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JANUARY 3–9, 2013 | FREE | VOL. 32 NO. 27 | PITCH.COM

JANUARY 3–9, 2013 | VOL. 32 NO. 27 E D I T O R I A L

Editor Scott Wilson Managing Editor Justin Kendall Music Editor David Hudnall Staff Writers Charles Ferruzza, Ben Palosaari Editorial Operations Manager Deborah Hirsch Calendar Editor Berry Anderson Clubs Editor Abbie Stutzer Food Blogger, Web Editor Jonathan Bender Proofreader Brent Shepherd Contributing Writers Tracy Abeln, Theresa Bembnister, April Fleming, Leslie Kinsman, Chris Milbourn, Dan Savage, Abbie Stutzer, Lucas Wetzel Intern Nadia Imafidon

SOME ASSEMBLY REQUIRED Merriam’s Ikea euphoria paves over the failure of Merriam Village. BY B E N PA L O S A A R I

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Art Director Ashford Stamper Contributing Photographers Angela C. Bond, Chris Mullins, Lauren Phillips, Sabrina Staires, Brooke Vandever Design Intern Chloe George

P R O D U C T I O N

Production Manager Christina Riddle Multimedia Designer Vu Radley

A D V E R T I S I N G

Sales Manager Erin Carey Senior Classified Multimedia Specialist Steven Suarez Multimedia Specialists Michelle Acevedo, Kirin Arnold, Collin Click, Page Olson Director of Marketing & Operations Jason Dockery Digital Marketing Manager Keli Sweetland

C I R C U L A T I O N

Circulation Director Mike Ryan

B U S I N E S S

Accounts Receivable Jodi Waldsmith Publisher Joel Hornbostel

S O U T H C O M M

Chief Executive Officer Chris Ferrell Chief Financial Officer Patrick Min Chief Operating Officer Rob Jiranek Chief Marketing Officer Susan Torregrossa Chief Technology Officer Matt Locke Business Manager Eric Norwood Director of Digital Sales & Marketing David Walker Director of Accounting Todd Patton Creative Director Heather Pierce Director of Online Content/Development Patrick Rains

N A T I O N A L

A D V E R T I S I N G

VMG Advertising 888-278-9866, vmgadvertising.com Senior Vice President of Sales Susan Belair Senior Vice President of Sales Operations Joe Larkin

Rolling with KC’s indie printers. BY THERESA BEMBNISTER

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B A C K P A G E . C O M

Vice President Sales & Marketing Carl Ferrer Business Manager Jess Adams Accountant David Roberts

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Hometown: Kansas City, Missouri

Who or what is your sidekick? A cup of coffee from YJ’s or Filling Station. If you see me without a cup of coffee, it’s an impostor. What career would you choose in an alternate reality? An art-gallery owner living in Paris with Coco Chanel (one of my biggest inspirations).

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“In five years, I’ll be …” Continuing to go to the best hairstylist in town: Price Leatherbarrow. What TV show do you make sure you watch?

What was the last local restaurant you patronized? Habashi House in the City Market. They have the best shawarma in town.

The Daily Show With Jon Stewart and Girls. Lena Dunham is brilliant.

Where do you drink? The Foundry and Kelly’s

Neil Young. He’s one of my all-time heroes.

What’s your favorite charity? Charlotte Street

What movie do you watch at least once a year?

Foundation. They’re a fantastic example of how you can directly support artists and sustain a creative community. If you love what Kansas City is doing right now in the arts community, support Charlotte Street.

Favorite place to spend your paycheck: Travel-

ing, Birdies or the Bunker

Celebrity you’d like to ride the Mamba with at Worlds of Fun: Jack White Texts From Last Night. I’ve been reading it since college, and it never gets old.

Where do you like to take out-of-town guests?

What subscription — print, digital, etc. — do you value most? The New Yorker

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“Kansas City screwed up when it …” Didn’t

approve funding for light rail.

“Kansas City needs …” Public transportation

beyond the downtown streetcar.

Was a competitive Irish dancer for most of my life — 15 years.

“On my day off, I like to …” Paint or scavenge

through the vintage stores in the West Bottoms, City Market or Westport. If it’s nice outside, I will take a blanket and my iPod to Loose Park and daydream for hours. (This usually turns into me falling asleep and waking up with a gnarly sunburn.)

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Last book you read: The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho. It’s a story about following your instinct, which is a philosophy I live by. Favorite day trip: My favorite day trip is Springfield to Branson. I went to Drury University in Springfield, and my friends and I would go camping in Busiek (right outside of Branson). The drive during the fall is one of the most beautiful scenes of the Ozarks I’ve ever seen. What is your most embarrassing dating moment?

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What local tradition do you take part in every year? St. Patrick’s Day at Kelly’s

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What local phenomenon do you think is overrated? The Power & Light District Arthur Bryant’s, the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, YJ’s, the City Market and Westport

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Embarrassing dating moment? Never.

Interesting brush with the law? I save those kinds of confessions for my priest.

Describe a recent triumph: Taking the risk

of leaving my former job to work in a more creative, focused position. I now have the opportunity to work for the AAF-KC with some of the most inspiring creative people in the advertising industry.

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SOME ASSEMBLY REQUIRED

Merriam’s Ikea euphoria paves over the failure of Merriam Village.

BY

BEN PALOSAARI

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t’s kind of an interesting story,” Merriam City Administrator Phillip Lammers says of the events that led an Ikea to this suburb. Lammers is right. Merriam probably owes its Ikea — slated for a 2014 opening — to the nation’s economic downturn and the failure of a big-box retailer. It all started with Merriam Village, a shopping development off Interstate 35’s Johnson Drive exit that never opened. “Merriam Village was intended to be kind of an extension of Merriam Town Center,” Lammers says. “It was like, ‘Oh this is going to be groovy.’ ” The complex never had a chance. Planned anchor tenant Circuit City crashed into bankruptcy and went out of business in 2009, leaving Merriam Village vacant. “It’s the old cliché: Be careful what you ask for,” Lammers says of the failed center. “Had they [Circuit City] launched, had that happened, I don’t think we would have an Ikea here.” This past December, the Merriam City Council unanimously approved a deal with the Swedish furniture retailer and erased three years of bad memories with a victory. As part of the deal, DDR Corp., the real-estate firm that owns the land, will sell the 22-acre site to Ikea. Ikea will keep half of a 1-percent sales tax that it generates — up to $19.9 million — over the course of 20 years. The city won’t take on any debt or ownership of any buildings or land, and the $19.9 million cap won’t go up. Merriam is poised to reap the rewards of shoppers who are known to drive to Ikea outposts for Klingsbo coffee tables and Poäng chairs. The first year’s sales revenue is estimated to earn the suburb $445,000 for the general fund and $200,000 for its capitalimprovement projects, according to Lammers. And the state of Kansas is estimated to gain $5 million in the first year. “In general, they will be the largest salestax producer that we have,” Lammers says. In addition to stuffing city coffers, Ikea stores around the country have drawn a variety of businesses near them.

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“I’m very optimistic that is going to happen because there’s a lot of land right around this area that hasn’t been developed,” Lammers says of the surrounding land owned by DDR. If you’re wondering which businesses might follow, Merriam City Council candidate Todd Boyer is already ahead of you. Boyer did a selfdescribed “very unscientific” study, looking at the businesses around 37 other American Ikeas and using Google Maps to find business listings within a quarter mile of the stores. “The things that jumped out is that there are lots of stores. And the crazy thing is, almost a third of those stores are furniture, décor, lighting stores,” Boyer says. Among them are Ashley Furniture, Ethan Allen Design Center, Pier 1 Imports and Sleep Number. “These are things that Ikea obviously already sells

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and supports themselves [by selling]. These guys enhance that and offer some additional products.” Boyer also found that the Ikeas are surrounded by a total of 169 restaurants (which he says he’s most looking forward to having in the area), three Apple Stores, and 24 sportinggoods stores, among other retailers. There’s worldwide precedent for the theory that businesses near Ikeas experience increased sales. In 2010, a Deutsche Bank analyst made a name for the bump in revenue that businesses near Ikea stores receive: the “honey pot effect.” The final hurdles to Merriam’s Ikea bliss were cleared with the Merriam City Council’s December 17 approval of the plan. (DDR confirmed the sale of the site the next day.)

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Boyer’s map to the Ikea honey Construction of the 349,000-square-foot outlet is expected to begin next summer, with a planned fall 2014 opening. Lammers says the potential for other businesses (or end-users, as he calls them) — and even more tax revenue — to follow Ikea to Merriam is likely to happen. “I think the good thing is that there are end-users being contemplated in the neighborhood, which I think is really exciting to us. And that’s on top of the $8.9 million in the general sales tax,” he says. “I was told by a planner that they are already looking at some proposed sites for an end-user near this.”

E-mail ben.palosaari@pitch.com

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TS, VISIT

ICKE FO OR T

Press Here SKILL, ARTISTRY, PROCESS, ENTREPRENEURSHIP

—THIS IS HOW KC’S INDIE PRINTERS ROLL.

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f you’re reading these words on newsprint, you’re looking at a page that has been machineproduced for a large audience — something manufactured, as most everything is, with efficiency and cost-effectiveness in mind. But not everybody who puts ink to paper operates that way. A vibrant community of commercial printers in Kansas City has purposely adopted laborintensive methods, sometimes using decades-old equipment that has fallen out of fashion, collateral to printing’s digital revolution. The entrepreneurial artists, designers and craftspeople spotlighted on the next few pages have found a profession that they say is a means to selfexpression and a way to improve their surroundings. They share a passion for process, and their missions are simple: impeccable craft, outstanding design, high-quality products. Arguably, they’re making something else, too: a KC indie-press boom. continued on page 8 pitch.com J A N U A R Y 3 - 9, 2 0 1 3 pitch.com M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X

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Hammerpress

110 Southwest Boulevard, 816-421-1929, hammerpress.net —−–—–−—−–—−—–——−–—–−—−–—−—–——−–—–−—−–—−—–—

Proprietor: Brady Vest Established: 1994 Services: design, letterpress Specialties: wholesale and retail paper goods and wedding invitations

Brady Vest (top), in his element at Hammerpress; left: staff members at work; above: the shop’s retail space.

It would be hard to overstate Hammerpress’ role in the development of Kansas City’s hive of small, artist-run print shops. Owner Brady Vest got hooked on letterpress as a student in the printmaking department at the Kansas City Art Institute (where his senior thesis was the production of 1,000 CD covers for a local band). “When I graduated, I had to figure out a way to keep doing it,” Vest says. So he purchased equipment he found advertised in a trade magazine, which he had picked up on campus (this was pre-Internet), and then he set up shop. Nearly 20 years later, Hammerpress is a Crossroads retail staple, shipping its original-design paper goods (stationery, posters, calendars, greeting cards) internationally. The company’s aesthetic has maintained the look of the original handset type, though plates today are usually produced from digital files rather than assembled by hand. And Vest has come a long way from the pre-Internet world. Hammerpress’ website and social-media presence attract customers from all over the world — customers whose digital routines have perhaps inspired a renewed appreciation for the handmade. “The Internet and Martha Stewart” revived the letterpress, Vest says. “I’m serious. Ten years ago, she was highlighting letterpress wedding invitations. Ten years ago, you’d have to explain to people what that is.” Thanks to artist-run print shops like Hammerpress, an explanation is no longer necessary.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Two Tone Press

3121 Gillham Road, 816-719-7270, twotonepress.yolasite.com —−–—–−—−–—−—–——−–—–−—−–—−—–——−–—–−—−–—−—–—

Proprietors: Michelle Dreher and Angie Dreher-Bayman Established: 2005 Services: design, letterpress Specialty: wedding invitations For now, Michelle Dreher and Angie Dreher-Bayman hold most of their client meetings at the Filling Station, just down the street from the building they’ve been renovating to house Two Tone’s studio, offices and retail space. Purchased from Truman Medical Center two years ago (in a deal partly financed by bartered prints), the building holds the partners’ three vintage Vandercook letterpresses and a Chandler & Price platen press. Dreher fell in love with the letterpress process as a student at the Kansas City Art Institute. She says, “It takes a certain kind of person to get grease on your fingers and want to work with machinery. I love it.” Her sister’s zeal, on the other hand, is for lists and spreadsheets. After joining the business in 2011, DreherBayman streamlined the pricing and revamped the business’s Web presence. She also convinced the reluctant Dreher to court more wedding work, a portion of their business that has since blossomed. When they’re not designing or printing for clients, the two produce their own line of fine-art prints and stationery, which they sell at craft and print fairs and on Etsy. 82 TT HH EE PP II TT CC H H

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Above, from left: Angie Dreher-Bayman and Michelle Dreher; left: the sisters divide their duties.

printosaurus.org, bestprintshop@yahoo.com —−–—–−—−–—−—–——−–—–−—−–—−—–——−–—–−—−–—−—–—

Proprietors: Chris and Lauren Foxworth Established: 2009 Services: design, screen-printing Specialty: original T-shirt designs Printosaurus’ husband-and-wife team, Chris and Lauren Foxworth, met as dorm neighbors during their freshman year at the Kansas City Art Institute. After graduating, the couple started taking screen-printing jobs on the side while working at a local business that printed soccer jerseys. Printosaurus began in the couple’s living and work space in 2009, after the Foxworths purchased a dryer, an exposure unit and a six-color manual T-shirt press from a friend of a friend.

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HOW THEY DO IT

Printosaurus

The company offers design services and screen-printing on textiles and paper goods, and its clients include Broadway Café and Spin Neapolitan Pizza. Doodling while watching movies together (the two now share another day-job workplace, Tivoli Cinemas) provides inspiration for the T-shirt designs that they sell through their website and on Etsy. They say they want to open a Printosaurus retail space, a goal they’re saving toward. Even without brick-and-mortar overhead, though, the Foxworths keep their prices low to make sure that anyone can afford to own an original design. “Who says art has to be expensive?” Chris Foxworth says. “Might as well have quality images for cheap.”

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n letterpress, an inked plate with a raised image or text is placed into the bed of a press before paper is pressed or rolled against it to create an impression. A form of relief printing, letterpress has a distinctly crisp, three-dimensional quality, thanks to the shadow effect created when the plate hits the paper.

Lauren and Chris Foxworth are working toward a brick-and-mortar store.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ La Cucaracha Press 2009 Campbell, 816-868-3678, lacucarachapress.com —−–—–−—−–—−—–——−–—–−—−–—−—–——−–—–−—−–—−—–—

Proprietors: Jordan Carr, Nicholas Naughton and Eric Lindquist Established: 2011 Services: design, letterpress, silkscreen Specialty: community-focused printing

Eric Lindquist, Nicholas Naughton and Jordan Carr (above, from left) believe in word of mouth.

Community is at the core of La Cucaracha Press, which grew out of the ruins of the Arts Incubator’s Inkubator Press, a membership-based printmaking studio that closed when the city shuttered its parent organization’s doors in June 2011. Nicholas Naughton, who served as Inkubator’s director, along with shop monitors Eric Lindquist and Jordan Carr, purchased some of the defunct press’s equipment to start a new shop. Operating from a space in the City Ice Arts Building, La Cucaracha offers design services along with letterpress and screen-printing, but the shop also retains a membership-based system similar to Inkubator’s, with a small roster of regular members paying rent to use the space and its equipment. The press generates work through word of mouth; its jobs have included labels for Broadway Café’s bottles of 20th-anniversary roast, tags and look books for Method boutique’s Negro Leagues Baseball Museum clothing line, and fine-art prints for Peruvian Connection stores. Most of La Cucaracha’s original designs center on repurposed vintage images, with a handmade aesthetic that takes advantage of printmaking’s inherent irregularities. Further cementing its community-centered status, La Cucaracha has served as a home base for the Phresh Prints Co-op, made up of Kansas City Art Institute students who volunteer their design and printing services to local nonprofits. continued on page 10

Letterpress was the most widespread printing method until the development of offset printing in the 20th century. Offset printing allows for more efficiency; paper can be fed mechanically into the press, and more than one color can be printed at once. But letterpress printing began making a comeback in the mid-1990s, and small presses began to proliferate. Popular presses now in use by small shops include models made by Vandercook, Chandler & Price and Heidelberg.

In order to create a screen print, a stencil of an image is first transferred onto a porous mesh screen using a light-sensitive chemical process. The screen is then held in place over paper or textile while ink is squeegeed across its surface. The ink forced through the screen creates areas of color on the material below. A separate screen must be created for each color in the final image. In a manual press, the squeegee is moved by hand; an automated press uses mechanized fill blades to spread the ink across the screen. After printing, the textile or paper must dry, most often by lying flat or traveling through a conveyor belt on a drying machine.

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Union Press Screen Printing Co. 1219 Union, 816-842-5683, unionscreenprinting.net —−–—–−—−–—−—–——−–—–−—−–—−—–——−–—–−—−–—−—–—

Proprietor: Zach Lovely Established: 2005 Services: screen-printing Specialty: small runs of T-shirts In order to reach the printing equipment at Union Press, you have to walk by what Zach Lovely describes as the “workout facility”: a graffiti-covered ramp that’s positioned just right for skateboarding breaks. But you expect that here — Lovely is the man behind Lovely Skateboards. He started Union Press as a way to cut a middleman out of the clothing line he designs, and he had a key ally: Brian Scott, the production manager who honed his skills making prints for the Chicago Museum of Contemporary Art. The business specializes in small runs of T-shirts (a typical order is just 24–50 pieces), and his local clients now include Mercy Seat Tattoo and Art Gallery, Lady Luck Hair Parlour, and the Blue Nile Café.

Lovely says the shop’s attention to detail sets it apart: “A lot of people just pump the jobs out. We actually care. We’re not going to let you print your logo on your belly like a Care Bear. We’ll move it up to where it’s supposed to be.” He hopes to open a satellite location for the print shop in Denver, but there’s no plan to return to a retail-store model in KC. Trunk shows and online shops are the only places to find his Lovely line and Scott’s Nug Life label.

Above, from left: Brian Scott, Brandon Chowning and Zach Lovely prefer details to middlemen.

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Skylab Letterpress 1968 Linn, North Kansas City, 816-472-0002, skylabletterpress.com —−–—–−—−–—−—–——−–—–−—−–—−—–——−–—–−—−–—−—–—

Proprietor: Bob Atkins Established: 2006 Services: letterpress, die-cutting, photopolymer

plate development Specialty: high-quality printing

Above: Katie Stamer and Ben Jones at work; top right: Bob Atkins, perfectionist 10 AN NTUHA RXYX–X 3 - 9, 4 TTHHEE PPI ITTCCHH MJO X , 2200103X pitch.com pitch.com

You don’t have to spend much time in the pressroom at Skylab Letterpress to realize that owner Bob Atkins and press operator Ben Jones are geeks — about printing and about science fiction. Atkins learned the letterpress craft while working at Rohner Letterpress, a shop in Chicago, and he opened Skylab in 2006 after attending the Kauffman Foundation’s FastTrac program. The business’s name (which refers to the NASA space station that orbited the Earth

from 1973 to 1979) reflects Atkins’ interest in all things out-of-this-world. Skylab prints large-volume letterpress jobs exclusively designed by outside clients, which have included Lululemon Athletica and the School of Visual Arts in New York City. Skylab is home to three Heidelberg windmill presses and one cylinder press, which allows the shop to comfortably produce 2,500 one-color impressions an hour — way more than a smaller, hand-fed Vandercook press — without sacrificing the three-dimensional quality that’s achievable only through letterpress. “They say that out of cheap, fast or perfect, you can get two of the three,” Atkins says. “We don’t offer cheap or fast here.”

Vahall a Studios

1401 Fairfax Trafficway, KCK, 913-233-0373, vahallastudios.com —−–—–−—−–—−—–——−–—–−—−–—−—–——−–—–−—−–—−—–—

Proprietors: Dan Padavic and Tad Carpenter Established: 2006 Services: design, illustration, screen-printing, letterpress Specialty: concert posters Tad Carpenter and Dan Padavic have been friends since they were 15 and played football for rival high schools. These days, they’re business partners. The two began running screen-printing jobs at night, after putting in hours at their day jobs. Their big break came when they landed Myspace Secret Shows as a client. Over three years, they produced posters for 164 Myspace-produced concerts. When not busy designing for Vahalla Studios, Carpenter maintains his own busy freelance practice, while Padavic’s entrepreneurial spirit has led him to start a fulfillment company. The networks that Padavic and Carpenter have developed in these careers provide a steady stream of business. The partners concentrate on fine-art screen- and letterpress prints for artists and designers, with an emphasis on the music industry. “Everything coming through here is going to be cherished by someone at some point,” Carpenter says. “It’s creating a memory for someone.” Eventually, he adds, Vahalla could expand into designing music festivals and making music videos or animation.

Dan Padavic (left) and Tad Carpenter know they’re making memories.

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Bandwagon Merchandise 2924 Cherry, 913-712-9496, bandwagonmerch.com —−–—–−—−–—−—–——−–—–−—−–—−—–——−–—–−—−–—−—–—

Proprietor: Ryan Beye Established: 2007 Services: screen-printing, T-shirt finishing Specialty: T-shirts screen-printed for wholesale

Beye’s mastery of the business led to serious product volume.

As this story was going to press, The Pitch learned that Bandwagon founder Ryan Beye had died. Beye, pictured above, died in his sleep December 28, according to his girlfriend, Abby Dimalanta. He was 31. In less than 10 years, Beye, a fixture in the local music scene, had gone from making buttons alone in a garage to running a company that employed 11 people, printed 250,000 shirts a year, and was admired by its local peers. Bandwagon Merchandise, which originally focused on

music-industry clients, grew so quickly that Beye had to decide between college and running his company. He chose the latter, and it proved a savvy move. He told The Pitch in December that Bandwagon’s original four-color press had given way to an eight-color automatic press and two manual six-color presses. The company was focusing on large-scale projects, with a client list including Urban Outfitters and Hot Topic (along with Waldo Habitat for Humanity ReStore and Boulevard Brewing Co.). Dimalanta says Bandwagon’s staff and Beye’s family are committed to ensuring that Bandwagon Merchandise will continue.

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WEEK OF JANUARY 3–9 | BY BERRY ANDERSON

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PAG E

FILM FDR’s motor runs in Hyde Park.

20 PAG E

FAT C I T Y Jamina Bone is brewing KCK a Cup.

24 PAG E

MUSIC FORECAST Celebrate the King’s 78th birthday.

FIRST-FRIDAY ROUNDUP One of the good things about First Friday during the winter months is the likelihood of smaller crowds — meaning a better chance of seeing the art but enough fellow viewers to hear some opinions or even share your own. There’s also the likelihood that something has been held over a bit longer than it might have been in the more crowded summer. Case in point: Blue Gallery (118 Southwest Boulevard) has extended a group exhibition that includes the latest provocative portraits by painter Lacey Lewis. And there’s a high-end bargain bin (called the Wonder Wall) of works priced at less than $500. Got some cash over the holidays? Now’s your chance to pick up a gift for yourself while supporting local artists. Over at the Leedy-Voulkos Art Center (2012 Baltimore), a few new exhibitions open tonight in the smaller galleries, but a burst of swirling color is waiting to delight your eyes and get you thinking. Stacie Chappell’s Mindful Movement does what her artist statement pledges: “Explores spatial movement of color and form as a metaphor for psychological states.” This visual stream of consciousness is on large canvases and takes up the whole front gallery. The main gallery takes a more controlled look at composition. Using crossword puzzles as his guide, Fernando Pezzino creates multiple square canvases and other angled shapes, each bursting with geometric shapes in bold colors, in the captivating exhibit Filling

T H U R S D AY | 1 . 3 |

EVERY FAN A WILDCAT

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uring the 2012 season, Kansas State earned its highest final Bowl Championship Series ranking in school history. Tonight at 7:30, the Wildcats square off against the University of Oregon in the Fiesta Bowl. Put on some purple (or green, if you’re feeling bold) and watch the game at one of these K-State-friendly hangouts. Sharks (10320 Shawnee Mission Parkway, Shawnee, 913-268-4006). Sharks is seriously gigantic, so there’s plenty of room for your empty glasses as you throw back $2 wells, $3 calls, $4 premiums and $5 bombs. Dub V’s Bar & Deli (122 North Cherry, Olathe,

FRIDAY

1. 4

on d deer See sa ay. id r F t Firs

Laura DeAngelis “Even the Mighty Will Fall” (detail) the Void. In the back of the space is Objects of Interest/The Interest of Objects, Michael Hager’s manifestation of his belief that humans are feeling animals and therefore experience reality only through the bodily senses. The four works in his show look like pieces of bridges, evoke ships’ sails and appear deceptively weighty. If you didn’t make it to Omaha’s Bemis Center about a year ago to see the grotesque stilllife photo arrangements by Vera Mercer (her

F R I D AY | 1 . 4 | 913-782-3827). Across the street from the Johnson County Courthouse, it’s $3 you-call-its. (Premiums and super-premiums don’t count, y’all.) Drivers Sport Café (8220 Metcalf, Overland Park, 913-383-5353). This cozy joint just south of downtown Overland Park has nine screens to hold your attention while you work on $2.75 bottled beer, $2 16-ounce PBR cans and $2 Busch Light bottles. During the game, the shot special is a $2 Fireball. Lucky Brewgrille (5401 Johnson Drive, Mission, 913-403-8571). This bar and grill made the move from Manhattan, Kansas, in 2001 and pulls in big crowds. The Cat-backer hangout features $2.50 domestic draws all night.

first solo exhibition), good news: Her largescale photos of arranged raw meats, waterfowl awaiting plucking, and household objects, fashioned after the 17th-century Dutch and Flemish style, are at Sherry Leedy Contemporary Art (2004 Baltimore). Also new here are the bold figurative ceramic sculptures by Laura DeAngelis. Pearl Diving includes an 80-inch-tall pair of playing-card towers topped by antlered deer heads. — TRACY ABELN

S AT U R D AY | 1 . 5 |

EAT AMERICAN

This past November, the American Restaurant (200 East 25th Street, 816-545-8000) made OpenTable’s list of the top 100 restaurants. The spacious, refined establishment overlooking Crown Center had an average score of 4.7 out of 5. Don’t let the thought of valet parking, aboveaverage prices and a cellar of 1,500 wines intimidate you. Consider lunch, which the American serves on First Fridays. “The lunch menu is different from our normal dinner menu because it’s a la carte,” says Tara Truax, the American’s event sales and service supervisor. “The starters and salads range in price from $7 to $13, and our sandwiches and entrées range in price from $9 to $17. Our menu is your ‘standard lunch’ menu with an American twist.” Also, bottles of wine are 50 percent off. Get in early if you can. Reservations begin at 11:30 a.m. Call 816-545-8001 or see theamericankc.com.

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KILROY WAS — IS — THERE

It’s been more than a decade since concert promoter Jim Kilroy published the last issue of his hard-rock-and-metal rag, Banzai Magazine, and he says it’s never coming back. “It’s not profitable, and it would take more time to put together than I can spare,” Kilroy tells us. But you can’t keep the Banzai Awards down, and the zine’s legacy burns bright tonight at Knuckleheads (2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456). The annual Banzai Awards recognize the musicians whom Kilroy says are the metro’s finest. Celebrate the winners, including the recipient of Kilroy’s first-ever Elvis Award, at 10:30 p.m. Purchase tickets ($10) at the door or at knuckleheads.com. See banzaimagazine.net for a list of winners since 1988. continued on page 14 J A N U A R Y 3 - 9, 2 0 1 3

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It’s been less than a year since the debut of Invicta FC, the all-pro women’s mixed martial arts organization that started up right here in KC. “We have really gotten big … and I have been nominated as Man of the Year by the Fighters Only MMA Awards in Las Vegas on January 11,” says Invicta CEO Shannon Knapp (who’s totally a woman). Tonight, see seven preliminary fights on the undercard (including one with KC native Laura Marcusse-Sanko, making her pro debut) and six additional matchups with fighters from around the globe, including Japan, Scotland and Australia. The main event features Rio de Janeiro’s undefeated Claudia Gadelha vs. Redondo Beach, California’s Carla Esparza. The fighting begins at 6 p.m. at Memorial Hall (600 North Seventh Street, Kansas City, Kansas, 913-549-4853). Tickets start at $25; see invictafc.com.

S U N D AY | 1 . 6 |

new Year’S reSOLutiOn:

Learn to be more fLexibLe

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JOIN THE BREW CREW

Jennifer Helber has been brewing her own beer for six years, with an additional seven years of experience in commercial brewing. The owner of the home-brewing supply store Grain to Glass has seen many mistakes made by new brewers. Learn the right way to brew when Helber teaches Homebrewing for Beginners, at 6 p.m. at the store (114 West Third Street, 816-472-0516), in the first of two meetings. “We’ll all brew a 5-gallon batch together, which will ferment in a bucket and carboy for two weeks at the store,” Helber says. “Two weeks later, the class will bottle the two-case

S AT U R D AY | 1 . 5 |

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orth Little Rock, Arkansas’ Flameing Daeth Fearies have opened for Foxy Shazam, Insane Clown Posse, (hed) p.e. and Electric Six. The band also comes with a 5,000-watt light show, and fog and bubble machines. “It’s basically as much Trans-Siberian Orchestra as we could fit in a Dodge Sprinter,” says Rusti Majere, singer and guitarist. FDF thrashes and bashes through each set with the Feary Doom Squad, its troupe of dancing girls. You have to see this one at the Bottleneck (737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483) to believe it. Tickets cost $11 and $13 for this 8 p.m., 18-and-older show.

Union Station

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batch, and each person will take home a sixpack.” To sign up, see brownpapertickets. com and search for the name of the class. The $35 fee covers both sessions and includes a $10 discount on equipment afterward.

DUCK AND COVER

Today is the last chance to see Alert Today, Alive Tomorrow: Living with the Atomic Bomb 1945–1965 at the Kansas City Central Library (14 West 10th Street, 816-701-3400). The exhibit recalls a time when the threat of nuclear war was palpable in everyday life and a political reality. View it during library hours today from 1 to 5 p.m. For more information, see kclibrary.org.

M O N D AY | 1 .7 | HAWGS IN ACTION

Nothing else symbolizes personal freedom quite like a Harley. And the motorcycle company’s Sportster, Dyna and VRSC models are homegrown, rolling off the line at Harley-Davidson Vehicle and Powertrain Operations (11401 North Congress Avenue). The 358,000-square-foot factory offers a Steel Toe Tour, which whisks small groups on a behind-the-scenes, close-up look at how a vehicle is put together. (Seriously, wear shoes with closed toes.) Your $35 admission includes a commemorative pin, a group photo and a $5 gift-shop coupon. The twohour tours start at 9:15 a.m. and noon. Make reservations by calling 877-883-1450 or see harley-davidson.com/experience.

T U E S D AY | 1 . 8 | HONKY-TONK MAN

It’s been awhile since The Pitch caught up with Scott Hobart, the man behind the Rex Hobart Honky Tonk Supper Club. In 2006, Hobart and his band played the dinner-show slot every Tuesday at RecordBar (1020 Westport Road, 816-753-5207) but has scaled back. “We decided to ‘rarify’ ourselves a couple of years ago by playing just the first Tuesday of every month,” Hobart says. The band starts the new year with a one-off, second-Tuesday performance from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. tonight. Dance or eat pizza — your choice. Admission is free. The Pitch: Who’s playing in the band? Hobart: Rex Hobart and the Honky Tonk Standards for the Supper Club is made up of myself, Paul Andrews’ drums, Daryl

Hobart’s country club Logue’s pedal steel, Mike Smarr’s lead guitar and Craig Lagerman’s bass, but the band started as Rex Hobart and the Misery Boys (TC Dobbs’ drums, Solomon Hofer’s pedal steel, JB Morris’ lead guitar and Blackjack Charlotte Snow’s bass as my original road and studio band). They still come out to play when they get the itch, though. Have you been working on new songs or will you be playing standards from your catalog? I’ve been working up more of my old original tunes with the Honky Tonk Standards over the last year. The regulars at the Honky Tonk Supper Club will tell you I can butcher the classics with the best of them, so we’ll keep plenty of those on hand, too. Who do you cover? As far as covers, we always do a good number of Haggard, Jones, Paycheck and Buck, plus some more obscure real — or “hard” — country artists we love.

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W E D N E S D AY | 1 . 9 | THE BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE

Don’t expect to see Bar Refaeli (No. 1 on Maxim’s Hot 100 in 2012) or Robert Pattinson (Glamour’s Sexiest Man of 2012) in Look Attractive at the UMKC Gallery of Art. The exhibition’s seven national and international artists have concentrated on the influences of beauty: physical, biological, cultural, environmental and societal. The gallery is located in the university’s Fine Arts Building (5015 Holmes, 816-235-1502). Look Attractive is open by appointment only and closes January 14.

Targets of attraction at the UMKC Gallery of Art. E-mail submissions to Filter editor Berry Anderson at calendar@pitch.com. Search our complete listings guide online at pitch.com.

pitch.com

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FIND MOVIE TIMES P ON

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INVITE YOU AND A GUEST TO SEE

ENTER FOR THE CHANCE TO WIN AN ADMIT-TWO PASS TO SEE

p

You and a guest are invited to a special advance screening of Text the word PITCH and your zip code to 43549 for a chance to win a pair of complimentary advance screening passes on to see Thursday, January 3 at 7:00PM.

EMAIL US AT KANSASCITY@43KIX.COM WITH YOUR FULL NAME, AGE, MAILING ADDRESS, AND “TEXAS” IN THE SUBJECT LINE.

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Entry Deadline: January 10 @ 5PM

There is no charge to text 43KIX. Message and data rates from your wireless carrier may apply. THIS FILM IS RATED R. Passes will be awarded by random drawing. Supplies are limited. LIMIT ONE ADMIT TWO PASS PER PERSON. Sponsors and their dependents not eligible to receive a pass. Screening is overbooked to ensure capacity. Please refer to pass for any other possible restrictions. No purchase necessary. All federal, state and local restrictions apply. A recipient of tickets assumes any and all risks related to the use of the ticket and accepts any restrictions required by the ticket provided. Focus Features, Allied-THA and the Pitch and their affiliates accept no responsibility or liability in connection with any loss or accident incurred in connection with use of prize. Tickets cannot be exchanged, transferred or redeemed for cash, in whole or in part. We are not responsible if, or any reason, winner is unable to use his/her ticket in whole or in part. You must be 18 years or older.

*NO PURCHASE NECESSARY. VOID WHERE PROHIBITED OR RESTRICTED BY LAW. Limit two admit-one passes per person. 100 passes available. Employees of participating sponsors are not eligible. This film has been rated R for strong violence including brutal disturbing images, and for language.

IN THEATERS JANUARY 11 WWW.ZERODARKTHIRTY-MOVIE.COM

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Hyde Park on Hudson’s FDR: hot dogs and hand jobs.

I

t can be confusing to see so much talent and good intention poured into an enterprise as wrongheaded as Hyde Park on Hudson. You see Bill Murray giving a studious but unmannered performance as President Franklin D. Roosevelt, and you wonder why he makes you wince. You watch Laura Linney — who can do anything because she’s Laura Linney — take a method E MOR approach to playing a wallflower and disappear in front of your eyes, midT A E IN ONL .COM sentence. You take in the PITCH nostalgic pleasantness of the Depression-era sets and costumes, the PBS whiff of the handsome camerawork and lighting, and you ask yourself: Is it I, or is this actually, as my grandmother might have put it, horrid? It’s not you. Linney plays Margaret Suckley, the president’s sixth cousin, whom friends called Daisy and whom Roosevelt — according to this trite, vacant movie — knew as “the one who gave me the handy in my convertible.” Suckley’s manual stimulation of FDR is a matter of debate. Geoffrey Ward, from whose

FILM

1995 book, Closest Companion: The Unknown Story of the Intimate Friendship Between Franklin Roosevelt and Margaret Suckley, this film’s screenplay is drawn, says the cousins’ relationship was almost certainly hands-off. But in the

Linney and Murray ride into history. historical-liberties department, playwright Richard Nelson’s script bears just right of Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter, so one gen-

BY

S C O T T W IL S ON

teel shot of a car rocked ever so slightly by a presidential orgasm isn’t the most grating violation on view. Nelson and director Roger Michell, not content with the implied bedroom farce of putting together in one house FDR, Daisy, Eleanor Roosevelt (Olivia Williams, stranded) and Missy LeHand (the president’s secretary, with whom he did have an affair, played here by Elizabeth Marvel), add a royal visit. So we’re there for the June 1939 weekend when King George VI (Samuel West) and Queen Elizabeth (Olivia Colman) stop at FDR’s Hudson River estate long enough to eat some hot dogs and suss out an alliance for the coming war. (West and Colman are both very good, lending a little depth to parts written with a condescending snarl.) And that’s basically it: A stressed-out president needs a little attention from a woman who doesn’t mind being treated like a doormat, so that he can be clearheaded as he brings hope to England, by way of barbecued wieners. It’s not confusing after all, but Linney is made to read what feels like a lot of voice-over anyway, a dumb movie talking to you as though you were a moron. ■

OUT THIS WEEK McDormand, digging deeper than required), encounter the locals and contend with Noble’s aggressive counterinsurgency, moral compasses are adjusted, flirtations are exchanged and lessons are learned. Without the EggersDamon-Krasinski pedigree (Van Sant’s name helps, too, though he came aboard only after Damon had to drop out of what would have been his directorial debut), this expertly made but lightweight movie probably wouldn’t exist at all. With those names attached, though, Promised Land feels like a missed opportunity.

— S.W.

NOT FADE AWAY

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PROMISED LAND

Damon knows better in Promised Land.

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written by Damon and John Krasinski from a story by Dave Eggers. It’s a sort of Guess Who’s Coming to Fuck Up My Land, and it makes room in its story for hints of romance (Butler likes a schoolteacher named Alice, played by Rosemarie DeWitt), a demonstration for children of how fracking can go wrong (so simple, even an adult movie audience won’t miss the point) and Hal Holbrook’s cataracts. Butler’s latest target is a small rural community that looks ready for some land-lease salvation. But once he’s on the scene there, his conscience is pricked by Alice and by the appearance of Krasinski’s character, an environmentalist eye-rollingly named Dustin Noble. As Butler and his partner, Sue (Frances

romised Land starts with a fine scene, a vaguely menacing corporate one-on-one in the Michael Clayton mode. Steve Butler (Matt Damon) is up for a big promotion within the energy company for which he has been an extremely successful traveling salesman. Director Gus Van Sant keeps the camera on Damon as the actor lays out Butler’s homegrown motivation for making rural America buy into fracking. Fracking, a controversial method by which natural gas is extracted from the Earth, is the topic of Van Sant’s movie, a throwback to the message pictures of an earlier era. Stanley Kramer would have loved a script like this one, an earnest, magazine-y narrative co-

ot Fade Away is writer-director David Chase’s rock-and-roll-changed-my-life movie. Chase, who created The Sopranos, takes us back to New Jersey, this time to the garage-band Garden State of the early 1960s. His stand-in for this semi-autobiographical story is Douglas (spunk-fi lled newcomer John Magaro), a decent kid and aspiring drummer who gets bitten by the rock bug when the British Invasion hits. As moptopped bands like the Beatles and the Rolling Stones infect kids’ minds, this clean-cut teen is growing his hair in a frizzy ’fro, joining a band and getting into fights with the old man (played by James Gandolfini, Tony Soprano himself, here more melancholy than menacing). Douglas has a crush on Grace (Australian actress Bella Heathcote), who sees the budding rock star in him. A soulful romance develops, and it takes on the quality of a rock

Out of Chase’s head: Jersey boys. dream, something worthy of a Springsteen monologue — disapproving dad and all. No surprise, Chase has had soundtrack help from E Street Band and Sopranos veteran Steven Van Zandt, who supplies a gritty take on Merseybeat-influenced garage rock, a sound suff used with blues and blue collars. For all its wall-to-wall rock cues and archival performance clips, Not Fade Away is largely a quiet, nostalgic story, told in a somber, Paul Mazursky-like tone. As he did in The Sopranos, Chase examines themes of suburban family dysfunction within suburban walls. And, once again, Chase has trouble knowing how to end a story. Still, Not Fade Away is an adoring, personal love letter to rock and roll. — CRAIG D. LINDSEY

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CAFÉ

PLEASED TO MEAT YOU

Whatever Anton’s Taproom is, it’s a cool place to get a steak.

BY

CHARLES FERRUZZA

Anton’s Taproom and Restaurant • 1610 Main, 816-888-8800 • Hours: 11 a.m.–10 p.m. Sunday–Thursday, 11 a.m.–11 p.m. Friday and Saturday • Price: $$–$$$

PITCH READERS

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very restaurant needs a personality. Anton’s Taproom and Restaurant, at 16th Street and Main, hasn’t stopped at just one. It’s not just a restaurant. It’s also a saloon, with 72 beers on tap. And a butcher shop. And an art gallery. Oh, and there’s the sustainability center in the basement, where babylettuce plants grow under artificial light and, in a different, glass-enclosed space — black, bubbling tanks about the size of bathtubs — tilapia is raised. Anton Kotar, who opened his namesake venue last month, seems to have packed a whole career’s worth of restaurateur ambition into the place. And now it has yet another identity: You can call it a success. I’ve eaten at Anton’s at least five times, and the main dining room (which also holds the bar) has been packed on each occasion, even E MOR weeknights. It’s an attractive space, lighted with an array of mismatched T A E IN ONL .COM chandeliers and with PITCH black-and-white harlequin triangles painted onto the building’s old wood floors. The room is noisy when the place is full, but the sound is convivial rather than annoying. And the voices you hear mainly belong to men. “Are the patrons here always mostly male?” I asked my server one night. He looked at me with undisguised incredulity. “This is a steakhouse,” he answered. Oh, right — Anton’s is also a steakhouse. In fact, the succulent, dry-aged beef here is among the work-in-progress menu’s more stable choices. Weeks after Anton’s official opening, the single-page listing of starters, salads and dinner choices is still printed in red and gray ink (in a hard-to-read typeface), with the red items reliably available and the gray (chicken-fried steak, braised pork belly, fish tacos, that tilapia) still missing in action. On one of my visits, a server aggressively steered me toward a rib-eye that he insisted had been aging nearly as long as I have. It sounded tempting, and his pitch was sure and amusing. But at more than $2 an ounce, my entrée would have cost more than my cable bill. I settled on a 7-ounce filet instead and was rewarded with one of the most beautifully prepared, delicious filets I’ve ever eaten in Kansas City. It was so good that I almost wish I had thrown caution to the wind and ordered the rib-eye. Almost. One of my favorite places to sit in the restaurant is at the four-seat counter that faces the kitchen and prep area. The kitchen crew at Anton’s is top-notch, and it can be a pleasure simply to see people at work when they’re this serious about turning out good food. I stopped in one night for a sandwich and watched one of the cooks carefully slicing fat from some wellmarbled hunks of beef, fastidiously saving the

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Offer expires January 11, 2013. Discounted item must be of equal or lesser value. scraps. “We render them and use the tallow in You can’t miss Anton’s. other dishes,” the cook explained. That combination of transparency and best pastry chefs in the city, to create the sustainability amounts to the real identity at desserts for the restaurant, and Holton’s list Anton’s. If the staff members aren’t too busy, changes frequently. One night’s offerings inthey’ll happily take customers to the basement cluded a lemon tart, profiteroles filled with to see the lettuce and the herbs and the tilapia brown-butter-and-praline ice cream, and a tubs. (When I worked in restaurants, it was bourbon-pecan bread pudding served on rare to see a kitchen crew recycle anything; a a puddle of silky caramel sauce. I went for lot of perfectly good foodstuffs were thrown the bread pudding, and its texture and conin the trash at the end of the night.) sistency were just right. It would have been The hamburgers here — 8 ounces of houseextraordinary if served warm. (Cold bread ground beef — are splendid, pudding always tastes sad and the fries hold their own and leftover to me.) Anton’s Taproom in that company. The meat in I expected a little attitude and Restaurant the fried-chicken sandwich from a place with such a dis14-day aged filet is good, but the concoction tinct hipness quotient, but mignon.............. $4.45/ounce is nearly impossible to eat the service at Anton’s was Short-rib sandwich ............$12 gracefully. The two chicken smooth, professional and Fried-chicken tenders, fried in a thick generally first-rate. That hip sandwich............................$10 armor of crunchy batter, are factor emerges in the occaBurger ....................................$8 tucked into a bun slathered sional joke, with the staff ’s Bread pudding ...................... $7 with way too much wholecollective wit tending toward ground mustard. It’s a yellow a half-ironic arrogance: “I’m accident waiting to happen. The best sand- just here,” one server told me, “to guide you wich is a heap of tender short-rib meat piled on through the dining experience.” a bun with caramelized onion, fresh arugula, Well, a guide comes in handy when a resa slice of Gruyère cheese and mushrooms. taurant has multiple personalities and a maze At a glance, the Anton’s menu doesn’t seem of interior destinations — the art gallery is upto offer much for vegetarians (give or take the stairs, and the butcher shop is just south of the salads and the tempura-fried pickles). But kitchen. Anton’s Taproom is still figuring out one night, I watched some dazzling bowls of which of its voices should be dominant, but roasted veggies — fresh-picked carrots cooked whatever identity the place settles into will be with sage, amber slices of butternut squash anything but ordinary. glazed with honey and cayenne pepper — steam out of the compact kitchen. They were Have a suggestion for a restaurant featured specials that evening. The Pitch should review? Kotar has hired Carter Holton, one of the E-mail charles.ferruzza@pitch.com

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J A N U A R Y 3 - 9, 2 0 1 3

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amina Bone could use a cup of coffee. The artist is trying to raise funds and support for a Kansas City, Kansas, community center, employment training office, art gallery, school and coffee shop. All of these endeavors, she explains, would be together in one place: A Cup on the Hill. “I used to joke with friends, whenever they complained about their jobs, that they should just quit and start a coffee shop,” Bone says. “Because we need a coffee shop in Kansas City, Kansas. But now I’m the one opening it.” Bone, who is in her 30s, intends to open her nonprofit, social-mission coffee shop in downtown KCK in the spring. She has been working on her idea — using on-the-job learning to help break cyclical poverty among disadvantaged kids — since she left her position as a special-education teacher at the Derrick Thomas Academy last April. “I wasn’t able to do everything that I wanted to do,” Bone says of her three years at the charter school. “There are so many demands as a teacher that I just didn’t have the chance to help these kids in the way I wanted to.” The way she wants to help involves a threestep employment-training program, designed to last from six months to a year (depending on the needs of a given participant), with the coffee shop at its center. Potential employees, between the ages of 16 and 25, will start as volunteers: sweeping, cleaning and learning social skills. She’ll assess the students’ abilities and move them to paid employment as they progress. The final phase would help A Cup on the Hill’s young workers find employment elsewhere in the community. “This is about empowering our disadvantaged youth,” Bone says. “It’s about having a place where they can become real, productive members of society.” Bone, who lives in KCK with her husband, Lennon Bone (the drummer for Ha Ha Tonka), says she grew up poor in Erie, Pennsylvania, and still remembers what her first job — sweeping floors and holding lights at a photo studio — meant to her as a teenager. “It was the opportunity to not only make money but see people who I thought had money and be in that world for a little while,” she says.

Jamina Bone, povitica fan “I just want to give people the same opportunity to let them see how they fit into the world.” The main room in the coffee shop may double as a gallery, displaying work from local artists. In the shop’s office space, mentors will work with teenagers on job-interview skills and résumé writing. Bone sees A Cup developing in a fashion similar to that of Fresh Grounds, the St. Paul, Minnesota, nonprofit coffeehouse that provides work training for formerly homeless youth. “I love coffee,” Bone says. “But this isn’t just about the coffee. People come to a coffee shop to have a conversation. It’s a place to build a community.” And she believes that starts with local goods. She plans to use Royal Drummer Gourmet Coffees, one of the products from KCK roaster Action Coffee Services. The coffee menu has been designed to feature a range of preparations, including drip, espresso, pourover and Turkish. Bone says she’ll throw a tasting party a month before the joint opens, so she can finalize which blends to stock. “We want to invite the neighborhood in to tell us what they want,” she says. In addition to coffee, Bone wants to serve a small, rotating menu of entrées — she points to YJ’s Snack Bar as a model — with sensitivity to gluten-free and vegan diets. And she has her eyes on a baked good that used to be a neighborhood staple. “It’s time to bring povitica back to Strawberry Hill,” Bone says. In talks to lease a space just outside the Strawberry Hill neighborhood, she also has secured fiscal sponsorship from the Young World Foundation, a Kansas City, Missouri, 501(c)3 organization that focuses on youth leadership and philanthropy. Bone is the vice president of that nonprofit, and its president, Debrina Wright, serves as A Cup on the Hill’s secretary. “I think we can help my neighborhood and these kids,” Bone says. “We just have to start talking.” She’s free for a cup of coffee any day.

E-mail jonathan.bender@pitch.com

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MUSIC

H O U S E FO R SA L E

BY

C HR I S MIL B OUR N

How does the Kansas City Techno crew’s underground ethos fit into the ongoing commercialization of dance music? obody listens to techno, Eminem blurted on his wildly broad 2002 diss track “Without Me.” Globally speaking, he was dead wrong; electronic music had been huge in Europe and Asia for decades. But from Slim Shady’s perch in middle America, he had a decent point: At the time, the number of people in the United States interested in hearing Eminem rap far exceeded those dancing to the thriving rhythms of Moby, the reigning king of dance music in the States at the time. A lot has changed in a decade. Rap record sales have plummeted (though, to be fair, The Eminem Show was certified diamond in the United States last year). And people in the States are creating, performing and listening to electronic dance music (EDM) at an unprecedented rate. Pop music has gone electronic — or the other way around, depending on where you’re sitting. Katy Perry and Lady Gaga now wail over house beats; Steve Aoki, a West Coast EDM star, produces remixes for LMFAO and Kid Cudi. Locally, the 2,000-capacity Midland has been hosting a series of massive EDM parties, known as the Global Dance Festival, about once every three months dating back to 2010. Smaller venues in Westport, Martini Corner, the Legends and even the Power & Light District regularly book DJs who spin uptempo dance music. Pulsing beats are the new Saturday-night soundtrack. DJ Josh C, head honcho of the Kansas City Techno crew, started spinning techno music around the turn of the millennium. He remembers fondly his green, starry-eyed phase with electronic dance music, before Britney did a dubstep song and before staff, security E R MO and overpriced bottled water became part of the landscape. T A INE “The overall expeONL .COM H PITC rience of this music is best served in a dark, dirty warehouse, where the bass kicks up a cloud of concrete dust and who knows what other kinds of fi lth,” Josh C says. (For old-school EDM revelers, that “filth” sometimes took the form of a mysterious black goo that you had to blow out of your nose upon waking the day after a good party. The amount of black goo tended to be an accurate indication of how much fun you had the night before.) Kansas City Techno is a tightknit group of local DJs and producers that includes Josh C, Mr. Nuro, Todd Howard, Andrew Boie, Amjanda, PK, Z-Sonic and Freeking. They’ve taken techno and house music very seriously for years individually and, since 2009, as a crew. Their blog, kansascitytechno.com, is an ongoing archive of music, events and information concerning all things Kansas City techno. In a city that can’t seem to let go of loud guitars, they strike a defiant pose. Given the

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rise of EDM, they’re becoming more and more formidable. And their primary objective is to try to preserve some of the old scene’s purity. “Kansas City [EDM] parties started out underground,” Todd Howard says. “Then in 2002, several parties were shut down. Soon after that, in 2003, the RAVE Act was passed.” That legislation (which stands for Reducing Americans’ Vulnerability to Ecstasy) dealt a near deathblow to the large, uncontrolled gatherings that defined Howard’s scene. Since then, techno, house music and other styles of EDM, like dubstep, have been pushed into the clubs. Some of the romance of the old scene has been lost in the transition, but a larger audience has opened up. “Dance music moving back into Westport within the past few years has helped a lot,” says Mr. Nuro, who spins at the Union, the Gusto Lounge and the Riot Room, in addition to more secretive, underground, one-off locations. But there has always been a stronger-thanaverage whiff of snobbery among EDM enthusiasts, and the Kansas City Techno crew is no exception. Josh C asserts that he does not have much interest in trying to convert anyone to techno. “In my opinion, good techno is like a fine wine; it’s an acquired taste,” he says. “The finest wines don’t normally sell well. They are more of a niche product.” Hence the preservation of those underground parties, where savvier crowds enable DJs to experiment without having to worry as much about losing the crowd. Here, the emphasis is on a more sophisticated sound propelled by skillful mixing abilities, rather than the big breakdowns and haymaker “drops” associated with a lot of current dubstep and trance tracks that are kicking up dust under dance tents at Wakarusa, Kanrocksas and Dancefestopia. It’s a response to the hotshot promoters cashing in on teenagers willing to fork over $30 to dance with a couple of thou-

pitch.com

Kansas City Techno: staying underground. sand people in a theater or arena. (The phrase, or perhaps motto, “No Cover, All Vibe” has been slapped across more than a couple of these underground party fliers.) Call it the black-goo effect. “The music that is played at the Global Dance events is the pop music of EDM,” Mr. Nuro insists. “Once this EDM bubble has popped, the money will move on to the next hot genre to promote. But the underground will still be here pressing on.” Chris Milbourn writes about local music online at demencha.com.

NINE TO FIVER: MIKE STOVER

M

ike Stover knows the value of some good old-fashioned peace and quiet. When he’s not at practice with his five active bands (the Grisly Hand, Mr. Marco’s V7, the People’s Liberation Big Band, Ernest James Zydeco, Dead Voices), he spends his days working at the audiovisual desk at the Kansas City, Kansas, Public Library, expanding the music selection and loaning cult movies to curious customers. The Pitch dropped by recently to talk shop and learn more about his day job at the library.  The Pitch: You were born in Joplin, Missouri? Stover: I was born in a rural area in Joplin, Missouri, and started playing music when I was 10 years old. I started playing guitar like a lot of people. And as I got older, I started branching off into other instruments, like mandolin, steel guitar, bass guitar, basically anything I could get my hands on, really. How did you pick it up? Did your parents influence you? pitch.com

Oh, no, I just loved rock and roll. I watched MTV like any other kid and just said, “I want to do that.” It wasn’t really a sheltered existence; it was just a rural area. We didn’t have cable, but I’d go over to friends’ houses and watch it.  Who were you watching on MTV? Van Halen, stupid stuff, really stupid stuff, like Bryan Adams. There’s a Bryan Adams video where he’s rocking out in a field, and I knew I wanted to do that. Playing guitar through high school, I was kind of an awkward, weird little kid. I didn’t study music in school. I took some private lessons. I have almost no traditional music education. I’m pretty much self-taught. I went to college for a while and I dropped out. I thought I wanted to do sound recording. And then I just stopped going to school and kind of forgot to go back. How did you start working at the library?  I’ve been working in public libraries pretty much all of my adult life. I lived in Texas and worked in a library there for three years. Then when I moved here, I worked in a kitchen for one summer and then I got the job here in Kansas City, Kansas. I was 24; now I’m 39.  What was appealing to you about working there? Well, I lived out in the sticks, so even going to the library was a big deal. I wasn’t a big reader but I was intrigued by the possibilities. As I got older, living in Texas, they had all this music on CD that I was interested in. It gave me an opportunity to broaden my musical horizons.  Has your role changed much over the years? I’ve kind of had the same job the whole time. When I came here, I told them about my experiences as a musician and was put in charge of ordering music materials for the library pretty much right away. I’ve been doing that since I started here, so all the musicrelated materials, I select that stuff. I take suggestions from our patrons, but mostly it’s just sort of me curating the collection. Would you say it has grown exponentially, thanks to your dedication? Oh, yes, absolutely. I’m pretty familiar with a lot of different types of music, obviously. I can order stuff and keep the collection nice and broad but also accessible. To a degree, I can select the more intimidating, more esoteric stuff but try to market it and get people interested in something they might not have heard before. That’s the most exciting and most interesting part about it. I can’t think of a better day job for a musician. People ask you for suggestions? That’s a big part of what we do. The staff members here are in charge of the collection, which is kind of rare in the library world. Everyone that works here is either a movie nerd or music nerd, or somewhere in between. So we get a pretty eclectic clientele that comes from all over the city. I mean, we’re just out here in downtown KCK, continued on page 24 M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X

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MUSIC

RADAR

MUSIC FORECAST

BY

Other shows worth seeing this week.

D AV ID HUDN A L L

T H U R S D AY, J A N U A R Y 3 Sam Sliva and the Good: 8 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456.

F R I D AY, J A N U A R Y 4 The Crayons: 9 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Chase Rice, Russell Dickerson: The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483.

S AT U R D AY, J A N U A R Y 5 Ad Astra Arkestra, the New Riddim: The Brick, 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Flameing Daeth Fearies, R Type Final: The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483.

Stover: the library lizard king which is kind of a weird place. But we have patrons driving from all over the metro area just because we have the best stuff. We have the cool stuff here.  I heard something about your dressing up as the library mascot? Yeah, dressing up in the lizard costume was something that happened earlier in my career.  Lizard costume? Why a lizard? Um, he’s the library mascot. His name is R.U. Reading. He doesn’t have scales. He’s just big and cuddly. When we first got that costume, it was a big adult-male-sized costume, and most of our children’s-library employees are shorter, little ladies. So I was kind of drafted to go out to the schools and sort of wave, hug kids, jump around, whatever.  Oh, I didn’t know you were visiting schools. I was hoping you weren’t on the corner … No, no, definitely not like the Little Caesars guy.  You probably never thought that dressing up in a lizard costume would be a part of the job … Well, it wasn’t a new thing because I’d done that in Texas as well. That was the weird one. The children’s library had a promotion called “Baby Big Foot.” They had a big papier-mâché cave in the corner of the library, and we would do this promotion where kids could come hang out in the cave with me. It was bizarre. Baby Big Foot would go around to all the schools in San Antonio, Texas, and kids were just terrified! We would go to kindergarten and firstgrade classes, and they would just cry and cry and cry. They knew something was up. They knew to avoid the man in the gorilla costume. So yeah, I had previous experience as a weird library mascot, so I got to wear the lizard costume. Now we have four lizard costumes for each branch. Big Foot is gone, though. We left him in Texas. What project are you most excited to be working on at the moment? Well, we’re finishing up the new Grisly Hand album. We got what I think will be the final mixes last week, and I’ve just been driving around in my car listening to them all the time. We recorded with Joel Nanos at Element Recording Studios. It was a great experience, and it’s just rare to still be excited about your own record after the whole process. We’re shooting for a springtime release. 

—LESLIE KINSMAN

S U N D AY, J A N U A R Y 6 Young Readers, Attic Wolves, Ancient Gates, Elsa Rae: The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179.

W E D N E S D AY, J A N U A R Y 9 Rumblin’ June, Fashionably Late, Amanda Hughey, Steady Breather: 9 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207.

FUTURECAST

Clockwise from left: Elvis, Father John Misty, and At the Left Hand of God

Elvis Birthday Bash

Had he not died on a toilet eating a peanutbutter-and-banana sandwich 35 years ago, Elvis Presley would have turned 78 on January 8 this year. He has been dead so long that 78 actually sounds kind of young to me; I doubt that I would have blinked if I was told he would have turned 100 this year. Nevertheless, because there are enough people still alive who are obsessed with the King, events celebrating his birthday persist. This weekend, there are two: one Friday at RecordBar, with impersonators Rich Vickers and Jeff Bergen, and one Saturday at Knuckleheads, with doppelgängers E-Rock, Frank Werth and Vickers. Friday, January 4, at RecordBar (1020 Westport Road, 816-753-5207) Saturday, January 5, at Knuckleheads Saloon (2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456)

At the Left Hand of God

Kansas City has its fair share of bands with hilarious metal names — Hammerlord, Koktopus — but none approach the epic

ring of At the Left Hand of God. The thrash crew’s 2012 album, Bayonets and Tourniquets, is about as bruising as its title suggests. They’re joined on this bill by fellow brutalists Trogdolyte, Moire and Sequoia. Friday, January 4, at the Riot Room (4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179)

FRIDAY 11 Mick Foley: Stanford’s Comedy Club, Kansas City, Kan. SATURDAY 12 Mick Foley: Stanford’s Comedy Club, Kansas City, Kan. MONDAY 14 Reel Big Fish, Pilfers, Dan Potthast: The Granada, Lawrence FRIDAY 18 Rodney Carrington: The Midland Jeff Mangum: sold out. Liberty Hall, Lawrence SUNDAY 20 Bloc Party, IO Echo: Liberty Hall, Lawrence Keane, Youngblood Hawke: The Midland SATURDAY 26 Frost: The Midland MONDAY 28 Sum 41, and more: The Granada, Lawrence WEDNESDAY 30 The Darkness: The Beaumont Club

FEBRUARY

Father John Misty

The best indie-rock breakout story of 2012 was Josh Tillman’s, who quit his gig drumming for Fleet Foxes, moved to Los Angeles, and released an album under the name Father John Misty. That album, Fear Fun, climbed onto a lot of year-end lists, and deservedly so — it’s full of smart, psych-tinged, alt-country songs with sticky melodies. He also gets points for his next-level stage presence, which is intense in a Neil-Diamond-on-peyote type of way. Monday, January 7, at the Bottleneck (737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483)

F O R E C A S T

K E Y

................................................Pick of the Week

............................................................ Growling

......................................................... Jumpsuits

.....................................................Kind of Scary

.....................................................Muttonchops

........................................ Chicks Love This Guy

SATURDAY 2 Morrissey: Liberty Hall, Lawrence MONDAY 4 Lady Gaga: Sprint Center SUNDAY 10 Emilie Autumn: The Granada, Lawrence FRIDAY 15 Galactic: Liberty Hall, Lawrence SUNDAY 17 Electric Six, the Dead Girls: The Riot Room THURSDAY 21 Toro Y Moi, Sinkane: The Granada, Lawrence FRIDAY 22 Talib Kweli: The Granada, Lawrence WEDNESDAY 27 Maroon 5: Sprint Center THURSDAY 28 Yonder Mountain String Band: Liberty Hall, Lawrence

MARCH WEDNESDAY 6 Slightly Stoopid, Tribal Seeds: Liberty Hall, Lawrence SUNDAY 10 Alabama Shakes: Uptown Theater TUESDAY 12 STS9: Liberty Hall, Lawrence

E-mail feedback@pitch.com 24 T H E P I T C H J A N U A R Y 3 - 9, 2 0 1 3 2 T H E P I T C H M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X

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MONTH

CHIPPENDALES February 9, 2013

GARY ALLAN

February 17, 2013

UPCOMING SHOWS: 1/4 1/11

Kilroy Presents: KC Groove Therapy Kilroy Presents: Elvis B-Day Bash 1-800-745-3000

1/18 1/19 1/25

Flirt Friday Saturday Night Vibrations Blue Corner

  •  VooDooKC.com

Know When To Stop Before You Start.® Gambling Problem? Call 1-888-BETSOFF. Subject to change or cancellation. Phone and online orders are subject to service fees. Must be 21 years or older to gamble, obtain a Total Rewards ® card or enter VooDoo ®. ©2013, Caesars License Company, LLC.

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J A N U A R Y 3 - 9, 2 0 1 3

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25

12/27/12 12:57 PM

NIGHTLIFE

WHERE THE BEST MUSICIANS IN THE WORLD PLAY

KNUCKLEHEADS F re e S h u tt le in S u rr o u n d in g A reth e a

Send submissions to Clubs Editor Abbie Stutzer by e-mail (abbie.stutzer@pitch.com), fax (816-756-0502) or phone (816-218-6926). Continuing items must be resubmitted monthly.

JANUARY

T H U R S D AY 3

2: Justin Andrew Murray Band 3: Sam Sliva & The Good 4: The Crayon’s 5: Elvis Birthday Bash

Eddie’s Lounge: 3512 S.W. Market, Lee’s Summit, 816-537-4148. Toni and Scotty. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. New Franklin Panthers.

ROCK/POP/INDIE

DJ

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL

Dark Horse Tavern: 4112 Pennsylvania, 816-931-3663. Live DJ. Mosaic Lounge: 1331 Walnut, 816-679-0076. Mosaic Thursdays. Saints Pub + Patio: 9720 Quivira, Lenexa, 913-492-3900. DJ Brad Sager.

B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Brody Buster. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Lonnie Ray Blues Band. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. The Old Crows, 5:30 p.m.; Brother Bagman, 9 p.m.

EBT Restaurant: 1310 Carondelet (I-435 and State Line), 816942-8870. Candace Evans. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Rod Fleeman and Dan Bliss.

AMERICANA

16: Chase Rice 18: Billy Joe Shaver

UPCOMING SHOWS 2/1: The Belairs 2/2: Trampled Under Foot 2/7: Cody Canada & The Departed 2/8: Victor Wooten THE PITCH PRESENTS: 2/9: THE BODEANS

2/14: Carrie Rodriguez 2/15: Chris Knight 2/16: Royal Southern Brotherhood 2/21: North Mississippi Allstars 2/28: Tom Russell

BLUES in Johnson County

Wed JAN 2

Dan Bliss 7-10 Thur JAN 3

Brody Buster Duo 7-10 Fri JAN 4

Old Crows 5:30-8:30 Brother Bagman 9-12 Sat JAN 5

Crosseyed Cat 5:30-8:30 Rock Paper Scissors 9-12 Tues JAN 8

Dave Hays Blues Jam 7-10 Wed JAN 9

For more info & tickets: knuckleheadskc.com 2715 Rochester, KCMO

816-483-1456

26

THE PITCH

J A N U A R Y 3 - 9, 2 0 1 3

RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Kenneth P. Noisewater & Loving It, with Rev Gusto and Saint Lux, 9 p.m.

COMEDY Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. John Henton. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Mike Speenberg.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS Bleachers Bar & Grill: 210 S.W. Greenwich Dr., Lee’s Summit, 816-623-3410. Extreme Bingo. Bulldog: 1715 Main, 816-421-4799. Brodioke. Buzzard Beach: 4110 Pennsylvania, 816-753-4455. Trivia, Ladies’ Night, and DJ HoodNasty. Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Hot Caution Thursdays, 10 p.m., free. Ernie Biggs Dueling Piano Bar: 4115 Mill, 816-561-2444. “You Sing It” Live Band Karaoke. Fatso’s Public House and Stage: 1016 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-865-4055. Electro Therapy Thursdays. Hamburger Mary’s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-842-1919. Charity Bingo with Valerie Versace, 8 p.m., $1 per game. Hurricane Allie’s Bar and Grill: 5541 Merriam Dr., Shawnee, 913-217-7665. Karaoke, 8:30 p.m. J. Murphy’s Irish Pub and Grille: 22730 Midland Dr., Shawnee, 913-825-3880. Ladies’ night. Jake’s Place Bar and Grill: 12001 Johnson Dr., Shawnee, 913-962-5253. Trivia. Johnny’s Tavern: 8262 Mission, Prairie Village, 913-901-0322. Bingo. Mac’s Place: 580 S. Fourth St., Edwardsville. Karaoke. Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. Karaoke on the main floor, 10 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Trivia Clash, 7 p.m. The Red Balloon: 10325 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-9622330. Karaoke, 8 p.m., free. Sherlock’s Underground Coffeehouse & Pub: 858 State Route 291, Liberty, 816-429-5262. Karaoke, ladies’ night specials. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Uptown Heat, 10:30 p.m. The Velvet Dog: 400 E. 31st St., 816-753-9990. Skeeball League. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. Trivia, 9 p.m.

EASY LISTENING

Billy Ebeling 7-10

Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Interactive Acoustic with Jason Kayne.

135TH ST. & QUIVIRA

Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Captain Ahab and the Narwhals.

12056 W. 135th St. OPKS 913-239-9666 www.quasimodokc.com

pitch.com

ROCK/POP/INDIE

B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Samantha Fish. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Grand Marquis. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Brody Buster Duo.

JAZZ

The SPOT for The

F R I D AY 4 Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. The Summit, After Nations. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Rev Gusto. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Alien Jones. MORE Jerry’s Bait Shop: 302 S.W. Main, Lee’s Summit, 816-525-1871. The Black Jackets. GS IN T Replay Lounge: 946 MassachuLIS E AT setts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Ask N I L ON M an Adult, Global Warmers, 6 p.m. ; Baby PITCH.CO Ghosts, Lazy, 10 p.m.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL

10: IBC Send off Party 11: Atlantic Express 11: Jason Eady 12: Platinum Express 15: John Fullbright w/ full band

Double T’s Roadhouse: 1421 Merriam Ln., Kansas City, Kan., 913-432-5555. Blues Jam hosted by RocknRick’s Boogie Leggin’ Blues Band, 7 p.m.

FOLK

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Stand-up comedy and open mic.

CLUB

DJ Beer Kitchen: 435 Westport Rd., 816-389-4180. DCal. Club Monaco: 334 E. 31st St., 816-753-5990. DJ Shaun Flo. The Gusto Lounge: 504 Westport Rd., 816-974-8786. Gruv: First Friday, 10 p.m. MiniBar: 3810 Broadway, 816-326-8281. DJ Superwolf. Mosaic Lounge: 1331 Walnut, 816-679-0076. Mosaic Friday hosted by Luke Rich, with DJ Allen Michael. The Quaff: 1010 Broadway, 816-471-1918. DJ E. Saints Pub + Patio: 9720 Quivira, Lenexa, 913-492-3900. DJ TA. Strikerz Entertainment Center: 18900 E. Valley View Pkwy., Independence, 816-313-5166. DJ night. Z Strike: 1370 Grand, 816-471-2316. Fabowlous Fridays with DJ Nuveau, 9 p.m.

JAZZ The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. Kerry Strayer Quintet, 8:30 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Rick Bacus and Monique Danielle, 4:30 p.m.; J.Love, 9 p.m. Thai Place: 9359 W. 87th St., Overland Park, 913-649-5420. Jerry Hahn.

COMEDY Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. John Henton, 8 & 10:30 p.m. Skylight Restaurant and Sports Bar: 1867 S.W. State Rt. 7, Blue Springs, 816-988-7958. Mike’s Comedy Club, 8 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Mike Speenberg, 7:45 & 9:45 p.m.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS Bleachers Bar & Grill: 210 S.W. Greenwich Dr., Lee’s Summit, 816-623-3410. Open Juke Box. ComedyCity at Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-842-2744. Major League Improv, 7:30 p.m. Ernie Biggs Dueling Piano Bar: 4115 Mill, 816-561-2444. KC’s Original Dueling Pianos. Hamburger Mary’s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-842-1919. Maryoke with Monique. Helen’s Just Another Dive: 2002 Armour Rd., North Kansas City, 816-471-4567. Trivia Riot with Roland, 7:30 p.m., $5 per person. Hurricane Allie’s Bar and Grill: 5541 Merriam Dr., Shawnee, 913-217-7665. Karaoke, 8:30 p.m. J. Murphy’s Irish Pub and Grille: 22730 Midland Dr., Shawnee, 913-825-3880. Karaoke, 9 p.m. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Wonderfuzz. Maker’s Mark Bourbon House & Lounge: 1333 Walnut, 816-442-8115. La Femme First Fridays. Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. Ab Fab Fridays, 9 p.m. The Red Balloon: 10325 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-9622330. Karaoke, 8 p.m., free. Sharks: 10320 Shawnee Mission Pkwy., Shawnee, 913-2684006. Dart tournament, 8 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. First Friday Story Slam, 7 p.m.

VA R I E T Y Take Five Coffee + Bar: 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park, 913-9485550. Take Five’s Third Birthday Party with KC Sound Collective. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Common Ground Poets and Musicians, 10 p.m.

S AT U R D AY 5

VA R I E T Y

ROCK/POP/INDIE

Aftershock Bar & Grill: 5240 Merriam Dr., Merriam, 913-3845646. Dreamcorp Records Showcase. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Banzai Awards Show with Chance the Arm Band, 11 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Sangha Studios Showcase, 6 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. KC Cabaret variety show, 9:30 p.m.

Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Bow Tie Affair, 6 p.m. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Taste Bud G-Spot, Plug Uglies, Mr. Marco’s V7. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 302 S.W. Main, Lee’s Summit, 816-525-1871. The Mooreheads. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Rock Paper Scissors, 9 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Karma Vision, 10 p.m.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Mama Ray Jazz Meets Blues Jam, 2 p.m.; Linda Shell and the Blues Thang, 9 p.m. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. The Brody Buster Band. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Cadillac Flambe, 9 p.m. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Crosseyed Cat, 5:30 p.m. Sherlock’s Underground Coffeehouse & Pub: 858 State Route 291, Liberty, 816-429-5262. The Earl Baker Band.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Starhaven Rounders, Whiskey Breath, 8 p.m.

DJ Beer Kitchen: 435 Westport Rd., 816-389-4180. DJ Finius. Club Monaco: 334 E. 31st St., 816-753-5990. DJ Pure. The Eighth Street Taproom: 801 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-6918. Saturday Soulclap with Josh Powers. Johnny’s Tavern: 6765 W. 119th St., Leawood, 913-451-4542. Live DJ, 9 p.m. MiniBar: 3810 Broadway, 816-326-8281. Shellac Attack. The Quaff: 1010 Broadway, 816-471-1918. DJ Chris. Saints Pub + Patio: 9720 Quivira, Lenexa, 913-492-3900. DJ Brad Sager.

HIP-HOP The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. COA, Joey Cool, the Abnorm, Dom Chronicles.

JAZZ The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. The JWB, 8:30 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Eboni Fondren and friends, 4:30 p.m. Take Five Coffee + Bar: 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park, 913948-5550. A Quartet: Clinkingbeard, Lower, Wilder & Chael.

COMEDY ComedyCity at Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-842-2744. ComedyCity After Dark, 10 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. John Henton, 7 & 10 p.m. Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. Dirty Dorothy on the main floor, 10 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Mike Speenberg, 7:45 & 9:45 p.m.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS Bleachers Bar & Grill: 210 S.W. Greenwich Dr., Lee’s Summit, 816-623-3410. Live music. ComedyCity at Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-842-2744. Major League Improv, 7:30 p.m. Ernie Biggs Dueling Piano Bar: 4115 Mill, 816-561-2444. KC’s Original Dueling Pianos. 403 Club: 403 N. Fifth St., 913-499-8392. Pinball tournament, Cash prize for winner, 4:30 p.m., $5 entry fee. Hamburger Mary’s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-842-1919. Maryoke, 9 p.m. Hotel: 1300 Grand, 816-226-3232. Hotel Saturdays. Hurricane Allie’s Bar and Grill: 5541 Merriam Dr., Shawnee, 913-217-7665. Karaoke, 8:30 p.m. Mosaic Lounge: 1331 Walnut, 816-679-0076. Mosaic Saturdays. The Red Balloon: 10325 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-9622330. Karaoke, 8 p.m., free. Sharks: 10320 Shawnee Mission Pkwy., Shawnee, 913-2684006. Pool tournament, 1 p.m. Westport Coffee House: 4010 Pennsylvania, 816-756-3222. The Kick Comedy Theatre: the Kick-Off Improv Comedy Show, 8 p.m.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Sherlock’s Underground Coffeehouse & Pub: 858 State Route 291, Liberty, 816-429-5262. Open Blues Jam with Earl Baker, 4 p.m.

M E TA L / P U N K Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Melting Point of Bronze, Ask an Adult, the Cleaners.

S U N D AY 6 ROCK/POP/INDIE Californos: 4124 Pennsylvania, 816-531-7878. Victor & Penny. Attic Wolves, Ancient Gates, Elsa Rae.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Lee McBee and the Confessors.

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Hamburger Mary’s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-842-1919. Bad Music Sundays with Brett Dietrich, 3:30 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Sunday Funday with DJ G Train on the patio.

JAZZ Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Les Mengel Duo, 5-9 p.m. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Dan Bliss. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Mark Lowrey Jazz Trio open jam session, 5 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. The People’s Liberation Big Band, 7 p.m.

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Come Shake Your Shamrocks! THURS Jan 3: Garry Lincoln 8-12 FRI Jan 4: Pat Lentz 10-2 SAT Jan 5: Danny McGaw Band 10-2 The Dubliner official Notre Dame Watch Party location! BCS National Championship Game January 7th 8 PM Call The Dubliner for Details

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COMEDY Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. John Henton, 7 p.m. Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. Dirty Dorothy, 10 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Mike Speenberg.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Smackdown Trivia and Karaoke. Clarette Club: 5400 Martway, Mission, 913-384-0986. Texas Hold ’em. Frank James Saloon: 10919 N.W. Hwy. 45, Parkville, 816-5050800. Karaoke, 6-10 p.m. Hurricane Allie’s Bar and Grill: 5541 Merriam Dr., Shawnee, 913-217-7665. Karaoke, 8:30 p.m. Jake’s Place Bar and Grill: 12001 Johnson Dr., Shawnee, 913962-5253. Free pool, 3 p.m. Johnny’s Tavern: 13410 W. 62nd Terr., Shawnee, 913-962-5777. Live music. Johnny’s Tavern - Lawrence: 410 N. Second St., Lawrence, 785-842-0377. Poker. Saints Pub + Patio: 9720 Quivira, Lenexa, 913-492-3900. Free pool. Wallaby’s Grill and Pub: 9562 Lackman, Lenexa, 913-5419255. Texas Hold ’em, 6 & 9 p.m.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Groove Station: 9916 Holmes, 816-942-1000. KC Blues Jam with Crosseyed Cat, 2-6 p.m. The Hideout: 6948 N. Oak Tfwy., 816-468-0550. Open blues jam, 7 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Open Jam with Levee Town, 2 p.m., free. R.G.’s Lounge: 9100 E. 35th St., Independence, 816-358-5777. Jam Night, 5 p.m.

What’s Your Remedy? LATE NIGHT HAPPY HOUR

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Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Sovereign States, Placeholder.

M O N D AY 7

SUNDAY:

SINGER-SONGWRITER SUNDAY AND KANSAS CITY'S ONLY ADULTS ONLY, DRINK ALONG SPELLING BEE FROM 8-10

ROCK/POP/INDIE Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Shantel Leitner, Aaron Newton. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Lot44, Years Past, Attic Lights.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS Barnyard Beer: 925 Iowa, Lawrence, 785-393-9696. Mudstomp Mondays.

JAZZ Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Jazzbo.

Visit www.erniebiggs.com for specials and line up. Like us on Facebook for upcoming promotions and special offers. pitch.com

MONDAY:

MAN CAVE MONDAYS - FOOTBALL, GAMES, & CHEAP BEER

TUESDAY:

PINT NIGHT WITH DJ HIGHNOONE AND ASHTON MARTIN J A N U A R Y 3 - 9, 2 0 1 3

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27

Sangha Deli!

MON: RURAL GRIT 6P SAT 1/5 NEW M, KARAOKE 10PM RIDDIM, BLOOD B THU 1/10 BLU IRDS 10PM E BOOT H JACK GRELLE EELERS, BRIAN FRAME 9P M FRI 1/11 THE BRANNOCK DEVIC E, SCHWER SAT 1/12 VICTO VON 10PM R AND NY PHANTOMS OPFEN THE OPRY 10PM

WED. JAN. 2

10PM LATE NIGHT SONIC SPECTRUM MUSIC TRIVIA THURS. JAN. 4

KENNETH P. NUISANCE & LOVIN’ IT REV GUSTO/SAINT LUX FRI. JAN. 5

6PM ELVIS BIRTHDAY BASH WITH JEFF BERGEN/RICH VICKERS 10PM LOOKS THAT KILL:MOTLEY CRUE TRIBUTE SAT. JAN. 6

DELI MAGAZINE & SANGHA STUDIOS PRESENT CLAIR & THE CROWDED STAGE/RUN WITH IT/ A THOUSAND DREADFUL THINGS/STACKED SUN. JAN. 7

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SUN. 12-5PM BARTENDER’S BRUNCH & BLOODY MARY BAR MON. 7PM SONIC SPECTRUM MUSIC TRIVIA TUES. 7PM HONKY TONK SUPPER CLUB WED. 7PM BOB WALKENHORST & FRIENDS THURS. 7PM TRIVIA CLASH

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THE HOME FOR LIVE MUSIC NORTH OF THE RIVER!

WED 1/2 OPEN BLUES JAM 7PM THURS 1/3 OPEN BLUEGRASS JAM HOSTED BY LOADED GOAT 7PM FRI 1/4 THE JOSH VOWELL BAND 8:30PM SAT 1/5 TOMMY TAYLOR AND THE UPTOWN ALL STARS 8:30PM SUN 1/6 OPEN JAM HOSTED BY COYOTE BILL’S BOOGIE BAND 6PM TUES 1/8 TELE-TUESDAY COUNTRY JAM HOSTED BY OUTLAW JIM AND THE WHISKEY BENDERS 7PM 6948 N. OAK TRFY, GLADSTONE MO | 816.468.0550 FIND US ON FACEBOOK - THE HIDEOUT BAR AND GRILL

FIGURE

The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Mark Lowrey Trio, 6 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Millie Edwards and Michael Pagan, 7 p.m.

AMERICANA Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Alexis Barclay and friends.

COMEDY Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. MANic Monday on the main floor, 10 p.m., free.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS Clarette Club: 5400 Martway, Mission, 913-384-0986. Texas Hold ’em. Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Slaughter Movie House: There’s Nothing Out There. Green Room Burgers & Beer: 4010 Pennsylvania, Ste. D, 816216-7682. Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz. Hamburger Mary’s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-842-1919. Maryoke. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Karaoke Idol with Tanya McNaughty. Nara: 1617 Main, 816-221-6272. Brodioke. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Sonic Spectrum Music Trivia, 7 p.m., $5; Karaoke with Baby Brie, 9 p.m. Sherlock’s Underground Coffeehouse & Pub: 858 State Route 291, Liberty, 816-429-5262. Tell a Joke Mondays. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. Texas Hold ’em, 8 p.m.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Jonny Green and Jake Stanton Open Mic and Jam Session, 8 p.m.; James Inman’s Microphone: Comedy (or Whatever) Open Mic, 10 p.m.

T U E S D AY 8 ROCK/POP/INDIE The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Glad Ghosts, Storm Circus. Californos: 4124 Pennsylvania, 816-531-7878. Lot44. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 302 S.W. Main, Lee’s Summit, 816-525-1871. Elvis Birthday Bash with Bobby Simkins, Michael D, E-Rock, Ken Graham, Richie Parton, Blake Pearson, Danny Johnson.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Trampled Under Foot. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Mark Montgomery. Slow Ride Roadhouse: 1350 N. Third St., Lawrence, 785-7492727. Lonnie Ray Blues Band.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS

@MIDLANDTHEATER

26

Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Elkheart’s Downtown Outlaw Fiasco, 7 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Rex Hobart’s Honky Tonk Supper Club.

SATURDAY

JANUARY

DJ Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. DJ Whatshisname, service industry night, 9 p.m.

HEAR THEM BEFORE YOU SEE THEM

//FREE MUSIC PLAYER ON THE MUSIC HOME PAGE OF PITCH.COM

JAZZ The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Open Jam with Everette DeVan, 7 p.m.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS Bulldog: 1715 Main, 816-421-4799. Double-feature movie night. Double Nickel Bar: 189 S. Rogers, Ste. 1614, Olathe, 913-3900363. Poker night. Dukes: 1501 Grand, 816-527-0122. Beer pong tournaments, 9 p.m. Hamburger Mary’s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-842-1919. Boob Tube Tuesdays, 7 p.m. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. It’s Karaoke Time! Johnny’s Tavern: 13410 W. 62nd Terr., Shawnee, 913-962-5777. Bingo. Johnny’s Tavern: 11316 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-8515165. Texas Hold ’em. MiniBar: 3810 Broadway, 816-326-8281. Robert Moore’s Name That Tune, 7 p.m. Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. Gayme Night upstairs, 7:30-10 p.m.; PHAT Show, 8 p.m.; karaoke on the main floor, 10 p.m. The Roxy: 7230 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-236-6211. Karaoke. Tower Tavern: 401 E. 31st St., 816-931-9300. Trivia, 8 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Tango night. The Velvet Dog: 400 E. 31st St., 816-753-9990. Beer Pong, team registration starts at 9:30 p.m., tournament starts at 10 p.m. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. Chess Club, 7 p.m.

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J A N U A R Y 3 - 9, 2 0 1 3

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OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS DiCarlo’s Mustard Seed Mexican-Americana Restaurant & Bar: 15015 E. U.S. Hwy. 40, 816-373-4240. Blues, country and classic rock hosted by Rick Eidson and friends. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Dave Hays Band Open Jam. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Open Mic Night.

W E D N E S D AY 9 ROCK/POP/INDIE RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Bob Walkenhorst, 7 p.m.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Shinetop Jr. The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483. Spongecake and the Fluff Ramblers, Dirt Leg Benders, Ryan Tenholder. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Tyler Gregory and the Bootleg Band. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Gospel Lounge with Carl Butler, 7:30 p.m.

DJ Avalon Ultra Lounge: 5505 N.E. Antioch, 816-452-CLUB. Flashback Wednesdays. Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. Sonic Spectrum with DJ Robert Moore, 9 p.m. Saints Pub + Patio: 9720 Quivira, Lenexa, 913-492-3900. DJ Pure. The Union of Westport: 421 Westport Rd. Random Play Wednesday.

ACOUSTIC Dark Horse Tavern: 4112 Pennsylvania, 816-931-3663. Live acoustic. Fuel: 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park, 913-451-0444. Colby & Mole.

JAZZ Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Max Groove Trio, 6 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. A La Mode. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Billy Ebeling, 7 p.m.

AMERICANA Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Mike Runyon and Gary Proctor.

COMEDY Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. Dirty Dorothy on the main floor, 10 p.m.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS The All-Star Rock Bar: 7210 N.E. 43rd St., 816-452-2660. Karaoke. Beer Kitchen: 435 Westport Rd., 816-389-4180. Brodioke. Bulldog: 1715 Main, 816-421-4799. Drink specials. Danny’s Bar and Grill: 13350 College Blvd., Lenexa, 913-3459717. Trivia and karaoke with DJ Smooth, 8 p.m. 403 Club: 403 N. Fifth St., 913-499-8392. Pinball tournament, cash prize for winner, 8:30 p.m., $5 entry fee. Nara: 1617 Main, 816-221-6272. Ladies’ Night. The Quaff: 1010 Broadway, 816-471-1918. Karaoke, 9 p.m. Qudos Cigar & Cognac Bar: 1116 Grand, 816-474-2270. Red Cup Wednesdays, 5-8 p.m. The Red Balloon: 10325 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-9622330. Karaoke, 8 p.m., free. The Roxy: 7230 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-236-6211. Karaoke. Sherlock’s Underground Coffeehouse & Pub: 858 State Route 291, Liberty, 816-429-5262. Animal House Wednesdays; open jam blues, bike night specials. Strikerz Entertainment Center: 18900 E. Valley View Pkwy., Independence, 816-313-5166. Ladies’ Night, ladies bowl for free in the Spare Room Party Room, live DJ, 9 p.m. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. Trivia, 8 p.m.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Jam Night, 9 p.m. Tonahill’s 3 of a Kind: 11703 E. 23rd St., Independence, 816833-5021. Blues, country and classic rock hosted by Rick Eidson and friends.

VA R I E T Y Californos: 4124 Pennsylvania, 816-531-7878. The Girlie Show. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Mix Tape, 7:30 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Poetic Underground.

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POWER & LIGHT DISTRICT 18th & VINE

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lvd st B hwe out

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J A N U A R Y 3 - 9, 2 0 1 3

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29

S AVA G E L O V E

STUDENT UNIONS M

ore than a thousand people showed up for a recent Savage Love Live event at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. It goes without saying that the students at UW submitted more questions than I could answer in 90 minutes. As promised, Madison, here are some bonus answers to questions that I didn’t get to during our time together.

Dear Dan: I know you lived in Madison for a while. Got any great Mad Town stories?

Savage Love got its start in Madison: I wrote my first columns on a computer in the back office of Four Star Fiction and Video, where I worked as a night manager/VHS-tape-slingin’ clerk. I did other things — after-hours things — in the storeroom of Four Star. Those things are known only to me, an insanely sexy guy named Roger, and one of the bartenders at the Plaza who one night overheard us talking about the things we’d just done to each other in that storeroom.

Dear Dan: What would you say to Ann Coulter, who said if her son told her that he was gay, she’d “tell him he was adopted”? Parental rejection of a gay child (which doubles a gay kid’s already quadrupled risk for suicide), the implication that adopted parents are less emotionally invested in their children and that adopted children are loved conditionally — only Ann Coulter could pack so much hatred, malice and emotional violence into a single “quip.” I’m not sure what I would say to Coulter — I’ve never had the pleasure of meeting her — but I can’t imagine that any child of Coulter’s, gay or straight, would be on speaking terms with her anyway, so I’d probably tell her that her feelings about her hypothetical children are irrelevant. 30

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J A N U A R Y 3 - 9, 2 0 1 3

pitch.com

D A N S AVA G E

Dear Dan: Facials: degrading or sexy? Yes.*

Dear Dan: Do you have any bisexual friends? “Dan has bisexual friends, and I am one of them,” says Eric Olalde, a yogi, a hottie and a close friend who happens to be bisexual. “He has seen me shift between male and female partners at different stages of my life and has even made brunch for me and my ex-girlfriend. Dan has never shown me anything but support and true friendship.”

Dear Dan: Can an open relationship work if it’s this type: dating two people, separately, both serious, neither relationship is the “primary” one? Define “work.” Most people define “work” — in the context of a relationship — as “a loving, lasting, long-term relationship that ends only with the death of one or both parties.” But I define “work” as “a loving relationship that makes the people in it happy, whether that relationship lasts for the rest of their lives or whether both parties — or all parties, if we’re talking about a poly or open scenario — decide at some point to end the relationship amicably.” So, yes, I do think the relationship you’ve described can work. Whether you’ll be in this relationship — or these relationships — for the rest of your life remains to be seen. You may wind up getting more serious about one person, or you may move on from both and find someone else — or a couple of someone elses — but if you’re happy right now, and if they’re happy right now, then your relationship is working.

BY

Dear Dan: My partner lives far away, and we Dear Dan: I’ve been treated badly in several past relationships. I’m now in a great one, but I have a hard time believing or trusting that nothing bad will happen. How can I get over this dread? Sooner or later, your new squeeze will do something bad, and you’ll get hurt. Hopefully the bad that happens won’t be as bad as the bad you experienced in the past relationships — no physical or emotional violence, no unforgivable betrayals, nothing that requires you to end this relationship — but your new partner will behave badly toward you at some point. And you will behave badly toward your new partner. There’s some bad even in the best relationships. You’ll experience less dread if you can accept that.

Dear Dan: Can a successful long-term relationship form if the other person can never admit that they’re wrong? Anyone who’s been in a successful long-term relationship knows that both parties have to be able to admit that they’re wrong — sometimes you have to admit you’re wrong even when you know you’re not. So the answer is “no.”

Dear Dan: How and when is it good/best to use whipped cream? We’ve covered this before: Whipped cream is NOT A SEX TOY. Two minutes after you put it on your nipples — or two minutes after you fill your bellybutton or ass crack or armpits with it — you begin to smell like baby puke. It’s not sexy. And it’s not like you’re not getting enough dairy in your diets, Wisconsinites. Save the whipped cream for your ice cream, and if you want to lick something off your partner, work up a sweat and lick that off ’em.

Dear Dan: My friends and I have a weekly tra-

dition where we read your column aloud, wear bathrobes and drink whiskey. What would you add to this already awesome ritual? Remote-control vibrating butt plugs, of course, each one set to go off at a different time.

can’t live together for at least two years. He says I can sleep with whomever I like. I want to tell him the same thing, but I’m kinda jealous and insecure. I told him to just not tell me, but he doesn’t want to lie. What to do? Withholding information at your request — holding that info back until you’re ready for it — doesn’t make your partner a liar. It makes him a considerate partner. Tell him to do what he needs to do but to spare you the details. OK! We have one more letter. It wasn’t a question asked at the talk I gave in Madison, but it does have a Madison connection …

Dear Dan: I met you briefly in Madison, Wiscon-

sin, a long time ago. As a physician, I’m usually impressed with your savvy advice and medical accuracy. And your It Gets Better Project is a major contribution to the mental and physical health of adolescents and young adults. Now for a quick medical comment: I agree with your suggestion that doctors give “flared base” advice to patients who use anal toys. But there’s a simple way for a person who didn’t get that advice to remove an object that is stuck in the rectum. They should squat — do a deep knee bend — stay still, relax, breathe, and voilà. The item will pop out onto the floor. No probing or uncomfortable procedure necessary. After learning about this technique from a woman physician (who recalled the history of women giving birth in that position and applied the same principle to relaxing the rectal muscles), I used this with young adult patients who would come to my clinic in an embarrassing predicament. The result was simple and comfortable for both patient and physician. Feel free to pass this advice on to others who might benefit!

Best Advice Simplifies Exit Dear Base: Thanks for sharing! *Sometimes both at once! Find the Savage Lovecast (my weekly podcast) every Tuesday at thestranger.com/savage.

Have a question for Dan Savage? E-mail him at mail@savagelove.net pitch.com

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The Pitch: January 3, 2013