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NET LOSS KC’s pro tennis team leaves for Texas after a lack of love. BY B E N PA L O S A A R I

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Art Director Ashford Stamper Contributing Photographers Angela C. Bond, Chris Mullins, Lauren Phillips, Sabrina Staires, Brooke Vandever Design Intern Chloe George

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BAD-NEWS BLUES The endless drama of the KC Blues Society

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QUESTIONNAIRE

B ETH SA RV E R

Solutionary educator

Hometown: I was an Army “brat” growing up,

so … Kansas City feels like home because it’s the place I have lived more than any other and it holds within its limits my epic community of heart-centered artists, visionaries and gay men.

Current neighborhood: Brookside Who or what is your sidekick? A small Nordic prince from another dimension, named Björn, who is here to teach me the secrets of humility, peace, love and light. What career would you choose in an alternate reality? Spiritual healer/medicine woman What was the last local restaurant you patronized? You Say Tomato Where do you drink? With friends in homes and

parks … at kitchen tables, on couches, porches or … wherever the sacred sip need be. I love so many, but I would have to say the ROYAL Project, which is a Seattle-based nonprofit that provides life coaching and case strategy for the disproportionate population of African-American youth in the juvenile justice system. They have a powerful program that is catalytic consciousness, empowering youth from the inside out.

Favorite place to spend your paycheck: Hmm, I

am incredibly frugal. Trader Joe’s for non-GMO and organic groceries and Maj-R Thrift for the occasional fashion upgrade.

What local phenomenon do you think is overrated? The Power & Light District and the Plaza Where do you like to take out-of-town guests? The east Crossroads for First Friday; the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art and Café Sebastienne; the magical forests around the Nelson-Atkins’ sculpture garden; to see the buskers in the River Market on Saturday mornings in the spring, summer and fall.

S A B R I N A S TA I R E S

What’s your favorite charity? This is hard.

complete with a gross domestic happiness index, a diversity of public transportation options, localized organic-food producers, holistic community-education centers, alternative value-exchange systems, and a standard operating procedure in social service that is trauma-informed, equitable, empowering and holds a belief that everyone in need of services has assets to leverage and a purpose to unfold.

What local tradition do you take part in every year? Mardi Gras/carnival season in KC is

“People might be surprised to know that I …”

What subscription — print, digital, etc. — do you value most? TED Talks

Believe that we are able to consciously and creatively eliminate poverty.

“On my day off, I like to …” Dance, play at the

Finish this sentence: “Kansas City got it right when …” It invested in supporting and cultivat-

park, read epic stories, sing songs, make homemade chocolate-chip/flax/oatmeal pancakes while talking with a British accent and sipping on a perfect Americano, and wrassle.

“Kansas City screwed up when …” It focused its

“In five years, I’ll be …” Collaborating with an international community of artist-educators as global ambassadors of peace.

ing its cultural vitality through the arts and entrepreneurship sectors.

development energies on conducting meetings to discuss the potential to meet and consider what is possible, market studies focused on serving vast populations with deep pockets of expendable cash, and doing assessments of needs to create “plans” that could be implemented once we find more funding to do the work that was discovered to be “desirable” to the “community.”

“Kansas City needs …” To become the exemplary sustainable community of the future,

What TV show do you make sure you watch? I abandoned the TV long ago, but The Daily Show inspires a fairly regular viewing via comedycentral.com.

take up a lot of space in my iTunes: Tempo/

mood-based playlists

What movie do you watch at least once a year? The Snowman

epic fun!

Celebrity you’d like to ride the Mamba with at Worlds of Fun: His Holiness the Dalai Lama Person or thing you find really irritating at this moment: Hyper-focus on social media for community outreach and social action

Last book you read: Daring Greatly by Brené Brown

Favorite day trip: St. Joseph, Missouri. Des-

tinations: the Glore Psychiatric Museum, and thrift and antique stores. Stop over in Wathena, Kansas, to visit farmer John Goode, purveyor of the most delicious tomatoes grown in the KC area.

What is your most embarrassing dating moment? During my freshman year in college, I

went out with a group of friends to the symphony and didn’t really realize that I was on a date until after I said, “It’s not like this is a date” to the young man who thought that I was his date. He was my lab partner in zoology. Everyone, including myself, thought I was a bitch. He was sweet and smart. I was dumb but quickly forgiven. Sorry about that, Scott. You were a great lab partner!

Interesting brush with the law? When I was five months pregnant, I was working at a pizza joint in Seattle. It was the end of my shift. I was starving and had to go to the bathroom, when one of my tables was seated with what appeared to be a family of three. I quickly got their drink order. The “parents” ordered waters and the “son” ordered a Bud Light. I carded him, glanced at the card and said, “How old are you?” He replied, “Twentyone,” and I looked at him and his “folks” with a smile and said, “I will be back with your drinks in one moment.”

As I set the beer down in front of him, “dad” pulls out a badge. I got stung by the Liquor Control Board. I was mortified. It was one of those experiences that is forever imprinted in your mind. I almost peed my pants, and by the end of it, “mom” was advising my boss on all the reasons that I shouldn’t be fired. The next day, my job search began. Thank God for my exceptional barista skills in a city of coffee snobs.

Describe a recent triumph: Becoming the

TEDxYouth@StateLineRoad organizer has been an awesome opportunity to collaborate with KC’s most creative firm, VML, and the innumerable driven professionals who seek to support and cultivate ideas worth spreading in KC and beyond. My vision for this youth movement is to build the most diverse TEDx event in KC, coming early this fall. We will be getting started soon with TEDxYouth@ StateLineRoad Salon events.

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PLOG

NET LOSS

The Explorers pro tennis team leaves Kansas City for Texas after a lack of love.

ansas City’s lone championship professional sports team of the past decade is moving to Irving, Texas. In January, the Explorers, 2010 World Team Tennis champions, announced plans to relocate to the Lone Star State. Home of the Dallas Cowboys and Exxon Mobil, Irving has pledged $400,000 to the team. The Explorers’ move came as a surprise, with merely a thank-you message on the team’s website “for 20 great seasons” and no mention of Irving. “It was our privilege to play for you and bring you a championship,” the site reads. “We hope you will continue to support tennis throughout the Kansas City area, especially USTA Missouri Valley programs.” In a time of pro-sports franchises using relocation threats to leverage cities against cities, Kansas City quietly let the Explorers go. There was no fan backlash or “save our team” campaign. No politicians pushed for taxpayer dollars to keep them. Kansas City had spent all it was going to spend on keeping the Explorers playing downtown at Barney Allis Plaza for three weeks every summer. The city had been subsidizing the Explorers for years, including a $100,000 sponsorship in 2012 and an additional $125,000 for bleachers at Barney Allis Plaza. For fiscal year 2012-13, the city had earmarked $325,000 for the team. “They were asking for more money than we were willing — could afford — to give them,” says Oscar McGaskey Jr., executive director of Kansas City Convention and Entertainment Facilities. The city attempted to help the Explorers find sponsorships, but there weren’t enough deals to make staying worthwhile, McGaskey says. “They basically felt the sponsorship commitment in Kansas City had fallen off in recent years,” he says. “They didn’t feel they were getting the sponsorship dollars that they needed to keep afloat.” Irving had been in talks to lure the Explorers to Texas for a year, according to Chris Wallace,

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The Explorers’ KC journey ended in 2012. president and CEO of the Greater Irving–Las Colinas Chamber of Commerce. With five Fortune 500 companies, Irving offers more opportunity for sponsorships, Wallace says. Financial support, though, isn’t a lock for a niche sport. “We’ve been providing guidance, but it’s up to them to make it work,” Wallace says. If the team can’t make it work, there’s nothing in that city’s agreement to keep the Explorers in Irving after this upcoming season. (The Explorers are slated to play at the Four Seasons resort, which should add highend appeal to the team’s matches.) “They could always go back next year,” Wallace says. “This was just for one year. I’m calling this sort of jump-start dollars.” That said, Wallace is confident that the club’s future is in Irving. The Explorers formed in 1993 as part of World Team Tennis. The league was founded in the early 1970s and marketed to fans as a new kind of tennis. Teams squared off in sets of men’s and women’s singles, doubles and mixed doubles. Despite an Elton John song named after its Philadelphia team, “Philadelphia Freedom,” the league didn’t survive the decade. Teams popped up again in the 1980s and early 1990s, including the Explorers, but interest varied, and teams formed and folded. The St. Louis Aces debuted in 1994 only to dis-

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band in 2012. The Explorers bounced around various playing surfaces in Kansas City until landing at Barney Allis Plaza in 2006. The team even brought tennis’s top names to the metro, including the 2012 Olympic gold medalists, Bob and Mike Bryan. But a lack of sponsorships doomed pro tennis in Kansas City. Mary Buschmann, executive director of the United States Tennis Association–Missouri Valley, in Overland Park, worked with the Explorers to promote tennis in the area. Even with pro tennis leaving KC, Buschmann says, the sport has a strong local following. “It’s a year-round sport,” Buschmann says. “We have tournaments on top of tournaments on top of tournaments.” But if tennis is so popular here, where’s the backlash from fans who want to keep the Explorers? In Sacramento, California, fans of the NBA’s Kings, which moved to the California capital city after leaving Kansas City in 1985, are trying to keep the team from moving to Seattle, which lost the Sonics (now known as the Thunder) to Oklahoma City in 2008. “I think the way they found out was that it was already announced they had moved,” she says. “Sometimes fans don’t quite think about them until the weather starts to break. They’re like, ‘Oh, yeah, this summer we can do World Team Tennis.’ ” There’s also an unpleasant truth: World Team Tennis isn’t as popular as other profes-

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BY

BE N PA L O S A A R I

sional sports. The Explorers’ Facebook page, which hasn’t been updated since November, has a little more than 1,000 likes — and zero comments from fans bemoaning the Explorers’ exit. Buschmann says tennis fans often are more focused on playing in their own indoor leagues and tournaments. “They’re very ensconced in their play right now,” she says. “They’re not thinking, yet, World Team.” Jake Hannas, the Overland Park Racquet Club’s director of tennis, agrees with Buschmann that the Explorers’ lack of fan support was due to tennis fans’ commitment to playing. “If you had two hours to spend on tennis in a week — play or watch — what are you going to do?” Hannas says. “You’re going to probably play.” Even though players around his club are disappointed about the Explorers leaving, there’s no movement to keep the team, Hannas says. “I haven’t heard that anybody is going to be marching down to City Hall or anything like that,” he says. “But they’re not happy about it.” The loss of the Explorers isn’t indicative of a lag in the metro’s appetite for sports, says Kathy Nelson, Kansas City Sports Commission and Foundation president and CEO. She points to the Big 12 men’s basketball tournament being locked in KC through 2016. “That’s huge for Kansas City,” she says. Nelson adds that the commission plans to bid on upcoming NCAA events, including wrestling and volleyball tournaments and some Olympic trials. The city is also adding three new sports franchises this year. “We have the new indoor football team that will be playing in Kemper Arena [the Kansas City Renegades],” she says. “We have the new women’s pro-soccer team [FC Kansas City]. They’re playing out in Overland Park. And we have the new professional volleyball team [the Heart of America Havoc]. I would say we’re definitely thriving.”

E-mail ben.palosaari@pitch.com

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FANBOYS

Fannect goes live and waits

BY

for the big nod from Bill Self.

JUS T IN K E NDA L L

t’s game day for Fannect. Inside a space on Grand last occupied by the clothing boutique Method, Hunter Browning, Will Coatney and their team wait for an e-mail from Apple. Six days ago, they submitted their sports app for approval. “We’re on edge,” Browning says. “I’ve got push notifications on every e-mail. I really wish people wouldn’t e-mail me today.” “Ninety-five percent of the apps get approved within six days,” Coatney says, “and today [February 13] is the sixth day.” Apple receives 26,000 submissions a week from developers hoping to be added to the more than 700,000 apps in the giant company’s store. Free apps, such as Fannect, often get discarded. “You have to be cool to get noticed,” Browning says. “And if you don’t do being cool right the fi rst time, you’re never going to be cool.” The Fannect team isn’t afraid of a little competition. That’s the heart of its app, which is meant to rank the most passionate fanbases in college and professional sports. Is Mizzou more devoted than KU? Who would win a street fight between Ohio State fans and the Michigan devout? And who exactly is the No. 1 Notre Dame fan? Fannect’s creators say they can provide the answers. When The Pitch last wrote about Fannect, in November, Browning and Coatney were poised to go live with Fannect. But the app never launched. “We really wanted to make sure the launch went off without a problem,” Browning says. “We didn’t want to launch something that would look cool but didn’t function well or crashed or had bugs and stuff.” Instead of launching, Browning, Coatney and Chris Anning went to Silicon Valley in midJanuary to test the concept in the tech mecca. “That was an unbelievable experience,” Coatney says. It started when Coatney boarded a plane from Phoenix to San Francisco. A sharply dressed bald man sitting next to him struck up a conversation after spotting a book on top of Coatney’s briefcase. “Your book, The Founder’s Dilemma. Let me guess, you’re flying out to Silicon Valley to raise money from venture capitalists?” The man happened to be an operator, someone who connects startups with venture capitalists. He told Coatney to pull out his pitch deck. Ninety minutes later, they were on the ground, and the man had scheduled five meetings for the Fannect team with potential investors. “People connect with this concept,” Coatney says. “Everyone’s a sports fan, and they relate to it. It’s new and unique. There’s so much pent-up demand for a product like this that it’s just going to be unreal.” There were still cold calls to make, including a visit with a secretary at Sequoia

S A B R I N A S TA I R E S

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Capital — which has funded Google, Instagram, PayPal, Cisco and others — that resulted in a last-minute meeting for Fannect’s hunting party. “We were with about five of the biggest names in venture capital in a half-week period, from a Wednesday to a Saturday,” Coatney says. “And we got unbelievable responses from them.” The checkbooks didn’t open in Silicon Valley, but the message was clear: Launch the app, show some growth, then talk to us again. Since that trip, Fannect has added to its roster. Among the new hires is 20-year-old Blake VanLandingham, a Kansas State University student whose title is intern and chief technology officer. “We got him to drop out of school,” Coatney says. “Technically, I’m still enrolled,” VanLandingham says. “I’m doing an internship this semester. I happen to be a CTO intern. On my application, it’s like, ‘What’s your position at your new job?’ I put CTO.” The designation confused his adviser, who asked if he was returning to Manhattan. VanLandingham doesn’t know, but he’s busy, having easily exceeded his internship’s credit hours in just three weeks. “He’s revamped quite a bit since he’s been here,” Browning says. “Probably about 300 hours in that three weeks.” “Everything that we’re using, I’ve written,” VanLandingham says. “The last three weeks, I’ve re-created the whole product.” “It’s much sturdier,” Browning says. Browning shows his Fannect KU profi le on a flat-screen TV. Each fan is ranked on three criteria: passion, dedication and

Browning (left) and Coatney go live with Fannect. knowledge. Users earn points by checking into games with “Attendance Streak” (and double points for away games), playing “Guess the Score” and turning on their “Game Faces.” And just as any social network does, Fannect connects fans with other fans. (In this case, a user builds a “Roster” of friends.) Future features include “Watch Party,” “Gameday Pics,” “Impact Players,” “Team Trivia,” “Tailgate King” and “Spirit Wear,” which can be unlocked as more users sign up. “We’re not asking sports fans to do anything that they aren’t already doing,” Coatney says. “All we’re doing is giving you a medium toward where you can get credit as a fan for doing that stuff.” A pizza-delivery man interrupts the presentation and takes notice of the app. Coatney asks the guy to name his favorite college team. “Kansas State,” the driver says. Coatney tells him to check out the app once it goes live. Browning discusses a new feature that he’s excited about: Tailgate King. Fans can geocache their tailgate. As people check in, Fannect will be able to show a heat map of the hottest tailgates in the parking lots across the country. It’s all part of capturing the experience of being a fan and making the app accessible to everyone. “We don’t really want it to be like fantasy football where it’s only for statistic junkies and die-hard fans,” Browning says. A yet-to-be unveiled update of Fannect includes a feature called “Huddle.” Browning and Coatney see that as the future of

team discussion and message boards. They dismiss the websites that fans rely on now for these functions as “very 1990.” “Unfortunately, they have a huge following,” Browning says of boards, “but they suck, and they’re just gross.” “They’re really hard to use on your mobile phone,” Coatney says. “Obviously, the goal is to replace those. And they’re all of our users, right? So why not go to a place where you’re proving your fandom, and you can do the same things you’re doing on the message boards.” Then Browning casually drops a bomb. “Coach Self is going to endorse it,” he says. “That’s pretty cool.” Bill Self? For real? “He’ll be tweeting it out to his followers,” Browning says. The Self endorsement is part of another major development for Fannect: a budding relationship with IMG Worldwide, which manages KU’s media rights. The IMG connection put Fannect inside Allen Fieldhouse last Saturday for ESPN’s College GameDay and KU's game against the Texas Longhorns. They handed out swag to students and pitched the idea to player-turned-analyst Jalen Rose; ESPN reporter Holly Rowe; and former Jayhawk stars Thomas Robinson, the Morris twins and Greg Gurley. That relationship will also lead to a PA takeover of Allen Fieldhouse during a future game, Browning and Coatney say. (A Fannect video will play on the jumbotron, and its logo will be featured on the signage.) “That relationship with IMG could be one of the pivotal points of this company because IMG sells advertising,” Coatney says. “Fannect is a customer of IMG right now. When we see user growth, then all of a sudden IMG becomes a customer of ours, and then they can buy a license to Fannect and sell our sponsorships as another medium. We would be piggybacking off IMG’s sales force and infrastructure.” Fannect is also trying to build a relationship with the other juggernaut of collegesports media rights: Learfield Sports. First, Fannect has to launch and grow. The app has already received requests from fans of 70 teams. “We haven’t marketed it,” Browning says. “We didn’t want to hype it too much [without a live product].” February 13 ends without a peep from Apple. But 24 hours later, word comes that Apple’s testers are playing with Fannect. By Friday, February 15, Fannect is downloadable from the App Store. “This app today is going to be so different a month from now,” Browning says. “We’re going to take it a million different directions, and it’s going to be cool to see the fi nal product.”

E-mail justin.kendall@pitch.com

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ou wouldn’t imagine that something as innocuous as a Kansas City Blues Society board election could turn as jagged as a Son House song. But contentious elections have become an unfortunate annual tradition for the KCBS, a nonprofit organization that purports to exist “solely for the purpose of promotion and preservation of various forms of blues music.” And when the society convened January 10 at Knuckleheads Saloon, to elect its 2013 board, the knives came out in a hurry. Most had been sharpened for “Lil” Joe Sherrick. Since his November 2010 election as

the group’s president, the society — already given to petty infighting — has grown especially discordant. Fourteen members of the board have quit or been removed. Many of the people who took over those board seats, according to KCBS members, are Sherrick’s friends or Judy Abraham’s friends. Abraham, chairwoman of membership for the KCBS, is also Sherrick’s girlfriend. In the past year alone, Blues News, the society’s monthly newsletter, has had five different editors. In his “Letter From the President,” in the January 2013 issue of Blues News, Sherrick endorsed specific candidates and pointedly reminded readers that certain other candidates had either walked away from or been voted

off the board. Sherrick also mailed personal letters to some members, on KCBS letterhead, endorsing his preferred candidates. (With these notes, he enclosed a pocket-size list for members to bring to the election.) Sherrick’s campaigning angered an already displeased contingent, the most vocal of whom are former board members Karen Baum, Micki Houze and Janet Stephens. They took to the KCBS Facebook group page to challenge Sherrick’s ethics. Much bickering ensued. Comments under posts piled up into the hundreds. As the election neared, each day seemed to introduce some further bureaucratic grievance to widen the rift between Sherrick’s detractors and his loyalists.

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January 10 at Knuckleheads, Danny Powell — the KCBS treasurer, who falls into the pro-Sherrick camp (a “Joe ho,” as the opposition calls a member of that group) — served as the host. There were 17 candidates for 11 board spots. Each was given about a minute to make his or her case on the Knuckleheads main stage. “This has been a down-and-dirty election,” said singer-songwriter Sara Elrod, a longtime KCBS member. “For the president to print his choices for the board in the newsletter is just dirty.” Cassandra Houze, the youngest candidate and one of the few people at Knuckleheads that night under continued on page 8

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Bad-News Blues continued from page 7 the age of 40, took the mic. She told the crowd that she had spent her high school years singing Trampled Under Foot’s songs into a hairbrush in her bedroom. She loved KC blues, she said. But, she added, “all this baloney on Facebook is embarrassing the entire Blues Society.” Curt Straub, who served on the KCBS board for eight years before Sherrick relieved him of his duties, detailed the current administration’s lack of communication skills. He complained that he had heard no response from the board about artwork for merchandise he was working on, and Straub said Sherrick had cut him out after he asked too many questions at the first planning meeting for the 2012 KC Blues Fest at Kaw Point. He sighed and said, “Joe has his heart in the right place but not his head.” According to the bylaws, KCBS presidents aren’t elected by members. Members elect the board, and the board determines who serves in what role. So Sherrick, too, was up for re-election. He wore a lime-green button-up shirt over a black turtleneck and spoke quietly into the mic about the need for the KCBS to continue moving forward. Apart from mentioning a recent meeting with Mayor Sly James, he did not supply much in the way of specifics. After the last candidate spoke, a middle-aged woman not running for the board commandeered the mic. She was a KCBS member, she said, and she had helped found the Blues Society of Omaha. “The KCBS is failing,” she said. “People are talking about these shenanigans with the KCBS up in Omaha, in Topeka. I’m a member of this Blues Society. I want to volunteer. I want to help! But nobody will tell us what this Blues Society is working on. There’s no minutes of the meetings. There’s no information anywhere. I was actually going to vote for Joe until he published, in the Blues News, who we’re all supposed to vote for. The president and the board are not the Blues Society. They represent the Blues Society.” Cheers went up from the assembly. One of the primary orders of business for the KCBS is choosing and sending local bands to represent Kansas City at the annual International Blues Challenge. This year, the society selected Jason Vivone and the Billy Bats, and Shinetop and Hudspeth. While the votes were tallied, the crowd enjoyed sets from both acts. Then the results were announced. The status quo prevailed: Sherrick and most of his cronies were re-elected. There wasn’t any screaming or shouting. A few members shook their heads in disgust, but most just gathered their belongings and exited the venue. Sherrick did not respond to interview requests for this story. At the fi rst meeting of the new board in February, he asked all members to sign a confidentiality agreement that would bar on-the-record conversations with the media.

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n 1980, blues legend John Lee Hooker played a show in Lawrence. The next night,

8 THE PITCH 2 THE PITCH

he performed in Columbia, skipping Kansas City entirely. At the time, touring and local blues artists had no presence in KC — no regular venues, no interested bookers. A handful of young, enthusiastic men decided that was not right. The next year, Roger Naber, Steve Shoemaker, Lindsay Shannon, William G. Osment and Teddy Dibble incorporated the Kansas City Blues Society as a nonprofit. A few years later, John Lee Hooker played an all-day blues party at the Uptown Theater. The two decades that followed would become a golden age for the blues in Kansas City. Naber, who served as president of the KCBS for its fi rst 13 years, opened the Grand Emporium in 1985, and it quickly became a world-famous blues destination. Shannon

Micki Houze (left) is one of 14 board members who has left since Sherrick (above) became president. society guys. Chuck, Roger, Lindsay — it’s an impressive group.” “It turned Kansas City into a real destination for blues music,” Pierre d’Entremont, a longtime local blues musician, says of the KCBS. “The Blues and Jazz Festival and the [KCK] street festival were truly international events in the 1990s. That’s what I’d like to see again. It’d be nice to get that back.” The most recent Blues and Jazz Festival was in 2001, right around the time when local enthusiasm for the blues began to wane. Naber sold the Grand Emporium in 2004, and

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hosted a blues radio show on KCUR 89.3 and then on KCFX 101.1. Following Naber’s lead, he opened the music-and-meat mainstay B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ in south Waldo in 1990. Chuck Haddix, author, historian and host of KCUR’s The Fish Fry, was involved with the society from the beginning. “It was a group that was really engaged with the community,” he says. “The society put on a lot of major events, like the KC Blues Festival, which grew into the Kansas City Blues and Jazz Festival.” “It would hold picnics to raise money to bring in blues acts for shows at Parody Hall, things like that,” says Dawayne Gilley, organizer of the now-defunct KCK Street Blues Festival. “And if you look at those guys now — there was a hellacious amount of growth that came out of that core group of blues

F E B R U A R Y 2 1 - 2 7, 2 0 1 3 pitch.com M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X pitch.com

it closed for good a few years later. In recent years, Knuckleheads has stepped up to house big touring blues acts, but the festivals and events that the KCBS was associated with are memories — and growing more distant. “The ’80s and ’90s were the real boom years,” Gilley says. “You still had these legendary blues figures touring. The problem today is that the blues community hasn’t replaced those legends with up-and-coming talent. There’s still some people connected to the music, but most are older. It’s a different world than it used to be.”

M

ismanagement in the KCBS hasn’t helped. After failing to fi le an annual registration report in 2001, it lost its 501(c)3 status that year and didn’t regain it until

2002. The same thing happened in 2007. And again in 2009. Sherrick has been on the KCBS board since 2005, and he often claims (see: “Letter From the President,” Blues News, January 2013) that he saved the KCBS from dissolution in 2010. This is not entirely accurate. The paperwork necessary for reinstatement was filed with the Missouri Department of Revenue prior to the first meeting of the board at which Sherrick was president. Then-treasurer Bonna Yost signed the application for reinstatement. Three months into Sherrick’s first term, Yost resigned from the board. A few months after Yost’s departure, Sherrick attempted to appoint his girlfriend, Abraham, as treasurer. Some balked. “We felt it was unethical for two people living under the same roof to have total control of the Blues Society’s fi nances,” Houze says. “Joe pitched a fit, but we held our ground and demanded a vote on it. But we lost.” The opaque nature of the KCBS’s finances has triggered concern among members, particularly in light of the fi rst KC Blues Fest at Kaw Point, held September 29, 2012. Only Big Bill Morganfield, son of Muddy Waters, was paid to perform; none of the local bands that played saw a dime. “Joe sent an e-mail to the bands telling them, essentially, if you donate your time this year, the KCBS will look favorably on you when they organize the fest next year,” Baum says. But is there going to be a 2013 fest? Last year’s event was staffed by volunteers, was poorly promoted (The Pitch received no press releases about it, for example) and poorly attended (members seem to agree that about 100 people showed up). Gilley, who knows a thing or two about throwing a blues festival in KCK, says, “I offered to help in 10 different ways. I’ve done nine street festivals. I worked on three blues and jazz festivals. The staff at Kaw Point had zero experience. We always paid a reasonable salary to the bands [at KCK Street Blues Festival]. Kaw Point charged $20 at the gate. They had no real star power, and it wasn’t BYOB. Of course nobody showed up.” The KCBS has refused to produce a financial statement about the event, despite requests from the board and the society’s members. Powell, the KCBS secretary, tells The Pitch that the festival “broke even” but has declined to elaborate. This lack of available basic information is part of a trend. Sherrick has eliminated the distribution of board meeting minutes. He has also scaled back the meetings from monthly to quarterly.

A

part from its fledgling festival and its sending bands to the IBC, about the only thing the KCBS regularly does is publish Blues News. (It also operates a website that looks like it was built during the Clinton presidency.) Baum edited Blues News for three years. She resigned at the end of 2011, after a year of clashing with Sherrick. One point of contention was Sherrick’s restriction against listing in Blues News any clubs or bands that don’t pay KCBS dues. (For the previous 30 years, every blues venue and act had been included.)

Harrison lasted only three issues as Blues News editor under Sherrick. “My feeling is that they have the idea of a society backwards,” Baum says. “I believe a society should support venues and musicians by advertising for them, showcasing them, holding events for them. Every single blues event in this city should be included in Blues News. But under Joe, the board decided that only members in good standing were to be featured. So you start to see ill will and venues dropping their advertising. It’s crazy. I don’t see why musicians and clubs are supposed to support the Blues Society. It should be the other way around.” Powell disagrees. “We felt that if you’re a society and you have paying members, then you have an obligation to promote those paying members over people getting free promotion without paying,” he says. Since Baum’s resignation, five editors have come and gone, the most recent being Alexander Harrison, a 19-year-old musician and English major at the University of Central Missouri. Despite his age, the issues that Harrison edited — December 2012, January 2013 and February 2013 — were praised among insiders as a return to form for Blues News. “I have never met Alexander Harrison,” Gilley says. “But I picked up the February

issue a few days back, and I see a story on Gino Bueno and the Side Show Band, a thing on Crosseyed Cat, a thing on Mary Bridget Davies, and a historical piece on Blind Willie Johnson. It was the first issue in a long while that had a good combination of articles, a nice layout. I tracked down Alexander to tell him he did a great job, and he tells me it’s his last issue, that Joe Sherrick fi red him.” Harrison says he resigned. His days working with Sherrick were numbered either way. Once again, Sherrick’s dictate that Blues News cover only dues-paying bands ignited tensions. Says Harrison: “Joe got in touch in November, and I, along with my friend Samantha [Whitehead], who knows a lot about Photoshop and InDesign, agreed to start editing Blues News. We were warned that Joe and Judy are difficult to work with, but we still felt it was a good opportunity for us. There were a lot of hitches in communication — they’re not very organized people — but we pulled off the fi rst issue. “The next month, I told them I wanted to put Gino’s band, a non-KCBS member, on the cover for February,” Harrison continues. “I wanted Gino because he’s not one of the four bands Blues News is constantly covering. I wanted to feature a new artist. Joe agreed and said it was OK as long as we didn’t make a habit of putting nonmember bands on the cover. I told him we planned to put Doghouse Daddies, who are very much a KCBS member band, on the cover the next month. Everything seemed fine. We submitted the final proof to Joe and Judy on January 23. Then, on the 24th, I received a professionally worded e-mail from Joe saying that I have no regard for the Blues Society, that I don’t understand his vision for the Blues Society, and that he has no choice but to bring the issue before the board. I told him that’s not necessary, that I quit, that I don’t want anything more to do with his organization.”

Harrison adds: “A year ago, Blues News had 30 ads an issue. Now there are two. It [the KCBS] is just a total mess, and it’s all because of Joe and Judy.” Says Gilley: “I’m not trying to steamroll anything [Sherrick] is doing. But I went to that election in January, and I couldn’t figure out what the hell was going on. It was rough. I reached out to Joe after and said, ‘What are you doing to mend some of these fences?’ … You can solve a lot of problems just by listening to people. I offered to bridge gaps with him, reach out to some people, try to help get them back onboard. But I never got a firm commitment one way or the other. And I continue to get people coming up to me asking, ‘What’s up with the Blues Society?’ It’s been going on for years now but particularly the last few. At a certain point, it’s like, who are you serving? What are you about?”

I

t’s kind of a mystery to me what exactly is going on with that entire organization,” says Paul Greenlease, who plays bass with

voices reminding everyone that the KCBS should be about the music, nothing more. But at this point, the KCBS is so divorced from most of the blues scene that a majority of the musicians The Pitch spoke with (many asked not to be identified, either because they didn’t want to risk gig opportunities or because they didn’t want their names associated with the KCBS’s high school drama) said they just don’t pay it much mind. “I’ve been playing around Kansas City for about 20 years now, and they haven’t done much for me as far as I can tell,” Greenlease says. “But usually, I’m just too busy playing to really think about anything with the Blues Society. My feeling is that all the infighting just makes a lot of musicians want to steer clear.” Steve Ashton, who says he has been a fan of KC blues for about two decades, had experience with another local 501(c)3, the Structural Engineers Association of Kansas and Missouri, for which he has served as president, so he ran for the KCBS board in 2013 and won. Despite some reservations — he believes he is the only member who did not sign Sherrick’s confidentiality agreement — he’s optimistic about the group’s direction. “ T he re ’s de f i n ite ly some internal conf lict, but I think it will be resolved,” A shton s ays. “They’ve done all these great things in the past: festivals, events, Blues News. One of the things I ran on is transparency, and the board is working toward that. There’s some internal talk of releasing budget information and board meeting minutes to membership. I think it’s just a matter of getting people to work together again.” Houze isn’t buying it. “These new guys on the board,” she says, “they don’t know what they’re in for.”

““At a certain point, it’’s like, who are you serving? What are you about?””

 such acts as the Nace Brothers and Dave Hays. On the KCBS Facebook page — as well as on the KCBS Response Group page, started by critics of Sherrick’s administration after they noticed that their comments were being deleted from the official KCBS page — the accusations and arguments are invariably interrupted by well-meaning, mediating

E-mail david.hudnall@pitch.com

The devil is in the details. And we know the details. About pretty much everything. www.jocolibrary.org/staffpicks pitch.com

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9

The Swingle Singers 7 p.m., Sunday, Feb. 24 Heard on GLEE!

L

www.jccc.edu/TheSeries | 913-469-4445

Performing Arts Series Johnson County Community College | NO ONLINE FEES | FREE PARKING 10

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F E B R U A R Y 2 1 - 2 7, 2 0 1 3

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Pitch

WEEK OF FEBRUARY 21–27 | BY BERRY ANDERSON

ART Unfolding Seth Johnson at the Greenlease.

19

PAG E

CAFÉ Rye grows at Mission Farms.

24 PAG E

MUSIC FORECAST Toro Y Mio brings the Chazmataz.

F R I D AY | 2 . 2 2 | THE PUPPET SAID WHAT ?

Four or five times a year, Paul Mesner Puppets (1006 East Linwood, 816-756-3500) steps away from the traditional canon of children’s shows to produce the Adult Puppet Slam, an 18-and-older night of comedy. “The overall style is like Second City or improv,” says Bill PreE M OR nevost, PMP’s interim executive director. During the 90-minute event T A E IN tonight and tomorrow, ONL .COM PITCH no subjects are off-limits, and most are drawn from current events and recent headlines. Performers include Mike Horner (who’s also a ventriloquist), Gabby Baculi, Erika Baker and Mesner. Tickets cost $10 at the door, and the show starts at 8 p.m. For more information, see paulmesnerpuppets.org.

EVENTS

THE SWEET LIFE Sugar isn’t that bad for you. In fact, the American Heart Association says 24 grams a day is OK. Consume your grams at The Pitch’s second annual Sugar Rush, at 6 p.m. at the Guild (1621 Locust). Tickets for our sweet sampling of local restaurants, bakeries and food trucks cost $12 in advance or $15 at the door. One of the featured vendors is Mud Pie Vegan Bakery & Coffee, a 39th Street joint that specializes in turning dietaryrestriction lemons into lemon cake. We asked owners Michael and Ashley Valverde and Sharon Hughes for the scoop on gluten-free goods. The Pitch: What do you think people believe they are in for when they try vegan or gluten-free baked goods? Mud Pie: One misconception we hear is that people expect our goods to be dry and dense. After trying our bakery items, people often say they would not know

TUMMY SUPPORT

In addition to a strong faculty and a supportive community, the Kansas City Academy (7933 Main, 816-444-5225) has a powerful man on students’ side: Brandon Draper. The multi-instrumentalist, percussion explorer and all-around talent runs the music program at KCA and is in his second year of curating the school’s Grassroots Concert Series, which has booked several of KC’s most acclaimed jazz acts (including Alaturka and Sons of Brasil). “Generally, the artists and KCA promote each individual event and split the proceeds, just like a club would,” Draper says. “It’s completely grassroots with no sponsorship at all.” Tonight’s show — the KC Belly Dance Showcase — is a little different: All the proceeds go back to KCA so that it can upgrade the auditorium’s lighting system. For tickets ($10 for GA, $15 for preferred seating) and more information, see kcacademy.org. The all-ages show begins at 7 p.m. continued on page 13

D THURS

that they are vegan without being told. What are some of the ingredients you use? We use a range of nondairy milks, including soy, rice, hemp, almond, coconut and cashew. The cashew and coconut milks are made in-house. We can use these milks in both our coffee bar and baked goods. We use a variety of flours in our gluten-free items: rice, sorghum, teff and garbanzo, to name a few. We experiment with different combinations until we get it right. What’s the biggest lesson you’ve learned in this business venture? You have to constantly be learning and experimenting. We want to keep things fresh for our customers and create new recipes. When a customer comes in and mentions that they haven’t been able to eat something in years, we always try to do our best to make that item available for them.

AY

2 . 21 e your Indulg tooth! sweet

S AT U R D AY | 2 . 2 3 |

TERMS OF ENDEARMENT

A

ctress, author, spiritualist, Downton Abbey guest star,

and all-around sexy broad Shirley MacLaine comes to Johnson County Community College’s Yardley Hall (12345 College Boulevard, Overland Park, 913-469-4445) at 8 p.m. ART CREDIT HERE

15

PAG E

to tell some of her stories. Buy tickets ($55–$150) at jccc.edu/ performing-arts-series. pitch.com

F E B R U A R Y 2 1 - 2 7, 2 0 1 3

THE PITCH

11

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art

Eduardo Bernel, Kent Davis, Vince Latona & Baker Medlock

performances Burlesque Downtown Underground music John Velghe & DJ Brad Ireland sponsored by:

continued from page 11

S AT U R D AY | 2 . 2 3 | RIDE ’EM, COWBOY

The Professional Bull Riders 2013 Built Ford Tough Series is drawing record crowds. Witness the toughness when the top (uninjured) 35 riders hit the dirt — PBR comes to the Sprint Center (1407 Grand, 816-949-7000) tonight at 8 and Sunday afternoon at 2. For tickets ($10–$100) and more information, see sprintcenter.com.

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STREET DANCING

The modern moves of Kacico Dance, the saxophone music of Hunter Long, the light projections of Robert Howsare — they all come E M OR together for Charlotte Street Foundation’s Overlay, part of the StuT A E IN ONL .COM dio Residency Program PITCH Series. The performance takes place in the fairly diminutive Paragraph Gallery (23 East 12th Street), a space with no stage. “It changes the way the audience will experience the movement,” says Holly Noel Harmison, co-artistic director of Kacico. “It’s been so refreshing to see our choreography reborn and transformed. Some pieces have grown stronger.” See it at 7:30 p.m. (Doors open at 7.) The suggested donation is $5. For more information, see urbanculturestudioresidents .wordpress.com.

EVENTS

S U N D AY | 2 . 2 4 | DON’T CRY FOR MYRA

Myra Taylor, one of KC’s most storied and beloved musicians, died in December 2011, at age 94. But Frank Hicks, of Knuckleheads Saloon (2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456), sees no reason to stop remembering the legendary singer’s birthday. “We just celebrated her birthday for so many years while she was living that we wanted to keep her in everyone’s mind,” Hicks says. No argument here. From 2 to 7 p.m., hang out for the Levee Town– hosted Sunday jam, then stick around to hear fans and musicians recall the great lady. There’s no cover. Find more information at knuckleheadskc.com.

2 . 23 ngest The lo s econd s t h ig e

Maker’s Mark (1333 Walnut, 816-442-8115). From 3 to 7 p.m., and then again from 9 p.m. to close, all martinis cost $5. If you’re feeling like dessert, there’s always the Chocolate Pretzel, made with Frangelico, Pinnacle whipped-vanilla vodka and a splash of cream, and served in a chocolate-laced glass with a salted rim.

T U E S D AY | 2 . 2 6 |

The Cashew (2000 Grand, 816-221-5858). This two-story, Jayhawk-friendly Crossroads bar and restaurant has two-for-one martinis from open to close including the Rock Chalk, a tangy cocktail made with Absolut Citron, Blue Curaçao, Cointreau and lemonade, and topped with sparkling wine and grenadine. Mac’s Sports Pub (9617 West 87th Street, Overland Park, 913-341-2000). All martinis — we like the boozy School Girl-tini (Smirnoff Strawberry and lemonade) and the Hendrick’s Breeze (made with Hendrick’s Gin, cranberry juice and a splash of soda) — cost $5 all night at this huge JoCo joint.

in H&R Block’s Hackovate Health Innovation Competition mean to make it easier for everyone. Their challenge? To develop and showcase mobile, online or social applications that help the public understand how the ACA will affect their lives. The ideas, coming from as far away as Pakistan and Dublin as well as here in KC, get presented in 10-minute blocks at Union Station (30 West Pershing Road). The winners get cash, and the attending public gets the chance to mingle with health-care-industry leaders. The free event goes from 12:30 to 8:30 p.m. For registration and more information, see hackovate.eventbrite.com.

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M O N D AY | 2 . 2 5 | HAPPY HOUR HIT LIST: MARTINI MONDAY

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Excision — the music producer and DJ from British Columbia — is coming to the Midland (1228 Main, 816-283-9921), and he’s packing “The Execution Tour” with a 420-squarefoot screen full of 3-D animations. The video images are synced to his slimy, relentless drum-and-bass beats. We’re talkin’ lasers, 100,000 watts of sound and all of the sweaty, writhing bodies you can handle. Tickets cost $28 in advance or $33 the day of the show, which starts at 8 p.m. See midlandkc.com.

HEALTHY COMPETITION

Whatever your opinion of the Affordable Care Act — the complex legislation better known as “Obamacare” — the 10 finalists

It’s been said that after World War I and on through the 1940s, one out of every seven U.S. women bought a garment designed, styled and constructed in Kansas City. That’s not hard to believe, given that our city’s Garment District — the area bordered by Sixth and 11th streets and Washington and Wyandotte streets — at the time employed more than 4,000 people. So it’s appropriate that the Garment District Boutique, Bar and Collective (1350 Main, 816-221-4387) is the site for Kansas City’s Fashion Week Kick-Off. The free, unticketed event features a show styled by local fashion bloggers, plus a DJ and drinks. It’s also the Garment District’s third anniversary, so party down from 6 to 9 p.m. and see what’s gonna be hot in 2014 – earthy hues and cool blues? For a schedule of KC Fashion Week events, see kcfashionweek.com. E-mail submissions to Filter editor Berry Anderson at calendar@pitch.com. Search our complete listings guide online at pitch.com.

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ART

SELF IMAGES

At the Greenlease, Seth Johnson

BY

shares a little me time.

T R A C Y A BE L N

T

here’s no missing Seth Johnson’s artist statement. For Centuries of Self, his fascinating solo exhibition at Rockhurst University’s Greenlease Gallery, he has put it up as a looming block of text, six white-on-black paragraphs on an 8-foot-by-8foot panel. It’s a barricade (Johnson calls it, aptly, “monolithic”) against casual viewing of the show, demanding a pause before you look at the works. It’s so big that some people are bound to walk around it anyway, intimidated by its scale or unwilling to digest its rhetoric or figuring that it can be picked up later, on a piece of paper, and taken home (it can’t). But skip it and you’ll miss a lot. What you’re hit with when you walk around the statement is what looks like a representation of a studio, including a desk set with drawing materials and useful items (a jar of granola, a work in progress on a board, stacks of perusable sketchbooks at the bottom of a cart that also holds records and a record player). The movable wall behind it, as well as the one that someone sitting in the desk’s chair would face, comprise a visual cacophony of found images culled from history, science, science fiction, Egyptology, vampire culture, film, cult sexuality, and more. Snakes, skulls, Disney princesses, the Stay Puft Marshmallow Man, a flexing Arnold Schwarzenegger, a He-Man action figure and dozens of other American totems from the 1980s and ’90s throw their competing colors and their packed-up layers of meaning in jumbled unison. Are you ready to go back to the statement and find out what this is all about? Difficult to reduce to a few key points, Johnson’s eyed, gray-faced alien — the one from the cover of the writing is, for starters, an invitation. He means for book Communion. Johnson’s gaze intensifies. “That, gallerygoers to pick around the items here, to touch what’s on that sawhorse desk, to set the little record when that first came out, that affected me deeply. It scared me.” He goes on staring and falls silent. player’s needle onto a hardcore 45 and listen, to stop When the gallery is quiet, Johnson’s show takes and read one of the 90-odd books on a cinder-blockon an eerie tone. The books on that long shelf are and-board shelf along the back wall of the gallery. But he’s also writing instructions, telling us how we presided over by plastic Halloween masks, painted by Johnson with creepy expressions. They’re monsters might let go of standard art-viewing habits. Instead, he asks us to erase our subjectivity and abandon any you can’t quite place but seem very familiar. Look long enough at the titles of the mismatched volumes rote contemplation of his intentions. — among them, A Brief History of Everything, Ritual There is no true individual, goes Johnson’s stateAmerica, Giordano Bruno and the Hermetic Tradiment, only a collection of systems, interactions and histories along a continuum. “We can choose to tion, The Evolution of Useful Things — and a certain logic in their sequencing seems to believe that ‘meaning’ is sitting emerge. (In any event, it’s amusing and waiting patiently to be unCenturies of Self: to imagine having time enough to covered by our curious minds,” he New Works read all of them, maybe right here.) writes. “In so behaving, however, by Seth Johnson Johnson’s fascination with symwe only skim the surface of our Through March 23 bology (and, to some extent, with experience.” at Greenlease Gallery, conspiracy) turns up again in the So I noticed, my first time 1100 Rockhurst Road, 816-501-4407, rockhurst.edu show’s most striking individual through, a book of poetry by Buckpiece: a narrow banner draped minster Fuller, a Swamp Thing down a blank part of the “studio graphic novel, a covetable 1969 wall” and onto the floor. Reading it requires a bit of reproduction of a 1902 Sears Roebuck catalog, and maneuvering, but doing so reveals something else to a beautiful coffee-table book depicting Samurai arbe explored. In a graphic essay using clean lines and mor. You’ll linger over other objects, things I missed. The installation leads you into an idea temple, one suggesting a blueprint, Johnson presents a lesson on sigils — symbols associated with magic and the that provides countless opportunities for discussion. Of course, Johnson is the common thread bind- occult — particularly their use in corporate logos. ing this ephemera, and he says he can talk at length Consider CBS’s creepy eye, Time Warner’s spiral eye, the figures on bathroom-door signs. about every separate image on display here. He has Anne Austin Pearce, Greenlease’s director, says been collecting them — from magazines, books, onshe’s a longtime fan of Johnson’s work, which has line — for years. often consisted of technically flawless graphite drawWalking through the gallery with me, he points to an instantly recognizable rendering of an almond- ings. Centuries of Self evolved from Johnson’s deep

Above and right: untitled examples of Johnson’s symbol-intensive art. sketchbooks, becoming something unexpected and, Pearce says, even better. But during the course of preparing for Centuries of Self, Johnson, who is about to turn 34, found that making drawings, sculptures and paintings wasn’t working. So he changed tack: “I ended up developing this [show] out of thinking about what was important to me and what I thought would be useful to me and to other people.” He adds, “I don’t care if what I make is art or not art.” Among his drawings on display here are white shapes, graphite images of things that carry symbolic baggage (including an apple, the anarchy sign and the peace sign). The arrangement is also on a card you can pick up from a stack on the corner of the desk, a do-it-yourself oracle kit. The back of the card explains that you can cut and reassemble the pattern into a 12-sided die that might help you divine an answer to some question or problem. As in the sort of role-playing game that requires such dice, Centuries of Self provokes interaction among perspectives. Johnson has created a game space here, a physical manifestation of the artistic mind. And he’s challenging the presumption that art is (as he puts it in an e-mail to me) “a game of trying to forget one’s self in order to enter the mind of the ‘genius artist.’ ” Whether you see genius here or just play, Johnson’s exhibition takes hours to absorb fully. It’s time well spent.

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n a scene about halfway through Evan S. Connell’s novel Mrs. Bridge, the title character tells some friends about the trip from which she has just returned, a European tour of great historic cities and their grand museums. But if any of that Continental splendor truly moved her, she doesn’t say. Instead, she finally admits: “All the time we were abroad I kept wondering if that awful hole in the pavement just off Ward Parkway had been fixed.” When Connell died last month, I remembered that scene, that glimpse of the way we think of wherever we come from. And I recalled my introduction to Mrs. Bridge, the Kansas City–born writer’s first novel — a book that I now teach my own students at an Eastern university. The teacher who assigned that book to me, 30 years ago, was in her 60s then. What had become of Mrs. Collins? I found her in the telephone book. She’s 91 now, retired and living a mile from my old high school. “Oh, yes, Connell had a strange way of seeing people,” she said when I called. “He wrote about their outsides, and you had to catch on to what was going on in their insides from their outsides, and I liked that.” I asked her what she thought about Mrs. Bridge herself, heroine of what some critics have called a feminist novel. “Did she have a character of her own?” she said, and laughed. “She just did what her husband told her.” The book takes place near the Country Club Plaza, where its author grew up in the 1930s and where I lived in the 1970s, until I was 13 and my parents divorced. When Mrs. Collins handed Mrs. Bridge to me, it spoke to my developing sense of irony and to my retreating faith about a world I’d escaped — the fashionable neighborhood that Connell so convincingly captures. I’d met those people, those accomplished doctors and lawyers and engineers (like my father) with their Corinthiancolumned porches and French mansard roofs and Italian villa porticoes. And I still haven’t forgotten the boulevards, manicured and

Connell got out of KC to make his name. lined with terraces of fountains and sculptures (and, yes, the occasional pothole). Connell was showing me how often, behind mansion doors, people move through empty lives, determined by rigid social codes. Reading Mrs. Bridge that first time, I began to ask a new question: How would I live my life? Like Connell, I left Kansas City as a young man, right after I turned 23. And though I return often to see relatives, I revisit when I teach Mrs. Bridge to my college students. After she asks about the status of Ward Parkway’s pavement, Mrs. Bridge tells her friends that “no matter how far you go there’s no place like home.” (The line nods to L. Frank Baum, that Oz architect whose work is so identified with the other side of the state line.) Connell continues: “She could see they agreed with her, and surely what she had said was true, yet she was troubled and for a moment she was almost engulfed by a nameless panic.” He never tells us precisely what the “panic” is, but he doesn’t have to. By that point in the book, the Bridge children have grown up and left home. Material needs have been met, and there’s nothing left to do. Mrs. Collins told me that, after she retired, she moved to China and taught English there. I told her that I was writing my own first novel, and that I make my students read Mrs. Bridge. I said she had inspired me. Her reply was humble: “It was not my teaching. The books inspired you.”  “What are you reading these days?” I asked.  She named True Grit, by Charles Portis, and she told me who had assigned it to her: “My son tells me to forget the movie, that the book is better.”

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Rye is in a field by itself.

BY

CHARLES FERRUZZA

Rye • 10551 Mission, Leawood, 913-642-5800 • Hours: lunch 11 a.m.–2.30 p.m. Monday–Friday; dinner 5–10 p.m. daily; brunch 10:30 a.m.–2:30 p.m. Saturday and Sunday • Price: $$–$$$

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olby Garrelts describes his new business, Rye, as “a country restaurant in a neighborhood that used to be in the country.” That neighborhood, the retail-and-residential development called Mission Farms, was indeed open prairie not so long ago. The land here, at the southern tip of Leawood, once held little more than the Saddle and Sirloin Club, a convivial riding and shooting society dating back to the 1940s. At age 38, Garrelts is too young to remember those days. He likewise would never have dined at such quintessential Kansas City restaurants E R MO as the Wishbone on Main Street or Mrs. Peters Fried Chicken in Kansas AT E N I ONL .COM City, Kansas. Yet he has H PITC somehow tapped into the culinary zeitgeist of those long-razed venues to create Rye, a restaurant that’s sleekly current on the surface but centers on a menu that shares its vintage with the first radio. The dishes that come out of Rye’s kitchen — fried chicken, mashed or fried potatoes, corn muffins, homemade pies — are the stuff of traditional home cooking. To dine here is to call to mind the image of apron-clad homemakers working from generations-old recipes in overheated home kitchens. No one cooks this way anymore. But people eat this way right now. Rye has been wildly successful since its December opening, a fact suggesting that 2013’s fashionable cuisine is pretty much the workaday food of 1913. Well, why not? In this age, a restaurant that insists on a pie crust made with lard is almost exotic. Not that dining at Rye is strictly a nostalgia trip. The space exudes modern style. Garrelts and his wife, Megan Garrelts, and their business partner, Kim Cooley — with help from John O’Brien (of the art gallery Dolphin) and architect George Lafferty — have turned this space, formerly occupied by the dark, ugly Lakeside Tavern, into a stylish, well-lighted dining room. Key to this is an open, exhibition-style kitchen, with white subway tiles and copper-colored drum light fixtures. The tables are bare but for the tidy place mats (and a trio of small bottles: the house-made steak sauce, a fiery hot sauce and a “Deluxe BBQ sauce”). The prices are equally au courant. Rye’s signature dish is a deep-fried chicken, and it’s somewhat pricey: $34 for a whole bird. Side dishes aren’t included, but boasting rights are. The poultry is free-range Amish, hormoneand antibiotic-free. And the process is laborious, with Garrelts brining the meat in sugar, salt and molasses; seasoning it with parsley, bay leaves, lemon and oregano; and then drying the pieces overnight before frying them to order (not in lard). The result speaks for itself.

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Rye gives a wry spin to classic Sunday-supper dishes every day.

fork-tender smoked and braised short ribs, This chicken is moist, lusciously crispy and served on a cloud of fluff y grits, is delicious. altogether first-rate. Judging by the number of platters of this dish I’ve seen rushed out of And the sliced, griddle-seared hanger steak the kitchen, I think it’s fair to say it’s the best- is juicy and tender, a succulent bargain. The servers here (all young and startlingly selling dish here. beautiful) like to rave about the slow-roasted Garrelts serves his deep-fried delicacy trout, and the dish really with tiny jars of house-made does live up to its sales pitch. pickles as a palate cleanser Rye The flesh is pale and flaky, (“Somet h i ng br isk a nd Deviled freeand it comes folded into a bright,” he says), and they’re range eggs...................... $4 buttery but not over-rich nearly as wonderful with the Whole fried chicken .....$34 almond sauce. battered bird as the satiny Smoked and braised So far, there isn’t much for sour-cream mashers or the short ribs ......................$26 vegetarians at Rye, though slightly bitter but addictive Griddle-seared Garrelts expects that to creamed turnip and mustard hanger steak................$20 change when summer rolls greens. Slow-roasted trout ....... $22 around, and he has more Less successful is the basLemon meringue pie ....... $6 fresh vegetables to work ket of crispy chicken livers with. For now, a meatless and gizzards on the starters meal can be made from combining a few side list. Served with a tongue-searing hot sauce, dishes. I recommend the roasted Wakarusa the livers are scandalously skimpy and the gizzards so chewy that you might momentarily oyster mushrooms, which Rye tosses in shallots, garlic, olive oil and fresh herbs, and the mistake them for tastefully breaded erasers. damn good roasted Brussels sprouts, draped in A far more pleasurable starter is a quartet of dainty, creamy deviled eggs (leaving room a lemony garlic butter. I’m also fond of Garrelts’ spin on macaroni and cheese. I prefer mine for the big bird). On a smaller, separate menu (a “reserve as the menu offers it — heavy on the Burger’s country bacon — but this cheddary side can program”) are Rye’s featured steaks (inbe ordered without the pig, and it’s not made cluding a 24-ounce Foster Family Farms with chicken stock. porterhouse for $46) as well as a rack of Vegetarians are out of luck on the pie lamb and a honey-brined, double-cut Duroc pork chop. By the time you get to that list, front, though, and that’s a pity because what Megan Garrelts and staff pastry chef Jessica though, you’ll probably have chosen your Armstrong make is nothing short of superb. meal. Besides, the less costly beef options on (There’s simply no substitute for lard when the main menu are plenty classy. A plate of

it comes to a perfectly flaky crust.) There are other options, of course, including a soothing apple-butter crisp, topped with a scoop of Nutmeg Ale ice cream, or a gorgeous almond cake layered with pineapple marmalade. But the delectably tart Meyer-lemon meringue pie — with a chapeau of browned meringue and a swirl of salted caramel sauce — is good enough to make the staunchest vegetarian forswear his or her vows for a night. I have a hard time choosing between it and the haunting, dark, molasses-rich MoKan nut pie. Made with black walnuts and pecans, it’s subtle and satisfying, without the jarring sweetness common to traditional pecan pies. The wine list here is suitably impressive (and more than reasonably priced), and among the cocktails are a few imaginative, countryinspired beverages. I’m thinking of the Sweet Corn Fizz, made with Kansas White Whiskey (brewed in New York), egg whites, house-made corn water, honey syrup and bitter-lemon soda. A friend of mine ordered one and sucked it up through a straw in about three sips. “I liked it a lot,” he said. “But I’d never order it again.” You won’t feel that way about Rye, however. This concept restaurant, which Garrelts spent several years planning, is so thoroughly likable that it’s impossible not to want to return, if only to have another buttered roll or another hearty bowl of burnt-end chili. Rye serves the kind of savory dishes and comforting desserts that you would make at home, if only someone had taught you. Happiness, though, is paying someone else to make this kind of food, beautifully prepared, for you.

Have a suggestion for a restaurant The Pitch should review? E-mail charles.ferruzza@pitch.com

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on Freeman is having a premonition. On a frigid Tuesday in February, the owner of two-month-old Flywheel Coffee, the tiny shop at 548 Central in Kansas City, Kansas, surveys the traffic speeding by. “Every time I sit down with someone,” he says as he slides a chair back from one of Flywheel’s four tables, “it gets busy.” Before Freeman, 41, can sit, the door swings open, sending him behind the counter again. The customer is a regular. “There are not too many places that I can go to get a coffee, where I can walk t h roug h t he g rou nds E MOR that were used to make the coffee,” the man j o ke s . H e ’s t e a s i n g T A E IN ONL .COM Freeman, who has been PITCH using espresso grounds to fertilize the grass seed planted in a small, spotty patch next to the shop’s parking lot. Freeman pushes up the sleeves of his brown hoodie, revealing another pair of sleeves in ink — a reminder of his days playing bass in bands like the Shaker Hoods — and works his equipment. He retorts: “There’s going to be lush green grass where I can put my picnic tables this summer.” Freeman has big plans for this brick postage stamp, which sits a few tire rolls from the Central Avenue Bridge. He says Flywheel Coffee is going to be a music venue (a few dozen people came to see a couple of singersongwriters play a pair of Saturday nights in February) as well as an art gallery (Freeman has sold two of his own abstract paintings off the wall). But fi rst, Flywheel (Freeman’s nickname, a word etched into his left forearm) has to pull another espresso shot. He is still the shop’s lone barista. “Whoever designed this had no idea how to design a drain for an espresso machine,” he says in mock frustration. These two men have had this conversation before. They talk like tinkerers in a garage. “Could you put a screen on it?” his customer asks. Freeman pauses, and you can feel a trade coming on. (He has already bartered with a contractor to get a new floor in exchange for cappuccinos.) “Might not be a bad idea at all, actually,” he says. The coffee menu, like Freeman, is straightforward. Working in a tidy area the size of a Mini Cooper, he makes every drink to order, including the occasional frozen mocha or milkshake. (Two blenders stand at the ready.) He doesn’t keep cold coffee in the refrigerator, though, and not 10 minutes after he admits this fact, a University of Kansas fan (with his Jayhawks cap slightly askew, his matching jersey slightly oversized, his body apparently unfazed by the cold outside) walks through the door and asks for an iced coffee. Freeman improvises, pouring drip cof-

JON AT H A N BENDER

BUILD YOUR OWN COFFEE LAB Ben Helt of Benetti’s says it’s not hard.

FAT CITY

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BY

B Freeman is the Flywheel in Flywheel. fee over ice and adding a shot of vanilla. He hands over the cup and asks the kid to tell him what he thinks. But the fan just wants to get on the road (he says he and some friends are headed out of town), and he leaves without opening the lid. “I ask my customers to tell me if something is working for them,” Freeman says. “They have to be my QA [quality assurance] when it comes to cold coffee.” He says this neighborhood is ready for a coffee shop that can serve as a gathering place for artists. Investors have purchased the former Sophie’s Deli across the street (a former stop on onetime bread-truck driver Freeman’s delivery route), and the bike shop Revolve, a few doors down, is slated to open this month. “There’s no foot traffic, but people from the neighborhood walk down,” Freeman says. “I thought about taking an espresso and cappuccino banner and going all Little Caesars out there. I haven’t done it yet, but that doesn’t mean I won’t.” His sign-holding days are pushed off a bit longer by a white-haired couple in need of caffeine. “We just drove by and saw you were open and thought we’d give you a try,” the woman says. She and the man take seats, as does Freeman for only the second time in the few hours since he has opened. “People don’t expect to see this here,” Freeman says. “But I know that there’s no coffeehouses here, and I can see people enjoying my vision.” Flywheel Coffeehouse is open 7 a.m.–2:30 p.m. Monday–Friday and 8 a.m.–2 p.m. Saturday.

en Helt knows that there’s a perfect cup of coffee out there. That’s why the 38-yearold co-owner of Benetti’s Coffee went to Panama in January (where he visited coffee farms and helped a friend’s bed and breakfast with its barista program). And it’s why he has spent six months perfecting styles — drip coffee, pour-over coffee, and cowboy coffee (a pot of grounds and water over an outdoor open flame) — for his Raytown roasting business. “The idea was to strip away every toy,” Helt says of the campfire experiment, conducted during last year’s Caffeine Crawl. “We wanted to really focus on all of the variables that we manipulate to make coffee.” Fat City asked him how coffee perfectionists might begin their own quest at home. Grind. Get a good grinder. Helt likes the Bodum Bistro, a conical burr grinder that can be had for less than $150. For the money, it’s really good. Weigh. Find a scale that measures in grams and to the hundredth of an ounce. You can get one at Harbor Freight (harborfreight .com) for $20. “You just want a digital scale with a quick response,” Helt says. Brew. At this point, you don’t even have to leave your basic auto-drip machine. You just have to get away from having a glass pot on a burner. “If you are looking for brightness or flavor clarity, go with a Chemex, a [Hario] V60 or an [Abid] Clever dripper. If you really like the body or deep complexity of coffee, you may want to move toward a French press.” Helt adds: “The interesting thing about coffee is that even when it’s perfectly sourced, perfectly roasted and excellently prepared, it still may not be your favorite cup. You just keep going until you find what you like.” Gusto Coffee Bistro in Lee’s Summit uses Benetti’s beans for espresso. Benetti’s coffee is also sold at One More Cup and can be ordered at benettiscoffee.com. — J.B.

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BY

BERR Y A NDER S ON

The Riot Room celebrates a half-decade of good times. n 2010, American Idol taped a segment with former winners in their hometowns — a peek at the humble beginnings of nowfamous pop superstars. David Cook, who won the reality-show singing competition in 2008, grew up in Blue Springs. Where around KC did Cook cut his teeth? “This is the Riot Room,” Cook says, as the camera scans the Westport venue’s circular bar. “This is one of the main local venues here in Kansas City that I actually grew up playing in. As you can see, it’s a long way from the Idol stage.” One of the club’s current owners, Tim Gutschenritter, doesn’t remember Cook playing the club. He also doesn’t remember ever E R O M running into the perfect ly coi fed si ngersongwriter during his T A INE formative years in WestONL .COM H PITC port. At the time of the broadcast, the Riot Room had been open only about three years. It’s more likely that Cook played the Hurricane, the venue that preceded the Riot Room at 4048 Broadway. The Hurricane also happens to be the place where Gutschenritter and his brother, Dallas, cut their teeth. “We were utility dudes [at the Hurricane],” Tim says of their time working for John Kelly, who also owned the Jerry’s Bait Shop party bars in Lee’s Summit and Lenexa. “We were working the door and booking shows. We packed the venue with bands we liked and made [Kelly] money.” The brothers knew the scene well, having played shows in Westport and midtown — “The Daily Grind, Grand Emporium, El Torreon, the Hurricane,” Tim says — since they were teens. But eventually the musician’s lifestyle took its toll. “I’ve quit playing music,” Tim says. “I was sleeping on dudes’ couches for 15 years. I was sick of being broke.” So in 2008, the Gutschenritters opened the Riot Room, and this weekend, the club celebrates its fi fth anniversary. In its fi rst year in business, the club successfully courted the local heavy-metal and underground hip-hop scenes. But 2010 does hold a little bit of meaning. “That was the year that shit really came together,” Tim says. Neil Smith, the club’s talent buyer, booked the Bronx, Twin Shadow, Anvil, Blitzen Trapper and Devin the Dude — up-and-coming acts that fit nicely in the club’s 300-person-capacity room. “Things just kind of slowly transformed, and we got into doing really heavy shows. But mostly, people just stayed and partied because there was such a good fuckin’ vibe,” Tim says. “We’re more refined, and we have a solid team working behind the scenes.

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LY N N C O L L I N S

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The Riot Room: timeless. Things have gotten easier. Everyone chips in. There’s a weird camaraderie among the people who work here. And basically, it’s just a fun place to work. I mean, how could it not be with all of this beer we have?” The beer definitely helps. The club has 58 taps and more than 75 bottle selections in its special reserve. Founders, Stone, Schlafly, New Belgium and Avery are all well-represented. “Beer is part of our brand,” Tim explains. “We get good beer out to different audiences.” Another secret of their success is the synergy between the local music community and clubs, which makes it easier to coordinate shows and sell tickets. “As the city grows, everyone is working with each other more. I guess that’s the whole goal of being progressive,” he says. The night we spoke with Tim Gutschenritter, the club was hosting Black Joe Lewis and the Honeybears. A sold-out crowd — made up mostly of upwardly mobile white people — packed the place. Outside, a group of three young white women were impressed by the openness of the club’s back patio. “Ooh, I’ve never been back here before,” one of them marveled. The next night, Friday, a different kind of crowd would turn up for local hip-hop from Info Gates and Godemis. On Saturday, 1990s alt-rock act Candlebox would hit the stage. “We pretty much live in the fuckin’ ’90s up in here,” Tim says, referring to the time when much of the staff, both past and present, was in its prime. But, he says, “The difference between us and everyone else is that we cater to everyone.” On Friday, the fi fth-anniversary show at the Riot Room (4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179) features Ben Kweller, Sons of Great Dane and She’s a Keeper. Tickets cost $18 in advance and $20 at the door. See theriotroom.com for more information.

E-mail berry.anderson@pitch.com

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F E B R U A R Y 2 1 - 2 7, 2 0 1 3

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23

MUSIC

RADAR

M U S I C F O R E CA S T

BY

Other shows worth seeing this week.

D AV ID HUDN A L L

T H U R S D AY, F E B R U A R Y 21 Heartscape Landbreak, Killer Bob, Ashley Tini: 10 p.m. Replay Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. North Mississippi Allstars, the London Souls: 8 p.m., $20. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. The Ruby Suns, Painted Palms, Hidden Pictures: 10 p.m., $8. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207.

F R I D AY, F E B R U A R Y 2 2 Ben Kweller, Sons of Great Dane, She's a Keeper: 7 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Mingo Fishtrap, Sarah & the Tall Boys: 8 p.m., $15. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456.

S AT U R D AY, F E B R U A R Y 2 3

Toro Y Moi (left) and Talib Kweli

Toro Y Moi

Chaz Bundick, the boy genius behind Toro Y Moi, has not yet made a true dance record, but he keeps inching closer. After smartly abandoning the cheap synth-pop sound (most often described, regrettably, as “chillwave”) of his debut, Bundick dropped some jaws with 2011’s Underneath the Pine, a dreamy, expertly produced mix of smooth funk and melodic psych. Anything in Return, released last month, has clear traces of previous Toro albums but also attempts to strike a balance between loungey downtempo cuts and 1990s house music. (On a few songs, Bundick gets all C+C Music Factory, dropping diva-house echoes into the mix.) It’s not quite the succinct artistic statement that Underneath the Pine was, but it does nothing to disrupt the notion that Bundick is one of the freshest songwriters and arrangers to emerge in recent years. Thursday, February 21, at the Granada (1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390)

slickly produced, cornball R&B rock. I’m having a hard time thinking of any right now, but I know that there are. Wednesday, February 27, at Sprint Center (1407 Grand, 816-949-7000)

Tribute to J. Dilla

Talib Kweli

Talib Kweli made his name through Black Star, his brainy, short-lived, conscious hiphop collaboration with Mos Def. Mos Def is the household name these days, but Kweli’s solo stuff has often been outstanding. (See his 2002 solo debut, Quality, which features “Get By,” one of the best rap songs of that decade.) Kweli’s set in Lawrence last year was heavy on songs from recent albums Gutter Rainbows and Eardrum. Expect similar material, plus cuts from his upcoming record, Prisoner of Conscious, which is scheduled to see the light of day in April. Friday, February 22, at the Granada (1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390)

Maroon 5

The wild success of “Moves Like Jagger” would seem to portend at least another three or four years of pop-cultural relevance for Maroon 5. It could be longer if the NBC American Idol knockoff The Voice, on which singer Adam Levine is a “coach,” keeps up its ratings. Two decades of cultural ubiquity for Maroon 5? I wouldn’t have believed it in 2003, when “Harder to Breathe” hit the charts. But I suppose there are worse sounds in the world than the Los Angeles group’s

Among fans of hip-hop and electronic music, J. Dilla has been conferred an almost saintlike status. The Detroit producer died in 2006, but the spaced-out boom-bap beats he pioneered (for acts like A Tribe Called Quest, De La Soul and Pharcyde) have influenced a new generation of rappers and beatmakers. A few will perform at this show: Les Izmore, Diverse, Lee Langston and Reach. Get there early for a preconcert talk by Kenton Rambsy, an English doctoral candidate studying African-American literature at the University of Kansas. Wednesday, February 27, at the Blue Room (1616 East 18th Street, 816-474-2929)

On the House Concert Series

Local bands, cheap drinks, free admission — that encompasses the general pitch for this new concert series, brought to you by local label Golden Sound Records. The debut show features brood rock from the Caves (whose new album, Duplexiaville, GSR recently put out as a 12-inch); jangly drones from new-ish KC-Lawrence act Oils; and a set from Cowboy Indian Bear, which releases

Mark Lowrey, Mark Southerland, Stan Kessler, Gerald Spaits and Roger Wilder are a few of the local jazz names lined up to riff on the catalog of Thelonious Monk. RecordBar closes early on Sundays, so get there before 9 p.m. if you want to catch all the sets. Sunday, February 24, at RecordBar (1020 Westport Road, 816-753-5207)

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M O N D AY, F E B R U A R Y 2 5 G-Eazy, Skizzy Mars: 7 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Maserati, Janet the Planet: 10 p.m., $10. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207.

T U E S D AY, F E B R U A R Y 2 6 Excision, Paper Diamond, Vaski: 8 p.m. The Midland, 1228 Main, 816-283-9900. Rockabilly Riot Run with Jason D. Williams, Dale Watson, Sleepy Labeef, the Rumblejetts: 7:30 p.m., $15. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. What Made Milwaukee Famous, Delta Sol Revival: 10 p.m., $7. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207.

W E D N E S D AY, F E B R U A R Y 2 7 3 Doors Down, Daughtry, Ananda: 6 p.m. Uptown Theater, 3700 Broadway, 816-753-8665. Archnemesis: The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483.

FUTURECAST Sonic Spectrum Tribute to Thelonious Monk

F O R E C A S T

24

Live Old, Die Young, its sophomore album of grand, soaring indie rock, in April. Saturday, February 23, at RecordBar (1020 Westport Road, 816-753-5207)

Samantha Fish and Damon Fowler: 8:30 p.m., $12. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Uncle Lucius, Quaker City Night Hawks, Bryant Carter Band: 8 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. UUVVWWZ, Pale Hearts, Natalie Oliver: The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483. Yo Gabba Gabba: 2 & 5 p.m. The Midland, 1228 Main, 816-283-9900.

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THURSDAY 28 Yonder Mountain String Band: Liberty Hall, Lawrence

MARCH FRIDAY 1 Avant, Bridgett Kelly: VooDoo Lounge, Harrah’s Casino LA Guns, Liberty Lush, For the Broken, Organic M, Groove Therapy: VooDoo Lounge, Harrah’s Casino Ardal O’Hanlon: Irish Museum and Cultural Center SUNDAY 3 An Acoustic Evening with Mary Chapin Carpenter and Shawn Colvin: Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts Permanent Collection: Replay Lounge, Lawrence WEDNESDAY 6 Slightly Stoopid, Tribal Seeds: Liberty Hall, Lawrence FRIDAY 8 J.B. and the Moonshine Band: The Granada, Lawrence SATURDAY 9 Alabama Shakes, Michael Kiwanuka, Sam Doores & Riley Downing: Uptown Theater Scotty McCreery: Uptown Theater Ol’ Yeller, Arthur Dodge & the Horsefeathers: Replay Lounge, Lawrence

M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X

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NIGHTLIFE

WHERE THE BEST MUSICIANS IN THE WORLD PLAY

KNUCKLEHEADS

MON: RUR AL GRIT 6 -9, KARAO SAT 2/23 KE 10PM ANTENNA S U P , D F O L L THU 2/28 ASH BULB FIRE LS ON FIRE, A LOVE EL ECTR TO DD SAT 3/2 MIKE DILLON BAIC ND CLOUSER, THU 3/7 MAN BEAR THE OUTE R CIR P FRI 3/8 ROJECT H, BORNCLE W/ MILES BON IN BABYL H ID DEN PIC SAT 3/9 ON NY, DREW BL TURES MONARCHACK AND DIRTY S OF SPEE ELECTRIC, D

F re e S h u tt le in S u rr o u n d in g A reth e a

FEBRUARY 20: Outlaw Jim 21: North Mississippi Allstars 22: Mingo Fishtrap 23: Samantha Fish & Damon Fowler 26: Dale Watson, Jason D. Williams, Sleepy LaBeef, Rumblejetts 27: Dirty River Boys 28: Tom Russell

MARCH 1: Atlantic Express

Send submissions to Berry Anderson by e-mail (berry.anderson@pitch.com), fax (816-756-0502) or phone (816-218-6775). Continuing items must be resubmitted monthly.

T H U R S D AY 21

Double T’s Roadhouse: 1421 Merriam Ln., Kansas City, Kan., 913-432-5555. Blues Jam hosted by RocknRick’s Boogie Leggin’ Blues Band, 7 p.m. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 302 S.W. Main, Lee’s Summit, 816-525-1871. Blues, Country and Classic Rock Jam with Rick Eidson and friends.

ROCK/POP/INDIE

REGGAE

Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Carson and Hopewell. Tomfooleries: 612 W. 47th St., 816-753-0555. Gov’t Cheez.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. The Samantha Fish Band, 7:30 p.m., $5. The Hideout: 6948 N. Oak Tfwy., 816-468-0550. J.D. Michael King. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Grand Marquis. Jazz: 1859 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-328-0003. Rich Berry, 6-9 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Jimmie Bratcher, 7 p.m. The Levee: 16 W. 43rd St., 816-561-2821. The Lonnie Ray Blues Band, 8 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Damon Parker, 7 p.m.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS

FEB 21: LADIES’ NIGHT (JELLO SHOTS) FEB 22: DJ SAM BLAM FEB 23: MIZZOU VS. KENTUCKY WATCH PARTY (BOURBON SPECIALS) FEB 26: GEEKS WHO DRINK TRIVIA FEB 27: CENTER OF CITY BANDS 816-561-1099 s 3740 BROADWAY KCMO

Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Deadman Flats, Tyler Gregory, Brody Buster Band, DJ Electric Theory.

DJ The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Team Bear Club’s Goomba Rave, 11 p.m., $3/$5. The Gusto Lounge: 504 Westport Rd., 816-974-8786. Think 2wice Thursdays with Brent Tactic & friends. MiniBar: 3810 Broadway, 816-326-8281. DJ Tequila Bear. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Playe, 10:30 p.m.

ACOUSTIC Lenexa Longbranch Steakhouse: 8600 Marshall Dr., Overland Park, 913-894-5334. Stovepipe and Jazzy Jazz, 7:30 p.m.

JAZZ The Kill Devil Club: 61 E. 14th St., 816-877-8312. Miles Bonny, 7 p.m. Take Five Coffee + Bar: 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park, 913948-5550. Peter Schlamb and Hermon Mehari Quartet.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS Bulldog: 1715 Main, 816-421-4799. Brodioke. Buzzard Beach: 4110 Pennsylvania, 816-753-4455. Trivia, Ladies’ Night, and DJ HoodNasty. Fatso’s Public House and Stage: 1016 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-865-4055. Electro Therapy Thursdays. Hamburger Mary’s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-842-1919. Charity Bingo, 8 p.m. Howl at the Moon: 1334 Grand, 816-471-4695. HATM’s Fifth Anniversary Party. Hurricane Allie’s Bar and Grill: 5541 Merriam Dr., Shawnee, 913-217-7665. Karaoke, 8:30 p.m. Johnny’s Tavern: 8262 Mission, Prairie Village, 913-901-0322. Bingo. Mac’s Place: 580 S. Fourth St., Edwardsville. Karaoke. Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. Karaoke, 10 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Trivia Clash, 7 p.m. The Red Balloon: 10325 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-9622330. Karaoke, 8 p.m., free. Sherlock’s Underground Coffeehouse & Pub: 858 S. 291 Hwy., Liberty, 816-429-5262. Karaoke, ladies’ night specials. Thirsty Ernie’s: 1276 W. Foxwood Dr., Raymore, 816-322-2779. Karaoke with Debbie Z, 8 p.m. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. Trivia, 9 p.m.

Bettye is an American soul singer-songwriter. Her eclectic musical style combines elements of soul, blues, rock and roll, funk & gospel.

26

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F E B R U A R Y 2 1 - 2 7, 2 0 1 3

ROCK/POP/INDIE Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. The Inwards, Standby Anchors, $5. Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. The Strive, Clairaudients, Courrier, Suite 709, 8 p.m., $5. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Mercury M OR E Mad and the Plastic Bitches, 10 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Hard@Play, 7 p.m. S G IN Replay Lounge: 946 MassachuLIST E AT N setts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. The I ONL M O Mad Kings, Das Furbender, .C PITCH 6-9 p.m.; Red Kate, Filthy 13, 10 p.m.

CLUB

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Doghouse Daddies, 9 p.m. The Hideout: 6948 N. Oak Tfwy., 816-468-0550. Lonesome Jake, 8:30 p.m. Icons Restaurant & Lounge: 1108 Grand, 816-472-4266. The Boss Kingz, 8 p.m. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Lonnie Ray Band. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Brody Buster Band, Monique Danielle & Rick Bacus.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Tyler Gregory, the Ready Brothers, 8 p.m.

DJ Beer Kitchen: 435 Westport Rd., 816-389-4180. DCal. Club Monaco: 334 E. 31st St., 816-753-5990. DJ Shaun Flo. The Gusto Lounge: 504 Westport Rd., 816-974-8786. I <3 Gusto. Hotel: 1300 Grand, 816-226-3232. Five Star Fridays with DJ Clu. Milieu: 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park. DJ Adam Bryce. The Quaff: 1010 Broadway, 816-471-1918. DJ E. Z Strike: 1370 Grand, 816-471-2316. Fabowlous Fridays with DJ Nuveau, 9 p.m.

ACOUSTIC Bar West: 7174 Renner Rd., Shawnee, 913-248-9378. Dan Brockert.

JAZZ The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. Darcus Gates. The Kill Devil Club: 61 E. 14th St., 816-877-8312. Miguel “Mambo” DeLeon, Dan Doran. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Patrick Gilbert, 5 p.m.; Stan Kessler Quartet, 7 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Lonnie McFadden, 4:30 p.m. Thai Place: 9359 W. 87th St., Overland Park, 913-649-5420. Jerry Hahn. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Attic Light, 8 p.m.

Blvd. Nights: 2805 Southwest Blvd., 816-931-6900. Good Fridays: International Party Experience, 10 p.m. Irish Museum and Cultural Center: 30 W. Pershing Rd., Ste. 700, 816-474-3848. Irish Winterfest with Flannigan’s Right Hook, 6:30-9 p.m.

Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. Free Form Free For All Open Mic with Teague Hayes, 8 p.m.

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F R I D AY 2 2

Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Hot Caution Thursdays, 10 p.m. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Jason Kayne, 9 p.m. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Derek Jones, 7 p.m.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS

816-483-1456

The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Songwriter’s Showcase with Megan Birdsall, 7:30-10:30 p.m.

WORLD

The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. Sons of Brasil.

2715 Rochester, KCMO

SINGER-SONGWRITER

EASY LISTENING

L AT I N

For more info & tickets: knuckleheadskc.com

Afrobeat: 9922 Holmes, 816-943-6333. Reggae Rockers, 10 p.m. The Levee: 16 W. 43rd St., 816-561-2821. AZ-One.

COMEDY Skylight Restaurant and Sports Bar: 1867 S.W. State Rt. 7, Blue Springs, 816-988-7958. Mike’s Comedy Club, 8 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Josh Wolf, 8 & 9:45 p.m.

COVERS

JAZZ

Jazz: 1859 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-328-0003. Valentine and the Ticklers, 7-11 p.m. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. My SoCalled Band, $5. Jerryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Ancient Chinese Secret. Jerryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bait Shop: 302 S.W. Main, Leeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Summit, 816-525-1871. The Clique. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Jeff Bergenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Elvis Show, 7 p.m., $10/$15 (reserved). Lenexa Longbranch Steakhouse: 8600 Marshall Dr., Overland Park, 913-894-5334. Loozinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Sleep, 8 p.m. The Levee: 16 W. 43rd St., 816-561-2821. The Magnetics. VooDoo Lounge: Harrahâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Casino, 1 Riverboat Dr., North Kansas City, 816-472-7777. The Zeros, $10.

The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. Dave Scott Quintet. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Joe DiFio, 5 p.m.; Bram Wijnands Trio with Barry Springer and Tommy Ruskin, 7 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Tim Whitmer & KC Express, 4:30 p.m. Take Five Coffee + Bar: 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park, 913948-5550. Greg Meise Trio.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS Club Rain: 8015 Troost, 816-361-2900. Happy hour, 5 p.m. ComedyCity at Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-842-2744. Major League Improv, 7:30 p.m. Hamburger Maryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-842-1919. Maryoke with Monique. Helenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Just Another Dive: 2002 Armour Rd., North Kansas City, 816-471-4567. Trivia Riot with Roland, 7:30 p.m. Hurricane Allieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bar and Grill: 5541 Merriam Dr., Shawnee, 913-217-7665. Karaoke, 8:30 p.m. J. Murphyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Irish Pub and Grille: 22730 Midland Dr., Shawnee, 913-825-3880. Karaoke, 9 p.m. The Red Balloon: 10325 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-9622330. Karaoke, 8 p.m., free.

EASY LISTENING RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. The Depth and the Whisper, Orthan Anderthan, Til Willis, 10 p.m. Take Five Coffee + Bar: 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park, 913948-5550. Megan Birdsall.

VA R I E T Y Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-832-1085. Radkey, the Hips, Approach, Y(our) Fri(end), 9 p.m.

S AT U R D AY 2 3 ROCK/POP/INDIE The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Antennas Up, Dolls on Fire, Flash Bulb Fire. Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Cavern Club. Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. Jorge Arana Trio, Doing What Apes Canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t, 10 p.m. Daveyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Steady States, Gospel Hands, the Zoids, 9 p.m., $6. Double Tâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Roadhouse: 1421 Merriam Ln., Kansas City, Kan., 913-432-5555. Echo Creek, 9 p.m. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Plains, Aotearoa. The Levee: 16 W. 43rd St., 816-561-2821. Camp Harlow, 5 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Vomit Assault, Melting Point of Bronze, 10 p.m.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Mama Rayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jazz -Meets-Blues Jam, 2-5:30 p.m.; D.C. Bellamy, 9 p.m. The Hideout: 6948 N. Oak Tfwy., 816-468-0550. Allied Saints. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Lonesome Hank and the Heartaches, 7 p.m. Lenexa Longbranch Steakhouse: 8600 Marshall Dr., Overland Park, 913-894-5334. Bobby Smith Blues Band, 8 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Janet Jameson, 9 p.m. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Danny McGaw Band, 9 p.m.

DJ Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Corduroy Mavericks, Jason Kidd, Amjanda, Budded, 9 p.m. The Gusto Lounge: 504 Westport Rd., 816-974-8786. Superb! Bass Party with Brent Tactic, NMEZEE, DJ B-Stee & DJ Archi. Hotel: 1300 Grand, 816-226-3232. Suite Saturdays with DJ Eric Coomes. Jerryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. DJ Jim Bob. Johnnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tavern: 6765 W. 119th St., Leawood, 913-451-4542. DJ Dave Step, 9 p.m. Milieu: 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park. DJ Mike Scott. MiniBar: 3810 Broadway, 816-326-8281. DJ Rico. The Quaff: 1010 Broadway, 816-471-1918. DJ Chris.

ACOUSTIC The Levee: 16 W. 43rd St., 816-561-2821. Drew6, 10 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. City Music with M-Bird, 8 p.m.

COMEDY Missie Bâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. Dirty Dorothy, 10 p.m. Stanfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Josh Wolf, 8 & 9:45 p.m.

COVERS The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Wolfmanz Bros. playing the music of Phish, Miss Conceptionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Saraswati, Scotty and Damon Duo.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS

AVANT

March 1, 2013

ComedyCity at Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-842-2744. Major League Improv, 7:30 p.m. Hamburger Maryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-842-1919. Charity Bingo, 5 p.m.; Maryoke, 9 p.m. Hurricane Allieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bar and Grill: 5541 Merriam Dr., Shawnee, 913-217-7665. Karaoke, 8:30 p.m. The Red Balloon: 10325 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-9622330. Karaoke, 8 p.m., free. Wallabyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Grill and Pub: 9562 Lackman, Lenexa, 913-5419255. Karaoke, 9 p.m. Westport Coffee House: 4010 Pennsylvania, 816-756-3222. The Kick Comedy Theatre: the Kick-Off Improv Comedy Show, 8-9:30 p.m. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. Live karaoke with Separated at Birth.

GARBAGE

April 10, 2013

EASY LISTENING Johnnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tavern: 8262 Mission, Prairie Village, 913-901-0322. Jason Kayne, 10 p.m. Walshâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Corner Cocktails: 304 W. 85th St., 816-361-7099. John Morris, Eddie Delahunt, Gabe Reyes, 8 p.m.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Coyote Bill open jam, 5:30 p.m. Sherlockâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Underground Coffeehouse & Pub: 858 S. 291 Hwy., Liberty, 816-429-5262. Open Blues Jam with Earl Baker, 4 p.m.

DAVID ALLAN COE April 11, 2013

S U N D AY 2 4 ROCK/POP/INDIE The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. A Lyon Project, Last Nightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Regret, Band 13, Years Past, 9 Volt Junkie, Sean Thibodeaux, 6 p.m.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Lee McBee and the Confessors, 6-9 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Myra Taylorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Birthday Jam, 2-7 p.m.

STEPHEN LYNCH April 13, 2013

DJ Hamburger Maryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-842-1919. Bad Music Sundays with Brett Dietrich, 3:30 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. DJ G-Train on the patio.

ACOUSTIC Tomfooleries: 612 W. 47th St., 816-753-0555. Phil and Gary, 9 p.m.

JAZZ Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Les Mengel Duo, 5-9 p.m. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Rich Hillâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s jazz brunch, 11 a.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Sonic Spectrum tribute to Thelonious Monk, 8 p.m.

UPCOMING SHOWS: 2/22 2/23

3/2

VooDoo Presents: The Zeros DJ Ataxic and DJ Bobby Keys

3/3

1-800-745-3000

KC Salsa Presents: Sexy Saturdays Kilroy Presents: LA Guns

s 6OO$OO+#COM

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS Clarette Club: 5400 Martway, Mission, 913-384-0986. Texas Hold â&#x20AC;&#x2122;em. DiCarloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mustard Seed Mexican-Americana Restaurant & Bar: 15015 E. U.S. Hwy. 40, 816-373-4240. Karaoke. The Fox and Hound: 10428 Metcalf, Overland Park, 913-6491700. Poker, 7 & 10 p.m. Frank James Saloon: 10919 N.W. Hwy. 45, Parkville, 816-5050800. Karaoke, 6-10 p.m.

Know When To Stop Before You Start.Ž Gambling Problem? Call 1-888-BETSOFF. Subject to change or cancellation. Phone and online orders are subject to service fees. Must be 21 years or older to gamble, obtain a Total Rewards Ž card or enter VooDoo Ž. Š2013, Caesars License Company, LLC.

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F E B R U A R Y 2 1 - 2 7, 2 0 1 3

THE PITCH

27

We Deliver!

FRANK JAMES

SALOON

Lunch Buffet, Salad Bar Daily Food & Drink Specials Bloody Mary Bar & Breakfast Pizza Buffet Sundays 11am - 2pm .DUDRNH6XQGD\V‡+DSS\+RXU

2/22 KNOCK KNEED SALLY 3/1 SCOTTYBOY DANIEL BLUES BAND

1:+Z\ (3.5 mi west of I-29)

CHECK FACEBOOK FOR UPDATES

Parkville, MO 816-505-0800

Hamburger Mary’s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-842-1919. Mary’s Drag Brunch, 11 a.m. Hurricane Allie’s Bar and Grill: 5541 Merriam Dr., Shawnee, 913-217-7665. Karaoke, 8:30 p.m. Johnny’s Tavern - Lawrence: 410 N. Second St., Lawrence, 785-842-0377. Poker. Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. Dirty Dorothy, 10 p.m., on the main floor; karaoke, 10 p.m. The Red Balloon: 10325 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-9622330. Karaoke, 8 p.m., free. Wallaby’s Grill and Pub: 9562 Lackman, Lenexa, 913-5419255. Texas Hold ’em, 6 & 9 p.m. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. Texas Hold ’em, 3 & 6 p.m.

EASY LISTENING Johnny’s Tavern: 13410 W. 62nd Terr., Shawnee, 913-9625777. Chill with Phil.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Groove Station: 9916 Holmes, 816-942-1000. KC Blues Jam with Crosseyed Cat, Sundays, 2-6 p.m. The Hideout: 6948 N. Oak Tfwy., 816468-0550. Open blues jam, 7 p.m. M OR E Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Open Jam with Levee Town, 2-7 p.m., GS IN T free. LIS E AT The Majestic Restaurant: 931 N I L ON M Broadway, 816-221-1888. Mark PITCH.CO Lowrey jazz jam, 5 p.m. R.G.’s Lounge: 9100 E. 35th St., Independence, 816-358-5777. Jam Night hosted by Dennis Nickell, Scotty Yates, Rick Eidson, and Jan Lamb, 5 p.m.

CLUB

Bar  &  Grill KI@M@8ÚKL<J;8PJÚÜÚB8I8FB<Ú<M<IPÚ=I@;8PچڣÚ:C

LIVE MUSIC: Feb 23: Shades of Gray Mar 2: 71 South Mar 9: Retro Active Mar16: Big Jimmy & the Twins

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SINGER-SONGWRITER Ernie Biggs Dueling Piano Bar: 4115 Mill, 816-561-2444. Singer-Songwriter Sundays.

M O N D AY 2 5 ROCK/POP/INDIE Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Aerodyne Flex, Umber, Autumn of Apologies, Damned by the Pope, 6 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Aotearoa, Yam, Desodean, 8 p.m. Tomfooleries: 612 W. 47th St., 816-753-0555. The Goods.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS Barnyard Beer: 925 Iowa, Lawrence, 785-393-9696. Mudstomp Mondays. The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Rural Grit Happy Hour, 6 p.m.

DJ Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Victory Lane service industry night, 10 p.m.

1515 WESTPORKÚI;ÚÜÚ816-931-9417

JAZZ Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Jazzbo. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Mark Lowrey Trio, 6 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Millie Edwards and friends, 7 p.m.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS :,),12:AVAILABLE!

&+(&.2877+(1(:$//'AY HAPPY HOUR

$4.95 DAILY LUNCH SPECIAL6‡1,*+7LY DINNER & DRINK SPECIALS

28

THE PITCH

F E B R U A R Y 2 1 - 2 7, 2 0 1 3

The All-Star Rock Bar: 7210 N.E. 43rd St., 816-452-2660. Monday Mancave: sports, drink and food specials. The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Karaoke with Kelly Bleachmaxx, 10:30 p.m., free. Bulldog: 1715 Main, 816-421-4799. Trivia, service industry night. Clarette Club: 5400 Martway, Mission, 913-384-0986. Texas Hold ’em. DiCarlo’s Mustard Seed Mexican-Americana Restaurant & Bar: 15015 E. U.S. Hwy. 40, 816-373-4240. Karaoke. Green Room Burgers & Beer: 4010 Pennsylvania, Ste. D, 816-216-7682. Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz. Hamburger Mary’s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-842-1919. Maryoke, 8 p.m. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Karaoke Idol with Tanya McNaughty. Nara: 1617 Main, 816-221-6272. Brodioke. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Sonic Spectrum Music Trivia, 7 p.m., $5. The Red Balloon: 10325 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-9622330. Karaoke, 8 p.m., free. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-7497676. Sam Club Karaoke with Scary Manilow, 10 p.m. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. Texas Hold ’em, 8 p.m.

The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Jonny Green and Jake Stanton open mic and jam session, 8 p.m.; comedy open mic, 10 p.m.

T U E S D AY 2 6 ROCK/POP/INDIE Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785832-1085. Hotel Coffee, Luke Pierce Project, Stric 9, 8 p.m. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 302 S.W. Main, Lee’s Summit, 816-525-1871. Jim Kilroy’s Metal Wars. Tomfooleries: 612 W. 47th St., 816-753-0555. The Transients, 9 p.m.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Hudspeth and Shinetop, 7-10 p.m. Jazz: 1859 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-328-0003. Dan Bliss, 6-9 p.m. Slow Ride Roadhouse: 1350 N. Third St., Lawrence, 785-7492727. Lonnie Ray Blues Band.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Elkheart’s Downtown Outlaw Fiasco, 7 p.m., free.

DJ The Gusto Lounge: 504 Westport Rd., 816-974-8786. Bring It Back Tuesdays with DJ G-Train & DJ Tip, 10 p.m., no cover.

JAZZ The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Hermon Mehari Trio, 6 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Open Jam with Everette DeVan, 7 p.m.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS Bleachers Bar & Grill: 210 S.W. Greenwich Dr., Lee’s Summit, 816-623-3410. Texas Hold ’em, 7 & 9:15 p.m. The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Bingo. Bulldog: 1715 Main, 816-421-4799. Double feature movie night. Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. Team Trivia with Teague Hayes, 7 p.m., $5 buy-in. Double Nickel Bar: 189 S. Rogers, Ste. 1614, Olathe, 913-3900363. Poker night. The Drop: 409 E. 31st St., 816-756-3767. Brodioke, 9:30 p.m. Dukes: 1501 Grand, 816-527-0122. Beer pong tournaments, 9 p.m. Flying Saucer: 101 E. 13th St., 816-221-1900. Trivia Bowl, 7:30 & 10 p.m., free. Hamburger Mary’s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-842-1919. Trivia Slugfest, 7 p.m. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Karaoke. Johnny’s Tavern: 13410 W. 62nd Terr., Shawnee, 913-962-5777. Bingo. Johnny’s Tavern: 11316 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-8515165. Texas Hold ’em, 7 & 9 p.m. MiniBar: 3810 Broadway, 816-326-8281. Robert Moore’s Name That Tune, 7 p.m., $5 entry fee. Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. Gayme Night upstairs, 7:30-10 p.m.; Karaoke, 10 p.m. The Red Balloon: 10325 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-9622330. Karaoke, 8 p.m., free. The Roxy: 7230 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-236-6211. Karaoke. Saints Pub + Patio: 9720 Quivira, Lenexa, 913-492-3900. Karaoke, 9 p.m. Tower Tavern: 401 E. 31st St., 816-931-9300. Trivia, 8 p.m. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. Chess Club, 7 p.m.

EASY LISTENING Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Garrett Nordstrom Situation. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Rock, Paper, Scissors, 6 p.m., free.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS The Hideout: 6948 N. Oak Tfwy., 816-468-0550. Tele-Tuesday open country jam with Outlaw Jim, 7 p.m. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Dave Hays Band Open Jam. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Open Mic Night.

SINGER-SONGWRITER The All-Star Rock Bar: 7210 N.E. 43rd St., 816-452-2660. Scott Ford Songwriter Showcase, 7 p.m.

W E D N E S D AY 2 7

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS

ROCK/POP/INDIE

Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Songwriter’s Scene Open Mic with Jon Theobald, 7 p.m.

Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Rev Gusto, the Shy Boys, She’s a Keeper, 9 p.m.

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RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Bob Walkenhorst, 7 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Ask An Adult, Real Sugar, 10 p.m. Tomfooleries: 612 W. 47th St., 816-753-0555. The Mickey Finn Band, 9 p.m.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Shinetop Jr., 7-9 p.m. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Billy Ebeling. Jazz: 1859 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-328-0003. Salty Dawg, 6-9 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Carl Butler’s Gospel Lounge with Dan Doran, 7:30 p.m., $5. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Damon Parker, 7 p.m.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. The Dirty River Boys, 8 p.m., $8.

DJ Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. DJ Robert Moore, 9 p.m. The Gusto Lounge: 504 Westport Rd., 816-974-8786. Cream with KC/DC. The Union of Westport: 421 Westport Rd. Random Play Wednesday.

HIP-HOP John’s Big Deck: 928 Wyandotte, 816-572-9595. Hip-Hop and Hot Wings, 8 p.m., no cover.

JAZZ Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Max Groove Trio, 6 p.m. The Kill Devil Club: 61 E. 14th St., 816-877-8312. Bram Wijnands, 7 p.m. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Paul Shinn Trio, 6 p.m.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS The All-Star Rock Bar: 7210 N.E. 43rd St., 816-452-2660. Karaoke. The Blue Line: 529 Walnut, 816-472-7825. Karaoke. Danny’s Bar and Grill: 13350 College Blvd., Lenexa, 913-3459717. Trivia and karaoke with DJ Smooth, 8 p.m. 403 Club: 403 N. Fifth St., 913-499-8392. Pinball tournament, 8:30 p.m., $5 entry fee. Hamburger Mary’s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-842-1919. Charity Bingo, 8 p.m. Hurricane Allie’s Bar and Grill: 5541 Merriam Dr., Shawnee, 913-217-7665. Bike night; Karaoke, 8:30 p.m. J. Murphy’s Irish Pub and Grille: 22730 Midland Dr., Shawnee, 913-825-3880. Karaoke, 9 p.m. Jake’s Place Bar and Grill: 12001 Johnson Dr., Shawnee, 913962-5253. Karaoke. Johnny’s Tavern: 10384 S. Ridgeview, Olathe, 913-378-0744. Trivia, 7:30 p.m. Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. Dirty Dorothy, 10 p.m. The Quaff: 1010 Broadway, 816-471-1918. Karaoke. Qudos Cigar & Cognac Bar: 1116 Grand, 816-474-2270. Red Cup Wednesdays, 5-8 p.m. The Red Balloon: 10325 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-9622330. Karaoke, 8 p.m., free. Retro Downtown Drinks & Dance: 1518 McGee, 816-4214201. Karaoke with DJ Jason, 8 p.m. The Roxy: 7230 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-236-6211. Karaoke. Sherlock’s Underground Coffeehouse & Pub: 858 S. 291 Hwy., Liberty, 816-429-5262. Open mic. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. Trivia, 8 p.m.

EASY LISTENING Fuel: 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park, 913-451-0444. Colby & Mole. Nara: 1617 Main, 816-221-6272. Ladies’ Night with Matt Shoaf. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Brandon Miller, 7 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Five Guys Named Moe, 10 p.m.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Acoustic Open Mic with host Tyler Gregory. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Jam Night, 9 p.m. Tonahill’s 3 of a Kind: 11703 E. 23rd St., Independence, 816833-5021. Blues, country and classic rock hosted by Rick Eidson and friends. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Poetic Underground.

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MONTH

PRESENTED BY

RUNS EVERY SATURDAY NIGHT

Angels Rock Bar No Cover on Friday

Drunken Fish Brooksider Sports Bar & Grill Late Night Happy Hour-10pm to $2.50 Corona Bottles Close Charlie Hooper's Bar & Grille Fridays- $1 Off Boulevard DRAFTS on Friday, Saturdays $1 off Domestic Bottles

Howl At The Moon 2 for 1 cover Indie On Main

Michael Forbes Grille Reverse Happy 930pm-1am. 2 for 1 Wells $3 Margaritas

Makerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mark Bourbon House & Lounge $5 Maker's Mark Cocktails

Martini Corner Haus $3 Radaberger Pilsner & Agris-Pinot Gris Sol Cantina $4 Trolley Margaritas & $2.75 Pacifico Bottle The Drop $5 Specialty Martinis & Cocktails Tower Tavern $3.50 Wells and $10 Pizza 7pm-12am Velvet DOG $1 off all Skyy Drinks Monaco No Cover

$3 Domestics with wristband!

McFadden's Sport's Saloon $4 UV Flavors Cocktails Mosaic Lounge No Cover Before 11pm PBR Big Sky Bar $5 Jack Danielâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Drinks Pizza Bar $3 Boulevard Wheat Pints Shark Bar $4 Malibu Cocktails Tengo Sed Cantina $3 El Jimador Margarita The Dubliner

$3.50 Boulevard Wheat on Fridays and Free cover with Wrist Band

Downtown Anthony's

POWER & LIGHT DISTRICT

2 for 1 Any Item from Late Night Menu with Purchase of Two Beverages

John's Big Deck (Upper) Dave's Stagecoach Inn $3 Wells $4 Bombs and No Cover $3 Jameson Shots and $2 16oz Cans of PBR Ernie Biggs Dueling Piano Bar River Market CafĂŠ Al Dente 2 for 1 cover $3 Mascot Shots, Buy One Fidelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cigar Shop The Only Cigar Shop on the Strip. 10% Appetizer get Second of Equal or Off Purchase of Cigars Lesser Value at 1/2 Price Firefly Hickok's $4 Wells, No Cover All Night with $5 Mojito $6 Black Margaritas $3 Draws and Free Queso with 2 Food Wristband Green Room Burgers and Beer Purchases, $3 House Margaritas Free Fry with Purchase of an EntrĂŠe Minsky's Pizza $1 off Apps $2.50 Domestic Draws $3 Gusto $2 Yard Beers and $5 Grape Bombs Wells $12 Bucket of Beers and 50 Cents off Martinis Harpo's Restaurant Bar The Blue Line $2 Selected Shots $2 Blue Line Beers $2 Blue Line Jersey Dog, Hot Dog Cart Shots $3 Wells 2 Jumbo Dogs for $5 and $1 Off Winslow's BBQ Any Sandwich $5 off Lunch or Dinner for Two Jerusalem Cafe $5 off Hooka Waldo Joe's Pizza Buy the Slice 75th Street Brewery 2 Slices for $5 $3.00 Wells & BombsBobby Baker's Lounge Kelly's Westport Inn $2 Domestic Bottles & $3 Rock Lobster Shots $1 off Cover Lew's Grill & Bar McCoy's Public House $2.50 Bud Light Draws $4.00 McCoy's Pints Quinton's Missie B's $3 Domestic Draws $3 Wells and a Free Cover Complimentary Shot with wristband! Remedy Food + Drink Riot Room $5 Jameson $3 Wells after Midnight 20% off including beer, wine, & liquor Tanner's Bar and Grill Tea Drops $1.00 Off a Cupcake or Regular Tea $2.50 Budlight 16 oz. Draws

Z-Strike Bowling 2 for 1 games, No cover on Fridays The Foundry $4.00 McCoy's Pints

RIVER MARKET DOWNTOWN

The Well Bar-Grill and Rooftop

Free Spinach Dip w/any Purchase

18th & VINE

S

lvd st B hwe out

W 31 St

E 18 St

E 19 St

E 31 St

MARTINI CORNER Rd ort stp We

The Paseo

P&L

$2 Wells and Drafts, $5 Smirnoff Bombs, $2 Canned Beers To Go, $2 domestic draws $12 Power Hours 8pm-10pm Fri & Sat

5 St

Westport Cafe and Bar Shot and a Beer for $5 Westport Coffee House 15% Off Any Coffee Drink

Main St

Brookside

Fri - Sat 9pm-Close $2.50 Domestic Draws $2.75 Wells $4.50 Cuervo Margaritas

TROLLEY STOPS

Any Specialty Pizza for $10 & 2 Slices for $4

WESTPORT

Brush Creek Blvd

E 63 ST

PLAZA de Blvd

Uptown Arts Bar Buy One Get One Free Wine or Mixed Drinks (Except Premiums)

Westport

Torre's Pizzeria

Br oo ks

36th & Broadway

Figlio $5 off Any Purchase 7-10pm O'Dowds Free Cover & $5 Boru Irish Vodka Tomfooleries

Westport

Beer Kitchen Late Night Happy Hour Friday & Saturday 11pm-1am Buzzard Beach $1.25 Domestic Drafts $2.50 Wells Californos $5 off $12 purchase Dark Horse

Wyandotte

Danny's Big Easy Get Your Wristbands here!

Plaza

Wornall Rd

18th & Vine

i

E 63 ST

BROOKSIDER WALDO E 75TH

Where do I catch the trolley?

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29

S AVA G E L O V E

WEDDING PARTY A

Dear Dan: My boyfriend and I are talking

Dear Dan: I’m a 31-year-old genderqueer in

Thank You So Much Dear TYSM: Number one answer: If your sis-

ter didn’t check with anyone — not members of her immediate family, not members of her bridal party — about potential conflicts, then your sister should’ve anticipated that some of the folks wouldn’t be able to attend. Folks who aren’t getting married have lives and commitments of their own, which means they can have conf licts, and your sister could’ve worked around those confl icts if she had cared to ask about them. But she didn’t care to ask because she seems to be one of those brides-to-be who thinks an engagement ring on her fi nger puts her ass at the center of the universe. Here’s hoping 30

THE PITCH

F E B R U A R Y 2 1 - 2 7, 2 0 1 3

pitch.com

D A N S AVA G E

cally viable, there isn’t enough demand for naked men to make gay strip clubs economically viable. (And people have tried.) There is, however, a great gay strip club in Portland, Oregon, called Silverado. If gay strippers are a must, plan a road trip as well as a bachelor party.

PROGRAMMING NOTE: I hosted a live taping of the Savage Lovecast in Seattle on Valentine’s Day, and it went great, thanks to all who came (especially to the five boys who left with butt plugs in their butts). But I made the mistake of having a drink or five afterward, and I’m so hungover right now that I shouldn’t be sitting upright, much less giving advice. But deadlines are deadlines. So here we go …

Brooklyn with a large family on Long Island. My only sister got engaged 48 hours ago, and she’s moving fast on planning the wedding. I have two questions. Number one question: I texted my sister the only date I wasn’t available in the next two years, which is Columbus Day weekend 2013. I have my 10-year college reunion, which I’ve been organizing. My sister texted me back that they picked this Columbus Day weekend for the wedding even though they have no idea if the places they want will be booked up. It quickly came out that they didn’t check with anyone about potential conflicts. She wants me to be the maid of honor, and I’m not sure what to do. She’s really upset with me. Columbus Day weekend is of no significance to them (it’s not the anniversary of the date they met or anything), and I can’t reschedule the reunion. Number two question: I was born female but do not identify that way. I’m genderqueer and do not look like a girl. I have not worn a dress in 10 years and feel like I’m in drag in one. In the past, my sister said she would consider putting me in a pantsuit-ish kind of thing at her wedding, which would be great, but I’m worried that now I’m rocking the boat too much with this Columbus Day thing, and I don’t know if I should just leave it alone. My girlfriend, who is very pretty and feminine, said if I had to wear a dress, she’d go in a suit and bow tie. Dan, help! If, for some reason, my sister can’t get her weekend, it will be because they’re rushing and everything is booked, but I have already caused trouble! Is it worth it to fi ght for the pantsuit thing, or should I just leave it alone and do what she wants?

BY

your sister can’t get the venue she wants and has to reschedule. If that doesn’t happen, tell your sister you’ll be with her in spirit and send a gift. Number two answer: The fact that your sister has been engaged for 48 hours and is already furious with her elected maid of honor is a bad sign. You’ll be doing yourself, both families and your sister a service if you stand up to her now. A little pushback now will either prevent your sister from going Bridezilla or get you dropped from the wedding party. You literally can’t lose. So tell your sister now that you’re delighted to be her maid of honor, if scheduling allows, and that you look forward to shopping for a pantsuit that matches her dress and the dresses of her bridal party. If she tells you that you have to wear a dress to be her maid of honor, then it’s clear that the dress is more important to your sister than the person wearing it, and you should tell her to fi nd someone else to model it at her wedding.

Dear Dan: A gay friend of mine is getting mar-

ried in Seattle, and we’re hoping to throw him a most excellent bachelor party. However, as a straight dude, I’m fairly clueless about gay strip clubs in the Seattle area. Can you please recommend one or two good ones?

Straight Best Man Dear SBM: There are no gay strip clubs in

Seattle, I’m sorry to say. You can blame the Washington State Liquor Control Board for that sad fact. Adults in Seattle can look at naked people or they can have a drink, but they can’t have a drink while looking at naked people. While there’s enough demand for naked women in Seattle to make nonbooze-servin’ straight strip clubs economi-

about getting married, and I am incredibly excited about marrying this awesome dude. My problem is that my ideal engagement ring is something that looks nice but is cheap. Seriously, a $50 ring would be perfect. I don’t want something expensive because (A) it’ll make me paranoid about losing it or having it stolen, and (B) I’d rather use the money for something else, like a house. However, my guy wants to spend about a grand on an engagement-wedding ring set. Given his income, this is far from an outrageous expense, but I’d still rather have my $50 cubic zirconia. I’ve talked with him about this, and we joke about how the stereotypical roles are reversed here, with my being the one who wants to go cheap and his wanting something more. But he’s holding fast. Any ideas how I might be able to get my way and make him see that he’s my prize, not the jewelry?

Not a Ring Girl Dear NARG: The difference between the

engagement ring you’d prefer and the ring set your fiancé wants to buy — $950 — ain’t nothin’, but it’s not enough to buy a house. I could see digging in your heels if your fiancé wanted to spend 20 grand on a ring, as that kind of money would go a long way toward a down payment. I could see going to war if he was planning to go into debt to buy you a rock. But learning to pick your battles is the secret to a happy, successful marriage, and the difference between a $50 ring and a far-from-outrageous $1,000 ring set isn’t worth fighting about. You want to make him see that he’s your prize? Let him have his way on this.

Dear Dan: My brother and his new wife had

a three-way with a male hotel receptionist while on their honeymoon. I don’t have a problem with three-ways in theory, but I think it’s wrong to have one on your honeymoon. I was their best man. What am I supposed to do now?

Disgusted Big Bro Dear DBB: You’re supposed to shut the fuck up and mind your own business — now and always.

Find the Savage Lovecast (my weekly podcast) every Tuesday at thestranger.com/ savage.

Have a question for Dan Savage? E-mail him at mail@savagelove.net pitch.com

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The Pitch: February 21, 2013