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WATER WORKS Urban Harvest KC whets your appetite for aquaponic farming. BY J O N AT H A N B E N D E R

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TALIB KWELI reschedules Granada show for May 10. SAMMY’S PIZZA & PUB in Leawood has closed. TRUMAN THE TIGER photographed smoking a bong.

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QUESTIONNAIRE

TEISHA BARBER

Executive director, Kansas City Fashion Week

Hometown: Blue Springs, Missouri Current neighborhood: the Crossroads District Who or what is your sidekick? My dogs, Bailey and Baxter

What career would you choose in an alternate reality? Veterinarian What was the last local restaurant you patronized? Zócalo on the Plaza Where do you drink? Coffee at Starbucks, a

What’s your favorite charity? I have loved working with Wayside Waifs, the Joplin Humane Society, the Niles Home for Children, and now CureSearch for Children’s Cancer. Favorite place to spend your paycheck: On vacation

What local phenomenon do you think is overrated? Oklahoma Joe’s Where do you like to take out-of-town guests? The Plaza, the Nelson-Atkins, River Market, Brookside — there are so many great areas.

Finish this sentence: “Kansas City got it right when …” It started rebuilding downtown. There

is so much history here, and we definitely needed something to be done to revitalize the area. I love walking around downtown now and seeing how many people are out and about.

“Kansas City screwed up when it …” Let its

public-school system go downhill. With all of the great areas we have to live in Kansas City, Missouri, it would be nice to have a good public-school system, so parents do not have to send their children to private schools.

“Kansas City needs …” Better and more efficient public transportation.

L AY N E H A L E Y P H OTO G R A P H Y

great bottle of wine at home or margaritas at El Patrón

“People might be surprised to know that I …” Am an interior designer by day and KCFW’s executive director by night/weekend.

“On my day off, I like to …” Sleep in, grab a cup of coffee at a coffee shop, get a manicure and pedicure, and go shopping. “In five years, I’ll be …” Bringing KC more

What movie do you watch at least once a year?

fashion magazines and music.

What local tradition do you take part in every year? Recently started going to the Wine

Favorite day trip: Tailgating and football games in Columbia, Missouri

Walk on Delaware. I also love the many art fairs that we have in KC.

fabulous Kansas City Fashion Week shows, with more events, more designers and lots of fashion!

Favorite person or thing to follow on Twitter:

What TV show do you make sure you watch?

Person or thing you find really irritating at this moment: When people write me e-mails

The Walking Dead, The Vampire Diaries, Smash, Homeland, Dexter, Game of Thrones … the list goes on and on. Hulu Plus is amazing.

take up a lot of space in my iTunes:

Adam Levine and Maroon 5

What subscription — print, digital, etc. — do you value most? Vogue and Spotify. I love

My guilty pleasure, The Twilight Saga. All five movies.

Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week! I love all the posts from everyone during runway seasons.

and don’t proofread before they hit Send. It’s always been one of my biggest pet peeves.

Last book you read: The Art of Racing in the

Rain by Garth Stein

What is your most embarrassing dating moment? Probably asking a guy in high school

to a homecoming dance and being turned down.

Describe a recent triumph: I was recently selected by KC Business for its 2013 Class of Rising Stars in Business. I was also listed in KC Magazine’s list of 100 Influential Women in the February 2013 issue. Kansas City Fashion Week runs through March 3. Find the full schedule at kcfashionweek.com.

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PLOG

WATER WORKS

Urban Harvest KC wants to whet your appetite for aquaponic farming.

BY

JON AT H A N BENDER

AQUAPONICS

B R O O K VA N D E V E R

B R O O K VA N D E V E R

A HOW-TO GUIDE

E

ric Person moves between garden beds, his left hand holding a spray wand attached to a container of liquid compost. He is trying to prevent mites from attacking a small field of microgreens, the cash crop funding the expansion of his new farm, Urban Harvest KC. The temperature is near freezing outside, but Person appears comfortable in a T-shirt and a Kansas City Royals cap. He checks his watch, glances up and winces as he looks directly into a 400-watt bulb above the garden bed. A pair of grow lights — the only illumination in what was most recently the back room of a Mexican bakery — shine down on Person, 38, and his business partner, Jason Irish, 33, as they tend to their crops: wheatgrass, hops, strawberries, peppers and tomatoes. Surrounded by walls, never touched by daylight, these and other plants are part of Person’s aquaponic farm, an indoor ecosystem of plant and marine life. (See sidebar.) The beds are arranged in plastic bins suspended a couple of feet off the floor by wooden frames, suggesting a row of bunks. White PVC piping delivers water from an opaque white cube in the corner of the room — a 375-gallon fish tank, home to 24 goldfish, which hums to the rhythmic heartbeat of its pump. Person knows that the lights and the black shade over the street-level window might lead people to wonder just what Urban Harvest is growing. He remembers the first time he tried to tell the beat policemen in his neighborhood what he was planning for 2100 Summit. “The officer told me, ‘I’ll keep an eye on you,’ ” Person says. “We laughed, and then he said, ‘No, seriously, I’m going to be keeping an eye on you.’ ”

U

rban Harvest started, as so many other farm systems have, with an attempt to solve a pest problem. But Person’s pea plants

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weren’t at the mercy of the usual varmints or insects. “I couldn’t grow anything past a certain point without my cat attacking them,” Person says. Person, an avid gardener who typically turns his tomatoes and peppers into homemade salsa to be given at Christmas, had noticed another, nonfeline hazard: temperature. Irish, too, was having trouble. “The last couple of years, it’s been getting hotter and hotter,” he says. “The season is extended, and nothing wants to bloom. Weather is going to be an issue.” The friends, who both garden and work in the energy-efficiency sector — Person helps homeowners secure energy-efficiency rebates; Irish is a draftsman for a firm that specializes in solar installation — wondered if there was a better way to farm. Last August, recalling the grandmother who had grown houseplants in an aquarium, using it as a miniature hothouse, Person converted a guest bedroom in his West Side house into a small laboratory. He paired a 10-gallon aquarium with a plastic bin from Home Depot. He started with six plants. By December, Fish Veggies Farm (the first name of their enterprise) had taken over the shop on Summit Street. After work, Person and Irish would come to build new garden table beds and plan the layout for their urban space. “It looks like a lot of work,” Irish says. “But it’s very simple. If you’ve got a fish tank and some rocks, you’ve got a garden.” Aquaponics, widespread in New Zealand and Australia, is still in its early stages in the United States. Anton’s Taproom last year became the first local restaurant to install an aquaponics system, raising tilapia, lettuce and herbs in the basement of its Main Street restaurant. Kansas City Food Circle Co-coordinator Dave Lawrence says several companies sell

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Irish (left) and Person have a grow house of a different kind. or install aquaponics equipment, but he calls Urban Harvest the first commercial aquaponics farm in Kansas City. “We keep seeing small organic growers and biodynamic growers coming up with new ideas to keep food close to home,” Lawrence says. “It [aquaponics] is a way to augment and extend the growing season. It’s about reducing our costs and improving our outputs without having to engage a lot of synthetic products or chemicals.” On a recent cold afternoon, the front room at 2100 Summit — where the Don Miguel Bakery used to sell tamales and Mexican pastries — houses a crate of potatoes, as though a farmers market has just begun unloading. There’s more food on the way — Urban Harvest is open on First Fridays, and the farm’s communitysupported agriculture (CSA) program began at the end of February. The bulk of the fruit and vegetables for sale this weekend is coming from Huns Garden, in Kansas City, Kansas. Farmer Pov Hun runs several Saturday stalls at the City Market. “We’re going to let people come in and pick whatever they want,” Irish says. “And the more we grow, the more we can add on each week.” Irish and Person are looking for potential meat and bread partners to augment their CSA offerings. And those aren’t the only expansion plans. Irish wants to use a walk-in freezer to grow mushrooms, and they want to raise and sell tilapia. (To do the latter, they’ll have to secure a health permit from the city.) They want to keep bees on the roof (having already picked up a license and permission from their landlord) and have been talking to Sue Bee Honey about setting up an apiary. Lynda Callon, executive director of the Westside Community Action Network, says pitch.com

R

emember symbiosis from high school science class? Simply put,

it’s when separate organisms engage in a mutually beneficial relationship — and it’s at the core of aquaponics. At one end of the system is a bed of plants growing in water, the roots under gravel or rocks. (By itself, this is hydroponics.) At the other end of the system is a tank containing fish or other marine life. Pipes circulate water between the two systems, and the fish waste fertilizes the plants. Under the rock bed are bacteria that break down fish-waste ammonia into nitrite, which becomes nitrogen, a key nutrient for plants. The wastefree water is then pumped back into the fish tank.

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These crops don't see the sun. a market full of fish, produce and honey is exactly what this neighborhood needs. “We do have people that have limited transportation,” she says. “Anytime you make healthy food accessible without having to get in a car, that’s a good thing. It can’t get fresher than two blocks away.” In the space’s backroom, Person and Irish are experimenting with various setups. A table from Person’s spare bedroom has been repurposed here, and a triangular tower ringed by PVC piping is a work in progress. “We do this with everyday stuff,” Person says. “It’s all stuff that people have lying around their house. But you have to remember that everything you put into your system eventually goes into your system.” The goal for now is to use this 1,600-squarefoot space to grow a series of specialty crops, rather than raising a one-vegetable bounty. The series of beds uses from 30 to 50 gallons a week, and the electricity bill (the grow lights run on 12-hour cycles) is less than what Person and Irish pay in their homes. “With aquaponics, we can break the tradition of how much food you can get in a confined space,” Irish says. “We can grow closer and stack things.” Beds of microgreens, pea shoots and wheatgrass are coming up. The microgreens and a tray of mache lettuce will be sold to restaurants such as Affäre and the Farmhouse. A bed of hops, originally conceived as a pick-your-own operation, has already been claimed by a local startup brewery expecting to go into production this year. Person envisions taking his operation even bigger, a 10,000-square-foot area in the West Bottoms. “What if Associated Wholesale Grocers didn’t have to ship lettuce from wherever they ship lettuce from?” he says. But before Urban Harvest’s produce appears on store shelves, the farmers know they need to educate the public. That means workshops at the KC Food Circle’s Eat Local (& Organic!) Expos March 30 and April 6. “This is something they should teach in high school, like math and science,” Person says. “If everyone learned this in high school, they might not have to go without jobs or food.”

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Jason Irish and Eric Person are scheduled to present to 1 Million Cups, a program of the Kauffman Labs for Enterprise Creation, Wednesday, March 20.

E-mail jonathan.bender@pitch.com 2

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M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X

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I

n the nation’s couture capital earlier this month, Teisha Barber realized that Kansas City Fashion Week had arrived. Barber, executive director of the KC event, was in New York to attend Fashion Week. She says: “I was hearing, ‘Oh, we’ve heard of you guys’ and ‘You all are doing some fabulous stuff.’ ” She credits Midwestern designers, 30 of whom are set to bring their best work to the local five-day fashion marathon. Kansas City Fashion Week returns February 27–March 3 with its 2013 spring showcase. The runway dazzle goes down at 28 Event Space. (See kcfashionweek.com for tickets.) Here’s a look at four Kansas City designers who are putting our city on the fashion map. continued on page 8

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Cut and Runway continued from page 7

JANAY ANDREWS Line: Janay A. Handmade On the runway: 10 a.m. Saturday, March 2 Style: “Clean, modern, feminine bridal” Favorite materials: Ecofriendly Design inspiration: Nature, femininity, literature, history

Find it: janay-a.com Cost: Basic dress, $700–$1,300; designer

dress, $1,300–$1,700; couture dress, starts at $1,700; alterations included in dress costs Hopeless romantics, prepare for Janay Andrews’ bridal collection to whisk you away to a place where mad, effortless love swirls with subtle surprises and organic whimsy. You know: the South of France. Andrews was there to attend a client’s wedding when she found inspiration for her runway look. “I’m going for simple elegance,” she says. “Like, it’s after the party, and you have this beautiful, careless look after dancing in the night.” This is KC Fashion Week’s first bridal show, and Andrews — a designer of custom, ecofriendly wedding dresses — is also new to this event. She has been designing since 2005, though, and she plans to move her studio and shop from midtown Kansas City to Mission this spring. Andrews says her collection this week is a fashionforward, conceptual take on her typical work. She’s elevating her look with chunky jewelry, a bold color palette and texture-heavy pieces. Her clean, focused designs are usually

made-to-order, and she loves hidden pockets, colorful tulle, open backs and art-nouveau screen printing. She uses only natural, organic fabrics — often a silk-and-hemp blend. She dyes with tea to turn dresses a champagne color. “I’m very passionate about sustainability, and I definitely feel like the way you live your life should reflect what you believe,” she says. “I want to use my work to make people more aware of their impact on the environment and give people a new perception of natural and organic. Ecofriendly weddings go beyond burlap. I also want to show that bridal does not mean stuffy or homespun. I’m certainly not your grandmother’s dressmaker.”

CHRISTIAN SHUSTER Line: christianMICHEAL On the runway: 7:30 p.m. Friday, March 1 Style: “Cutting edge” Favorite material: Wool Design inspiration: Latest trends Find it: christianmicheal.com Cost: Vests, $80–$100; pants, $150–$200; jackets, $400–$500 Christian Shuster is chasing a mega break this week. “I’m looking to attract some capital investors, between Kansas City and Omaha’s fashion weeks, that believe in my design sense and will take my label from a boutique design house to a full-fledged wholesale label sold to retailers across the country,” he says. He’s aiming to sign with a half-dozen retailers, then team up with a manufacturing house to push out 2,000 pieces this fall. If that sounds ambitious, consider that Shuster’s strategy has gone according to plan so far. Without formal fashion

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FEBRUARY 28-MARCH 6, 2013

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training, he set out to build a label while reading Oscar de la Renta’s autobiography, and teaching himself sewing and garment construction. He broke into the menswear scene in 2007 with bold neckties, then expanded to six local retailers and attracted a strong customer base. Last year, Shuster ramped it up at Fashion Week with an avant-garde collection, and this week he’s revealing a collection he calls “modern American sportswear with a classic British fox-hunting twist.” The ready-to-wear look recalls Ralph Lauren and features wool, herringbone tweed, corduroy, houndstooth, earth tones, and bright colors mixed with plaid. Items include a quilted hunting jacket and a double-breasted frock coat, and his models will don bow ties, hats, umbrellas and travel bags. “I’m catering to the style-conscious modern man who likes to look very clean, polished and tailored, and isn’t afraid of pushing the envelope,” Shuster says. His plans go beyond this week. “I was born and raised here and wholeheartedly believe in building in the Midwest,” he says. “Instead of transplanting to the coasts and having to look to the coasts for fashion, it’s time the coasts start looking to us. And I want to be a part of that.”

KARMA JADE Line: American Trash On the runway: 7 p.m. Thursday, February 28 Style: “Rock star” Favorite materials: Leather, found items Design inspiration: Music (pop, industrial) Find it: “American Trash Couture” on

Facebook, karmaclothingdesigns.com Cost: Graphic T-shirts start at $20; handbags and halter tops cost around $100; a couture wedding gown runs $1,500–$15,000. A design-school instructor once told Karma Jade that she wouldn’t amount to anything in the fashion industry. Four years later, Jade’s work has been featured in fashion showcases in Chicago and Kansas City, and has dressed musicians such as Halestorm’s Lzzy Hale and Red Velvet Crush’s Jillian Riscoe. “I’ve never been one to let someone’s negativism get to me,” says Jade, whose ever-changing, Kool-Aidcolored hair and numerous tattoos and piercings add to her own rock chic. “I just stay focused on making everyone feel like a rock star.” Jade (whose real name is Katherine Swanson) takes an unconventional approach to her loud creations. She doesn’t do sketches. Instead, she gathers her materials, many of them garbage-bound items, and then lets music dictate her results. Case in point: her process for KC Fashion Week. She broke down a group of items (including old leather jackets and a purse) into raw material and then waited on a mix from DJ Preston Jeffrey Parsons, known as GENT.

“I put on my headphones and let my subconscious take over,” Jade says. GENT’s lively tracks led to pieces that look good on musicians walking the red carpet. The stage pieces, Jade says, look like something out of a Las Vegas show — Cirque du Soleil, perhaps. Her accents include costume jewelry that incorporates crosses and crucifixes. She hopes also to add wings made from guitar strings, sheet metal and copper tubing. (She has a deal with Shawnee’s Funky Munky Music: Instead of throwing away the leftovers from restringing instruments, the shop holds them for her.) “I’m all about making a statement and doing what’s best for the environment, and hope I can inspire people along the way,” Jade says.

BRIT TANY DAV I D S O N Line: BMDesigns On the runway: 7:30 p.m. Saturday, March 2 Style: “Classic, sophisticated” Favorite materials: Lace, double knits,

wool tweeds

Design inspiration: Travel Find it: bmdesignsonline.com Cost: $40–$100 Some Midwest designers might get back from a New York Fashion Week acting all big-time. Not Brittany Davidson. “To be honest, it made me miss Kansas City Fashion Week, which is so organized and well-run, and the models are all nice and on time,” Davidson says a day after returning home from showing her collection at New York Fashion Week for the first time. “I love the support of the fashion community here. Everyone tends to want to see everybody succeed, and that’s rare.” Davidson’s appreciation of KC doesn’t stop her from drawing inspiration from the Big Apple. She began her line in 2009, and she says her latest collection is an ode to New York City’s hard streetwear but made with a soft touch. The pieces include a man’s motorcycle jacket with unexpected quilted fabric, and a woman’s gown that pairs pleated silver material with a train. She’ll also present accessories — think crocheted scarves and hats along with necklaces and rings. Davidson’s Fashion Week clothing collection is edgier than her signature look, which centers on Europeaninspired, wearable items that attract the modern and sophisticated working woman. She says her English heritage and studying in Paris and London have had the heaviest influences on her work, resulting in what she calls a sexy, classy statement.

But her U.S. travels also play into her creations, as does the scene close to home. “I love Kansas City fashion because it’s more eclectic than big cities on the coasts,” she says. “You get to see it all here, and that’s really fun for me.”

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WEEK OF FEBRUARY 28–MARCH 6 | BY BERRY ANDERSON

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PAG E

ART The Kansas City Plein Air Coterie is on a mission.

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PAG E

FILM True/False Film Fest takes over Columbia.

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CAFÉ Pull up a stool for one and dine at these three bars.

T H U R S D AY | 2 . 2 8 | FEELS LIKE THE FIRST TIME

“Storytelling is arguably humanity’s oldest art form,” says Laura Packer, a professional storyteller and writer. “We’ve been telling each other stories to understand the world and our place in it for as long as we’ve had language.” Her new M OR E monthly event, Speak Up Storytelling and Spoken AT INE L Word, promises six-minute N O M PITCH.CO stories (fiction and nonfiction) loosely organized around a theme — this month’s is “Firsts” — and related by Packer and storyteller Joyce Slater, as well as audience volunteers. “The stories don’t have to be real-life experiences,” Packer says. “The more creative the better.” Try it at 7 p.m. at Prospero’s Uptown (3600 Broadway, #107). For more information, search “Speak Up Storytelling” on Facebook.

EVENTS

FIRST FRIDAY HIT LIST You might want to block out Saturday afternoon, too, because there’s plenty of competition for your attention this First Friday — and not just in the Crossroads. If, for instance, you haven’t seen Artifacts of Immigration, which includes works by Texas artist Henry Membreño, don’t put it off. His haunting portraits at Mattie Rhodes Art Gallery (1740 Jefferson, 816-221-2349) are accompanied by short, poignant narratives culled from family history. An excerpt: “Before the Revolution my aunt Noemi would wear red high heels to where the parakeets nested along the river.” At Leedy-Voulkos Art Center (2012 Baltimore, 816-474-1919), Ada Koch’s massive compositions bear the curious title The Piazza: Praising Architecture and a Balanced Life. You can imagine that she made these collage and mixed-media drawings of places — Montmartre, the Vatican, the interior of the Louvre — while actually traveling in Paris and Rome. Or you can simply imagine yourself transported right to these scenes, and to the serenity they suggest. Sherry Leedy Contemporary Art (2004 Baltimore, 816-221-2626) has a powerhouse combination of two solo exhibitions. Caleb Taylor’s abstract paintings, which have a subtle geometric grace, and printmaker Mike Lyon’s works, which include giant portraits reminiscent of Chuck Close but, amazingly, drawn by a machine programmed by Lyon. There’s a new gallery in town, Garcia

F R I D AY | 3 . 1 | MARS ATTACKS

For the third of four programs marking its 20th–anniversary season, the NewEar Contemporary Music Ensemble offers you a little exercise. Tonight and tomorrow night, Strangely Familiar starts at All Souls Unitarian Universalist Church (4501 Walnut), then moves to the neighboring Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art (4420 Warwick Boulevard) after intermission. So if you’re the sort of person who’d say, “I wouldn’t walk across the street to see great modern chamber music,” well, stay home. But if you’re ready to hear Anna Clyne’s menacing, mechanical “Fits + Starts,” the jabbing rhythms of Lee Hyla’s “We Speak Etruscan,” Thomas Adès’ aptly titled solo-piano work “Still Sorrowing” and other pieces, get to All Souls by 8 p.m. The Kemper segment is dedicated to a piece continued on page 14

FRIDAY

3 .1

lains f the P Paris o Paris. meets

“Sacre Coeur Montmarte in Paris” by Ada Koch Squared (115 West 18th Street, 816-916-4266), where Ecuadorian-born Leonor Jurado’s photographs ask you to contemplate “the duality of strength and weakness of human life through the construction of improvised narrative scenes that address the uncanny and the mundane of life.” Front/Space Studio (217 West 18th Street, 816-561-6061) has The Places I’ll Never Be

Again, in which Sarabeth Dunton shows us a set of household blinds set in otherwise empty rural landscapes. At Old Souls Tattoo Parlour & Gallery (2006 Main, 816-452-0393), artist and proprietor Noah Moore provides a glimpse of his late father’s work, zeroing in on African photographs of the 1970s. — TRACY ABELN

F R I D AY | 3 . 1 |

BIG IN IRELAND

C

hances are that Ardal O’Hanlon‘s name isn’t going to ring any bells, unless you’re familiar with Irish humor. Lucky for us, the Irish Kings of Comedy are sending their boy to the City Stage at Union Station (30 West Pershing Road, 816-460-2020) for a Tullamore Dew-sponsored show at 8 p.m. Tickets cost $20. (VIP tickets are $30 and include a reception at 7 with whiskey samples and a meetand-greet with O’Hanlon at 9:15.) See irishcenterkc.org. pitch.com

FEBRUARY 28-MARCH 6, 2013

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13

)L]T\[7VTa6QOP\ Thursday,  March  7  and  Thursday,  April  25 5-­â&#x20AC;?8pm        FREE  admission

 Discarded  and  cast  away,  trash  becomes  treasure     at  the  hands  of  Just  Colcord.     DÄ&#x17E;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x161;Ć&#x161;Ĺ&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x152;Ć&#x;Ć?Ć&#x161;Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x161;Ĺ&#x161;Ĺ?Ć?Ä?Ć&#x152;Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x;ŽŜĆ?Í&#x2DC; ^Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x17E;Ĺ&#x161;Ĺ?Ć?Ć?Ć&#x161;Ĺ˝Ć&#x2030;žŽĆ&#x;ŽŜÄŽĹŻĹľĆ?Í&#x2DC; Ć&#x152;Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ç&#x2021;ŽƾĆ&#x152;Ĺ˝Ç ĹśÄ?Ĺ&#x161;Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x152;Ä&#x201A;Ä?Ć&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;ĨĆ&#x152;ŽžĆ&#x152;Ä&#x17E;Ä?Ç&#x2021;Ä?ĹŻÄ&#x17E;Ä&#x161;Ĺ?Ć&#x161;Ä&#x17E;ĹľĆ?Í&#x2DC; dŽƾĆ&#x152;Ć&#x161;Ĺ&#x161;Ä&#x17E;žƾĆ?Ä&#x17E;ƾžÍ&#x2DC;

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continued from page 13 making its premiere this weekend, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Martian Chronicles,â&#x20AC;? by UMKC Conservatory of Music professor Paul Rudy (with Mark Southerland sitting in). Call 816â&#x20AC;&#x201C;235â&#x20AC;&#x201C;6222 for tickets ($20; $10 for students). Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a preconcert talk at 7:15 p.m.; for details, see newear.org. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; SCOTT WILSON

S AT U R D AY | 3 . 2 | TOO LEGIT TO QUIT

The KC Roller Warriorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; eighth season of mayhem on the flat track starts tonight. KC Roller Warriorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; marketing and PR manager, Melody Alexander (aka Mary Lou Wretched),

S AT U R D AY | 3 . 2 |

promises more skater interaction with the fans and more gritty action. Doors open at Municipal Auditorium (301 West 13th Street, 816-513-5000) at 5 p.m., and the first of two bouts starts at 6. Advance tickets cost $13 for adults and $6 for kids (or $16 and $8 at the door). See kcrollerwarriors.com.

FINDING YOUR MARBLES

Since 2000, Moon Marble Co. (600 East Front Street, Bonner Springs, 913-441-1432), has hosted Marble Crazy, a contemporary art-glass show that draws about 2,000 enthusiasts a year. â&#x20AC;&#x153;With antique marbles, I guess it is more like a hobby,â&#x20AC;? says MMC co-owner Lynda Sproules. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But with contemporary marbles, it is definitely an art. Most visitors to the show have an appreciation for the art of working with glass.â&#x20AC;? This year, the show features more than 20 artists and four demonstration areas, with a reproduction marble machine from 1905 and a furnace-working area. Geek out today from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m (and Friday, March 1, from noon to 9). The event is free. For information, see marblecrazy.com.

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THE PITCH

FEBRUARY 28-MARCH 6, 2013

pitch.com

price

A

mber Langston, founder of Women Against Prohibition, was named High Times magazineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Freedom Fighter of the Monthâ&#x20AC;? last April. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s organizing Show-Me Cannabisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Trivia Night, a fundraiser for the legalization cause. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Right now, the biggest deal we have going on is [Missouri] House Bill 512, which would effectively make anything less than 35 grams a ticket only,â&#x20AC;? Langston says. Put your dollars to use at Westport Flea Market (817 Westport Road, 816-931-1986). Doors open at 6 p.m., and trivia starts at 7. The buy-in is $15, or $20 at the door (tables of six cost $75 in advance) and includes one drink and serious raffleprize opportunities. First place makes a cool $180. Register at show-mecannabis.com.

Hail to the marble makers.

S U N D AY | 3 . 3 | SUNDAY SCRAMBLE

Motocross was known as â&#x20AC;&#x153;scrambles racingâ&#x20AC;? when it started in the United Kingdom after World War I. The sport made it to the United States in the 1970s, and we eventually turned it into â&#x20AC;&#x153;arenacross,â&#x20AC;? putting speed, air and danger in the spotlight. Feel it at noon (and at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, March 2) when AMSOIL Arenacross revs up at the Sprint Center (1407 Grand, 816-949-7000). Tickets cost $15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$45 for adults, and $10 for kids between 2 and 12 years old. See sprintcenter.com.

M O N D AY | 3 . 4 | &

kansas city

present

Bad Economy.

High Hopes.

PUB

Big Laughs.

CRAWL AT 1 PM

by David Lindsay-Abaire

MIDNIGHT RAIDERS

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our years in the making, Tomb Raider is ready to relaunch. On a deserted island in the Devil’s Sea, icy badass Lara Croft is engaged in a desperate fight for survival. Her ability to adapt to the desolate landscape with physics and rudimentary weapons is much more valuable than her treasure-hunting skills. Make Lara your gaming bitch when the Microsoft Store at Oak Park Mall (11467 West 95th Street, Level 1, Overland Park, 913-693-0901) opens at 10 p.m. for the video game’s midnight launch. Play the game first, then buy it at 12:01 a.m. Giveaways and drawings go till 2 a.m. Preorder your copy and get more information at microsoftstore.com/overlandpark.

M O N D AY | 3 . 4 | FOOD FIGHTS

More than 50 taped interviews with foodindustry folks are the subject of the play Eat This! KC Chews on the Politics of Food. Written and directed by Stephanie Roberts, UMKC assistant professor of physical theater, it’s kind of the who, what, when, where and how behind the always burning question, “What’s for dinner?” Afterward, the audience shares a meal with Bread KC, the micro-financing organization that attempts to find sustainable support for the local creative community. This UMKC Theatre production runs through March 10 in Studio 116 of the Olson Performing Arts Center (4949 Cherry, 816-235-6222). Tickets for this evening’s industry-night performance cost $10. The show starts at 7:30 p.m. See umkctheatre.org for more information.

Tony Award Nominee For Best Play

MARCH 16TH 2013 7:30AM IN DOWNTOWN LEE’S SUMMIT

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It’s time to clean out your closets and join us as we collect for a cause. Come bundled up with your family in your unwanted clothing and donate your items at the designated “strip” stations throughout the race. All clothing will be donated to the Big Brothers Big Sisters Foundation.

ENTER “thepitch” AS A PROMO CODE AT REGISTRATION TO EARN $5 OFF

7 p.m., CCON puts on a production of The Lot, a play written and performed by local kids. “It will highlight the daily life of young people and how they respond to the issues that they encounter — to show youth how their daily decisions affect their life,” says CCON board member Ed Atkins. Jamar Rogers, a former contestant on The Voice, whose past struggles with meth and an HIV-positive diagnosis make him an appropriate character in the play, has a special cameo. “He will be incorporating his life experience into the play,” Atkins says. “He will do a vocal performance, but his personal story will add depth.” Tickets for the one-night-only show at the Kauffman Center (1601 Broadway, 816-994-7222) cost $16–$31. See kauffmancenter.org.

Today thru Mar 24 816.531.PLAY www.unicorntheatre.org 3828 Main Street KCMO

W E D N E S D AY | 3 . 6 | ZOOM ZOOM

From left: Logan Black, Alisha Espinosa and Jamie Dufault, in Eat This!

T U E S D AY | 3 . 5 | CHECK YOURSELF

The Calvary Community Outreach Network promotes wellness in the urban core. At

Don’t even think about stealing one of the more than 500 new vehicles on display this weekend for the Greater Kansas City International Auto Show. All of these rides have just one-eighth of a tank of gas, disconnected batteries and sealed gas caps. Rediscover that new car smell from 5 to 10 p.m. (and through Sunday) at Bartle Hall (301 West 13th Street). Tickets cost $11 for adults and $6 for kids 8-12 years old. For more information and a schedule, see kansascityautoshow.com. E-mail submissions to Filter editor Berry Anderson at calendar@pitch.com. Search our complete listings guide online at pitch.com.

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FEBRUARY 28-MARCH 6, 2013

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FEBRUARY 28-MARCH 6, 2013

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ART Kansas City Plein Air Coterie.

BY

THE RE S A BE MBNI S T E R

t’s a few minutes past midnight. A ragtag group, dressed in sensible layers and coated in rain gear, trudges north in the center of Wyandotte Street. They carry bags, wooden cases and plastic toolboxes up the otherwise empty street. A thick layer of clouds, colored a dull pink by the downtown light, drops a heavy mist, an insult magnified by a bitter wind. On the south side of the Kauffman Center’s lawn, the group halts and assembles near the top of the parking garage’s stairs. They form a half-circle around one of their ranks, a woman known as the Scout. She opens a notebook, takes roll, records the time and the temperature and the wind direction. The Scout instructs everyone to meet here again in 75 minutes. They disperse to complete their mission. This night marks the 50th session of the Kansas City Plein Air Coterie, a platoon of artists that has met every weekend for the past year to paint outdoors, regardless of weather. Its members have braved searing drought and temperatures low enough to freeze paint. They do this to record — on paper or on canvas or on board — what they see. Each Sunday morning at 8:30, or every 10th session at midnight, they head to a new location somewhere in the metro, and they observe and they paint. If you had been present at KC PAC’s founding, you would have painted two friends drinking beer. Afflicted by cabin fever last February, Lee Piechocki and Robert Bingaman decided to take their easels and palettes outside and give “plein air” painting (a French term for painting outdoors) a try. “It started as a reaction to spending long hours in the studio, kind of stressing out,” Piechocki explains. “It was almost like going golfi ng or something. Just get outside, get

some fresh air, and get away from the studio and work.” Joined that first morning by painter Nicole Mauser, Piechocki and Bingaman trekked to Burr Oak Woods Nature Center in Blue Springs. Bingaman made the rookie mistake of bringing along a table. “You know when you’re carrying something across your house and you’re like, ‘I can’t carry this any longer,’ and you have to put it down? I was doing that every 50 feet,” Bingaman tells me. “I finally get there and make the shittiest painting I’ve ever made. I couldn’t do worse.” But they kept going, and soon, other people wanted in. The three original members, Piechocki, Bingaman and Mauser — as well as Kelly Clark, who attended the second session — call themselves the founders, and they operate KC PAC with a tongue-in-cheek formality. There are, for example, the “Rules in Brief” outlined in each week’s e-mail invitation — “Must: Make marks from observation; Must: Sup or sip with us; Must: Be a mammal, unless otherwise approved by the Scout; Had Better: Enjoy yourself and those around you.” If the heraldry surrounding some KC PAC activities feels like something out of a Wes Anderson movie, one look at Bingaman on a group outing seals the association: slimtailored jacket, tie, wooden pipe. Melissa Lenos, given the honorary title “Scout” for her efforts planning a plein-air session that was also a full-on weekend camping trip, knitted each of the four founders a scarf, each representing one of the four seasons. All that esprit de treehouse helps keep KC PAC’s members from sleeping in on Sundays. (It also helps that they eat breakfast together before or after painting; cocktails precede the

CHRIS MULLINS

I

CHRIS MULLINS

CHRIS MULLINS

CHRIS MULLINS

PAINT BALL

Brushing up against the

midnight raids.) It’s the same logic behind having a workout buddy — you’re more likely to show up if there’s someone else to hold you accountable — though no spin class looks like this. To date, more than 50 people have joined KC PAC for at least one session. The group is open to anyone, as long as he or she makes marks from observation during the session. (Rules are rules.) I joined three sessions myself, and the notes I scrawled in my Moleskine for this article counted as my observations. Tom Matt, a painter who moved to Kansas City from New York, tells me that KC PAC has been a good way for him to meet locals with common interests. Founder Bingaman echoes Matt’s sentiment. “You don’t really have a choice of who you are going to meet,” he says. “It’s whoever decides they’re going to come. And what’s funny is, we find that we like everyone, because right then you have enough in common. You find value in standing outside for two hours no matter what and looking at something? That makes you like me.” Scout Lenos, a nonartist, likes the Sunday ritual. “They are trying to teach me to paint,” she says. “I’m a writer and researcher. It’s changed the way I concentrate. The first time I joined them, we went out in the woods. I had never drawn before, but I just sat and looked around me for an hour. It was a really appealing kind of slowness. It made me rush less.” For some members, the problem solving involved in painting outdoors is part of the appeal. Artists use a variety of mediums — oil paints, watercolor, gouache, marker, pen, pencil and even woodcut — and each presents its own challenges outside the studio (starting with portability).

KC PAC observes the city in a way that few others do. Member Chris Bell designs and builds his own easels and tables. During session 0049, he debuted an altered cigar box that opened to hold a postcard-size board in place. The inside of the box holds tiny bottles of oil paint. He puts the entire setup atop a camera tripod. Dedicating a full two hours a week to painting from observation and adopting the Zen-like attitude that not every plein-air session can yield a masterpiece have had positive effects on many of the member artists’ studio production. After a full year of KC PAC, Bingaman says it has changed the art that he makes indoors. “I kind of pictured it as kind of a critical response to my studio practice,” he tells me. “I could learn things and challenge myself. And what’s really happened is that it’s gotten into what I do. This has become part of my work and what I’m making. My process has gotten looser, and I’m observing and using source material in a different way. My compositions are getting less structured and rigid.” At the end of the cold, dreary midnight session — No. 0050 — the members lean their artwork against the concrete steps leading down to the Arts District Parking Garage and snap quick cellphone-photo documentation. They form another circle on the nearby sidewalk and put their hands — some gloved, some charcoalor paint-covered — together in the center, one on top of another. A shout goes up, the group’s motto: “Observe!” Then they gather their handiwork and head to warmer, drier places. In the morning, they can sleep in.

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FEBRUARY 28-MARCH 6, 2013

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See The Gatekeepers (left) and No at True/False.

S

ince David Wilson and Paul Sturtz conceived of Columbia, Missouri’s True/False Film Fest in the summer of 2003, their annual event has demolished three persistent myths about documentaries and the festivals that spotlight them. Namely: 1. That documentaries are dull (not true). 2. That the movies in the fests are obscure (not true). 3. That there’s no audience for them (false). For proof, look no further than the happy geeks who dressed as their favorite sci-fi characters when Morgan Spurlock’s Comic-Con Episode IV: A Fan’s Hope debuted. The folks at True/False can also take pride in their prescience. Two of last year’s entries received Oscar nominations: How to Survive a Plague (about the successful activism that enabled millions to survive despite being HIVpositive), and Searching for Sugar Man (about the neglected career of singer-songwriter Sixto Rodriguez), which went on to win the Oscar Sunday night. The Gatekeepers, another nominee, is making its Missouri debut at this year’s True/False. And what about star power? The Steven Spielbergs and the Martin Scorseses of the doc world are often guests here. Among those who have presented work at the festival: Joe Berlinger and Bruce Sinofsky (the duo behind the Paradise Lost trilogy, about the unjustly imprisoned West Memphis Three), Oscar-winner Kevin Macdonald (One Day in September, Touching the Void and The Last King of Scotland), Kirby Dick (The Invisible War, Outrage, Twist of Faith), James Marsh (Man on Wire, Project Nim) and Rachel Grady and Heidi Ewing (Jesus Camp, Detropia). Anyone who has waited in line to get a ticket at True/False knows that attracting crowds isn’t a problem. Last year, the festival sold 37,000 tickets, a record. (Columbia itself, home of the University of Missouri, has a population of 110,438.) Sellouts are common. There’s still entertainment for those who don’t make it into screenings. All of Columbia

seems to be taken over by the March March parade on Friday, and buskers from across the United States play songs before the movies start. All the venues are within walking distance of one another, and the streets of Columbia are spring-loaded with surprises (a man in a gorilla suit, playing an accordion, say). This year’s festival runs from Thursday afternoon through Sunday evening. For tickets, movie details and a schedule, see truefalse .org. This year’s entries weren’t available for advance viewing at press time, but the following titles look to be in awards contention.



The Gatekeepers

Nominated for Best Feature Documentary at this year’s Academy Awards, The Gatekeepers is a major achievement simply because it features all six of the surviving former directors of Shin Bet, the Israeli security and counterterrorism agency. All of the men profiled in the film have been understandably tight-lipped about their experiences. And all six agree, with some variation, that Israel’s lasting safety depends on concessions to the Palestinians. Director Dror Moreh sits for a Q&A afterward.



Stories We Tell

Canadian actress-writer-director Sarah Polley picked up an Oscar nomination in 2008 for writing the narrative feature Away From Her. It turns out that her own life might be as fascinating as the roles she has played and the characters she has created. Stories We Tell reveals that Polley’s history is more complicated than even she imagined it to be. For one thing, her mother died when she was 11, and the actor whom she thought was her father wasn’t. In fact, to accurately portray what actually happened in her childhood, she has had to make up footage to reflect it. Polley is in Columbia to talk with viewers after the screening.



No

Like Stories We Tell, Chile’s entry for Best Foreign Language Film, No, weaves fact and fic-

tion. It’s based on a play by Antonio Skármeta (whose novel Burning Patience inspired Il Postino) and chronicles the ad campaign that helped bring down the rule of dictator Augusto Pinochet. Gael García Bernal (The Motorcycle Diaries) plays a Don Draper-style pitchman who spearheads a campaign against a referendum to keep Pinochet in power. While No’s framework is dramatized, the ads featured in the film are ones that actually convinced Chileans that a more democratic government would be a good thing. In interviews, director Pablo Larraín recalls he was able to find dozens of people who could vividly recall the work they did on “no” ads, but he found only one “yes” man. Producer Daniel Dreifuss is attending the screenings.



After Tiller

Since the 2009 murder of Wichita abortion provider George Tiller, only four doctors in the United States have provided late-term abortions. After Tiller profiles all of them and attempts to provide a more nuanced discussion of the polarizing subject. Co-directors Martha Shane and Lana Wilson are present for screenings.

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Which Way Is the Front Line From Here? The Life and Time of Tim Hetherington

Hetherington, a still photographer and videographer, and Sebastian Junger, the print journalist who wrote The Perfect Storm, teamed up to cover the deployment of a platoon in Afghanistan. That partnership resulted in the Oscarnominated 2010 documentary Restrepo. Then the 40-year-old British photojournalist died while covering the war in Libya. Junger uses his new film to ask what sort of person Hetherington was, what his legacy says about the status of journalism, and what attracts people like him to dangerous stories. Junger will be on hand to discuss the film and his friend.

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KANSAS CITY PITCH WEEKLY THURSDAY 02/28

CAFÉ

STOOLIE

There’s no wrong time

BY

to eat alone at the bar.

CH A R L E S F E R RU Z Z A

12 Baltimore Café • 106 West 12th Street, 816-346-4410 • Hours: 6:30 a.m–11 p.m. Sunday–Thursday, 6:30 a.m.–1 a.m. Friday–Saturday • Price: $$–$$$ The Majestic Restaurant • 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888 • Hours: 11 a.m.–9 p.m. Monday–Thursday, 11 a.m.–10 p.m. Friday, 8:30 a.m.–10 p.m. Saturday, 8:30 a.m.–9 p.m. Sunday • Price: $$–$$$ Harry’s Bar & Tables • 501 Westport Road, 816-561-3950 • Hours: 3 p.m.–2 a.m. Monday–Thursday, 11:30 a.m.–2 a.m. Friday–Sunday • Price: $$–$$$

O

h, the things I’ve witnessed, eating alone at the bar. I once saw a man reading aloud from the Bible and sloppily drinking scotch. Another night, there was the young, tuxedo-clad fellow who tried not to damage his rental as he vomited. And among the many people I’ve seen conductE R MO ing animated conversations with themselves, the one who stands out AT E N I ONL .COM most in my memory is the H PITC guy who took a gun from his coat pocket, then sobbed hysterically. (Quite sensibly, the bartender took the weeping customer’s gun away and then served him a Dr Pepper.) At moments like these, I’m reminded that dining companionship is overrated. I typically dine at a bar only when circumstance leaves me no choice, so sometimes I forget about the uncomplicated pleasures of the solo barroom meal. And one such enjoyment is that being on my own allows me to view these eccentric spectacles with complete detachment. I can simply turn discreetly away, return to my reading and eat a fry. It’s like changing channels on a TV show: “Well, that’s enough of that.” In a restaurant’s dining room, each table is its own little stage, ready for scenes of hilarity or despondency, lust or loss. These performances have ways of reaching a broader audience, though. It’s difficult to completely tune out the party at the next table when it’s just inches away. Especially if the evening’s script includes lines like, “He was very blunt about it. He said any drugstore carries the product over the counter. As if I’d go to Walgreens and have everyone see me buy it.” It’s different at the bar, even when you’re dining with someone. Grunting between bites is perfectly acceptable in this lateral arrangement, and the built-in voyeurism is welcome rather than intrusive. A friend of mine, a chatty bon vivant, likes to engage strangers near him at the bar. “I like to create a convivial tone,” he says, as though he were a character out of Dodsworth. Not me. I prefer a more disagreeable tone. Sure, I’ll make small talk with the bartender until my plate arrives, but we both know that this is merely polite prologue, and we both want it that way. When my food comes, I bury my head in a newspaper or a magazine, savor my meal without having to share it, and keep an ear cocked for a little gossip. Over the past couple of weeks, I set out to update my mental list of smart places to indulge this old practice. Here’s what I found.

Midnight on a Tuesday, Harry’s Bar & Tables

“We do a pretty good late-night dining busi20

THE PITCH

ANGELA C. BOND

CAFÉ

Grab a stool and a menu at Harry’s Bar & Tables (above) and at the Majestic. ness during the week,” Sonia tells me as I sit down. She’s a pretty bartender at Harry’s Bar & Tables, the venerable brick saloon at the busy intersection of Pennsylvania and Westport Road. “There aren’t that many places in this neighborhood where you can get a real meal after midnight.” She’s right. The popular Westport Café & Bar, up the street, and its Italian sister, the Boot, both offer food until the kitchen shuts down at 1 a.m., but Harry’s keeps its cooks up an hour longer, with a limited but enticing selection of dishes until 2. Despite its crisp linen napkins and classy look, Harry’s isn’t the kind of bar — at least at this hour — where you’ll nose quietly into your worn copy of Victor Hugo’s Les Misérables while you nibble on sautéed shrimp and sip a Sazerac. The dining room and the bar at Harry’s are one, and it can get raucous even when the space is less than half-full. But this is still the most dignified place in Westport for a sit-down supper after most of the other restaurants — and many of the bars — have closed for the night. And it’s an ideal place to eavesdrop on the occupants of nearby bar stools who really should be forced to listen to their own dizzy conversations in the brutal light of day. “Do you like to travel?” the stylish blonde

FEBRUARY 28-MARCH 6, 2013

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asks the preppy young man sitting next to her. “I love adventure!” And before he can answer, she’s talking about Swiss Miss cocoa mix. That’s my cue to focus on the midnight supper in front of me: a half-order of the hummus duo — one a traditional chickpea, the other a red-pepper variety — served with a generous stack of warm pita slices. The creamy hummus comes dotted with a couple of salty Kalamata olives and three soft, buttery cloves of roasted garlic, as well as a sprinkling of feta cheese and a spoonful of chopped tomato. From my vantage at the center of the bar, I can see a cook working in the tiny kitchen. I seem to be the only one eating at this hour, but Sonia and the other bartender, Jeremy, assure me that 1 a.m. always brings another wave of hungry prowlers. I eat too much hummus and finish only one of my spicy Cajun soft tacos. Jeremy boxes up my leftovers, and I take a big gulp of tonic water while settling my bill. The two attractive young women now to my right have very large martinis in front of them. They speak very little to each other and not at all to me — highly appropriate behavior. At that hour, there’s often nothing left to say.

4:30 p.m. Wednesday, the Majestic Restaurant

Ever since my drinking days ended, I’ve found that pretty much any variation on the happy-hour concept that doesn’t include pitch.com

food is an incredible waste of time. (I took the opposite stance during my boozy years, ignoring countless free buffets when local bars and restaurants offered such enticements.) No, the serenity of sobriety means that today I disregard the sparkle of track lighting on bottle glass but fondle a printed happy-hour menu with the same reverence I might pay the Dead Sea Scrolls. The four-hour special at the Majestic’s grand old bar isn’t sacred, but it allows me to eat well, and cheaply, from 2 to 6 p.m. And if I did drink, I’d have a friend in this bar’s Sean Moriarty, a master mixologist who’s also a charming old-school bartender, straight out of a William Saroyan play. The special is good enough that I’ve brought my friend Carol, who pointedly pays no attention to a chubby insurance salesman sitting on her other side. He’s trying to flirt. We’re trying to taste a few of the $5 appetizers, including ground-lamb sliders and sassy little fried risotto balls stuffed with cheddar. We order a crabby crab cake that’s big enough to share and comes with “Majestic fries,” deep-fried hunks of potato as large as fresh-hewn wood shards. According to Moriarty, Friday is the busiest happy hour here. It’s a collision of downtown’s after-work crowd and its beforetheater set, and he says it makes this tiled room happily noisy. I’ll stick to Wednesday afternoon. MONTH XX–XX, 200X

THE PITCH

1

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In the historic Hotel Phillips, the subterranean dining room, formerly known as the Sir Loin Room, Walt Bodineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Steakhouse, and Platters, is still there but no longer used as a restaurant. The street-level bar now does double duty as both saloon and dining room, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s called the 12 Baltimore CafĂŠ. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a sleek, tasteful space, and the blackgranite-topped bar is a solid spot for enjoying a first-rate, not outrageously expensive breakfast, served graciously and without commotion. This is a hangover-friendly room, with no clattering plates or jarring piped-in music or parade of latte-ordering commuters. Even the wall-mounted TV screens are muted, so you can comfortably peruse a morning newspaper (several national editions are complimentary to diners) without having to hear well-coifed cable talkers. The morning I stop in, the TV on one side of the bar is tuned to CNBC, and another is set on Fox News. I look up from my eggs Benedict and see a bronzed, toothy Tucker Carlson. Even absent his voice, I shudder. Kallen, the bartender, senses my dread. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Would you like me to switch the channel?â&#x20AC;? she asks. I tell her itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s OK. I just wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t look up again. She pours me more of 12 Baltimoreâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fine, robust coffee. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve come for the starches. There are five different kinds of pancakes here, including a potato pancake (this is one of the few restaurants in town to serve a pretty decent latke), and three different sizes of biscuits and gravy (hefty, average or, for $3, â&#x20AC;&#x153;tinyâ&#x20AC;?). I ask for tiny, but what comes out isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t so little: a doughy biscuit, split open and blanketed with a thick sausage gravy, that wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t go down in a few bites. My eggs Benedict had also been saucy, a Hollandaise drench so vibrantly yellow that I thought for a moment it might be lemon curd. This is the quietest bar meal of my venture, and Kallen tells me that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s usually this way here unless thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a convention in town. I tell her that this is just the way I like it. The best time to be in a bar â&#x20AC;&#x201D; any bar â&#x20AC;&#x201D; is when it seems to be all yours.

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THE PITCH

M O N T H X Xâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;X X , 2 0 0 X

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THE PITCH

Restaurants rally around JJ’s employees after the explosion.

Breakfast: Mon-Fri 7-11am, Sat 7-12pm, Sun 8-1:30pm Lunch: Mon-Sat 11-3pm, Sun 11-1:30pm

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CH A R L E S F E R RU Z Z A

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pitch.com

R

estaurateur Jimmy Frantze stood in front of the charred shell of the former JJ’s Restaurant Wednesday morning, February 20, with several agents from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives. When a natural-gas leak ignited around 6 p.m. Tuesday, an explosion leveled the popular Plaza bistro and injured 16 people. A fire burned through the evening. Rescue workers recovered the body of 46-year-old Megan Cramer, a JJ’s waitress, Wednesday morning in the rubble of what was once the restaurant’s bar area. Frantze, who has operated JJ’s for nearly three decades, admitted that he was in shock: “I didn’t think seeing this would impact me so much,” he said, “but it really, really has.” Last week, a group of local restaurateurs, including Jasper Mirabile Jr., Michael Smith, Aaron Confessori, Celina Tio, Colby Garrelts, and Stretch, discussed how they could find temporary work for the JJ’s employees left unemployed by the blast. Restaurant veteran Brian Wilson (Plaza III restaurant), chef Terry Mille (Cowtown Cheesecake Co.) and Duane Daugherty created an indiegogo account for JJ’s employees, raising almost $21,000. “All the funds will be going directly to the employees and staff of JJ’s,” Mille says. “We want those employees to get the money fairly quickly. Mille says donations will be accepted through the site until March 7. A group called Friends of JJ’s KC is holding a benefit concert and silent auction for JJ’s staff on March 5 at the Uptown Theater. The event is hosted by former Kansas City Chiefs receiver Eddie Kennison and KCTV Channel 5 personality Kelly Jones. Bands and artists scheduled to perform include the Latenight Callers, Megan Birdsall, the Grisly Hand, Victor

The aftermath of the natural-gas explosion & Penny, Loaded Goat, Shellac Attack, DJ Rico, and Ron Megee and Missy Koonce. Tickets cost between $10 (general admission) and $500 (VIP tickets) and go on sale February 27 through Ticketmaster. “We’ve had a terrific response for donations to our silent auction,” says Tara Tonsor, an art educator at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art who is overseeing the auction. “Many visual artists are donating their work, as well as jewelers and local theaters. Wine lovers are donating rare vintages from their private cellars. We have many, many gift certificates, ranging from salon and spa services to restaurants.” The cutoff date for donations to the silent auction is March 2; all auction items must be cleared by Tonsor at seekdesign1@gmail.com. An April 7 fundraiser — “Sabre! A Celebration of JJ’s” — is also being planned for the American Restaurant by a committee that includes chef Debbie Gold, Mille, JJ’s bartender Kevin Fossland, and Joyce Angelos Walsh. According to Mille, the event — priced at $60 for GA and $25 for service-industry personnel — will “be a collaboration of local restaurants and chefs re-creating the most popular dishes on the JJ’s menu.” This event also features a silent auction. The Greater Kansas City Restaurant Association held a one-day, citywide fundraiser February 23 with more than 120 area restaurants donating 10 percent of sales to the JJ’s Restaurant Fund. Missouri Restaurant Association executive director Steve Cole says, “All funds collected will be provided to JJ’s Restaurant owner Jimmy Frantze, to help his staff convalesce.”

E-mail charles.ferruzza@pitch.com

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FEBRUARY 28-MARCH 6, 2013

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23

MUSIC

CENTRAL CASTING

Making Movies brings some

BY

star power to A La Deriva.

D AV ID HUDN A L L

A

part from the songs, which are quite good (more on that in a minute), the most notable thing about Making Movies’ second LP, A La Deriva, is that Steve Berlin produced it. Berlin has played saxophone and keyboards for decades in East L.A. Chicano rock band Los Lobos, and he has produced records for Leo Kottke, Rickie Lee Jones, Chuck Prophet and John Lee Hooker. He also played on the Replacements’ All Shook Down, R.E.M.’s Document, and Paul Simon’s Graceland. In other words, Berlin is a respected guy among people who make great records. After he caught Making Movies at Knuckleheads in September 2011, when it opened for Los Lobos, he asked the band members if they’d be interested in his producing their next record — a vaguely fairy-tale-like proposition for the Kansas City group.   “I mean, it was a game changer. It was a huge turning point for our band,” says singerguitarist Enrique Chi. “Things had been going fairly well. But to have him step up and decide he wanted to be involved changed everything for us.” Record-producing credits have become a little bit like movie-producing credits. Sometimes it’s a hands-on effort on the part of the producer, but sometimes a big-name producer just lends his or her name as a promotional tool and collects the cash. Chi says Berlin was of the former camp. “I have a handful of friends who have worked with big-name producers, where they literally don’t even show up,” he says. “Or at least they don’t even step foot in the studio. They just send notes from afar. And there’s a midE MOR dle ground, too, which I think is the most common, where you have a T A E IN producer who listens to a ONL .COM PITCH couple things, gives some suggestions, then leaves and comes back a few hours later. That’s kind of what I expected Steve to do. As it turned out, he was there 12 hours a day with us for the 11 days we recorded with him in Portland [Oregon].” “It wasn’t just that he was physically in the studio,” says Diego Chi, bassist. “He was mentally engaged in everything happening, always giving instruction. He was always pushing in one direction or another.” “Down to very small stuff,” Enrique continues. “He would listen to an overdub that would last 15 seconds of a song, and he’d say, ‘Change the tremolo settings,’ or whatever. It was awesome. We couldn’t have asked for a better experience. And it was inspiring to me because I sometimes wonder if you do anything for long enough, you get burned out on it. Like, I know I want to do music for the rest of my life. But will I be stoked in 30 years to make music? Will it still be fun? And from him, we learned it can be. You can stay fuckin’ stoked about waking up and making music every day. That’s his attitude.”

M US I C

24

THE PITCH

One thing that Berlin possibly saw in Making Movies is that it’s a Latino rock band with ambitions beyond the genre of Latino rock music — not unlike Los Lobos. Chi and the band, which is rounded out by percussionist-keyboardist Juan-Carlos Chaurand and drummer Brendan Culp, also recognize this. In addition to soaking up Berlin’s musical knowledge, they looked to Los Lobos as a model for how to break out of the ghettoized world of Latino music. “Here’s the thing about Latino music and Latino venues,” Enrique says. “On one hand, it’s cool because there’s a built-in draw. A lot of people will show up to a gig just because they want to see some entertainment in their own language. Even a buzzy Pitchfork band has a hard time drawing at RecordBar on a Tuesday, but you can usually get 40 people to come to a Latino music venue without even knowing who you are most nights of the week. The challenge is that the talent pool is usually pretty amateur.” “A lot of bands we end up playing with on those gigs are kind of like high school bands,” Culp says. “They all tend to have the same sound, which is basically Latin music influenced by the Cure or the Smiths or something. And it’s been that way for about 25 years now.” Within the Hispanic community, Enrique says, there’s a lot of variation in the music-fan demographic. Low-income immigrant workers gravitate toward more traditional rural Latino sounds. But there also are Latino kids with better educations who come from a higher socioeconomic background, and media and marketing groups don’t quite know how to reach them. “It’s like the difference between somebody from rural Alabama and New York City,” he says. “It’s just drastically different backgrounds. These kids might be into indie bands. They might be Buzz listeners. They might be into hip Mexico City bands. So there’s this

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Painting themselves out of the Latino rock corner. weird gap that we’re trying to fill, and part of the challenge is to get the mainstream music business to not see you as only part of Latino culture. A traditional venue sees us on the edge there and says, ‘Well, you wouldn’t make sense opening up for whatever buzzy indie band.’ When in fact we would and we have, and it works. We’ve done it. “So one big lesson we’ve learned from Lobos is not to be afraid to try new, weird ideas,” Enrique continues. “Lobos toured with the Clash. They functioned like a punk-rock band. It was a do-it-yourself, book-your-own-gigs, tradeshows-with-bands type of thing. That’s how they started, playing with the Blasters and the L.A. punk scene. That’s what we try to do. We play underground shows here in town at Club Moustache, and we’ll play with punk bands on tour in San Antonio or whatever. Or we’ll play a Mexican festival and just not give a shit that we’re different than the other bands and just let whatever happens happen. To me, we’re a fuckin’ punk band. We’re outside of the music business. If people like what we’re doing, fine, and if not, fuck ’em.” Listen to A La Deriva and you’ll quickly pick up on some of the fiery confidence that Chi’s hinting at there. On Making Movies’ 2009 debut LP, and last year’s Aguardiente EP, there are some Anglo-pop moments, but largely the songs hew to familiar Latin rhythms and cadences — the salsa, merengue and cumbia records that the Chi brothers absorbed from their mother’s record collection growing up in Panama, with some modern-rock flavors sprinkled in. There’s no mistaking that A La Deriva is rooted in Latin music — more than half the songs are sung in Spanish, and Chaurand’s inspired Afro-Cuban backbeat is a constant — but there are plenty of moments when you pitch.com

wouldn’t think to file Making Movies under any genre except plain old rock. Or, yes, punk: “Pendulum,” a highlight, snarls and chimes like a London Calling track, and Diego’s dirty, restless bass turns it into something irresistible. “Ciego Sin Querer” is sung in Spanish but has guitar tones like you’d hear on Radiohead’s Hail to the Thief or In Rainbows. “Ready for the Rain” shows some new range; its gray soar has echoes of a slow-burning My Morning Jacket ballad. It’s a big step forward musically. I was a casual fan before, but after hearing A La Deriva, I’m kind of a believer. I’m not alone. In recent months, NPR and CNN Español have run segments on Making Movies. The band is getting strong play on KTBG 90.9 (the Bridge). And to get the word out about the album (out officially March 5, though you can pick it up on CD at just about any record store in town), Making Movies is doing a long run of dates that includes trips to Panama, Puerto Rico and a month through the American Southwest. Riding a strong new album and a publicity push, the group hopes to see significant added turnout on tour this year. “It’s market by market,” Enrique says. “Chicago is getting good. Texas is getting good. Los Angeles and Bakersfield are really good. It’s little pockets we’re trying to open up and expand.” At the same time, there’s a certain charm to being a struggling touring band. “We’re still constantly having strange but great experiences,” Enrique says. “You’re in Burtonsville, Maryland, and the place has a bad PA, and the sound guy doesn’t know how to work a DI box, and you’re in the back of a Mexican restaurant or something and you’re just pissed off. But then some girls show up, and they know your songs just from looking up the band on YouTube. And you’re like, ‘OK, I’m being a dick right now. I get to play music here tonight. I should just relax.’”

JUMPING IN High Dive Records pools together the ACBs, Ghosty, more.

I

n the video for the ACBs’ surfy pop nugget “Television,” the members of that group have been transformed into bloody zombies. But the local quartet is very much alive. Its latest album, Little Leaves, is starting to get some attention from national blogs. And along with Ghosty, Fourth of July and Shy Boys, the ACBs are part of a new local label, High Dive Records. On Friday, the ACBs celebrate the release of Little Leaves with an early show at RecordBar. The Pitch recently chatted with frontman Konnor Ervin, bassist Bryan McGuire, and High Dive founder Jeff McCoy about their new adventure together. The Pitch: First, let’s talk about the new album. Your sound seems continued on page 26 M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X

THE PITCH

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FEBRUARY 28-MARCH 6, 2013

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continued from page 24 to have evolved into something more specific. Also, why did you call it Little Leaves? Konnor Ervin: The last record we put out was constructed track by track, and this time we wanted to record live takes of the full band. We’ve been getting together for the last couple years and playing songs from demos I had made, and in the process of finding the right songs, we kind of developed a sound, I think. Once we had enough material we were excited about, we went in and recorded live over a weekend. We tinkered with the tracks for about a year before it was done.   Little Leaves is taken from a song lyric on Label them as you will: the ACBs. the album. It refers to living the manual-labor life. I’m a landscaper, and I experience life by Jeff, I assume you don’t have illusions of getmyself for the most part. I enjoy being by myting rich with an indie record label, so what are self, but there’s definitely a growing sense of you hoping for? detachment from the real world, which can McCoy: Basically, at the end of day, it’s be kind of discomforting sometimes. That’s something I always kind of wanted to do. basically the gist of the album.   Obviously, I will not be quitting my day job Can you tell me a little about the backstory of anytime soon. I think as long as we can make High Dive Records? enough money on Little Leaves to make the Bryan McGuire: Basically, what it comes next record, I’m good with that. It’s a really tough business, a very flooded market. But down to is that nobody in the ACBs is good at self-promotion. We have always been terrible think if you have a quality product, you can at it the entire time we have been a band. It’s make it viable to continue making records. And I just really want to help these guys. All just not in us. It’s easy to get excited about four bands on the label are personal favorites of your friends’ bands, though, and promote mine, and I think the new music we’re getting them. So the idea was that we could kind of ready to put out is really good. team with these bands that we really like, and How did you get Fourth of July onboard? everybody could root each other on, and the whole thing of getting the word out becomes They’ve been an anchor on [Lawrence label] Range Life Records for a while. easier that way. Jeff, you work in plumbing or something? McCoy: I’ve known [frontman] Brendan Jeff McCoy: [Laughs.] Yes, right now I run [Hangauer] for a while. When I got married a a commercial plumbing-supply business. I couple years ago, I rented out RecordBar and had a private concert for started a business out of friends, and Fourth of July college where we had a The ACBs, was the opening band. We patent and manufactured with Fourth of July became buddies, and I knew countertops for laboratories 7 p.m. Friday, March 1, they were recording, so I told and hospitals. Then I sold it, at RecordBar Brendan what we were doing and I now run this plumbing with the ACBs. He thought it business. was a cool idea and similar to what they tried So naturally the next step was to form a reto do with Range Life before everybody on cord label … McCoy: I had been friends with Bryan and that label kind of scattered across the U.S. And when I reached out, he happened to have the Konnor for a while, and about a year ago, Bryan reached out to pick my brain about the business record done, so it just worked out. What specifically does High Dive do for, say, end of releasing a new record and promoting the ACBs? it. He kept saying that they weren’t very organized as a band, and that they were interested McGuire: A lot of it is kind of boring stuff, in forming a label or collective type of thing. like the website, which looks good, and which Ervin: Mike [Nolte, Ghosty bassist and re- you’ll be able to buy all the bands’ music and merch from. As opposed to a plain old Bandcording engineer] and I were talking about the same thing around the same time: banding camp page. together with some other people in town and Konnor: Basically, we paid for the cost of the kind of presenting ourselves in a way where making of the record, and High Dive is paying if you like one band, you’ll probably like the for the record to be pressed and for merch. And others. We were calling it a “fake record label.” he’s handling mailing and things like that. So But McCoy made the idea seem a little sturdier. in that sense, it’s just nice to have somebody McGuire: McCoy is a big music fan with good carrying the other half of the load for you — everything together is pretty overwhelming, taste — he has a massive wall of records in his as we’ve learned. house — and he’s also a business-minded guy, The other thing is that the contract is so so it seemed like he might be into what we intentionally light for us and for everybody were thinking about. With him, it’s not, like, who’s on the label. McCoy is not in it to make somebody’s dad giving us money to help us money, and he’s not only just saying that; he’s out. It’s a guy who gets what we’re doing. McCoy: At first it was going to exist basi- actually putting it into the contract. It’s almost cally for Little Leaves, but gradually we pulled like he can’t make money on any of this. So it’s very easy to sign something like that. other bands in and settled on this team con— DAVID HUDNALL cept, which has become more about bringing attention to some of my favorite music and art being created here in KC. E-mail david.hudnall@pitch.com 26

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FEBRUARY 28-MARCH 6, 2013

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27

WHERE THE BEST MUSICIANS IN THE WORLD PLAY

KNUCKLEHEADS F re e S h u tt le in S u rr o u n d in g A reth e a

MUSIC

RADAR

MUSIC FORECAST

BY

Other shows worth seeing this week.

D AV ID HUDN A L L

T H U R S D AY, F E B R U A R Y 2 8

FEBRUARY 27: Dirty River Boys 28: Tom Russell

F R I D AY, M A R C H 1 Avant, Bridgett Kelly: 7 p.m. VooDoo Lounge, Harrah’s Casino, 1 Riverboat Dr., North Kansas City, 816-472-7777. L.A. Guns, Liberty Lush, For the Broken, Organic M, Groove Therapy: 6:30 p.m. VooDoo Lounge, Harrah’s Casino, 1 Riverboat Dr., North Kansas City, 816-472-7777. Ardal O’Hanlon: 8 p.m. Irish Museum and Cultural Center, 30 W. Pershing Rd., Ste. 700, 816-474-3848.

MARCH 1: Atlantic Express 1: Brandon Santini LR

S AT U R D AY, M A R C H 2

2: Bettye LaVette

Acid Baby Jesus, Hellshovel, Up The Academy: 10 p.m. Replay Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Robert Earl Keen: 7 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Bettye LaVette with Shannon and the Rhythm Kings: 9 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456.

5: Cash’d Out

Johnny Cash Tribute Band

ERIC JOHNSON TUESDAY, MARCH 5

Eric’s stature as one of the premier guitar players in contemporary music. backed by a Grammy Award and five nominations, platinum album, Top 10 hits like “Cliffs Of Dover,”

MARCH 11:

Marshall Crenshaw

MARCH 20:

Tower of Power

S U N D AY, M A R C H 3

Menomena (left) and Rakim

Menomena

Brent Knopf, a founding member of Portland trio Menomena, split from the group in 2011. Justin Harris and Danny Seim have forged ahead as a duo, and in 2012, they released their fifth LP, Moms. It’s nothing drastically different from Menomena’s previous albums — lots of looping, jagged transitions, kaleidoscopic instrumentation (flutes, saxophones, hand claps, fuzzy guitars) and surrealist lyrics. Menomena’s good-natured explorations have always reminded me a little of (gasp) Phish, though I hear traces of TV on the Radio in the band’s sound, too. Thursday, February 28, at RecordBar (1020 Westport Road, 816-753-5207)

An Acoustic Evening with Mary Chapin Carpenter and Shawn Colvin

In addition to being ’90s-famous folk-country artists, Mary Chapin Carpenter (five Grammys, 12 million records sold) and Shawn Colvin (“Sunny Came Home”) are longtime friends. On their current tour together, they’re performing as a duo. Expect highlights from their respective catalogs, with some covers — they share a fondness for Simon and Garfunkel and Tom Waits songs — mixed in. Sunday, March 3, at the Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts (1601 Broadway, 816-994-7222)

Rakim

Last week, when we congratulated the Riot Room on its fifth year in business, we neglected to mention that the Westport venue has been on a real tear lately in terms of bringing in hip-hop talent. Kool Keith and Cam’Ron have visited in the last couple of months, and this week, Rakim stops by. Rakim never hit it big commercially, but his 1980s duo, Eric B. and Rakim, influenced a generation of conscious rappers. He’s one of only a handful of MCs who can legitimately lay claim to the title of Greatest Rapper of All Time. Wednesday, March 6, at Riot Room (4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179)

Eric Johnson

Eric Johnson is a quieter type of guitar virtuoso than the likes of Steve Vai and Joe Satriani, both of whom he teamed up with for 1996’s famous-among-guitarheads G3 Tour. Johnson is a notorious perfectionist and has a more songwriterly mind. Roots, folk, pop and jazz filter into his sound (in addition to the usual rock and blues), and he practices more solo restraint than most Guitar World idols. Of course, he still likes to shred — his most famous song, “Cliffs of Dover,” is the final challenge on Guitar Hero III. Tuesday, March 5, at Knuckleheads Saloon (2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456)

F O R E C A S T

For more info & tickets: knuckleheadskc.com 2715 Rochester, KCMO

816-483-1456

28

THE PITCH

Tom Russell: 8 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Yonder Mountain String Band: Liberty Hall, 644 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1972.

K E Y

.................................................Pick of the Week

.................................................... Guitar Heroics

...................................................... Portlandians

...........................................Probable Dad Jeans

..................................................... Living Legend

.......................................................... NPR Types

...................................................East Coast Rap

....................................... Possible Birkenstocks

FEBRUARY 28-MARCH 6, 2013

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Permanent Collection: 10 p.m. Replay Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. White Mystery, Dry Bonnet, Pale Hearts: 9 p.m. Jackpot Music Hall, 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-832-1085.

T U E S D AY, M A R C H 5 The Soil and the Sun, Kellen and Me, Chase Castor: 8 p.m. Czar, 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300.

W E D N E S D AY, M A R C H 6 Murs, Prof, Fashawn, Steddy P, DJ Mahf: 7 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Slightly Stoopid, Tribal Seeds: Liberty Hall, 644 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1972.

FUTURECAST FRIDAY 8 J.B. and the Moonshine Band: The Granada, Lawrence SATURDAY 9 Scotty McCreery: Uptown Theater Joshua Nelson and His Kosher Gospel Band: The Lewis and Shirley White Theatre at the Jewish Community Center, Overland Park Ol’ Yeller, Arthur Dodge & the Horsefeathers: Replay Lounge, Lawrence SUNDAY 10 Alabama Shakes, Michael Kiwanuka, Sam Doores & Riley Downing: Uptown Theater Joshua Nelson and His Kosher Gospel Band: The Lewis and Shirley White Theatre at the Jewish Community Center, Overland Park TUESDAY 12 STS9: Liberty Hall, Lawrence WEDNESDAY 13 STS9: Liberty Hall, Lawrence THURSDAY 14 Kottonmouth Kings: The Granada, Lawrence SUNDAY 17 Heavy Times: Replay Lounge, Lawrence MONDAY 18 Yes: The Midland TUESDAY 19 Jaill, Widowspeak: Replay Lounge, Lawrence THURSDAY 28 R5: The Granada, Lawrence

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MONTH

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29

NIGHTLIFE We Deliver!

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SALOON

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Send submissions to Berry Anderson by e-mail (berry.anderson@pitch.com), fax (816-218-6775) or phone (816-218-6926). Continuing items must be resubmitted monthly.

T H U R S D AY 2 8 ROCK/POP/INDIE The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. A Love Electric, Todd Clouser, Mike Dillon Band. The Dubliner: 170 E. 14th St., 816-268-4700. The Transients. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. The Summit, Perfect Pursuit, Grenadina, 9 p.m. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Antenna’s Up, the Yawpers, $3. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Going To Hell in A Leather Jacket, Something & the Whatevers, Chateau Nowhere, Gavin Snider, 10 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Filthy 13, the Lucky Graves, 8 p.m., $5. Tomfooleries: 612 W. 47th St., 816-753-0555. Gov’t Cheez, 10 p.m.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. John Paul’s Flying Circus with Bill Dye and Pat Recob, 7:30 p.m., $3. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Grand Marquis. The Levee: 16 W. 43rd St., 816-561-2821. The Lonnie Ray Blues Band, 8 p.m.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Josh Vowell and The Rumble, 9 p.m. Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. Jason Vivone and the Billy Bats, 9 p.m. The Hideout: 6948 N. Oak Tfwy., 816-468-0550. Bobby Smith Blues Band. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Atlantic Express featuring Hal Wakes, 8:30 p.m., $10. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Crosseyed Cat, 5:30 p.m.; Brother Bagman, 9 p.m.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Don’t Stop Please, KC Bear Fighters, My Oh My, 9 p.m., $6.

DJ Beer Kitchen: 435 Westport Rd., 816-389-4180. DCal. Club Monaco: 334 E. 31st St., 816-753-5990. DJ Shaun Flo. The Foundry: 424 Westport Rd., 816-960-0866. DJ Leo Night Us, 11 p.m. The Granada: 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Max M OR E Mazon, Brandon Dremann, Dillon Jackson, Joshua Josh B Balance, Luckas Mason, Troy Mueller, S Protosapien, Hi-Boi, DJ Reverse, DJ ING LIST E AT Lee & Will Funk, 9 p.m., $10. IN ONL M The Gusto Lounge: 504 Westport PITCH.CO Rd., 816-974-8786. Gruv with Mike Dileo & Trevor Shaw. Milieu: 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park. DJ Adam Bryce. The Quaff: 1010 Broadway, 816-471-1918. DJ E.

The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Team Bear Club’s Goomba Rave, 11 p.m., $3/$5. The Gusto Lounge: 504 Westport Rd., 816-974-8786. Pop Shots with Clockwerk & DJ Archi. Milieu: 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park. DJ Rich B. MiniBar: 3810 Broadway, 816-326-8281. DJ Tequila Bear. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Playe, 10:30 p.m.

EBT Restaurant: 1310 Carondelet (I-435 and State Line), 816942-8870. Candace Evans. The Kill Devil Club: 61 E. 14th St., 816-877-8312. Miles Bonny, 7 p.m. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Bram Wijnands and Joe Lisinicchia, 6 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. A La Mode, 7 p.m.

COMEDY Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Bobby Slayton, 8 p.m.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS Bulldog: 1715 Main, 816-421-4799. Brodioke. Buzzard Beach: 4110 Pennsylvania, 816-753-4455. Trivia, Ladies’ Night, and DJ HoodNasty. Howl at the Moon: 1334 Grand, 816-471-4695. HATM’s Fifth Anniversary Party, 7 p.m. Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. Karaoke, 10 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Trivia Clash, 7 p.m. The Red Balloon: 10325 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-9622330. Karaoke, 8 p.m., free. Sherlock’s Underground Coffeehouse & Pub: 858 S. 291 Hwy., Liberty, 816-429-5262. Karaoke, ladies’ night specials. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. Trivia, 9 p.m.

EASY LISTENING Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. Laura Lisbeth and Kasey Rausch, 7-9 p.m., $3. Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Hot Caution Thursdays, 10 p.m. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Jason Kayne, 9 p.m. Lenexa Longbranch Steakhouse: 8600 Marshall Dr., Overland Park, 913-894-5334. Andy Dewitt, 7 p.m. O’Dowd’s Little Dublin: 4742 Pennsylvania, 816-561-2700. Casey & Colby. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Songwriter’s Showcase with Megan Birdsall, 7:30-10:30 p.m.

E X P E R I M E N TA L Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. The UFO Show with Pat Hopewell, 10 p.m.

THE PITCH

RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. The ACBs, Fourth of July, 7 p.m., $10; Various Blonde, Electric Hawk, Simple Lines, 10 p.m., $7. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-7497676. Paper Buffalo, the New Cosmopolitans, 6 p.m.; Radkey 7-inch release, Stiff Middle Fingers, 10 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Heroes + Villains, Me Like Bees, Clock People.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS

JAZZ

30

ROCK/POP/INDIE

The Granada: 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Matt Stell, County Road 5, Robe, 8 p.m., $8. PBR Big Sky Bar: 111 E. 13th St. Scott Peery Band, 9 p.m.

DJ

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FEBRUARY 28-MARCH 6, 2013

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CLUB

Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Heidi & the Kicking Heels, Adam Kuhn and Hotfox, 9 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Making Movies, Javier Mendoza, Shy Boys.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Blue Orleans, 9 p.m.; Mama Ray’s Jazz -Meets-Blues Jam, 2-5:30 p.m. The Hideout: 6948 N. Oak Tfwy., 816-468-0550. Brother Bagman.

DJ The Eighth Street Taproom: 801 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-6918. Soul Clap with Josh Powers. The Foundry: 424 Westport Rd., 816-960-0866. DJ Kid Twist. Hotel: 1300 Grand, 816-226-3232. DJ Eric Coomes. Milieu: 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park. DJ Mike Scott. The Quaff: 1010 Broadway, 816-471-1918. DJ Chris. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Burn with DJs Ataxic and Skeme, 10 p.m., $7.

JAZZ The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Tim Whitmer & KC Express, 4:30 p.m.

COMEDY ComedyCity at Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-842-2744. Major League Improv, 7:30 p.m.; ComedyCity After Dark, 10 p.m. Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. Dirty Dorothy, 10 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Bobby Slayton, 7:45 & 9:45 p.m.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS Hamburger Mary’s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-842-1919. Charity Bingo, Saturdays, 5 p.m.; Maryoke, 9 p.m. Hurricane Allie’s Bar and Grill: 5541 Merriam Dr., Shawnee, 913-217-7665. Karaoke, 8:30 p.m. The Red Balloon: 10325 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-9622330. Karaoke, 8 p.m., free. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. KC Cabaret variety show, 9:30 p.m.

S U N D AY 3

HIP-HOP

ROCK/POP/INDIE

Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Raw Energy with Mars, Irv Da Phenom, Leaders of the Lost, Juarez & Indivisuals, Jae Stylz aka Tekneek, Tone Lou and the Snowinsoz, Versatile, Freddy Grimes, Naydivz, JPZ, Tk and Supa, Young Stylz, DJ Tez, 10 p.m., $10.

The Granada: 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Conflicts, On the Shoulders of Giants, the Perfect Pursuit, Hellevate, Embrace This Day, At the Left Hand of God, the Sibyl, A Plague in Faith, 6 p.m., $12.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS

DJ

The Brooksider: 6330 Brookside Plz., 816-363-4070. Trivia, 6 p.m. ComedyCity at Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-842-2744. Major League Improv, 7:30 p.m. Hamburger Mary’s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-842-1919. Maryoke with Monique. Helen’s Just Another Dive: 2002 Armour Rd., North Kansas City, 816-471-4567. Trivia Riot with Roland, 7:30 p.m., $5. Hurricane Allie’s Bar and Grill: 5541 Merriam Dr., Shawnee, 913-217-7665. Karaoke, 8:30 p.m. J. Murphy’s Irish Pub and Grille: 22730 Midland Dr., Shawnee, 913-825-3880. Karaoke, 9 p.m. The Kill Devil Club: 61 E. 14th St., 816-877-8312. Burlesque Downtown Underground, 7 p.m.

EASY LISTENING Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Lisa Donnelly with Approach & The Boogaloo Odyssey. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Brandon Santini, 9 p.m., $10. PBR Big Sky Bar: 111 E. 13th St. Scott Peery, 7 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Danny Cox and Friends, 7 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Sterling Witt, 9:30 p.m.

S AT U R D AY 2 ROCK/POP/INDIE The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Cowboy Indian Bear, Cloud Dog, Soft Reeds, 8 p.m. The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Man Bear. Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. Solid Gold Easy, 7-9 p.m.; Jorge Arana Trio, Doing What Apes Can’t, 9 p.m., $5. Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. She’s A Keeper, Jack and the Bear, Attic Wolves, 8 p.m., $5. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. The Still Line, Adam Evolving, 9 p.m., $6.

The Foundry: 424 Westport Rd., 816-960-0866. Radstar Glitters Gold. Hamburger Mary’s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-842-1919. Bad Music Sundays with Brett Dietrich, 3:30 p.m.

JAZZ Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Les Mengel Duo, 5-9 p.m. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Rich Hill’s jazz brunch, 11 a.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. People’s Liberation Big Band with Dave Scott, 8 p.m., $5.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Smackdown trivia and karaoke, 9 p.m. Frank James Saloon: 10919 N.W. Hwy. 45, Parkville, 816-5050800. Karaoke, 6-10 p.m. Hamburger Mary’s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-842-1919. Mary’s Drag Brunch, 11 a.m. Hurricane Allie’s Bar and Grill: 5541 Merriam Dr., Shawnee, 913-217-7665. Karaoke, 8:30 p.m. Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. Karaoke, 10 p.m. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. Texas Hold ’em, 3 & 6 p.m.

EASY LISTENING Ernie Biggs Dueling Piano Bar: 4115 Mill, 816-561-2444. Singer-Songwriter Sundays. Johnny’s Tavern: 13410 W. 62nd Terr., Shawnee, 913-962-5777. Chill with Phil. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Wake Owl, St. Lux, Tommy Donoho. Tomfooleries: 612 W. 47th St., 816-753-0555. Marty and Gary, 8 p.m.

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Come Shake Your Shamrocks! WED February 27th: Acoustic Full Band 10-1 Pat Lentz 5:30-7:30 THURS February 28th: Tranziants 8-12 FRI March 1st: Tranziants 10-2 SAT March 2nd: Flannagans Right Hook 10-2

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DON’T BE LEFT OUT OF THE

PARTY

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS

M O N D AY 4

Hamburger Mary’s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-842-1919. Trivia Slugfest, 7 p.m. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Karaoke. MiniBar: 3810 Broadway, 816-326-8281. Robert Moore’s Name That Tune, 7 p.m., $5 entry fee. Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. Gayme Night upstairs, 7:30-10 p.m.; karaoke, 10 p.m. The Red Balloon: 10325 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-9622330. Karaoke, 8 p.m., free. The Roxy: 7230 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-236-6211. Karaoke. Saints Pub + Patio: 9720 Quivira, Lenexa, 913-492-3900. Karaoke, 9 p.m. Tower Tavern: 401 E. 31st St., 816-931-9300. Trivia, 8 p.m.

ROCK/POP/INDIE

EASY LISTENING

Groove Station: 9916 Holmes, 816-942-1000. KC Blues Jam with Crosseyed Cat, 2-6 p.m. The Hideout: 6948 N. Oak Tfwy., 816-468-0550. Blues jam, 7 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Open Jam with Levee Town, 2-7 p.m., free. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Mark Lowrey jazz jam, 5 p.m. R.G.’s Lounge: 9100 E. 35th St., Independence, 816-358-5777. Jam Night hosted by Dennis Nickell, Scotty Yates, Rick Eidson, and Jan Lamb, 5 p.m.

FOKL Center: 556 Central Ave., 913-207-9549. Permanent Collection, Pilots, 8 p.m., $5. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. TrebucheT, Breaking Even, 9 p.m., $5/$7. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Tiny Horse EP and video release show, 9 p.m., $5.

ROCK/POP/INDIE

The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Mark Lowrey Trio, 6 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Millie Edwards and friends, 7 p.m.

The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. UV Hippo, the Monarchs, 8 p.m. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Lovely Bad Things, Denny & the Jets, 9 p.m., $5/$7. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Bob Walkenhorst, 7 p.m. Tomfooleries: 612 W. 47th St., 816-753-0555. Flannigan’s Right Hook, 9:30 p.m.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Karaoke with Nanci Pants, 10:30 p.m. Bulldog: 1715 Main, 816-421-4799. Trivia, service industry night. Clarette Club: 5400 Martway, Mission, 913-384-0986. Texas Hold ’em. Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Slaughter Movie House, 7 p.m. Green Room Burgers & Beer: 4010 Pennsylvania, Ste. D, 816216-7682. Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Karaoke Idol with Tanya McNaughty. Nara: 1617 Main, 816-221-6272. Brodioke. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Sonic Spectrum Music Trivia, 7 p.m., $5. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. Texas Hold ’em, 8 p.m.

The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483. Taking Back Mondays with Sovereign States, 9 p.m., free. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Songwriter’s Scene Open Mic with Jon Theobald, 7 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Jonny Green and Jake Stanton open mic and jam session, 8 p.m.; Comedy open mic, 10 p.m.

T U E S D AY 5 ROCK/POP/INDIE Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Night Beats, 10 p.m. Tomfooleries: 612 W. 47th St., 816-753-0555. The Transients, 9 p.m.

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The All-Star Rock Bar: 7210 N.E. 43rd St., 816-452-2660. Scott Ford Songwriter Showcase, 7 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Patrick Krief, David George, Margo May, 10 p.m., $8.

B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Hudspeth and Shinetop, 7-10 p.m., $3. Slow Ride Roadhouse: 1350 N. Third St., Lawrence, 785-7492727. Lonnie Ray Blues Band.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Elkheart’s Downtown Outlaw Fiasco, 7 p.m., free. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Cash’d Out, a Johnny Cash tribute, 8 p.m., $12.

DJ The Gusto Lounge: 504 Westport Rd., 816-974-8786. Bring It Back Tuesdays with DJ G-Train & DJ Tip, 10 p.m., no cover.

JAZZ The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Hermon Mehari Trio, 6 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Open Jam with Everette DeVan, 7 p.m.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. Team Trivia with Teague Hayes, 7 p.m., $5 buy-in. Double Nickel Bar: 189 S. Rogers, Ste. 1614, Olathe, 913-3900363. Poker night. Dukes: 1501 Grand, 816-527-0122. Xtreme League Trivia, 8 p.m. Flying Saucer: 101 E. 13th St., 816-221-1900. Trivia Bowl, 7:30 & 10 p.m., free.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Shinetop Jr., 7-9 p.m. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Billy Ebeling.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. J.P. Harris and The Tough Choices with Betse Ellis, 8 p.m., $7.

DJ Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. Robert Moore, 9 p.m. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Cowtown Playboys, 10 p.m. The Gusto Lounge: 504 Westport Rd., 816-974-8786. Smack in the Middle with Brent Tactic & Avant Garde.

JAZZ Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Max Groove Trio, 6 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Brian Ruskin Quartet, 7 p.m.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS The Blue Line: 529 Walnut, 816-472-7825. Karaoke. Ernie Biggs Dueling Piano Bar: 4115 Mill, 816-561-2444. 15year anniversary of The Big Lebowski. Hamburger Mary’s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-842-1919. Charity Bingo, 8 p.m. Jake’s Place Bar and Grill: 12001 Johnson Dr., Shawnee, 913962-5253. Karaoke. Johnny’s Tavern: 10384 S. Ridgeview, Olathe, 913-378-0744. Trivia, 7:30 p.m. Michael’s Lakewood Pub: N. 291 Hwy. and Lakewood Blvd., Lee’s Summit, 816-350-7300. Humpday Comedy Night, 9 p.m. Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. The Dirty Game Show, 10 p.m. The Quaff: 1010 Broadway, 816-471-1918. Karaoke. The Red Balloon: 10325 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-9622330. Karaoke, 8 p.m., free. Retro Downtown Drinks & Dance: 1518 McGee, 816-4214201. Karaoke with DJ Jason, 8 p.m. Sherlock’s Underground Coffeehouse & Pub: 858 S. 291 Hwy., Liberty, 816-429-5262. Open mic. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. Trivia, 8 p.m.

EASY LISTENING Fuel: 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park, 913-451-0444. Colby & Mole. Nara: 1617 Main, 816-221-6272. Ladies’ Night with Matt Shoaf.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Acoustic Open Mic with host Tyler Gregory. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Jam Night, 9 p.m. Tonahill’s 3 of a Kind: 11703 E. 23rd St., Independence, 816833-5021. Blues, country and classic rock hosted by Rick Eidson and friends. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Poetic Underground.

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Dear Dan: I am writing about a friend. By all appearances, he is straight. However, on more than one occasion, he has gotten drunk and tried to hook up with a transvestite or a person who could have been one. In one instance, he went to a club and was approached by a really masculine-seeming girl who proceeded to give him head. My friend, in his drunken state, reached into her pants and felt for a pussy only after she started giving him head. On a trip to Las Vegas, he drunkenly picked up someone whom I was told looked like “Kevin Garnett in a wig” and was very obviously a man. He tried to take this person back to his hotel, but friends put a stop to it. I just received a message from a friend who is with him on a trip to Europe, who said he just tried the same thing again with yet another manly looking transvestite type. Again, my friend was stopped before he did anything he might regret. I can understand if these cases happened with transvestites who looked like real women. It’s easy to fool someone when he’s drunk. However, the situations I have seen personally and have heard about all seem to indicate he is seeking out transvestites. Could he be harboring some gay or bisexual tendencies? I’ve never seen him act this way when sober. Or could he just have the world’s thickest pair of beer goggles?

Cautious Lad Observing Developments Dear CLOD: When we speak of “beer goggles,” we refer to someone too drunk to realize that he/she has accidentally picked up — or fucked the shit out of — a type that he/she would not normally/soberly fi nd attractive. But I don’t think your friend is getting drunk again and again and going after this particular type again and again by accident. Once? Yes, that could be an accident. Twice? That could be a coincidence. But three times that you know of ? Sorry, your friend isn’t going after these types because he’s drunk. He’s getting drunk so he can go after these types. Before we go on, a word about the particular term you use to describe your friend’s type: transvestite. That word? I don’t think it means what you think it means. A transgender woman is not a transvestite, and a transvestite is not a transgender woman. A trans woman is someone who was “coercively assigned male at birth,” as they say on Tumblr, but who now identifies and lives as female. A transgender woman may or may not have had sex-reassignment surgery — which means, of course, that a transgender woman could have a dick or she could have a pussy. “Transvestite” is an archaic term for “cross-dresser” that no one uses anymore. Now, I don’t know what your friend is looking for in a sex partner, but considering his observed pickup history (“a really masculine-seeming girl,” “Kevin Garnett in a wig,” “another manly looking transvestite type”), it’s possible that he’s not interested in either trans women or cross-dressers. 34

THE PITCH

FEBRUARY 28-MARCH 6, 2013

pitch.com

let him know you accept him for who he is, and you may help him fi nd the courage to accept himself before his liver gives out.

Dear Dan: I’m a straight 18-year-old female,

a senior in high school, and still a virgin. I’m fine with this. I’m going to a university about 3,000 miles away next fall, and I’m starting to wonder about going on some method of birth control. My degree is going to take me six years to complete, and I expect that within those six years, I might want to have sex with someone. Would going to the doctor and having an implant or IUD inserted be dumb? (I might want a long-term method of birth control.) I trust the doctor I have here at home; the second I turned 14, he gave me tons of info on birth control and how I can get access to it. So I would be more than comfortable getting it through him. Please let me know if I’m overthinking all of this and whether I should cross birth control off my pre-college to-do list.

Thinking I Might Encounter Love Yearnings I did drag for nearly a decade, and there was a certain kind of guy who lurked around drag shows. By all appearances, these guys were straight. But they weren’t interested in women, they weren’t interested in boys who could pass, and they weren’t interested in trans women. They were interested in “girls” who were obviously men in drag. They were interested in guys like me: 6 feet 8 inches in heels, big tits, 26-inch waist (thank you, waist cincher!) and a latex minidress. I was pretty — I’ll tweet out a few pictures to prove it — but I didn’t look like a woman, cis or trans, I looked like a great big fuckin’ drag queen. (My drag name? Helvetica Bold.) The queens I ran with called the guys who wanted to fuck us “panty chasers.” It was an odd choice, seeing as none of us actually wore panties. (Trans and cis women wear panties; drag queens wear dance belts over tights.) I didn’t know at the time that there was an actual $20 term for guys who were into us: gynandromorphophiles, aka “lovers of males in the shape of females.” Some gynandromorphophiles are into crossdressers, some are into drag queens, and some are attracted to trans women. While some want partners who can pass, many gynandromorphophiles do not. They want the mix to be obvious. Give the kind of gynandromorphophile who chased after me and my friends in drag a choice between a “real woman” — cis or trans — and a guy who looks like “Kevin Garnett in a wig,” and he’ll choose Kevin Garnett every time. So back to your panty-chasing friend. I’m pretty sure the reason you’ve never seen him “act this way when sober” is because booze provides him with the courage he needs before he picks up “Kevin Garnett in a wig” and the alibi he needs after. My advice: Stop cock-in-frock-blocking your friend and

Dear TIMELY: “It is in no way ‘dumb’ to consider contraception as a virgin,” says Dr. Unjali Malhotra, medical director for Options for Sexual Health British Columbia, aka the Planned Parenthood of British Columbia. “It is actually best to get on a method prior to ever having sex to ensure she is happy on her chosen option before acutely requiring it for birth control.” Malhotra also supports — acutely supports — your preference for a long-term method. “Although oral contraceptives are popular,” Malhotra says, “they have up to a 9 percent ‘typical use’ failure rate.” Pills can fail a woman who forgets to take them, which is all too common, but a woman can’t forget to take her IUD or implant. Which is why progesterone-releasing IUDs have failure rates of 0.2 percent, copper IUDs have failure rates of 0.8 percent, and implants have failure rates of 0.05 percent. “TIMELY can choose between a nonhormonal copper IUD, a progesterone-releasing IUD, and a progesterone-releasing implant,” Malhotra says. “Timingwise, she has options of a threeyear implant, five-year IUD and 10-year IUD. There are advantages to each, which she can discuss with her physician. And, despite myths to the contrary, there are very few risks with an IUD, and she can remove it and get pregnant at any time if she wishes.” None of these options, however, will protect you from sexually transmitted infections, so use condoms regardless. For more info about birth control, sexual health and STIs, see optionsforsexualhealth.org. Find the Savage Lovecast (my weekly podcast) every Tuesday at thestranger.com/savage.

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FEBRUARY 28-MARCH 6, 2013

THE PITCH

37

IS HIRING! KANSAS CITY, MO MULTI-MEDIA ADVERTISING SALES PRO NEEDED!

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A Real Estate & Rentals Supplement

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3239 Broadway | Kansas City, MO 64111 For more information about our graduation rates, the median debt of students who completed the program, and other important information, please visit our website at www.concorde.edu/disclosures.

38

THE PITCH

FEBRUARY 28-MARCH 6, 2013

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FEBRUARY 28-MARCH 6, 2013

THE PITCH

39

APTS/JOBS/STUFF

Ø

816.218.6702 NGLDHGNDLMKO

FREE BANKRUPTCY CONSULTATION r 1" : . & / 5  1 - " /  "7" * - " # - & r

FEBRUARY 28-MARCH 6, 2013

$"4)'03$"34

8SFDLFE %BNBHFEPS#SPLFO 3VOOJOHPS/PU

LAW OFFICE OF JENNIFER DODSON 435 NICHOLS ROAD SUITE 200 K A N S A S C I T Y, M O 6 4 1 1 2 8 1 6 . 9 7 7 . 2 7 6 3 W W W. J D O D S O N L AW. C O M

8FBSFBEFCUSFMJFGBHFODZ8FIFMQQFPQMFĐMFGPSCBOLSVQUDZSFMJFGVOEFS UIF#BOLSVQUDZ$PEFĂFDIPJDFPGBMBXZFSJTBOJNQPSUBOUEFDJTJPO BOETIPVMEOPUCFCBTFETPMFMZPOBEWFSUJTFNFOU

$BTI1BJE XXXBCDBVUPSFDZDMJOHDPN 

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4PMWJOH$BTFT'PS0WFS:FBST

%08/508/"3&"456%*0"15 8&&,.JO

%FQPTJU "MM6UJMJUJFT1BJE -BVOESZ'BDJMJUJFT )PMJEBZ"QUT 8)BSMFN3E ,$.0

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 BDUOPXJOWFTUJHBUJPOTDPN

8&#6:."(*$ 5)&("5)&3*/( "$5*0/410354



Tarot Readings Crystal Readings

%8* 40-*$*5"5*0/ */5&3/&5#"4&%$3*.&4



XXX5IF-BXDPN

-BXPGGJDFPG%BWJE.-VSJF

'VMMZ-JDFOTFE*OTVSFE,4.0

4DBSFE "OYJPVT $POGVTFE

Psychic Readings Palm Readings

%6*%8* ,4 .0

MJGFTUZMFTPGLDDPN )PVTF1BSUJFT&WFSZ'SJEBZ 4BUVSEBZ/JHIU )PU5VC %BODF1PMF -JWF %+ 1PPM5BCMF 

"UUPSOFZTJODF ,4.0*OKVSJFT XPSLFSTDPNQ DSJNJOBM EJ WPSDF %6* USBGGJD BOENPSF-PXGFFT $BMM (SFH#BOHT

1*8PSL$PNQ#BOLSVQUDZ 3FBTPOBCMFSBUFT 4VTBO#SBUDIFS XXXCSBUDIFSMBXCJ[

1FSTPOBM*OKVSZ &NQMPZNFOU-BX

#SBEZ"TTPDJBUFT-BX0GGJDF -JDFOTFE*O.JTTPVSJ ,BOTBTBOE$PMPSBEP 888.#3"%:-"8$0.

44H4`_TVR]4Rccj4=2DD6D

"7C664]RddW`c2_j>Vec`2cVRDTY``]6^a]`jVV "7C664]RddaVcDTY``] 8c`fa@eYVc5ZdT`f_edRgRZ]DV]W5VWV_dV ERTeZTR]EcRZ_Z_X *"$*%!"#!$`cUcY`UVd&%*1Y`e^RZ]T`^

41&&%*/( %8* $3*.*/"40-*$*5"5*0/ $BMM5JN5PNQLJOT5PEBZ ,$5SBGGJDMBXZFSDPN  

5PYJO'SFFXOBOIPVS 8FDBOIFMQZPVQBTT$PPQFST #SPBEXBZ ,$.0 

$"4)'03$"34

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44H4`_TVR]4Rccj4=2DD6D

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$99 DIVORCE $99

&3*$"h414:$)*$456%*0

3FVOJUFT-PWF%FQSFTTJPO'JOBODFT 4VDDFTT(VBSBOUFFE3FTVMUT

3FBEJOHT

Simple, Uncontested + Filing Fee. Don Davis. 816-­531-­1330

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E96=2H@77:46@7 56?:D6<:C3J )"'##"$'*"

277@C523=62EE@C?6J

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$"4)

8FQVSDIBTFDBST USVDLT BOEGBSNFRVJQNFOU /PUJUMFTOFFEFE .VTUIBWFWBMJE*%   5PYJO'SFFXOBOIPVS 8FDBOIFMQZPVQBTT$PPQFST #SPBEXBZ ,$.0 

"UUPSOFZTJODF ,4.0*OKVSJFT XPSLFSTDPNQ DSJNJOBM EJ WPSDF %6* USBGGJD BOENPSF-PXGFFT $BMM (SFH#BOHT 1FSTPOBM*OKVSZ &NQMPZNFOU-BX

#SBEZ"TTPDJBUFT-BX0GGJDF -JDFOTFE*O.JTTPVSJ ,BOTBTBOE$PMPSBEP 888.#3"%:-"8$0.

%6*%8* ,4 .0

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$BTI1BJE XXXBCDBVUPSFDZDMJOHDPN 

1*8PSL$PNQ#BOLSVQUDZ 3FBTPOBCMFSBUFT 4VTBO#SBUDIFS XXXCSBUDIFSMBXCJ[

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)05&-300.4 ".PUFM $BQJUBM*OO &UI4U)JMMDSFTU3E )#0 1IPOF #BOR)BMM

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The Pitch: February 28, 2013