNaughty. Nara: 1617 Main, 816-221-6272. Brodioke. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Sonic Spectrum Music Trivia, 7 p.m., $5. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. KC Mutual UFO Network, 6:30 p.m., free, low-cost donation; Texas Hold ’em, 8 p.m.

M E TA L / P U N K Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Damned by the Pope, Ghosts of Normandy, Autumn of Apologies.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Songwriter’s Scene Open Mic with Jon Theobald, 7 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. James Inman’s Microphone: Comedy (or Whatever) Open Mic, 10 p.m.

T U E S D AY 15

JUST GRADUATED &

ROCK/POP/INDIE

?

LOOKING FOR YOUR FIRST real JOB Gradspring is a boutique career site that offers 1,000’s of prescreened, scam free, entry level jobs that require 0-2 years of experience.

Enter coupon code: SouthComm for 25% off a premium upgrade

WWW.GRADSPRING.COM May not be combined with any other offer. Limit one use per customer. 32 2 TTHHEE PPIITTCCHH

AN NT UH A RXYX–X 10X - 1, 62, 0200X1 3 pitch.com pitch.com MJ O

RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Yam, Jorge Arana Trio, Claque, 9 p.m.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Miss Major and Her Minor Mood Swings, 6 p.m. Slow Ride Roadhouse: 1350 N. Third St., Lawrence, 785-7492727. Lonnie Ray Blues Band.

DJ Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. DJ Whatshisname, service industry night, 9 p.m.

JAZZ Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Rick Bacus and Monique Danielle. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Open Jam with Everette DeVan, 7 p.m.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS Bleachers Bar & Grill: 210 S.W. Greenwich Dr., Lee’s Summit, 816-623-3410. Texas Hold ’em Poker Night, 7 & 9:15 p.m.

The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Gak Attack. Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. Team Trivia with Teague Hayes, 7 p.m., $5 buy-in. Double Nickel Bar: 189 S. Rogers, Ste. 1614, Olathe, 913-3900363. Poker night. Dukes: 1501 Grand, 816-527-0122. Beer pong tournaments, 9 p.m. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. It’s Karaoke Time! MiniBar: 3810 Broadway, 816-326-8281. Robert Moore’s Name That Tune. Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. Gayme Night upstairs, 7:30-10 p.m.; PHAT Show, 8 p.m.; karaoke on the main floor, 10 p.m. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. Chess Club, 7 p.m.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Dave Hays Band Open Jam. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Open Mic Night.

M E TA L / P U N K The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Ben Grim, Les Paul, ABNORM, E MC, Approach DJ set.

SINGER-SONGWRITER Californos: 4124 Pennsylvania, 816-531-7878. Steve Sterner.

W E D N E S D AY 16 ROCK/POP/INDIE Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Stric-9, Dead Man’s Hand, Last Night’s Regret. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 302 S.W. Main, Lee’s Summit, 816-525-1871. The Magnetics. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Bob Walkenhorst, 7 p.m.; Ryan Lee Toms, Blondie Brunetti, DJ Gent, Second Hand King, 9 p.m.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Shinetop Jr. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Billy Ebeling.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Honkey Suckle, Brother Bagman. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Chase Rice, with Miss Major, 7:30 p.m.

DJ Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. Sonic Spectrum with DJ Robert Moore, 9 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Purusa, 4 p.m.

HIP-HOP Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Mac-Reala.

JAZZ The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. The Brian Ruskin Quartet.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS The All-Star Rock Bar: 7210 N.E. 43rd St., 816-452-2660. Karaoke. Beer Kitchen: 435 Westport Rd., 816-389-4180. Brodioke. Danny’s Bar and Grill: 13350 College Blvd., Lenexa, 913-3459717. Trivia and karaoke with DJ Smooth, 8 p.m. 403 Club: 403 N. Fifth St., 913-499-8392. Pinball tournament, cash prize for winner, 8:30 p.m., $5 entry fee. Hamburger Mary’s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-842-1919. Charity Bingo with Valerie Versace, 8 p.m. Hurricane Allie’s Bar and Grill: 5541 Merriam Dr., Shawnee, 913-217-7665. Bike night; karaoke, 8:30 p.m. J. Murphy’s Irish Pub and Grille: 22730 Midland Dr., Shawnee, 913-825-3880. Karaoke, 9 p.m. MiniBar: 3810 Broadway, 816-326-8281. Nerd Nite. Nara: 1617 Main, 816-221-6272. Ladies’ Night. The Quaff: 1010 Broadway, 816-471-1918. Karaoke, 9 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Poetic Underground, 8 p.m. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. Trivia.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Tyler Gregory hosts Acoustic Jam Session. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Jam Night, 9 p.m.

SINGER-SONGWRITER Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Chad Elliott, Bonita Crowe, Living Room session, 8 p.m.

PRESENTED BY

RUNS EVERY SATURDAY NIGHT

Angels Rock Bar No Cover on Friday

Drunken Fish Late Night Happy Hour-10pm to Brooksider Sports Bar & Grill Close $2.50 Corona Bottles Fran's Restaurant

The Only Cigar Shop on the Strip. 10% Off Purchase of Cigars

Appetizer get Second of Equal or Lesser Value at 1/2 Price Firefly $5.99 Premium Breakfast on Fridays, $4 $4 Wells, No Cover All Night with Hickok's Charlie Hooper's Bar & Grille $5 Mojito $6 Black Margaritas Bacardi & 360 Vodka Bombs after 10pm, Wristband Fridays- $1 Off Boulevard, Open 24 Hours Green Room Burgers and Beer $3 Draws and Free Queso with 2 Food Saturdays $1 off Domestic Bottles Howl At The Moon Free Fry with Purchase of an Entrée Purchases, $3 House Margaritas Minsky's Pizza Gusto 2 for 1 cover Michael Forbes Grille $1 off Apps $2.50 Domestic Draws $3 $2 Yard Beers and $5 Grape Bombs Wells $12 Bucket of Beers and 50 Cents Indie On Main Reverse Happy 930pm-1am. $3 Domestics with wristband! Harpo's Restaurant Bar off Martinis 2 for 1 Wells $3 Margaritas Maker’s Mark Bourbon $2 Selected Shots The Blue Line House & Lounge $2 Blue Line Beers $2 Blue Line Jersey Dog, Hot Dog Cart $5 Maker's Mark Cocktails 2 Jumbo Dogs for $5 and $1 Off Shots $3 Wells Martini Corner McFadden's Sport's Saloon Winslow's BBQ Any Sandwich $4 UV Flavors Cocktails $5 off Lunch or Dinner for Two Haus Jerusalem Cafe Mosaic Lounge $3 Radaberger Pilsner & $5 off Hooka No Cover Before 11pm Waldo Agris-Pinot Gris Joe's Pizza Buy the Slice PBR Big Sky Bar 75th Street Brewery Sol Cantina 2 Slices for $5 $5 Jack Daniel’s Drinks $2.50 Wells, Bombs, and Pints! $4 Trolley Margaritas & Kelly's Westport Inn Bobby Baker's Lounge Pizza Bar $2.75 Pacifico Bottle $2 Domestic Bottles & $3 Rock Lobster Shots $1 off Cover $3 Boulevard Wheat Pints Lew's Grill & Bar The Drop McCoy's Public House Shark Bar $2.50 Bud Light Draws $5 Specialty Martinis & Cocktails $4 Malibu Cocktails $4.00 McCoy's Pints Quinton's Missie B's Tengo Sed Cantina Tower Tavern $3 Domestic Draws $3 Wells and a Free Cover $3 El Jimador Margarita $3.50 Wells and Complimentary Shot with wristband! The Dubliner Riot Room $10 Pizza 7pm-12am Remedy Food + Drink $3.50 Boulevard Wheat on Fridays and $5 Jameson $3 Wells after Midnight 15% off with Wristband Velvet DOG Free cover with Wrist Band Tanner's Bar and Grill Tea Drops $1 off all Skyy Drinks Z-Strike Bowling $2.50 Budlight 16 oz. Draws $1.00 Off a Cupcake or Regular Tea Monaco 2 for 1 games, No cover on Fridays The Foundry The Well Bar-Grill and Rooftop No Cover $4.00 McCoy's Pints Free Spinach Dip w/any Purchase

RIVER MARKET DOWNTOWN

POWER & LIGHT DISTRICT 18th & VINE

Blvd est thw Sou

W 31 St

E 18 St

E 19 St

E 31 St

MARTINI CORNER Rd ort stp We

The Paseo

Brookside

P&L

5 St

Main St

Uptown Arts Bar Buy One Get One Free Wine or Mixed Drinks (Except Premiums)

Fri - Sat 9pm-Close $2.50 Domestic Draws $2.75 Wells $4.50 Cuervo Margaritas

TROLLEY STOPS

WESTPORT

Brush Creek Blvd

E 63 ST

PLAZA de Blvd

OutaBounds Fridays-$2 Wells All Night, Saturdays-$5 Bomb Shots after 9pm

Figlio $5 off Any Purchase 7-10pm O'Dowds Free Cover & $5 Boru Irish Vodka Tomfooleries

Westport

Br oo ks

36th & Broadway

Blanc Burgers + Bottles Reverse Happy Tacos,Calimari, and Great Drink Specials!

Westport

Torre's Pizzeria Beer Kitchen Any Specialty Pizza for $10 & 2 Late Night Happy Hour Friday & Slices for $4 Saturday 11pm-1am Westport Cafe and Bar Buzzard Beach $1.25 Domestic Drafts $2.50 Wells Shot and a Beer for $5 Westport Coffee House Californos 15% Off Any Coffee Drink $5 off $12 purchase Downtown Dark Horse $2 Wells $2 domestic draws $12 Anthony's Power Hours 8pm-10pm Fri & Sat 2 for 1 Any Item from Late Night Menu with Purchase of Two Beverages Dave's Stagecoach Inn John's Big Deck (Upper) $3 Jameson Shots and $2 16oz $3 Wells $4 Bombs and No Cover Cans of PBR Ernie Biggs Dueling Piano Bar River Market 2 for 1 cover Café Al Dente Fidel’s Cigar Shop $3 Mascot Shots, Buy One

Wyandotte

Danny's Big Easy Get Your Wristbands here!

Plaza

Wornall Rd

18th & Vine

i

E 63 ST

BROOKSIDER WALDO E 75TH

Where do I catch the trolley?

• River Market - The Blue Line • Downtown - John’s Big Deck • Power & Light - Dubliner • 18th & Vine - Danny’s Big Easy • 36th & Broadway-Uptown Arts Bar • Martini Corner - Velvet Dog • Westport - Dark Horse • Plaza - O’Dowds • Brookside - Brooksider • Waldo - Quinton’s

www.thekansascitystrip.com pitch.com

JANUARY 10-16, 2013

THE PITCH

33

S AVA G E L O V E

PHALLIC FALLACIES Dear Dan: I’m a straight male, 21 years old. I

love women. I’ve always loved women; I’ve always loved having sex with women. However, in the last year, here and there, I’ve jerked off to transsexual porn. One night, after drinking with a friend and smoking some hash, I arranged a date with a trans sex worker. She was totally womanly, nothing manly about her, except for, you know. She licked my butt, gave me head and fingered me. I’ve been on the receiving end of anal play before from girls, so nothing new. But somewhere during this encounter, I became the receiving partner during anal sex. At the time, I was too fucked up to care. But the next day, I started to feel really bad. She was very safe and used condoms for everything. I just can’t get past the fact that I did the gayest thing a guy can do. I feel really depressed about this traumatic situation. I can’t seem to enjoy my life anymore. I’ve even felt somewhat suicidal. (I would never kill myself — I wouldn’t do that to my family and friends.) I still want to date women and have sex with women. I don’t regret being with a trans woman because I wanted to experiment. I’ve been tested since the encounter to make sure I didn’t catch anything. What I regret is her sticking her thing in my butt. Can a single act like this make me gay? Please help.

Wrong Side of Wild Side Dear WSOWS: Give yourself a break.

Yes, yes, you did the gayest thing a guy can do — you allowed someone to put a dick in your manbutt — but now you’re doing the second-gayest thing a guy can do. You’re being a huge drama queen about the whole thing. Stop acting so cray, as the kids say, and repeat after me: One dick in the ass does not a gay man make. Look at it this way: The difference between having a woman’s finger in your ass and having a woman’s dick in your ass is a matter of degree. If the woman’s finger was fine — to say nothing of the woman’s tongue — why freak out about the woman’s dick? Remember: You don’t sleep with men; you’re not attracted to men. You made an exception for this woman’s dick because her dick is exceptional: It’s attached to a woman. So maybe you took a longer walk on the wild side than you might have if you’d gone on that walk sober, but thankfully, your sex worker was conscientious and responsible and used condoms. So you didn’t emerge from this encounter with anything more devastating than a touch of gay panic. Be a man about this — be a straight man about this — and walk it off, as the football coaches say. Maybe this will help: Like a lot of gay men, I had sex with a woman before I came out. I did the straightest thing a guy can do — I put my dick in a vag — and it didn’t make me straight. So while you did the gayest thing a guy can do — you let someone put a dick in your ass — that didn’t make you gay because you’re not gay, and one ride on a trans escort’s dick can’t change that.

34

THE PITCH

JANUARY 10-16, 2013

pitch.com

If nothing I’ve said has made you feel better, maybe this will: Gay men don’t hire trans women sex workers. Wanting to be with a woman who has a dick is an almost exclusively straight-male kink/obsession/wild side. Gay men are into dick, of course, but what we’re really into is dudes. There are gay men out there who date and fuck and shack up with trans men — men with pussies — so not all gay men are after dick. What we’re all after is dude. If our gayness can’t be defined solely by dick, then surely your straightness can’t be undone entirely by dick.

Dear Dan: I’m a married straight man. I recently spent a lovely day snorkeling with my wife in Mexico. We were grouped with three men who were obviously in a committed three-person relationship. I lacked the cojones to ask directly, but they had an extensive travel history together and lived together. Everything was “we” this or that, and there were various PDA pairings during the day. They were lovely people. I wish we all lived in the same city because it’s hard to meet cool people who aren’t exactly like you when you’re married with kids. Several questions: (1) What do gay people call such a union? (2) Does the gay community think it’s odd? unremarkable? sensible? (3) How does a union like that form? A couple adds a third? (4) Do these relationships last? Lots of pros and cons, just curious how it plays out.

Three-way Relationship Intrigues Oblivious Straights Dear TRIOS: (1) Such unions are referred to as

“throuples” by gays and straights. For a picture of the inner workings of a gay throuple, check out Molly Young’s profile of one in New York magazine’s most recent “Sex Issue.” Benny, Jason and Adrian are the men behind the popular “gipster” porn site cockyboys.com, and you can read Young’s piece about their home, work and sex lives at tinyurl.com/gaythrup.

BY

D A N S AVA G E

(2) Some gay people think throuples are odd, some think they’re unremarkable, and some think they’re sensible. And some gay people — some dumb ones — think gay throuples are bad PR at a time when gay couples are fighting for the right to marry. But our fight is for equal rights, not double standards, and no one argues that straight marriage should be banned because of all the straight throuples, quadles, quintles, sextetles, etc., out there. (3) In my experience, yes, that’s usually how it happens. (4) Throupledom presents unique challenges: Major life decisions require buy-in from three people; two can gang up against one during arguments; the partners who were coupled before the third came along may treat the third as a junior partner, not an equal partner, etc. But throupledom presents unique benefits, too: another set of hands to help around the house, another income to pay down the mortgage, another smiling face to sit on, etc. And it’s not like coupledom is a surefire recipe for success. Half of all marriages — those traditional “one man, one woman, for life” marriages — end in divorce. Yet discussions of throupledom all seem to begin with the assumption that coupledom is a self-evidently more stable arrangement. Maybe it is, maybe it isn’t. I’d like to see some research comparing throuples with couples before I accept that premise.

Dear Dan: I recently used the term “saddle-

backing” to indicate the position where a man rubs his penis between his partner’s ass cheeks as either foreplay or nonintercourse sex. My girlfriend, a regular reader of your column, insists that I used the term incorrectly. Did I?

Rubbed the Wrong Way Dear RTWW: You did. “Saddlebacking,” as

defined by Savage Love readers (the Académie Française of sexual neologisms), is when two straight teenagers, endeavoring to preserve an evangelical girl’s virginity, engage in anal intercourse. This is a thing that really happens. Because anal sex isn’t really sex, according to the abstinence educators whom evangelical teens are exposed to, many good Christian teenagers rationalize that getting fucked in the ass doesn’t really count against a girl’s virginity. The act to which you refer — rubbing your penis between someone’s ass cheeks as foreplay or as a substitute for intercourse — is known variously as frottage, outercourse, the Princeton Rub or “the pearl tramp stamp.” But in Chicago, it’s known as “the Cardinal George.” Find the Savage Lovecast (my weekly podcast) every Tuesday at thestranger.com/savage.

Have a question for Dan Savage? E-mail him at mail@savagelove.net pitch.com

MONTH

dating. 18+

816-841-4000 913-279-9218 30 minute FREE trial

816.841.1577 913.279.9202 30 Minute FREE Trial!

18+

LONELY

HOUSEWIVES

Kansas City’s

HOTTEST GAY CHATLINE 816-841-1588 913-279-9212 30 minute FREE TRIAL 18+

pitch.com

JANUARY 10-16, 2013

THE PITCH

35

DO YOU SUFFER FROM

ARTHRITIS?

LICENSED MASSAGE

Alexis Signature Service OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 10 a.m. - 7 p.m.

CALL FOR APPOINTMENT Cash / Debit Mastercard / Visa 913-400-3515

NOW OPE N!

Eastern Massage OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK CALL

913.232.8129 8726 Grant Avenue

Compensation up to $50.00 per visit No-cost study-related care and study medications for up to 42 months. No health insurance or referrals are required.

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK * THREE YOUNG GIRLS *

913-469-1616

Swedish • Deep Tissue • LomiLomi • 4-hands

Walk-ins Welcome

13410 College Blvd, Lenexa, KS 66210 (Pflumm Rd. QT Gas Station) cash / debit / Visa / Mastercard

4-Handed Massage

! LL

••NOW OPEN••

The purpose of the study is to determine the efficacy and safety of asenapine compared with placebo in preventing the recurrence of any mood episodes. You may qualify for this study if you: • Are at least 18 years of age • Have a current diagnosis of Bipolar 1 Disorder • Suffer from manic or mixed episodes. *Other requirements will need to be met If you qualify, you will receive study-related drug and physical exams at no charge to you. Compensation for time and travel may be offered.

Green Spa 13027 Kansas Ave. Bonner Springs, OPEN KS 66012 7 DAYS A WEEK

Soft Breeze Spa

785-856-4994 23rd Street Lawrence, KS 2331 Alabama Street Suite #103

707 Main Street Eudora, KS

JANUARY 10-16, 2013

pitch.com

(10 min east of Lawrence on Hwy 10)

(785) 542-2364

LIC # 12-004

Dynamic Clinical Research 305 NW Englewood Court, Suite 300 Gladstone, MO 64118 THE PITCH

X

CC Massage & Spa

Please call: 816-942-2626

36

913-745-4107

Haskell

CA

If you or someone you know is suffering from manic or mixed episodes associated with Bipolar 1 Disorder, you may be interested in a clinical study opportunity.

(913)362-2000

10729 Shawnee Mission Parkway Shawnee, KS 66203

Do you or someone you know have manic or mixed episodes associated with a

Bipolar Disorder?

Walk-Ins Welcome 7 days a week

Alabama

&

Visit: www.StudyForArthritis.com

BEST ASIAN MASSAGE

Naismith

IP CL

877-213-6023

$ 10 OFF

GRAND OPENING

MASSAGE

Local doctors need volunteers for a research study comparing FDA-approved arthritis medications.

BRING THIS AD IN FOR

Overland Park, KS 66212

* * NEW LOCATION * *

140 N. 130th

Bonner Springs, KS (913) 721-1111

NOW HIRING FOR

CONCERTS CONVENTIONS SPORTING EVENTS EVENT STAFF, USHERS, TICKET TAKERS

APPLY IN PERSON 4050 Pennsylvania Ste. 111 KCMO 64111 OR ONLINE www. crowdsystems.com EOE

HILTON PRESIDENT IS NOW HIRING

u Engineering Supervisor u Part Time Room Service u On Call Banquet Servers u Servers Other Openings available, call our Job Hotline. 816-303-1696 Pre-screen Interviews: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday & Friday 8:30am - Noon & 1:00-3:00pm

1329 Baltimore

Kansas City, MO 64105

Research Subjects Do you have ASTHMA? Physicians at the Asthma Clinical Research Center at Truman Medical Center Hospital Hill are currently recruiting for studies for Astma Patients.

• You must be at least 18 years old. • On asthma medications and your asthma is controlled. • All study related care is provided at no cost for those who take part. • Financial compensation for participation is available. This Asthma Center is one of 18 prestigious Centers of Excellence funded by the American Lung Association. Please call 816-404-5503 for screening and to learn more about this research study.

pitch.com

JANUARY 10-16, 2013

THE PITCH

37

ADHD STUDY MAC PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

Is your child 13-17 diagnosed with ADHD? You may be eligible to participate in a research study of an investigational medication.

MACAPARTMENTS.COM FEATURED PROPERTY :

PARK CENTRAL APARTMENTS

Symptoms of ADHD include difficulty remembering information, difficulty concentrating, trouble organizing or completing tasks and procrastination.

STUDIOS STARTING AT

$599

Qualified participants may receive study-related psychological evaluation(s) and may also receive compensation for time and travel. For more information, please call:

Dynamic Clinical Research at 816-942-2626 Dynamic Clinical Research 305 NW Englewood Court Suite 300 Gladstone, MO 64118

Pet friendly, Gated Parking, Dishwasher, Central Air, Granite Countertops

p

877-453-1039

KANSAS

CITY'S

350 E. Armour, KCMO

ENTERTAINMENT RESOURCE NEWS • EVENTS

• FOOD • MUSIC • FILMS

ACCESS INFO ANYWHERE

38

THE PITCH

JANUARY 10-16, 2013

pitch.com

BUY NORTHLAND VILLAGE $100 DEPOSIT ON 1&2 BEDROOMS

$525 / up Large 1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apts and Townhomes Fireplace, Washer/Dryer Hook-ups, Storage Space, Pool.

SELL RENT

I-35 & Antioch • (816) 454-5830

HOUSE WILLOWIND APARTMENTS

1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apartments Starting @ $475

3927 Willow Ave • KCMO 64113 816.358.6764

Stonewall Court Apts 1-Bdrms starting at $395 central air, secure entry, on site laundry, on bus line, close to shopping, nice apts, Sections 8 welcome $100 Deposit (816) 231-2874 M-F 8-5 office hours

LOFT APARTMENT ROOMMATE OFFICE SPACE

Are you out of housing options? Have Credit Problems? Previous Evictions?

We rent to the rent challenged

Holiday Apartments Studios FREE Downtown Area

$112/WEEK $150/DEPOSIT*

* Restrictions apply

APPLICATION WHEN YOU BRING IN On Site Loundry Facility Paid Cable TV THIS AD Holiday Apartments (816) 221-1721

Month to All Month Lease! Utilities

& CLASSIFIEDS

pitch.com

JANUARY 10-16, 2013

THE PITCH

39

APTS/JOBS/STUFF

®

816.218.6702 816.218.6759

FREE BANKRUPTCY CONSULTATION

CLUBEROTICAKC.COM

• PA Y M E N T P L A N AVA I L A B L E •

The oldest living lifestyle club in town Now celebrating 13 years & Still #1 Lifestyle Party In KC

Parties Every Fri. & Sat. Wanted Party Place & Web Designer

LAW OFFICE OF JENNIFER DODSON 435 NICHOLS ROAD SUITE 200 K A N S A S C I T Y, M O 6 4 1 1 2 8 1 6 . 9 7 7 . 2 7 6 3

Limo Available $200 per night

913-238-4339

W W W. J D O D S O N L AW. C O M

We are a debt relief agency. We help people file for bankruptcy relief under the Bankruptcy Code. The choice of a lawyer is an important decision and should not be based solely on advertisement.

ADOPT: College Sweethearts, Successful Business Owners, At-Home Parents, Unconditional LOVE awaits 1st baby. Expenses paid 800-933-1975 Gabby & Kevin

DUI/DWI, KS, MO

P.I.--Work Comp.--Bankruptcy Reasonable rates! Susan Bratcher 816-453-2240 www.bratcherlaw.biz

Attorney since 1976: 913-345-4100, KS/MO. Injuries, workers comp, criminal, divorce, DUI, traffic, and more. Low fees, Call Greg Bangs.

CASH FOR CARS

Wrecked, Damaged or Broken. Running or Not !

Cash Paid ! www.abcautorecycling.com 913-271-9406

LOST WEDDING RING Lost at Massage Envy KC Plaza

Offering $800 REWARD! Rebecca 614-354-8385

SPEEDING DWI CRIMINAL SOLICITATION Call Tim Tompkins Today KCTrafficlawyer.com 913-707-4357 816-729-2606

BE IN A MOVIE!

Auditions on Saturdays in KC. Casting For Feature Film. Lead Roles, Crew, Extras. Male & Female 18+ For Details, Serious Inquiry's: 913-526-5150

Psychic Readings Palm Readings

Tarot Readings Crystal Readings

ACT NOW INVESTIGATIONS ****Confidential****Professional**** Infidelity-Domestic Dramatic Family & Child Issues

Solving Cases For Over 24 Years Fully Licensed & Insured. KS-MO

913-469-0006 actnowinvestigations.com

$99 DIVORCE $99

Personal Injury & Employment Law

Simple, Uncontested + Filing Fee. Don Davis. 816-531-1330

Brady & Associates Law Office. 913-696-0925 Licensed In Missouri, Kansas and Colorado. WWW.MBRADYLAW.COM

AFFORDABLE ATTORNEY

SPEEDING, DWI, POSSESSION, ASSAULT

DOWNTOWN AREA STUDIO APT $112/WEEK Min.

FREE CONSULTATION Call: The Law Office of J.P. Tongson (816) 265-1513

$150 Deposit, All Utilities Paid, Laundry Facilities. Holiday Apts, 115 W. Harlem Rd, KCMO 816-221-1721

U-PICK IT SELF SERVICE AUTO PARTS

ADOPT: College Sweethearts, Successful Business Owners, At-Home Parents, Unconditional LOVE awaits 1st baby. Expenses paid 800-933-1975 Gabby & Kevin

$$ Paying Top Dollar $$ For Junk Cars & Trucks Missouri: 816-241-7548 Kansas: 913-321-1000

Scared? Anxious? Confused?

DUI/DWI, KS, MO

Help Is Here!

DWI, Solicitation, Traffic, Internet Crimes, Hit & Run, Power & Light Violations.

ERICA'S PSYCHIC STUDIO

$10

Reunites Love- Depression-Finances Success 100% Guaranteed Results !

816-965-7125

Readings

816-221-5900 - www.The-Law.com David Lurie Attorney

* DWI * * CRIMINAL * * TRAFFIC * Practice emphasizing DWI defense. Experienced, knowledgeable attorney will take the time to listen and inform. Free initial phone consultation.

THE LAW OFFICE OF DENISE KIRBY 816-221-3691

DWI, SOLICITATION, INTERNET BASED CRIMES

816-221-5900

www.The-Law.com

$99 DIVORCE $99

Law office of David M. Lurie

Simple, Uncontested + Filing Fee. Don Davis. 816-531-1330

AFFORDABLE ATTORNEY

SPEEDING, DWI, POSSESSION, ASSAULT FREE CONSULTATION Call: The Law Office of J.P. Tongson (816) 265-1513

99.7% Toxin Free w/n an hour We can help you pass Coopers 3617 Broadway, KCMO 816.931.7222

LOST WEDDING RING Lost at Massage Envy KC Plaza

Offering $800 REWARD! Rebecca 614-354-8385

SPEEDING DWI CRIMINAL SOLICITATION Call Tim Tompkins Today KCTrafficlawyer.com 913-707-4357 816-729-2606

P.I.--Work Comp.--Bankruptcy Reasonable rates! Susan Bratcher www.bratcherlaw.biz

816-453-2240

Personal Injury & Employment Law

Brady & Associates Law Office. 913-696-0925 Licensed In Missouri, Kansas and Colorado. WWW.MBRADYLAW.COM

Attorney since 1976: 913-345-4100, KS/MO. Injuries, workers comp, criminal, divorce, DUI, traffic, and more. Low fees, Call Greg Bangs.

HOTEL ROOMS A-1 Motel 816-765-6300 Capital Inn 816-765-4331 6101 E. 87th St./Hillcrest Rd. HBO,Phone,Banq. Hall

$37.06 Day/ $149 Week/ $499 Month + Tax


The Pitch: January 10. 2013