Issuu on Google+

AUGUST 8–14, 2013 | FREE | VOL. 33 NO. 6 | PITCH.COM

OFFICER ———(gay)———

FRIENDLY KCPD officer Rebecca Caster aims to build a department relationship with the LGBT community. —————————— BY B E N PA LO S A A R I


2

the pitch

august 8 -14, 2013

pitch.com


S

p

t

Y

11—

Z

AuGutsht

Y

This sunday!

RD

A

Get your discounted tickets in advance at ticketmaster.com

Y

Z

6—vip! PM

7d—oors PM

&ga

fo r s : t ticke l

cal 665 53.8 816.7 master t m ticke .c o

HoStEd BY: erIC “MEaN” MELIN 3700 Broadway at: Suite 300 KcMO 64111

S-—--———————— chERokee r0ck rifle | g a d marq is | the conquerors pe f rma c s by -———----S---—————————-—---------------r o

n e

r n

u

pitch.com

august 8 -14, 2013

the pitch

3


A U G U S T 8 –1 4 , 2 0 1 3 | V O L . 3 3 N O . 6 E D I T O R I A L

Editor Scott Wilson Managing Editor Justin Kendall Music Editor David Hudnall Staff Writers Charles Ferruzza, Ben Palosaari, Steve Vockrodt Editorial Operations Manager Deborah Hirsch Events Editor Berry Anderson Proofreader Brent Shepherd Contributing Writers Tracy Abeln, Danny Alexander, Jonathan Bender, Liz Cook, Adrianne DeWeese, April Fleming, Nancy Hull Rigdon, Leslie Kinsman, Larry Kopitnik, Angela Lutz, Dan Lybarger, Dan Savage, Lucas Wetzel

R ULE BR EAK ER S Outlaw motorcycle clubs stake their claims within KC’s 100-mile territory. B Y J U S T I N K E N DA L L

7

A R T

Art Director Ashford Stamper Contributing Photographers Angela C. Bond, Barrett Emke, Chris Mullins, Lauren Phillips, Sabrina Staires, Brooke Vandever Intern Tessa Canon

O FFI CER (GAY ) FR I ENDLY

P R O D U C T I O N

Production Manager Christina Riddle Multimedia Designer Vu Radley

A D V E R T I S I N G

Sales Manager Erin Carey Senior Classified Multimedia Specialist Steven Suarez Multimedia Specialists Michelle Acevedo, Collin Click, Sharon Donat, Page Olson, Brooke Swenson Director of Marketing & Operations Jason Dockery Digital Marketing Manager Keli Sweetland

C I R C U L A T I O N

Circulation Director Mike Ryan

B U S I N E S S

Accounts Receivable Jodi Waldsmith Publisher Joel Hornbostel

S O U T H C O M M

Chief Executive Officer Chris Ferrell Chief Financial Officer Patrick Min Chief Marketing Officer Susan Torregrossa Chief Technology Officer Matt Locke Business Manager Eric Norwood Director of Digital Sales & Marketing David Walker Controller Todd Patton Creative Director Heather Pierce Director of Content/Online Development Patrick Rains

N A T I O N A L

KCPD officer Rebecca Caster aims to build a department relationship with the LGBT community. B Y B E N PA L O S A A R I

A D V E R T I S I N G

9

VMG Advertising 888-278-9866, vmgadvertising.com Senior Vice President of Sales Susan Belair Senior Vice President of Sales Operations Joe Larkin

D I S T R I B U T I O N

X X LI BER T Y

The Pitch distributes 45,000 copies a week and is available free throughout Greater Kansas City, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for $5 each, payable at The Pitch’s office in advance. The Pitch may be distributed only by The Pitch’s authorized independent contractors or authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of The Pitch, take more than one copy of each week’s issue. Mail subscriptions: $22.50 for six months or $45 per year, payable in advance. Application to mail at second-class postage rates is pending at Kansas City, MO 64108.

Conrad’s supersizes the suburban everybar. BY CHARLES FERRUZZ A

21

C O P Y R I G H T

The contents of The Pitch are Copyright 2013 by KC Communications, LLC. No portion may be reproduced in whole or in part by any means without the express written permission of the publisher.

DO YOU WANT TO

BUY LOCAL

The Pitch address: 1701 Main, Kansas City, MO 64108 For information or to leave a story tip, call: 816-561-6061 Editorial fax: 816-756-0502 For classifieds, call: 816-218-6759 For retail advertising, call: 816-218-6702

FOR HALF OFF?

ON T HE C OVE R

WELL ,

NOW YOU CAN!

5 7 9 13 16 17 19 21 22 26 32 34

QUESTIONNAIRE NEWS FEATURE F I LT E R ART SHOP GIRL FILM CAFÉ FAT CITY MUSIC NIGHTLIFE SAVAGE LOVE

MEANW H I LE AT PI TCH .CO M

.com ILLUSTRATION BY BRIAN STAUFFER

4

the pitch

august 8 -14, 2013

pitch.com

pitch.com

Dark Horse Tavern in Westport has closed. Cronuts: Make your own, the really lazy way. Smokin’ Fresh Streetside BBQ will sell you the whole barnyard.

M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X

THE PITCH

2


QUESTIONNAIRE

ERIC MELIN

Marketing manager, film critic, drummer

SUBURBAN

BLISS?

Occupations: Social-media marketing manager, Spiral16; film critic, Scene-Stealers.com, KCTV Channel 5, Lawrence Journal-World; drummer, the Dead Girls Hometown: Olathe

THE POLITICAL CARTOONS OF

BOB BLISS

Current neighborhood: Lawrence

Exhibit on display until August 31st at the Johnson County Museum

What I do (in 140 characters): Create and curate great content in the social-media, movie and rock-and-roll arenas. Enjoy life with my wonderful friends and family.

Shawnee Mission Parkway & Lackman Road Shawnee, KS 66217 (913) 715 – 2550 jocomuseum.com

What’s your addiction? Movies and rock ’n’ roll,

What’s your drink? Beer. Right now, I think Boulevard’s Tank 7 might be the best thing I’ve ever tasted, but when I drink cheap (usually at a show), it’s High Life or PBR.

Where’s dinner? Any Mexican joint with

unlimited chips, bean/cheese dip and Negra Modelo with a lime. So pretty much any Mexican restaurant.

What’s on your KC postcard? A collage of the couple hundred or so truly great original records made by area bands in the last 20 years. This town seriously undervalues its original musical talent. Finish this sentence: “Kansas City got it right when …” It remodeled and added the classy,

mo t

S A B R I N A S TA I R E S

What’s your game? U.S. Air Guitar: a competitive sport/performance-art form that appeals to all sides of my personality and sense of humor, plus the committed community of nerdy rockers who support and participate in it each year.

parking? Also neglected but rising, thanks to new management: Screenland Armour. Great guys with vision. Support specialty houses and original programming or they’ll disappear. You’ll never run out of places to see Grown Ups 2, you know.

My sidekick? Nick Colby/Peter “Stiff ” Dickens,

“Kansas City needs …” To go out more.

prom date in the face doing an Axl Rose dance. True story. #tragedy

“In five years, I’ll be …” Hosting a game show. “I always laugh at …” Mr. Show With Bob and

David, the most inventive, absurd and consistently funny sketch-comedy show since Monty Python.

“I’ve been known to binge-watch …” Freaks

and Geeks.

“I can’t stop listening to …” Erik Voeks’ new EP, Finulu, and Mikal Cronin’s MCII.

high-tech Mainstreet theater (first AMC, now Alamo Drafthouse) to its neon-lit, Mall of America–style downtown.

“I just read …” Nightmare Town, a collection of short stories from Dashiell Hammett, the master of pulp-noir fiction.

“Kansas City screwed up when …” It got lazy and decided parking was too much of a hassle to support it. Seriously, people. We have an amazing, community-centric theater with great programming, tons of special events, a full bar/menu and insanely delicious gourmet feasts, and you’re worried about paying $2 for

The best advice I ever got: “Wherever you

go, there you are.” — Peter Weller, in The Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai: Across the 8th Dimension.

Worst advice? “Call your album Open Up and

Say Awesome.”

my partner-in-crime/manager/trainer for U.S. Air Guitar and bass player for the past 16 years in Ultimate Fakebook and the Dead Girls.

My dating triumph/tragedy? I elbowed my

e ic

Q&As

nsas cit Ka ycle s y er rc o

v

baby. Cross them both and I’m over the moon. Seriously, can anything beat This Is Spinal Tap, Almost Famous or Kiss Meets AT E N I ONL .COM the Phantom of the Park PITCH for sheer awesomeness in all directions?

MORE

Cafe Racer

Exceptional Motorcycle & Scooter Service

1305 Union Ave. KCMO | 816-221-0711

My brush with fame: Appearances on VH1’s World Series of Pop Culture and Who Wants to be a Millionaire, before Meredith Vieira left and it got all weird and complicated. My eternal shame: hair gel and The Wings of the Dove. You only remember the ones you got wrong.

My 140-character soapbox: OMG KC. Rock-

fest equals your idea of a moneymaking music festival? Generic, one-word bands with riffs so tired, Nickelback threw them out? #UCanDoBetter

My recent triumphs: Winning the U.S. Air Guitar Northeast Semifinal in NYC and getting nominated for a fifth Pitch Music Award with the Dead Girls. Melin hosts The Pitch Music Awards at the Uptown Theater August 11 and competes for the U.S. Air Guitar National Championship in Los Angeles August 17.

pitch.com

I can do this! I am strong,

I will not let him treat me this way.

I will Learn self-defense for real people:

913.248.3288

5725 Nieman Rd Shawnee, KS

shesapistol.com

august 8 -14, 2013

the pitch

5


You could have a pool. Savings start in your home. A leaky toilet can waste up to 10,000 gallons of water a year — enough to fill up a backyard swimming pool. Don’t be all wet. Call 816.561.1061, ext.135, or visit bridgingthegap.org for more information.

WaterWorks!

Save energy. Save money. Save now.

816.531.SAVE n EnergyWorksKC.org

There’s a NEW game in town! Each week, Pitch Street Team cruises around to the hottest clubs, bars and concerts. You name it, we will be there. While we are out, we hand out tons of cool stuff. So look for the Street Team... We will be looking for you!

ic Showcase The Pitch Mus in Westport

The Pitch Music Show case in Westport

Global Dance Festival @ Indie on Main

Upcoming Events Boz Skaggs Up @ town Theater

8.10 - Unico Microbrew Festival @ Zona Rosa 8.11 - Pitch Music Awards @ Uptown Theater 8.17 - LEWau @ Lew’s Grill & Bar 8.17 - Soul Shakedown Party @ Zebedee’s

See more on the “promotions” link at p 6

the pitch

august 8 -14, 2013

pitch.com

KC’S ONLY FM SPORTS STATION! SPORTS RADIO 102.5 THE FAN LINEUP:

5AM-8AM: Tiki Barber, Brandon & Dana 8AM-11AM: John Feinstein 11AM-2PM: Jim Rome 2PM-5PM: Doug Gottlieb 5PM-9PM: Chris Moore & Brian Jones 9PM-1AM: Scott Ferrall 1AM-5AM: D.A. - Damon Amendolara


NEWS

RULE BREAKERS

Outlaw motorcycle clubs stake their claim inside

BY

the Galloping Goose’s broken 100-mile territory.

JUS T IN K E NDA L L

he Galloping Goose Motorcycle Club has had a stranglehold on the Kansas City area since the 1950s. The oldest motorcycle club in the United States enforced a “100-mile rule” here. No other outlaw gang — 1-percenters, as they like to call themselves — could operate within 100 miles of the metro. But the Goose’s grip on KC has begun to slacken as its closed membership ranks have either aged or fallen to federal drug convictions. Since the mid-2000s, the Goose’s 100mile force field has been breached. Now, several outlaw clubs are moving in to stake their own turfs. “The Bandidos and the Sons [of Silence] have claimed this area,” a Kansas City Police Department source tells The Pitch. Independence police detective Steve Cook says the Bandidos and the Sons aren’t alone. Five of what are known to law enforcement around the country as the “big eight” motorcycle clubs are located here. Cook estimates — “conservatively,” he says — that 100 patchwearing members of various motorcycle clubs are in the KC area. “We have Mongols,” says Cook, the president of the Midwest Outlaw Motorcycle Gang Investigators Association. “We have Vagos. We have Bandidos. We have Outlaws. We have the Sons of Silence. We have a majority of the major gangs, with the exception of the Hells Angels.” And that legendary outfit isn’t going to stay away much longer. “That’s forthcoming,” Cook says. “It’s gonna occur.” With the clubs, Cook says, comes criminal activity: bike thefts, drugs, prostitution, burglaries, assaults, homicides. The police officer, who wears his silver mustache and hair neatly trimmed, his badge on a chain around his neck and a tie around his button-down collar, could fit easily onto the set of Law & Order. “These guys aren’t Jax Teller,” he says, referencing the biker with a heart from the cable series Sons of Anarchy. “Some of them are pretty dangerous.” Cook would know. He’s not just an expert on motorcycle clubs but also someone who should have his own IMDb page, for his cabledocumentary credits. He has been featured on the History channel’s Gangland (“Biker Wars,” “Bandido Army,” “Beware the Goose”) and Book of Secrets (on the Hells Angels), on Biography’s Gangsters: America’s Most Evil and Gang World (“One Percenters”), and in a French documentary titled Hells Angels vs. Bandidos. While some of the incoming clubs have beefs with one another, they all share one thing in common: “They hate the Hells Angels,” Cooks says. By extension, they also hate the Hells Angels’

SUBMITTED

T

longtime Missouri allies, the Galloping Goose. The Pitch’s KCPD source says the Bandidos established a KC chapter in June, and the Sons crossed the state line in October 2012. (In February, authorities served a search warrant at a Northland home and arrested three Sons after seizing guns, marijuana and meth.) Cook calls the metro “ground zero for motorcycle gang activity.” But why here? “This is obviously a pipeline,” Cook says of the Interstate 35 and Interstate 70 corridors. “It’s good drug territory. It’s not something that you want to give up.” The Goose, formed in California by World War II veterans in 1943, lost hold of the area after going down in federal court for conspiracy to distribute methamphetamine. Members of the Goose and a brother club, El Forastero, pleaded guilty in 2009. (El Forastero’s Kansas City chapter was founded in 1965, and it shared a clubhouse with the Goose on Guinotte Avenue.) “We ended up locking up the entirety of the El Forasteros in Kansas City, and to this day they’re gone,” Cook says. “There are no patchwearing El Forastero members on the streets. They’re done. We locked up the majority of the Galloping Goose. “The problem we’re seeing now is, these guys are panicked because they are losing a foothold that they’ve had since the ’50s,” Cook adds. “And now we’re seeing some of these

Cook (left) says the Bandidos is just one motorcycle club that is now in the metro. guys getting out of prison and trying to get the club [up and running]. So they’re recruiting hard. … But they’re trying to go back to their old stomping grounds, but they’re not their stomping grounds anymore.” The KCPD source confirms that the Goose is rebuilding its ranks. “They have almost a full chapter,” the source says. “They’re still here. They haven’t left. They have prospects in their club, and they’re continuing to add to their numbers.” The arrival of the Mongols, the Vagos and the Outlaws could make a volatile situation even worse for the outnumbered Goose. “They [the Goose] exist at these other groups’ leisure right now,” Cook says. “If the Goose bow up to these other groups, it’d be nothing for, say, the Outlaws to come in and wipe them off the map.” Cook adds: “All the Goose can really do is hold on and wait for reinforcements.” Reinforcements as in the Hells Angels. “There was never a need for a permanent presence because it was locked down,” Cook says. “Now it’s not. It’s not a matter of if but when. The Hells Angels are coming. They’re going to set up here because everyone else is.” “We don’t have anything saying the Hells Angels are coming here,” the KCPD source

pitch.com

counters. “That’s been a rumor that’s gone on for 20 years. Until they establish, then they’re not here.” Tensions are already high. A few months ago, Independence police were called to a 20-person bar brawl on 23rd Street. When cops arrived, Cook says, they found a supporter of the Goose “dazed and confused.” “You can tell something happened, but nobody’s telling us anything,” he recalls. Within a few minutes of police being on the scene, other Goose members rolled in. Cook says he has heard of Sons of Silence members hunting Goose members and affiliates in bars on the Kansas side. “Johnson County, Kansas, which has historically been a bedroom community over there, they’ve got all kinds of problems,” Cook says. “I’ve heard of several area bars, not just in Jackson County but in Clay County and places like that, that their businesses are suffering miserably because these guys are frequenting their establishments, and they’re running the legitimate patrons off.” The KCPD source tells The Pitch that there haven’t been any reported “problems or violence” in the city between the incoming clubs and the Goose. “But we foresee that could be a problem because the Galloping Goose are aligned with the Hells Angels,” the source says. Cook keeps a high profile. He’ll roll into biker swap meets, park his car and walk around. “They know I’m there,” he says. “I’ll have a radio in my back pocket and a gun on my hip. I’m not hiding from them. I’d much rather they see me there and know this isn’t the time or the place to do it. “The best way to find something out is to go and ask the source. … Why play games?” In 2001, Cook and his partner went undercover and formed their own outlaw motorcycle gang called the Outsiders. They tried to infiltrate the Goose but couldn’t break through. Cook knows that most of the outlaw bikers he tracks don’t like him. “That’s no secret,” he says. “But I think there’s a respect there at least. I try to deal with them professionally. I’m not a cop that’s going to plant dope on you or try to jam you up illegally. They know if I’ve got them, I’ll get ’em. If I don’t, I’ll try to get them another time. Typically, I’ll try to talk to them to work things out. I did it with the Goose. I told them to clean up their act. They chose not to and they got what they got. “I don’t hate bikers,” Cook adds. “I ride a bike. I’ve got a Harley. I like motorcycles. I like bikers. It’s business, plain and simple.”

E-mail justin.kendall@pitch.com august 8 -14, 2013

the pitch

7


LegenDs at vooDoo

RobeRt CRay august 23, 2013

Dave Mason

september 15, 2013

steve vai

october 27, 2013 1-800-745-3000

  •  VooDooKC.com

Know When To Stop Before You Start.® Gambling Problem? Call 1-888-BETSOFF. Subject to change or cancellation. Phone and online orders are subject to service fees. Must be 21 years or older to gamble, obtain a Total Rewards ® card or enter VooDoo ®. ©2013, Caesars License Company, LLC.

8

the pitch

august 8 -14, 2013

pitch.com V1_99204.1_4.776x9.8125_4c_Ad.indd 1

7/31/13 4:45 PM


OFFICER ———(gay)———

FRIENDLY KCPD officer Rebecca Caster aims to build a department relationship with the LGBT community. —————————— BY B E N PA LO SA A R I PHOTOG R APHY BY BARRET T EM KE

W

e’re in Methville. Where is everybody?” Rebecca Caster, her blond hair swept into a ponytail, has posed her question from the passenger seat of an ancient Kansas City, Missouri, Police Department Crown Victoria. She and her partner, Aaron Kohrs, are cruising Sector 30, a territory bounded roughly by Interstate 435 to the east, Missouri Highway 210 to the south, Northeast Vivion Road to the north and North Oak Trafficway to the west. The police radio stays mostly quiet as the two officers pass through neighborhoods dotted with small homes, patrolling business strips stocked with check-cashing joints and tiny taverns with blacked-out windows.

The department is testing more modern vehicles, but this unit isn’t one of them. The odometer hovers near 215,000, and the AC wheezes. A shotgun is locked down between the two cops, and there’s no barrier between the front and back seats. It’s the first Saturday afternoon of August, and nothing is happening north of the river. The sun shines down on miles of idle roadconstruction projects, and traffic is light. “Why is nobody out?” Kohrs asks Caster during a commercial break on the oldies station they’ve been singing along with. Blood, Sweat and Tears (no calls). The Eagles (no calls). Stevie Wonder (no calls). Caster and Kohrs pull into a QuikTrip to pick up cold drinks. (The first rule of patrol

officers is to stop exclusively at QuikTrips: “7-Elevens don’t have public restrooms,” Caster says. “QuikTrips clean their bathrooms every hour, on the hour.”) But before Kohrs can head inside, their unit finally gets a call: an “outside disturbance” at a nearby Wal-Mart. The dispatcher advises Caster and Kohrs to look for a red Toyota. Kohrs switches on the siren and the lights and accelerates into the low 50s. The store is only a mile or so away, and soon the partners are scanning its parking lot for red Toyotas. (Whoever called 911 apparently didn’t provide a model.) After a few minutes, two Wal-Mart managers direct the officers toward a young man leaning against the trunk of a white Ford Tau-

pitch.com

rus. The 23-year-old man called police after finding his 16-year-old sister at the store with a boyfriend he says is abusive. The sister and her boyfriend have already left. The brother, a distraught, lanky blond kid, wants the officers to issue a restraining order against the boyfriend. “It’s up to her to do that,” Caster, an officer for 11 years, tells him in a commanding voice. “She has to file the restraining order.” “She’ll take the abuse until she’s dead,” the brother says. “We weren’t raised right. It’s my sister. She’s so little, and she’s not eating. She’s on that K2 stuff, and it’s messing her up.” The officers comfort him as best they can while reinforcing that there’s nothing they can do until the sister makes her own police call. “We don’t have a continued on page 10 august 8 -14, 2013

the pitch

9


Officer (Gay) Friendly continued from page 9 victim here,” Caster tells him. “Be there for her when she’s ready.” As the unit returns to duty, the officers don’t talk. They share a moment of frustrated silence that’s part of the job. All that awaits them on this part of their shift is a minor fender bender. But a quiet afternoon is something of a break for Caster, who, in addition to her patrol duties, has spent the past nine months as the KCPD’s first LGBT community liaison. Her new gig puts her in charge of forming a strong relationship with LGBT residents of the city as well as promoting a culture of acceptance and openness for LGBT officers on the force. The work — searching for unfair policies, advising gay officers and reaching out to advocacy groups — keeps her busy. And she took the job at the end of a five-year personal storm. Calm Saturday patrols might be just what Caster needs more of.

A

brush with cancer, a miscarriage, a divorce, coming out gay. Any of these events by itself would be plenty for one person in a lifetime. Caster, though, spent a tumultuous five years enduring all of them in rapid succession — as she will happily relate to you over coffee. (The only outward sign: a shark-biteshaped scar from a surgical procedure.) First came the miscarriage, in February 2008. It caused problems in her marriage, she says. “When I had the miscarriage, we kind of drifted apart.” She and her husband separated, and she began spending time with members of the LGBT community. “He had made assumptions because I was hanging out with somebody who was, according to other people — gossip, rumors — bisexual,” she says of her ex-husband, also a police officer. “So he started to have concerns.” In 2009, he told her that he was ready to end their marriage. “I begged him to stay because I feared that I would be outed,” Caster says. “And I feared that I wouldn’t have that perfect little life with the white picket fence.” With both of them on the job, work became uncomfortable. “It was awkward for a

After five years of chaos, Caster is happy in her new KCPD role. while,” Caster says. “And a lot of people took sides because we had mutual friends in the department.” In January 2010, just a few months after the divorce was final, Caster’s doctor noticed something on her left knee. For a person who describes herself as “really, really pale,” skin exams had become routine. “I’ve had 60 freckles and moles removed,” Caster says. This time was different. She had surgery to remove the melanoma to prevent its spread to the popliteal lymph node in the knee. “It could have been really bad,” she says. (As of this week, she was awaiting the results of new tests.) A few years before, her father had successfully beaten the same disease. Caster says he told her then, “You never know how much you want to live until somebody tells you that you may not.” It was time, Caster now understood, to embrace her new life. She says, “I just realized: I can live a miserable existence or just be who I am. When I got cancer, that’s when it didn’t hurt me to be out about it. I didn’t feel like I needed to hide it anymore.” Acceptance from others wasn’t a given, though.

Caster grew up in the Northland with five older brothers in a socially conservative household — “a very Christian home,” she says. She had been raised to want sameness, to value conformity. Now she felt that familiar pressure again: Some family members suggested that she wasn’t gay but was instead suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder caused by the miscarriage. “I wanted a normal life,” she says. “I didn’t want to disappoint my parents and my family and to be different from other people. I wanted to be the same.” But she had always had an idea that she was different. While her friends were crushing on boys, she was gravitating toward mostly male social circles. And she definitely knew that she felt something her friends didn’t for Paula Abdul in the 1990s. “I had a thing for her,” she says, laughing. “Who didn’t?” Her brother Tim, 34, a former cruise-line singer, had come out to their parents four years before. By then, he had dealt privately with years of denial, including a short stint in what he calls “pray the gay away” therapy. “They’d say things like, ‘You can’t be around my children,’ ” Tim says of their brothers, who wouldn’t share drinking cups with him. “Like, ‘You’re going to get AIDS, and you’re going to die, and you’re going to hell.’ ”

“I didn’t want to disappoint my parents and my family and to be different from other people. I wanted to be the same.” Caster had seen all of this and was reluctant to withstand it herself. But in 2010, she and Tim went to Bistro 303 in Westport, and after several drinks, she told him. “I was like, ‘OK, you watched me go through all that crap, and you couldn’t tell me?’ ” Tim says. “When I came out to him, he was a little upset with me,” Caster says. “He basically asked me, ‘Why did you let me go through that by myself?’ He went through a lot. He kind of felt

like, ‘Where were you? Why didn’t you stand up with me?’ Well, because I saw what you were going through, and it scared the hell out of me.” The story has become family lore, enough so at least for the two of them to joke about it now. “Sometimes when I’m drunk there [at Bistro 303], I’ll tell the story of how this is where I came out to my brother, and I’ll point out the bar stool,” Caster says.

A

n LGBT community liaison isn’t a novel idea. Cities around the country — not just Atlanta and Los Angeles but even Boise, Idaho, and Fargo, North Dakota — beat Kansas City to it, assigning an officer to build relationships with LGBT citizens. If the Kansas City Police Department was relatively slow to create such a position, no one on the force wanted to explain why. Caster estimates that the KCPD’s policies are about a decade behind those of other big-city police departments. The first time she recalls hearing that gay-advocacy groups were lobbying the department for a liaison was under Chief James Corwin. “For unknown reasons,” she says, “they didn’t see the need for it. They asked again under Chief Darryl Forté, and it was a go. There wasn’t a hesitation.” “There is a sense of urgency, and I think it comes from Chief Forté,” says KCPD Deputy Chief Cheryl Rose, commander of the Professional Development and Research Bureau and the highest-ranking gay member of the force. “I’m not saying that other chiefs in the past haven’t cared, but that’s one of his platforms — that we make everything right and fair for everyone.” Rose, a 26-year veteran of the force, adds: “It isn’t like all of a sudden it was horrible before, and now we’re making it better. It’s [that] we’re more attuned to fair and equitable treatment in our policies.” Capt. Dan Haley, the department’s diversity commander, says Forté is driving the department’s publicly gay-friendly attitude shift from the top down. To understand that, he says, take note that Caster has been told she can cut through the usual bureaucratic red tape to enact a policy change. Typically, Haley says, a beat cop who wants to make a policy or procedural change waits

THURSDAYS 7pm 10

the pitch

august 8 -14, 2013

pitch.com


months to see results. First, there’s paperwork. The officer hands a report to her sergeant. If the sergeant likes it, he endorses it to the captain. The captain takes it to the major. If the major approves it, the next stop is the deputy chief, who decides whether it goes to the chief and the executive command board. Meanwhile, Haley says, “It could be sent down for revisions or additions at any time, causing this policy to take some time.” When Caster suggests a change that would help make the department more equitable for gay officers, her commanders let her jump the line. She had long known, for instance, that the KCPD’s benefits and policies were a puzzle for LGBT officers, who can add a domestic partner to their health insurance but not to their pension plans. “If I died tomorrow,” Rose says, “my partner couldn’t get my pension. Which isn’t fair.” With her eye on those policies, Caster spoke with a gay policewoman who had legally married her same-sex partner in Iowa. Shortly after the officer started on the force, her wife was laid up for weeks following surgery. An officer in an opposite-sex marriage would have been able to use her sick leave to care for her spouse. This gay officer, however, was forced to burn most of her vacation time to help her wife. “If you’re going to say that your domestic partner is important enough that we’ll give you time off when they die, your domestic partner is important enough that we’ll give them insurance, but your domestic partner is not important enough that if they are sick or bedridden, that we’ll let you off work?” she says. “We need uniformity.” Caster advocated for a policy change, and her notes went to the top and earned approval in three weeks. No more lost vacation time for cops like the woman Caster talked to. Typically, Rose says, an officer’s suggestion takes about six months to run the gauntlet to the top. Not for Caster. “Those suggestions will come directly to me, and I’ll send those up to the chief and the executive committee,” Haley says. “That’s a pretty short process, if you think about it.” In addition to policy changes, Caster’s liaison role is geared to make her a resource for her fellow gay officers. She’s setting up a mentoring program for recent LGBT graduates of the academy, and she plans monthly meetings for officers who are out and officers who are closeted. (“I’d say I run into 10 to 15 that I run into at bars or whatever,” she says of the latter group.) Rose says having a point person for gay officers will be crucial as the department both attracts more who are gay and works on its reputation internally. She tells the story of a ceremony the department held last year, honoring her for 25 years of service. Her partner’s attendance was acknowledged during the ceremony. “Some young gay person in our department [at the ceremony] made a comment to someone else: ‘Wow, that’s really cool.’ That’s a positive,” she says. “I don’t look at myself as an inspira-

40% OFF

& CDs SOUL LNPTsH LONG! ALL MO

WN O D E K A H SOUL S ARTY • P • DANCE7 2PM-7PM 1 SAT AUG

OK FACEBOIL N O S S U FOLLOWFOR FULL DETA Her “strange little family,” from left: Caster, Tim Caster and Brianna Lopez tion because I wasn’t out until five years ago. But the fact that I’ve been promoted since then shows that, yeah, it’s no big deal.” Caster has been making an effort to get to more LGBT events. She and a handful of other officers went to the Kansas City Pride Festival this summer. It was the department’s first such presence at the festival, with Caster attempting a difficult dual task: improving the KCPD from within while forming a bond with the LGBT community. “I think we recognize that there is a problem,” she says. “We can sit here and say we’re going to go recruit from Pride events and all these LGBT events and we’re going to just recruit more people who are openly gay. That’s not going to change things, because if we’re not OK internally, they’re going to come on the department and feel excluded in some way.”

I

didn’t think she had the huevos,” Brianna Lopez says of her girlfriend’s decision to accept the liaison position. “It seems like she’s a whole new person professionally, and that translates into her social life.” Caster lives in her Northland bungalow with Lopez, a graduate student studying to be a family counselor, and Tim. There’s a 12-year-old beagle named Bella and a 2-year-old blue pit bull named Romi. Over coffee, Lopez says the three make their living situation work: “We’re cohesive, for the most part.” “It’s a strange little family, but I really like it,” Caster adds. Lopez and Tim came out long before Caster, and they give her crap for her enthusiasm over

gay-rights issues. Their own sense of activism has mellowed over time. There was, for example, the June day when the Supreme Court struck down a large part of the Defense of Marriage Act. Caster, by all accounts, was ebullient. Lopez: “We’re like, ‘That’s great. What’s for breakfast?’ ” Tim: “I do my best to stay away from politics.” Caster: “And I hate that.” That such a victory still feels fresh to Caster — she herself says she has “this fire” — is, they agree, what makes her right for the liaison position. But even during a summer that has seen Minnesota, California, Rhode Island and Delaware allow gay marriage and has dealt serious damage to DOMA, the Caster siblings know that not everybody has totally come around on equal rights. And not everybody will. Maybe not even their family. One of Caster’s brothers recently read an article about her in the local gay publication, Camp, and he objected to seeing his sister called gay in public. Caster recalls: “He said, ‘I just don’t like them labeling you a lesbian or Tim gay.’ ” Tim says, “I don’t think anybody from our family would go to Becky’s wedding. Maybe the sisters-in-law.” “Dad said to me the other day, ‘I don’t want to be on the wrong side of history,’ ” Rebecca Caster says of a recent conversation they had about gay marriage. Caster is already part of the KCPD’s history. That’s her job. “I look forward to the next decade. I really do. A lot of people think that I am almost too positive,” she says.

E-mail ben.palosaari@pitch.com pitch.com

august 8 -14, 2013

the pitch

11


... STILL FUNKY AFTER ALL THESE YEARS...

FUNKY TOWN ’S

WO N

’T YOU TAKE ME TO ...

CALL NOW FOR RESERVATIONS

SALUTE TO ELVIS! FRIDAY AUGUST 16th

Feast on Hounddogs & American Trilogy Frozen Drinks Also A Very Special Elvis Show

8300 E. BLUE PARKWAY KANSAS CITY, MO | 816-737-FUNK (3865)

12

the pitch

august 8 -14, 2013

pitch.com


WEEK OF AUGUST 8–14 | BY BERRY ANDERSON

16

PAG E

Y S U N DA

8 .1 1

e And th s… i r w inne

ART Smithville: a new art neighborhood

19

PAG E

FILM

THE PITCH MUSIC AWARDS The voting is over for The Pitch Music Awards. Now it’s time to toast the winners, drink up and rock out with our friends Cherokee Rock Rifle, Grand Marquis and the Conquerors at the Uptown Theater (3700 Broadway, 816-753-8665). This year’s affair is once again hosted by Dead Girls’ Eric Melin. VIPs get in at 6 p.m. ($25 in advance and $35 day of) and doors open at 7 for the show. GA tickets cost $8 in advance and $10 day of. Call 816-753-8665 or see pitch.com.

Elysium makes Matt Damon future tense.

26

B R O O K E VA N D E V E R

PAG E

MUSIC Relive The Pitch Music Showcase.

INDEPENDENTLY YOURS

Jim Hennequin knew the time was right for the first Independence Film, Art and Music Festival. “I like options and I like variety,” says Hennequin, an ad rep for eastern Jackson County’s Examiner. Multiple locations in and around Independence Square and the Englewood Station Arts District host live acoustic acts, more than 60 artists and 20 featurelength films. The mostly free, all-ages event starts today at 5 p.m. and runs through Sunday. See the KC premiere of Ain’t in It for My Health: A Film About Levon Helm, a documentary that follows the multi-instrumentalist,

actor and Grammy winner after the release of his comeback album, Dirt Farmer. See independencefilmartmusicfest.com for a full list of performances, film showings (admission to most is $6) and participating galleries, as well as their locations.

F R I D AY | 8 . 9 | PUTTING ON THE FUN CROWN

Crown Center (2450 Grand, 816-274-8444) claims that 5 million fun seekers visit every year. Many of them have been on hand for this summer’s WeekEnder events: free family-friendly Friday-night happenings with vendors, continued on page 14

F R I D AY | 8 .9 |

STRIKE A POSE

T

hrough 36 works by 29 photographers from around the world, the exhibition About Face, opening at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art (4525 Oak, 816-751-1278), asks its viewers to consider the meaning of portraiture in contemporary society. Running alongside it is Making Pictures of People, an online, digital display with touch screens to engage viewers with the photographic practice. Stare long and hard at the free presentation, open today from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Both run through January 19, 2014. See nelson-atkins.org. pitch.com

PIETER HUGO

T H U R S D AY | 8 . 8 |

august 8 -14, 2013

the pitch

13


Space is limited.

COME BE OUR GUEST HAS A BEAUTIFUL NEW SPACE SALON • PHOTO STUDIO • BOUTIQUE - SEEKING QUALIFIED STYLISTS -

Call foR SponSoRShipS: 913.451.1500

RegisteR NOW!

Benefits Spinal Cord Injury Recovery

Saturday, OCTOBER 19 CommunityAmerica Ballpark

Register & more info: projectwalk-kansascity.org

7105 W 105TH ST OVERLAND PARK, KS 66212 913.766.7465

INVITES YOU AND A GUEST TO A FILM SCHOOL SCREENING OF

continued from page 13 food trucks, an outdoor film and live music. Tonight, the popular destination hosts its final WeekEnder with country band Outlaw Junkies and a showing of Iron Man. Get food from Little Italy, Monk’s Roast Beef and Indios Carbonsitos while buying goods from Boys Grow (tomato products), Stone Loca, Quirkybeads, and others. Things get kicking at 5 p.m., and Iron Man begins around 9. See crowncenter.com for more information.

S AT U R D AY | 8 . 10 | GOOD HAIR

Keeping chemicals out of your food? Keep them out of your hair, too. Big Afros, dreadlocks and natural weaves are making a comeback because treatments that keep hair straight, like Brazilian blowouts and hair relaxers, use methylene glycol and sodium hydroxide. “You can’t have a healthy body without healthy hair. Going natural promotes not only healthy hair but healthy lifestyle,” says LaToya Rivers, founder of Espresso Culture, a local modeling agency that is hosting the second annual Natural Hair Expo at the Holiday Inn CoCo Key Water Resort (9103 East 39th Street). There is something for the whole family today: on-site hair demonstrations from the top industry product lines, styling classes, a fashion showcase and a competition called “King Dread Head” for the brothers with the finest dreads. Tickets for the event cost $12 in advance or $15 at the door. The expo runs from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. See espressoculturekc.com or call 816-352-7410.

BEERS UPON BEERS

Selections from more than 60 breweries — local and national — are available at the fifth annual UNICO Microbrew Festival, from 5 to 9 p.m. in the courtyard of Zona Rosa (8640 North Dixson Avenue). In addition to hometown favorites Boulevard, Flying Monkey and Weston Brewing Co., this year’s festival offers spirits from Parkville’s S.D. Strong Distilling. Tickets cost $25 in advance or $30 at the gate; see unicokc.org.

TROPICAL ITCH

LOG ON TO PITCH.COM BEGINNING THURSDAY, AUGUST 8 FOR YOUR CHANCE TO WIN A COMPLIMENTARY PASS FOR TWO “LIKE” US AT /ALAMOKANSASCITY FOLLOW US ON AT/ALAMOKC Please note: Winners will be selected at random from all entries. No purchase necessary. Limit one admit-two pass per winner. Employees of participating sponsors are ineligible. THIS FILM IS RATED PG-13 FOR SEX AND ADULT CONTENT.

AT ALAMO DRAFTHOUSE AUGUST 10TH DRAFTHOUSE.COM/KANSAS_CITY/MAINSTREET

14

the pitch

august 8 -14, 2013

pitch.com

For many young women in Lawrence, dancing on the bar with a toy-laden Bahama Mama and licentious older men at their feet is a rite of passage, thanks to the Sandbar (17 East Eighth Street, Lawrence, 785-842-0111). The friendly tiki bar celebrates its 24th birthday, as well as the grand opening of Sandbar Subs World Headquarters and Peoples Bank (at Eighth Street and New Hampshire), with a block party on Eighth Street (between Massachusetts and New Hampshire). The bar has proved that it’s tough enough to remain a party staple, so the Fabulous Thunderbirds are headlining the free, all-ages event. For VIP access, tickets cost $50, and beer-garden admission is $15. Gates open at 5 p.m. See thesandbar.typepad.com.


R A M E S H WA R D A

Krishna Das

JAZZ BEAT: SHADES OF JADE AT THE GREEN LADY LOUNGE

Shades of Jade bills itself as a “neo-soul quartet.” Josh Williams winds an often eloquent, R&B-influenced trumpet through each song as if on a journey. Eddie Moore’s keyboards are the guide, weaving notes into solos of life and imagination. Dominique Sanders’ bass grounds the group, while Julian Goff’s drumming rhythms drive it forward. The music comes together with a leisurely, exotic feel. It’s neo-soul, yes, but a version of it that has evolved from Kansas City’s classic jazz traditions. Shades of Jade performs from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. at the Green Lady Lounge (1809 Grand, 816-215-2954). — LARRY KOPITNIK

S U N D AY | 8 . 11 | RELAXING AND RENEWING

About an hour and 15 minutes north of downtown, the tobacco barn at the Riverwood Winery’s Estate Vineyards location (33655 Iatan Road, Weston, 816-579-9797) overlooks the vineyards, pond and creek valley of the winery. This morning, yogis of all levels can partake in Yoga at the Vineyards, a one-hour restorative session to engage the parasympathetic nervous system; improve digestion; and reduce stress, fatigue and blood pressure. After the 9:30 a.m. class, there’s wine (one glass comes with the session). Sounds perfect for a Sunday, right? Registration and a $15 prepayment are required by calling the winery; see riverwoodwinery.com.

M O N D AY | 8 . 1 2 | THE PATH TO ENLIGHTENMENT

Before he was a Grammy-nominated newage artist, Krishna Das (born Jeffrey Kagel) was a rock-star wannabe, who abandoned his big dreams to search for contentment in India through Hindu guru Neem Karoli Baba. His story is chronicled in One Track Heart: the Story of Krishna Das, screening at Tivoli Cinemas (4050 Pennsylvania, 816-561-5222) as part of the weeklong Open Circle Film Festival. One Track Heart begins at 4:45 p.m. (and

at 7 p.m. Sunday, August 11). Tickets cost $6.75–$8.50. For a full schedule of the series’ feature-length documentaries — on mind-body wellness, East and West teachings, and exploits in consciousness — see opencircleonline.com.

T U E S D AY | 8 . 13 | ROAR OF THE H.O.G.

Gail Worth of Gail’s Harley-Davidson runs one of the country’s top motorcycle dealerships, a 55,000-square-foot showroom in Grandview. She’s the subject of Kansas City: Cradle of Entrepreneurs, a series of public conversations with Crosby Kemper III at the Kansas City Central Library (14th West 10th Street, 816-701-3400). Discover how Worth rose to the top of a male-dominated profession and made thousands of community connections with smart thinking and a simple mantra: “Every day is an excuse to have fun.” The free event begins with a reception at 6 p.m. Reserve your spot at kclibrary.org.

W E D N E S D AY | A U G U S T 1 4 | HEAT TREATMENT

Pulse-pounding paranoia and a constantly racing mind aren’t unusual symptoms for ambitious young media types in New York City. So it didn’t immediately occur to Susannah Cahalan, a 24-year-old New York Post reporter, that her crying jags and angry outbursts were signs of a potentially lethal neurological malfunction. Things got worse — way worse. In her best-selling Brain on Fire: My Month of Madness, a kind of medical-mystery memoir, Cahalan offers a piercing account of what happened to her and what it took to bring her back. Tonight at 7, she talks about her experience and her book at Unity Temple on the Plaza (707 West 47th Street). Admission comes with purchase of the $16 paperback; order from rainydaybooks.com. — SCOTT WILSON E-mail submissions two weeks in advance to calendar@pitch.com. Search our complete listings guide online at pitch.com.

pitch.com

august 8 -14, 2013

the pitch

15


ART BY

adjacent art space in Smithville.

N A NC Y HULL RIGDON

B R O O K E VA N D E V E R

THE LINKUP

Jeff Becker hatches a new, Justus-

I

t’s crunch time inside this two-story, 130-year-old building in downtown Smithville. Fifteen days from this July afternoon, it opens as the Three Link Gallery. Workers are putting up partial Sheetrock walls in the front room — a space where tall, exposed brick walls run up to a white pressedtin ceiling. An inspector surveys the progress. Industrial fans blare in the summer heat. Owner Jeff Becker steps away from his long to-do list for what has grown into a daily chat with his friend and business neighbor across the alley, Jonathan Justus of Justus Drugstore. Justus has arrived to return some tools. The August 10 debut of the gallery, event space and studio marks a momentous occasion for both men. It furthers the vision that Justus had for his hometown when he opened his sophisticated, farm-to-table restaurant seven years ago to national praise. Plans for the gallery’s event space extend to Justus’ business. And for Becker, who founded Kansas City’s now-defunct Arts Incubator, the opening signifies the realization of personal and professional aspirations. But this isn’t a time for reflecting on dreams. A deadline looms. Becker scans his place and embraces the loose ends with a calm smile. “We’ll be opening as the paint dries,” he says. “Isn’t that the way it’s supposed to be?” The road to the present goes back to spring 2011. Becker, his wife and their children were living in Overland Park while Becker was executive director of Arts Incubator, a Crossroads space that brought affordable studios to emerging artists. He longed for a simpler life: a rural home and a small studio and gallery of his own. 16

the pitch

august 8 -14, 2013

tore down drop ceilings, paneling, drywall, One day, he wandered north, past the red carpet and seafoam-green curtains and noise of the city and suburbs, to Smithville. A “for sale” sign outside the old hospital discovered brick, wood and pressed tin. “There was all this 1980s trash construction,” he says. building on Main Street caught his eye. He noticed Justus Drugstore down the block and “It was like a gift. As I unwrapped it, I started to see the treasures.” figured it wouldn’t hurt to stop in and introSince the early 1880s, the building had duce himself. He had heard of the restaubeen in the hands of the Independent Order rant, but he hadn’t yet experienced firsthand of Odd Fellows, an obscure, co-ed internaJonathan Justus’ intensity and excitability — especially if you mention growing the arts tional fraternity. The organization had rented out the first floor to various businesses over in downtown Smithville. the years, keeping the upstairs as the local “An hour later, Jonathan was walking me Odd Fellows headquarters. A storage room all around downtown, talking a mile a minute, served as a clubhouse lair of sorts, packed with all animated, about the history of every buildmedieval-looking regalia, secret writings and ing and how he envisioned everything down a casket bearing a skeleton. the road,” Becker recalls. “It (The casket had vanished by was, ‘a boutique hotel here, Three Link Gallery the time Becker took possesmusicians performing in the Opens Saturday, August 10. sion of the building.) alleys there.’ ” See facebook.com/ Fascinated by his buildWhile Justus’ restaurant threelinkgallery. ing’s history, Becker emcontinues to lure diners from braced the past as he crafted throughout the Kansas City his new venture. The gallery name honors the area and beyond, downtown Smithville isn’t Order of Odd Fellows, which promotes itself as yet the vibrant destination the restaurateur “The Three Link Fraternity” and announces pictures. (That said, Nellie’s Sweet Shoppe, a fudge store with old-fashioned charm, is worth itself with a three-link logo containing the letters F, L and T (for “friendship, love and truth”). the 25-minute trip from downtown Kansas The upstairs now houses an event space. A City.) Yet the low-key atmosphere of this city new industrial kitchen makes way for catering of 8,000 felt like home to Becker, and he fell by Justus Drugstore. With a historic-meets-hip in love with the potential he discovered in a space for 150, Becker hopes to attract Northbuilding at 108 North Bridge Street. When he bought the building, he began landers planning wedding receptions, parties and business meetings, as well as Justus working with the Arts Incubator board on a customers. plan for his exit. While he was on sabbatical in Justus is characteristically giddy about summer 2011, the city of Kansas City shut down the Arts Incubator, citing structural concerns what’s taking shape a few steps from his patio. “Camille and I always viewed what we were with the building. doing to be a catalyst for something bigger Inside Becker’s new place in Smithville, he

pitch.com

Becker, on an Independent Order of Odd Fellows chair, amid art by Melissa Furness downtown, and we always had the arts in mind,” he says, referring to Camille Eklof, his wife and the restaurant’s co-owner. “What Jeff is doing is bigger than any single project we envisioned.” In the back of the main floor, Becker, a sculptor, has his own studio space. The front room holds the gallery, which will feature regional artists. First up: a solo exhibition by Denver artist Melissa Furness, titled Sticks and Stones. (The opening reception runs from 5 to 9 p.m. Saturday.) Her paintings and objects explore the paradox of ruins and self with what Becker describes as heavy depth and breadth of meaning. “Her work’s not shocking but engaging — a good fit for this community,” he says. Becker says he’s looking to create collaborations with locals outside the artist community — organic gardeners, perhaps. “We simply want to work with other people doing exceptional things, whatever that may be and may bring,” he says. When Becker pictures the end of construction and the beginning of gallery life, the word contentment comes to mind — something he has found at his three-acre farmhouse property on the edge of Smithville. There, he has converted a root cellar behind the house into a wine cellar. “I like to get some cured meats and cheeses and wine and go down there and just sit,” he says. A wide smile crosses his face. “We have chickens now, too,” he says.

E-mail feedback@pitch.com


SHOP GIRL

RE-BURBS

Abbie Marshall upcycles Olathe with Ecolectic.

BY

N A NC Y HULL RIGDON PRE-MIXED SYNTHETICURINE KIT

Kit Contains:

• 3.5 oz of the highest qualit y sunthetic urine available • Adjustable belt • T wo heat pads • Temperature label

1 YEAR SHELF LIFE

BEST Selection of Glass in KC! 11-8 Mon - Sat • Noon - 6 Sun 3617 Broadway KCMO 64111

S A B R I N A S TA I R E S

816.931.7222

A

bbie Marshall’s bright, bold style pops inside Reused Furniture — a store that, beyond Marshall’s front corner, sells a sea of consignment goods. The business sits between a now-defunct Waid’s restaurant and A.B.I.A. (A Bargain Insurance Agency), an antidote to the dreariness of this Olathe shopping strip. Given the demand for upcycled furniture around here lately, you’d think Marshall would be doing all she could to move her quirky business, Ecolectic, to a much hipper location. But no, she loves it here. You see, Marshall, 27, thrives on being different. “Instead of doing what everyone else was doing, I wanted to come out to where repurposing isn’t big and spark an interest in it here,” she tells me as she eyes one of her favorite pieces: a chair she turned from pastel to emerald-green and reupholstered with a burlap coffee sack. That desire to stray from the pack prompted her to avoid the resale-shop epicenter of the West Bottoms when she moved to the Kansas City area from Chicago more than a year ago. She spent part of her childhood in Overland Park, and after she earned her bachelor’s degree in interior design at Chicago’s Harrington College of Design, the comforts of home were calling.

facebook.com/coopersbroadway

Things fell into place last summer. Her Bright frames (top) and a chandelier mother had sold refinished furniture in both incorporating an ikat motif reflect a West Bottoms shop and the space Marshall Marshall’s “live life in color” motto. now occupies in Reused, and she was looking that Reused owner Zip Iams sells completo leave both ventures. With Marshall ready ment each other. Occasionally, one of Iams’ to start her own boutique while working as an customers ventures to Marshall’s corner to interior designer, the timing was right. In July see if she can spice up a consignment piece. 2012, she opened Ecolectic in her mom’s prior Based on Ecolectic’s steady growth in space, which sits at West Santa Fe and Kansas the past year, Marshall’s style seems to be Highway 7. The move to Kansas City has also catching on. gone well for her husband, Kip Marshall, who “People will say, ‘Wow, I never would joined local pop-folk band Tides for Aviation. have thought of that. This is like Pinterest,’ Abbie Marshall says she wants to help ” she says. “I like that reacher customers “live life in tion because it means I’m color,” as the saying goes. Ecolectic making people want to try In practice, this means that Inside Reused Furniture something new.” she finds used furniture 1090 West Santa Fe, Olathe She’s mulling whether from such places as Craigs402-321-8536 to commit to an idea to list and renders her pieces facebook.com/ecolectic honor her favorite designer, with loud colors, vivid deJimmie Martin of London, signs and high contrast. by creating pieces that look She pays attention to trends while adding her own touch to what’s like they’ve been tagged with graffiti. “Would the suburbs be ready for that?” popular. For instance, she sanded down an old church pew, painted a red and cheery she wonders. “I am all about pushing the limits and empowering others to do the “Hello!” in cursive on the seat, then added some red military chevron — an edgier ver- same, so I might have to just do it and see how it goes over.” sion of the zigzag pattern that’s all the rage — on the backrest. Her items and the well-selected antiques E-mail feedback@pitch.com

pitch.com

SEE THE MOST SPECTACULAR MOVIE OF THE SUMMER

Tell us what movie, book or song you think best portrays your generation! Email kANSASCITy@43kIX.COM by Sunday, August 25 for your chance to win a pair of passes and copy of the New york Times best selling book The Spectacular Now by Tim Tharp! This film has been R foR alcohol use, language, and some sexualiTy, all involving Teens. Please noTe: Passes are available on a first-come first-served basis. While suPPlies last. no Purchase necessary. Passes are valid beginning monday, august 26 through the run-of-engagement, monday through thursday only, excluding Weekends and holidays.

IN SELECT THEATRES AUGUST 23 SpectacularNowMovie.com

august 8 -14, 2013

#TheSpectacularNow

the pitch

THE PITCH

17


Only two weeks left to see...

Death in the Dustbowl The Mystery Train

Tickets now available at The Central Ticket Office:

816-235-6222 www.kcmysterytrain.com

408 Armour Rd. NKC, MO. 64116 816.421.9700 www.Screenland.com/Armour

HOT FUZZ//aug 1Oth ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW AUG 9TH BREAKING BAD PREMIERE AUG 11TH BRUNCH AND MOVIE: STAND BY ME AUG 11TH GIRLS NIGHT OUT: FOOTLOOSE AUG 15TH PRINCE AVALANCHE AUG 16TH SCOTT PILGRIM VS THE WORLD AUG 17TH

Trivia: EVERY WEDNESDAY AT 7PM 18

the pitch

august 8 -14, 2013

pitch.com


The Smurfs 2 (PG) @ 9:05pm The Wolverine (PG13) @ 10:45pm FILM Gates open @ 7pm FIND BY_________ MOVIE Enjoy a Double feature under the stars: BIL GE EBIRI TIMES Adults $10/Kids 11 and under are FREE ONONLY business Elysium: a great first half, a strong leading man, a foolish ending. We are a CASH RAIN OR SHINE ––––––––– Movie Infoline: 913.262.0392 outh African director Neill Blomkamp hit the ground running four years ago with www.boulevarddrivein.com

PARADISE LOST

1051 MERRIAM LANE, KCKS • WWW.BOULEVARDDRIVEIN.COM

Enjoy a Double feature under the stars

Movie Infoline: 913.262.0392 www.boulevarddrivein.com

THE WORLD’S GREATEST DRIVE IN 4k Digital Projection & dts DIGITAL SOUND

P p

Friday, Saturday & Sunday | August 9 - 11

Planes (PG): 9:00pm The Smurfs (PG): 10:35pm 1051 MERRIAM LANE, KCKS WWW.BOULEVARDDRIVEIN.COM

Gates open @ 7pm | Adults $10 / Kids 11 & under FREE We are a CASH ONLY business | RAIN OR SHINE

S

District 9, an imaginative futuristic thriller that presented a world where extraterrestrials lived here, segregated in shantytowns — a not-soveiled allegory of his country’s troubled racial legacy. With his second feature, Elysium, the writer-director’s vision has expanded along with his profile. A space-age variation on Metropolis, Elysium posits an overpopulated Earth blanketed in poverty and disease, a vast planetary favela of despair. Rich humans have long since decamped for the titular habitat in the sky: a massive orbital colony that looks like the rotating space station from 2001. Inside are rolling meadows, ornate villas and crystal-clear lakes. As the name suggests, it’s less Moonbase Alpha than Eternal Kingdom. Among the poor schlubs back home, the lucky get to work in dingy factories building robots and other goods for use in that distant, unreachable paradise. Among the proles is our hero, Max (Matt Damon), who as an orphan was raised by Spanish nuns alongside Frey (Valentina Giron as a child, Alice Braga as an adult). To her the boy admits his fondest hope: a blissful life someday on far-off Elysium. Unfortunately, Max grows up to be a thief, and now he’s an ex-con stuck on Earth. One day on the assembly line, he absorbs a fatal dose of radiation. With five days to live, his only hope is to make it to Elysium, where citizens have access to personal medical pods that can fix even the most grotesque injuries. Getting to those pearly gates won’t be easy. Elysium is guarded by tough Secretary of Defense Delacourt (Jodie Foster), who regularly uses extralegal tactics to keep the rabble out. Such tactics usually involve Kruger (Sharlto Copley), a cloaked, earthbound renegade who fires missiles at any unauthorized ships that dare approach Elysium — even if those ships are loaded (as they usually are) with sick women and children. To get himself smuggled into Elysium, Max approaches Spider (Wagner Moura), an underworld sleaze. The resulting mayhem supplies enough intrigue for a half-dozen sci-fi dystopias: a high-tech coup, a botched kidnapping, DNA downloads, an exoskeleton that grants its wearer superhuman powers. To Blomkamp’s credit, Elysium’s story doesn’t seem convoluted when it’s unfolding onscreen. Much of the film’s first half has a dense, lived-in feel, yet the details seem, refreshingly, to have been well-thought-out. For instance, when Max is outfitted with

“AmAndA Seyfried iS SenSAtionAl! She bringS lindA lovelAce to life.” – OWEN GLEIBERMAN,

A rob ePStein/Jeffrey friedmAn FILM DIRECTED BY rob ePStein & Jeffrey friedmAn WRITTEN BY Andy bellin INC. © 2012 LOVELACE PRODUCTIONS,

Damon wants off this planet. that exoskeleton, he doesn’t suddenly become an indestructoterminatokillerbot, just a stronger version of himself: sturdy and awkward in equal measure. Likewise, the idea that Elysium’s airspace is being protected by a shabby psycho back on Earth is a uniquely goofy idea that speaks to Delacourt and Elysium’s need to keep the dirty work of homeland security hidden from judgmental eyes. Sound familiar? Blomkamp establishes the contours of this world so firmly that you can’t help but be confused by his climactic second half, which makes mincemeat of his carefully established rules while piling on generic heroics and emotional crescendos. Many of these later scenes betray the very things that make the first half so involving. When one of the bad guys finally puts on an exoskeleton, he does become an indestructoterminatokillerbot and lays waste to everything in his path. If Elysium had been conceived as a dumber film, a straight-up action picture, these later scenes probably wouldn’t have stung so much. Luckily, the movie has as its hero Matt Damon. Is there another action star who can be so consistently, believably vulnerable? As in the Bourne films, he’s the guy who seems slightly out of his element yet possessed of deep inner strength. Elysium might be his most fragile action role yet — he starts off getting his arm broken, and things get steadily worse — and he conveys all of his considerable agony. Credit this scrappy, likable movie star, and an exceedingly smart first half, for making so much of Elysium so enjoyable — even if it doesn’t live up to Blomkamp’s grand ambitions.

the trUth goeS deePer thAn yoU thinK

eXclUSive engAgement

StArtS fridAy, AUgUSt 9!

Olathe AMC Studio 30 (888) AMC-4FUN

CHECK DIRECTORIES FOR SHOWTIMES NO PASSES ACCEPTED

GRAB SOME

•GREAT DEALS• Kansas City Pitch Weekly

THU 08/08 2 COL. (4.77") X 3" ALL.LVL.0808.KCP

JL/RR OPERA HOUSE COFFEE & FOOD EMPORIUM

$20 MEAL FOR TWO - ONLY $10 500 WALNUT ST KCMO 64106

PEANCHES FOOD & WINE

$30 WORTH OF FOOD FOR $15 900 W 39TH ST, KCMO 64111

PACHAMAMA’S RESTAURANT

$30 CERTIFICATE FOR $15

800 NEW HAMPSHIRE ST LAWRENCE KS

GET THESE DEALS AT

.com

E-mail feedback@pitch.com pitch.com

august 8 -14, 2013

the pitch

19


It’s our 32nd Birthday! We are celebrating by offering 1981 prices on Burgers* and Bartenders choice Aug 12-15

Jerry’scafe

LOCALLY GROWN, DELICIOUSLY PREPARED!

Breakfast & Lunch

gluten-free, vegetarian, and dairy-free options Specialty Baked Goods

WWW.FIGTREECAFELS.COM

*Mini Burgers

Open everyday | 6aM

VOTED BEST DESSERTS 817 NE Rice Road, Lee Summit | 816.347.0442

817 Westport Rd KCMO 816-931-1986 westportfleamarket.com

tO

3pM

816.941.4055 1209 w 103rd st. kcMO hOMe Of the faMOus reuBen & Giant pOrk tenderLOin!

Owned and Operated By

the jerry naster

1713 VILLAGE W. PARKWAY KANSAS CITY, KANSAS 913.299.8787 chiusanospizza.com

HAPPY HOUR 2 for 1 ALL drinks

• 40 YEARS OVERLOOKING THE PLAZA • INGREDIENT DRIVEN MENU • AWARD WINNING WINE LIST

beers & wine at the bar

Mon-Fri : 4-6

Locally owned & operated!

Photograph: Angela Bond

201 WEST 47TH STREET KANSAS CITY, MO 64112 816.753.3565 • WWW.STARKERSRESTAURANT.COM

A Local Favorite for Over 25 Years Tues: Live Jazz

www.elpatronkcmo.com

Martini & Wine Specials

4890 Main St. KCMO • 816-753-0810

Or book online at: accursos.com Accurso’s Caters! find us Fri Aug 16th

Tuesday: $1.50 Tacos from 2-10pm

HAPPY HOUR

Mon thru Fri 2-6pm

Specials on Mojitos, Margaritas, & Appetizers

Come and enjoy our authentic and unique Mexican cuisine

OPEN EVERYDAY FROM 11AM TO 10PM 2905 Southwest Blvd • Kansas City, MO • 816.931.6400 20

the pitch

august 8 -14, 2013

pitch.com

Come Let Us Drink

a collaboration of the KC Baroque Consortium & Byrd Productions

naughty and ribald barroom music from 16th-18th century England 8:00pm - $10

!

1001 Arabian Nights bellydance with A’isha, Theresa & friends Sat Aug 10th 8:00pm - $5

Katy Guillen & Claire Adams Sat Aug 10th 10:30pm - $5

3611 Broadway • KCMO 4 - 1:30 Mon-Sat

a community bar celebrating the performing arts

Check our website for details and other upcoming events

ollow us on

acebook

MORE THAN 50 ar ts events ever y month!

www.uptownartsbar.com


CAFÉ

XXLIBERTY

Conrad’s supersizes the suburban everybar.

BY

CHARLES FERRUZZA

Conrad’s Restaurant & Alehouse • 210 North State Route 291, Liberty, 816-407-1717 • Hours: 11 a.m.–10 p.m. Monday–Saturday, 11 a.m.–9 p.m. Sunday • Price: $–$$

C

onrad’s Restaurant & Alehouse is almost certainly the biggest dining operation in Liberty. (The place used to be a CVS pharmacy.) It’s also clearly a prototype for the kind of combination restaurant and saloon that plays well in various suburbs. I have no trouble picturing another, equally big Conrad’s in Olathe or in Lee’s Summit. Shawn Conrad Barber, you see, knows a few things about the restaurant business. For decades, his parents ran the downtown-KC diner E R O M Connie’s, located from 1968 to 2002 in the Argyle Building (12th T A INE ONL .COM Street and McGee), and H PITC satellite versions of the same operation in Jefferson City, Missouri, and Sioux City, Iowa. Barber chose a different path, working as a professional photographer. (Back in the 1990s, he was a co-worker of mine at a now-defunct newspaper.) But he has come around to the idea that there might be more money in pork chops than in family portraits. No one can say he hasn’t thought big. Barber has divided the former retail space in two, installing a family-friendly, modestly priced dining room on one side and a noisier, livelier (and much larger) lounge on the other. The latter, where the majority of Barber’s clientele seems to end up, is dominated by a long bar that has 21 beers on tap. (Barber says he plans to add 20 more taps next month.) There are pool tables, a semi-enclosed patio, TV screens and an interactive golf game. The Alehouse side serves the same menu the dining room does. On both of my visits, I chose to sit in the less raucous restaurant, which isn’t always less noisy. During my first visit, so many small children were packed into the dining room that I feared I’d been escorted into a Chuck E. Cheese by mistake. Apparently, Liberty has a lot of young families who have been waiting for a place that offers the alluring combination of children’s menus and $3 glasses of sangria (during the longish happy hour, from 3 to 7 p.m.). That’s not really my scene. But one afternoon, I found myself at liberty in Liberty (visiting with my overburdened accountant, if you must know) and unexpectedly hungry. From a shopping strip on Highway 291, Conrad’s beckoned, offering a more dignified solution than the CiCi’s Pizza in the same center. Even from the outside, Conrad’s looks cavernous — nearly the length of a Wal-Mart, I’m telling you. The interior of the dining room is a little clubby — stone walls and dark

ANGELA C. BOND

CAFÉ

joint that can make a cheap steak taste good can do almost anything right, and Conrad’s does indeed serve a fine slab of budget beef. wood — with a few mounted canvases (you What I tried was nearly fork-tender and grilled could call them art if you’re feeling generprecisely as I’d ordered it. ous), silk-screened with restaurant platitudes. My server’s guidance went sideways, One reads: “Dining is and always was a great though, when she steered me toward a “topartistic opportunity.” Architect Frank Lloyd per” for my steak. The house-made crab cake Wright, who never lived to see the age of the highway-ramp strip mall, is credited with that that came out was nearly as big as the steak, a hefty little puck made with far too much breadstatement. Would he have ordered the $11.99 chicken piccata at Conrad’s? It does, after all, ing and a fearsome amount of black pepper. “Didn’t you like your crab cake?” she asked come with two side dishes. My server that evening was a willowy young when she came for the plate. “It’s one of our woman who brought an ecstatic fervor to her specialties.” I don’t know what this “specialty” says about descriptions of the better dishes at Conrad’s. The menu at this restaurant hews closely to the culinary tastes of Liberty, but it was one of the few misfires I tasted at comfort-food favorites — a Conrad’s. The grilled appleCajun-style pasta with anConrad's Restaurant wood shrimp appetizer was douille sausage and a Cha& Alehouse another, but only because blis sauce is about as exotic Applewood shrimp ......... $7.29 the five tiny shrimp looked as Conrad’s gets. She didn’t Top sirloin, 10-ounce ....$15.99 marooned on a big appetizer suggest anything especially Crab cake "topper" ..............$6 plate. They needed a saucer. elaborate, so her advice was Filet mignon ..................$27.99 Macaroni and cheese.. $10.99 Far more satisfying were pretty much on point. Kay's carrot cake ...........$5.99 the boneless, bacon-wrapped There are a couple of pork chops, succulent and steaks priced over $20, inmoist and blanketed with a cluding an aged 8-ounce filet mignon — it was as tender and perfectly grilled savory apple-and-bacon chutney. They were particularly good with a mound of creamy as something from a proper steakhouse. But on mashed potatoes (the real thing) and saumy first visit, I decided to order what the couple téed fresh broccoli. It was no surprise that at the next table seemed very satisfied with: a 10-ounce top sirloin, served with two side the macaroni and cheese here comes in a big portion, but I was pleasantly shocked by its dishes, for $16. I’ve always believed that any

Bigger is better at Conrad’s.

pitch.com

tastiness. Under a crispy crust, the sauce of cheddar, mozzarella, parmesan and pepper jack was delicious. My dining companion another night, a Johnson Countian who self-identifies as a food snob, was wary of Conrad’s from the first minute. “Everyone here is wearing shoes from Payless,” she whispered. But in the end, she gave her filet mignon a full-throated endorsement. She also loved the green beans and had the highest praise for a generous hunk of house-made carrot cake. (Baked by Barber’s stepmother, it’s one of the few desserts at Conrad’s made in-house.) “I think a restaurant like this would do well in Johnson County,” she told me. “The food is really very good.” Barber knows this already and would like to extend his brand over the border. But, he told me later, “I’ve got to get this fi rst one up and running at full speed fi rst.” So far, so good. I’d rethink that peppery crab cake, of course, and I don’t know if Leawoodites are prepared to view tortilla chips as a “side dish.” But Conrad’s is solid, and it has the kind of potential that transcends the tastes of any one ’burb. It’s worth keeping an eye on — a Conrad’s could be coming to a strip center near you.

Have a suggestion for a restaurant The Pitch should review? E-mail charles.ferruzza@pitch.com august 8 -14, 2013

the pitch

21


FAT C I T Y BY

best in 94 area home brewers.

JON AT H A N BENDER

CHRIS MULLINS

TRANSFORMERS

Boulevard’s wort brings out the

I

n a warehouse filled with nearly 500,000 gallons of beer, only 94 bottles matter on this Saturday. Each contains a home brewer’s hopes — and a concoction created with wort supplied by Boulevard Brewing Co. In May, the KC beer giant offered free 5-gallon batches of wort (the malted barley that’s the basic building block of beer) to 160 people who reserved buckets. Whatever the wort users did with the stuff would be tasted — and judged — if the brewers took their concoctions to Boulevard by July 15. “I took off work [at Cerner] early,” 27-yearold Tim Squires says. “It was a fun day. I brought a buddy, and we had a few beers in the tasting room.” He had in mind a beer-andwine fusion, something he figured he’d tweak after tasting the wort, which Boulevard had kept as neutral as possible. Boulevard received 94 entries in the contest, called “Wort Transformation 2013.” And on August 3, in the former Coors warehouse off Front Street — a few odometer ticks from the Isle of Capri casino — a group of volunteer employees is preparing to determine which home brewer’s creation has earned a featured slot in the brewery’s taproom. “We’re not looking to crush anybody’s spirit,” brewer Jeremy Danner says. “The question is, what was the goal of the beer and did you accomplish it?” Elizabeth Belden, who oversees the brewery’s quality-assurance lab, explains 22

the pitch

august 8 -14, 2013

the judging rules to the three dozen gathered employees. A perfect score is 50 (three points for appearance, five for mouth feel, 12 for taste, 20 for flavor and 10 for the overall impression). A “world-class beer” is in the 45–50 range. A “problematic” brew (there were none Saturday) would score between zero and 13. Each home brewer will get a sheet explaining the scores from each judge, along with a series of descriptors: metallic, say, or astringent. Maybe vegetal. Maybe grassy. I’m at a table with Master Cicerone Neil Witte and six other people. My half of the table is judging the Belgian specialty category. There also are fruit, saison, specialty, American ale, spice/herb/vegetable, “smoked and Scottish,” and lager/Pilsner categories. I’m allowed to weigh in, but my vote won’t determine whether someone moves on or stays in the competition. The brown bottles arrive with white stickers and three-digit numbers but no other distinguishing marks. An Excel spreadsheet includes a brief description of the beer, focusing on its style and the ingredients used. Quick hisses of air sound as bottle caps are pried off. It’s 9:14 a.m., and I’ve suddenly got eight beers to drink. After the first round, Belden walks me back to the cooler, and the door slides up and releases a blast of cold air as our feet approach on the concrete. She hands me a pile of white papers, the notes that each brewer submitted alongside his or her six-pack. Much of the

pitch.com

text is formed in the compressed scrawl of someone who would rather not be writing. Some brewers documented their brew days as faithfully as Ken Burns, but many have jotted down just a few words. There is, for one, the peanut-butter-and-jelly ale whose maker has described it simply as “Dehydrated Peanut Butter. Strawberry Juice.” There are some secrets that home brewers want to keep, even from Boulevard. “I wanted to use saison yeast, but the homebrew store was all out,” Squires says of his brew, which he has named Fusion. “So I used Belgian strong yeast. I boiled some pinot grigio grape juice and added orange and lemon peel. There’s a little bit of candied ginger, although it didn’t come through at all. And then I dryhopped it with some Cascade hops.” With each beer, the judges bury their noses in the small, clear-plastic sample cups. They often swirl the contents to help oxygen open up the beer, as they would with wine. The nose goes back in. Next comes the sip. Some then stare and think. Others look down into the beer for answers. “Beer gets more honest as it warms,” Belden says. “If you still like it when it’s warm and the carbonation is gone, that’s the true test.” Boulevard founder John McDonald arrives for the third of four rounds, dressed casually in a red Boulevard T-shirt. He grabs a chair across from Boulevard brewmaster Steven Pauwels and asks for a full set of nine

samples. The chatter resembles that of a dugout: short, excited bursts of conversation modulated by sips. A sour ale with lemongrass reminds Pauwels of a shandy. “I keep coming back to this one. The cucumber one is … ” McDonald trails off. “Cucumber-y?” Boulevard brewer Sterling Holman suggests. McDonald nods and smiles. The beer doesn’t advance to the finals, but another of McDonald’s picks — a wheat with lemon and ginger — moves on. Eight Boulevard employees sit down for the last round. They won’t get up for another hour. “What is the best beer?” McDonald asks now that the field has narrowed to three choices: Squires’ Fusion, a dry-hopped Belgian, and the wheat with ginger. “Is it something you can drink a lot of?” The day belongs to Squires. On Monday, he gets a call from Boulevard, inviting him back to brew his beer on their equipment. At home in Olathe, Squires has been upgrading his home-brew system, retrofitting a 10-gallon water cooler from Home Depot to serve as his new mash tun. “I didn’t want to give my six-pack up for tasting, but my wife, Ashly, convinced me that this was a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity,” Squires says. “It’s going to be neat seeing my beer in the taproom.”

E-mail jonathan.bender@pitch.com


We

KC

uarter century of cool Aq

25

BUY LOCAL

New Menu! New Ownership!

WEEKDAY LUNCH BUFFET - $6.99

Contemporary Regional Missouri Cuisine Dinner: Tues - Sat Happy Hour: Wed - Fri, 4 - 5:30

WITH PRESENTATION OF THIS AD THROUGH SEPT 31

Open Everyday

Comfort Food For Thought

11am - 3pm, 5:30pm - 10pm Contact: (913)381-1234 or (913)381-4567 7301 W 91st St. Overland Park KS 66212

www.masalaskc.com

900 W 39th St. Kansas City, MO 64111

• WE SERVE HALAL MEAT ONLY •

DUBLINER

Our Passion is Great Food with a Mission

THE

We allocate 50% of our profits to educational charities.

Irish Ale House & Pub

13 LUNCH

1809 West 39th St. Kansas City, MO 816.753.6661 www.annasoven.com

HAPPY HOUR MON-FRI 4-7

CHOICES for $ (M-F)

7

LIVE MUSIC

THURS-SAT

MENTION THE PITCH FOR A 1/2 PRICE APPETIZER

170 E. 14TH ST. KCMO IN P&L DISTRICT • 816.268.4700 THEDUBLINERKC.COM •

15

$

1414 W. 9TH ST . MINUTES FROM DOWNTOWN 816.472.6333

LUNCH & MOVIE

Choose one menu item for lunch before or after a movie and receive one matinee ticket for just $15!*

VOTED A BEST MISSOURI RESTAURANT 2013

Daily Lunch Specials

/THEDUBLINERKC

Wonderful meals. Refreshing drinks. Great movies. The Village Shops | Prairie Village, Kansas | standeeseatery.com | 913.601.5250 *Some limitations apply. Call for details or visit our website.

pitch.com

august 8 -14, 2013

the pitch

23


FAT C I T Y

Restaurants

AMERICAN DREAMS

New executive chef Michael Corvino brings big ideas to the American.

BY

JON AT H A N BENDER

T

NOT

TODAY! BREAKFAST: MON-FRI: 7-11AM SAT: 7-12PM SUN: 8-1:30PM

S

LUNCH:

MON-SAT: 11-3PM SUN: 11-1:30PM

409 W. Gregory KCMO 816.444.1933 www.theclassiccookie.com

• UPCOMING EVENTS • 8.7 YOUSPIN - INTERACTIVE VIRTUAL JUKEBOX 8.8 MY ROTTEN SELF, THE CAVES, ALIEN JONES 8.9 THE MONARCHS, AFTER NATIONS, GUNS ON MARS, PERFECT PURSUIT 8.10 COPPER CREEK (CLASSIC COVERS) MATINEE 8.12 HOME GROWN HIP HOP W/ HOUSTON ZIZZA, GUN JAKC, FINAL FOUR, DJ PMS 8.13 ELKHEART’S DOWNTOWN OUTLAW FIASCO (FEATURING MEDICINE THEORY) HAPPY HOUR SPECIALS 4PM - 7PM . MON-SAT

1531 GRAND KCMO

816.421.0300 . CZARKC.COM 24

the pitch

august 8 -14, 2013

he American Restaurant may be Kansas City’s greatest culinary contradiction. The jewel of Crown Center has a storied past and a stunning roster of former chefs (including James Beard winner Debbie Gold). It has resonated with the city, even as it hasn't always been able to turn special-occasion diners into regular patrons. Fast-talking, 31-year-old Michael Corvino may not be the obvious choice as the American’s new executive chef — his fi rst time in that role. But it’s clear that Corvino, who has a tattoo of a sweet onion on the inside of his right elbow in honor of his hometown, understands the challenges ahead for the restaurant. “People come for an occasion,” he says. “It was the same battle at the [Rosewood] Mansion [on Turtle Creek]. We want them to importance of hospitality as well as food come more often. I want to pack this place.” trends on the coasts. And he’s hoping that Born in Walla Walla, Washington, Corvino has worked in kitchens since his sophomore his drive to find new techniques and ingreyear in high school. His culinary education dient combinations becomes his hallmark began at the Marcus Whitman Hotel, where in Kansas City. “We’re going to bring in some liquid he spent three and a half years learning how nitrogen,” Corvino says, “but that won’t be to source local produce, butcher, and design food pairings for the region’s exploding what defi nes me. I just want people to see my style.” wine scene. On a recent weekday morning, Corvino In 2003, he moved to Chicago and took a job on the line at the Peninsula Hotel. The spoke to The Pitch in the American’s pastel lounge about his plans for the restaurant. average room rate was $1,100, so expectations in the dining room were high. “The The Pitch: What’s next for the American? natural-born line cook” kicked out 300 Corvino: I want to push food. I want peoplates at a time and learned to bake bread ple to really get excited about what we’re in the hotel’s French café. Corvino also ran doing. [Interim executive chef] Josh [Eans] the hotel’s banquet business and oversaw has been doing great food, and now we’re the butchering operation from a room kept really going to freaking go. Three courses at a cool 52 degrees. for $59 is a steal. “I think I can sense the most finesse in cold What dishes have you got planned for the food,” Corvino says. “It’s either amazing or …” menu? After a 15-month stint at We changed the foie. the Ritz-Carlton’s flagship It’s the same prep. Josh has “We’re going to bring hotel in Naples, Florida, been cold-smoking it, and Corvino was hired by the coming from Texas, we’re in some liquid nitrogen, Sage Restaurant Group to always doing that kind of but that won’t be open a pair of restaurants stuff. I love torchon. We’re what defines me.” — Urban Farmer and Deparadd i ng a Meyer-le mon ture — in the Nines luxury marmalade with cracked hotel in Portland, Oregon. black pepper. There will be Corvino witnessed how hotel guests were ground cherries, almost like a sweet tomabecoming enamored of celebrity chefs rather tillo, and puffed wild rice like Rice Krispies. than a restaurant’s dining heritage. So, in 2011, There’s also a black-bass dish. I love black he took a position as the executive sous chef bass. It’s black olives puréed with lardo from at the Rosewood Mansion on Turtle Creek in La Quercia and kale in a couple different forms. Dallas. Under chef Bruno Davaillon, Corvino There’s potato gnocchi and preserved lemon, developed an appreciation for balancing fla- and the fish is served with a crispy skin. vors and melding Asian, French and regional By next week, the menu will be comAmerican cuisine into one dish. pletely turned over. I came to this place to Corvino brings 14 years of experience really develop my style of food. We’ve got a to the American’s kitchen. He knows the James Beard dinner in November, and that

pitch.com

Corvino: ready to “freaking go” at the American. will be a blast. There’s also a wine dinner with Merry Edwards. What are you experimenting with? It’s a scallop dish with farro verde from Anson Mills. It has such an earthy, nutty aroma, and it almost smells smoked, even though there’s no smoke. I cook that risotto-style with squid ink. It’s black and super-rich and savory. You talk about umami right there. Then there’s fresh summer garbanzo beans with a yogurt component and ground chorizo. It’s rich and fresh and light, and there’s a balance of flavors. What’s one food you love? Lobster. Caviar. But not in a snobby way. I eat that with a spoon. We had a guy at the Peninsula who would regularly come in on Sundays and order Beluga, when Beluga was still available. He and his wife would each get an ounce. She would just eat it out of the jar, and he would dump his onto his eggs Benedict and go to town. What’s one food you hate? I don’t know if I have one. Food is in your head. I thought I didn’t like feta. It was a salty, briny, worthless cheese. But feta has its place. It’s with fresh fruit like olive and grapefruit. You put something salty and briny with something fresh. Besides your own place, where do you like to go out to eat? I’ve got a long list. I’m going to start crossing them off. Oklahoma Joe’s is at the top of my list. Obviously, there’s Bluestem and Michael Smith’s spot. A chef is only as good as … … his team.

E-mail jonathan.bender@pitch.com


WHERE THE BEST MUSICIANS IN THE WORLD PLAY

KNUCKLEHEADS MEETING/PARTY ROOM AVAILABLE

withiends fr pitch.com > Restaurants > Restaurant Guide

8/10 BEN HENDRIX BENEFIT SMASH THE STATE & FRIENDS

8/13 BILLY BEALE

Live Music Live Music 7 nights 7 nights a week

8/21 QUANTRILL SESQUICENTENNIAL IRON DOG STRING BAND & MORE

VISIT US AT BLACKGOLDKC.COM

816-561-1099 • 3740 BROADWAY KCMO

F re e S h u tt le in S u rr o u n d in g A reth e a

AUGUST:

7: The Crayons 8: Lyal Stickland 8: John Velghe & The Prodigal Sons

AUGUST 9TH, 2013

paul thorn w/ special guest cassie taylor

a week

816.561.2444 www.erniebiggs.com nsas 4115 Mill Street West Port Ka

10: Paul Thorn with Rick Gibson & Tom Hall 11: Paul Thorn’s Old Time Gospel Brunch 14: Outlaw Jim & The Whiskey Benders

City

AUGUST 15th, 2013 Courtney Patton

15: Dana Fuchs with Shannon Whitworth 16: Levee Town live CD recording 16: Asleep at the Wheel 17: Wayne(the Train) Hancock, DekeDickerson & The Rumblejetts COMING SOON!

sprint center

For more info & tickets: knuckleheadskc.com

september 8

TICKETS ON SALE NOW! • Sprintcenter.com • Sprint Center Box Office • Charge by phone 888.929.7849 :

A

BEAVER

PRODUCTION

2715 Rochester, KCMO

816-483-1456

:

pitch.com

august 8 -14, 2013

the pitch

25


MUSIC

B R O O K E VA N D E V E R

SHOW AND TELL

Pitch Music Showcase

Far left: Sheppa (top) and Stevie Cruz of Hammerlord, John Velghe and the Prodigal Sons (at left) and Gee Watts (above)

F

riday night, about 25 local acts assembled on five different stages in the Westport area for The Pitch Music Showcase. There were guitars. There was progressive fashion. There were spilled drinks. There was at least one fight. It was an excellent time. Below, some memories. And don’t forget about The Pitch Music Awards, this Sunday, August 11, at the Uptown Theater. • Best Rock nominee Not a Planet drew probably the biggest crowd of the evening to the Riot Room’s indoor stage, playing for well E MOR over an hour. The band dut i f u l l y r e m i n d e d the audience to cast T A E IN their votes in its favor: ONL .COM PITCH Dr um mer Lia m Sumnicht promised “change” if victorious; singer Nathan Corsi (wearing white denim, a crisp white oxford and red suspenders) vowed to put “soda machines in every lobby.” • On the one hand, the fresh, punchy tracks and clear-cut vocals from frontman Kyle Akers puts Antennas Up fi rmly in the power-pop genre. On the other, half the songs from Antennas Up have enough en-

M US I C

26

Piecing together the 2013

the pitch

august 8 -14, 2013

coded bleeps and blips to make you feel like you’ve just been dropped into an old-school computer game (or maybe a Postal Service show). The result is an oddly charming mix of electro pop that feels like it was lifted from your favorite late-’80s flick, given some modern flair and a haircut, and dropped into your best playlist. A great follow-up to Not a Planet’s set. • With her bedazzling jewels around both eyes, fi shnet stockings and smart confessional lyrics, La Guerre’s Katlyn Conroy won lady crush of the evening. Her Dresden Dolls–meets–Ben Folds keyboard style was secondary only to her excellent vocals at her RecordBar performance. (Her microphone seemed almost unnecessary.) She split immediately after her set was over so she could drive her mom home, which seemed sweet. • Outside on the Riot Room patio stage, Reach rapped over a beat that was mostly just Jay Z saying Tom Ford over and over again. Then he asked everybody to get out their phones and vote for him for Best Hip-Hop act. You gotta respect that kind of hustle. • On one of Info Gates’ songs, he rhymed quitter with shitter, then fuck it with flush it.

pitch.com

He rapped about mixing milk with bourbon. He rapped about breathalyzers. He rapped about roofies. He did a Nicki Minaj–style monster growl. Then he brought CES Cru up onstage for “One Bomb State,” and the three alternated verses and rhymes at approximately 1 billion miles an hour. A definite contender for highlight of the evening. • At Californos, Shades of Jade’s set was a mix of R&B and classic KC jazz. It was like really diggin’ into a fat piece of jazz pie, letting the juices run down your face, but instead of reaching for a paper towel, you just keep eating. Dirty, dirty music — but dirty in the instrumental way, not like R. Kelly or Bobby Brown. • Also at Californos, Brandon Draper spent about an hour generally asserting himself as one of the more precious gems in the jewelry box of the KC scene. He alternated between high-level drum-and-bass and looped, trancy grooves that sounded like they belonged on the dance floor of a sexy Vegas nightclub. Jaws subsequently dropped. • On the Outdoor Stage, Oils frontman Andrew Frederick ended the set by descending from the stage into the crowd with just his microphone, dancing in a circle and

repeating the line, You’re dialing me in! Seemed like a great way to fi nish the set. But as soon as the song ended, he explained to the crowd that he had just broken a guitar string and was just winging it. Could have fooled us. • An uptick in exposed midriffs and dancing in the crowd at the Outdoor Stage? Yep — Making Movies. • Hammerlord frontman Stevie Cruz sprang like a pinball around the stage as his band closed down the party at the Riot Room. He balanced himself fearlessly on speakers, leaned into the crowd and showered those up front with sweat from his drenched hair. “We thank you for giving us the chance to be responsible heavy-metal motherfuckers,” he said, and that about wrapped it up. More Pitch Music Showcase coverage online at pitch.com. — DAVID HUDNALL, BERRY ANDERSON, LESLIE KINSMAN, ADRIANNE DEWEESE AND NATALIE GALLAGHER

E-mail david.hudnall@pitch.com


pitch.com

august 8 -14, 2013

the pitch

27


MON: RURAL GRIT 6PM // KARAOKE 10 FRI 8/9 C PM ROSSED WIR ES, SAT 8/10 FTHE QUIVERS DECO AUTO, ORREST ANDREW WHITLOW BAND, (FEAT. MEMB CONNOR & TH ER THU 8/15 C E S LOUD DOGS,OFMDRAKKAN SAUNA & FOHIP URTH OF JULY Y ) B O FRI 8/16 THVINYL, MAMMOTH LIYFFRIEND ON E, DJ NARTAN E BURDOCK KIN SAT 8/17 THTONY LADESICH G, LOVES IT!, IS IS MY CO NDIT OLIVETTI LEION, SIMPLE LINES, TTER

MUSIC

GREAT ESCAPE

David Burchfield and the Great Stop release their

BY

first full-length right as they say goodbye to KC.

A PR IL F L EMING

I

f Sufjan Stevens and Bon Iver had a cornfed Kansas baby, it might make music a little like that of David Burchfield and the Great Stop. The band’s music is spare, lovely and interested in the mystical — and now that we’ve come to appreciate it, Burchfield and his bandmates are all headed in different directions across the country for graduate school. But, thankfully, they’re not out before the band’s debut album, Perseids, a beautiful collection of Americana, is released at the band’s farewell/record-release show this Saturday at RecordBar. We recently caught up with Burchfield over a beer at the Brick. The Pitch: Your band started out with you and Leslie [Hammer]. How did you two meet? 1515 WESTPORT RD. • 816-931-9417 Burchfield: We met at a house show here WED 8/7 TROY ALLEN & FRIENDS for a band named Soil and Sun in Kansas City. THU 8/8 KEVIN HYATT We had some mutual friends, and I found out FRI 8/9 5PM SHERRI ACOSTA ART EXHIBIT 9PM BUTTERMILK BOYS that she played banjo. I had just moved back SAT 8/10 ACOUSTIC DIAMOND to town, about three years ago. I liked her TUE 8/13 CRITTER’S TIE-DYE TUESDAY from the very beginning. WED 8/14 MICHAEL SHULTZ B-DAY JAM Where were you living before? WIFI NOW AVAILABLE! In Guatemala. After I graduated, I moved able but very real. I feel most inspired by CHECK OUT THE NEW ALL DAY HAPPY HOUR there to work for a human rights organiza- mystery and grandeur and wonder, and tion. We started playing that August. I had those kinds of ideas. That’s where that song [“The Great Stop”] comes from. written all these songs while I was living in 8/8 - Kevin Hyatt How does it relate? Guatemala and I wanted to make a record, On an organ, when you pull all of the stops, so IArt recruited a bunch of musicians from my 8/9 - 5pm Sherri Acosta Exhibit community and recorded these songs with a it’s called ‘the great stop,’ when infrasound 9pm Buttermilk Boys happens. pretty big band. Showing my musical ignorance, what does it What do you mean by community? mean to pull a stop? Specifically Jacob’s Well. It’s a church in WED. 3/6 THURS. 3/7 1020 WESTPORT RD WWW.THERECORDBAR.COM 816-753-5207 LIQUORBUDDIES CAVEMANCOMPUTER On a pipe organ, there are these pegs that town. It’s a pretty progressive, pretty artisHOTDOGSKELETONS MAGIC VEHICLES you pull out. If they’re all pushed in, you’re tically vibrant community. There’s like 50 THURS. AUG. 8 FRI. 3/8 SAT. 3/9 basically limiting how much air is coming semiprofessional musicians who go there, so INSTANT KARMA 6PM DOODADS 7PM WIRES 10PM CHEROKEE 10PM SOFT REEDS through the organ. The more stops you pull, it’s pretty easy to find people to work with. WE LEAVE AT MIDNIGHT ROCK RIFLE NOISEFM the more you’re opening up. It’s like a lung Could you explain to me what infrasound is BAD IDEAS GENTLEMANSAVAGE THE SEEN APPROPRIATE GRAMMAR ANDREAPERDUE that you open up. and how that relates to your band? FRI. AUG. 9 SAT. AUG. 10 SUN. 3/10 MON. 3/11 Ah! So that’s what it actually means to pull Infrasound is just subsonic frequency, 7PM DIRTY WORK 7PM OLASSA 8PM DESERT NOISES just below the range of human hearing. So out all the stops. 10PM GYPSY SPARROWS DAVID BURCHFIELD ALATURKA MELISMATICS SUDDEN DEATH ASHES & IMMORTALITY 10PM Yeah. That idea is really appealing to me. it’s out there, and you can actually feel it, CD RELEASE SO COW PRODUCER’S BATTLE JOHN GOOLSBY PARTY (IRELAND) It’s a musical thing that you can’t hear but you like the hairs on the back of your neck will can feel. This new album, stand up, or like a shakTUES. 3/1211 WED. 3/13 SUN. AUG. MON. AUG. 12 GOTNEXT OFF WITH THEIR HEADS MIDWEST especially more than the ing or a rumbling in your SUNDIVER FORTUNATE YOUTH David Burchfield and TWO4ONE TEENAGEBOTTLEROCKET first one, a lot of it is related chest, but you can’t hear DOMCHRONICLES VOLCANO VEINS ARM THE POOR the Great Stop MASKEDINTRUDER PETER SENSAY to grandeur and mystery. it. It exists in things like Saturday, August 10, KILL NOISEBOYS STEDDYP TUES. AUG. 13 WED. AUG. 14 Your first record as a band — for instance, elephants at RecordBar UPCOMING KARAOKE is coming out right before you use it to communicate over LOADED GOAT 3/14 EXPENDABLES 4/8 FU MANCHU make a big life change. But 3/18 DARWIN 4/16 MOWGLIS WITHDEEZE INSOMNIAC FOLK great distances because the 3/19 LYDIA LOVELESS 4/23 BLACK MT. wavelength is so long that it travels far. It’s this is not the end of the band, correct? Did you TULIPANA PIONEER 4/3 THAO& TGDSD 4/30 DEVIL MAKE 3 want to release this before you left? also a sound that we can’t hear that occurs in WEEKLY Yeah. The way this process began was, natural disasters like volcanic eruptions and SUN. 12-5PM BARTENDER’S BRUNCH & BLOODY MARY BAR my bandmates and I just loved each other hurricanes. And on some organs, if they’re MON. 7PM SONIC SPECTRUM MUSIC TRIVIA TUES. 7PM HONKY TONK SUPPER CLUB and loved to play music together. It was a big enough and they pull all of the stops, WED. 7PM BOB WALKENHORST & FRIENDS really sweet time for us in a lot of different then the organist can achieve infrasound. It THURS. 7PM TRIVIA CLASH OPENDAILY ways. One of us just came out of a breakup was used, and maybe still is in some places, SUN. 12PM-12AM WED-FRI and needed community, and it was great for to create this experience of the Holy Spirit. 12PM-1:30AM MON.TUES.SAT. us to provide that. Another hadn’t been in a Like a physical experience. 4PM-1:30AM KITCHEN OPENLATE band in a long time and really was missing Yeah. This thing that’s kind of unexplainWWW.THERECORDBAR.COMFOR FULL SCHEDULE

Sudden!

kcmo

WED. AUG. 7 the family bed TOO LATE FOR SATELLITES FreedomClutch

28

the pitch

august 8 -14, 2013

pitch.com

The group comes to a four-way stop. that. It was just a great thing for all of us, and as Devon [Russell]’s time was ending, we thought, “We have to do something.” There’s this Ani DiFranco quote, “A record of an event of people making music in a room.” A mark in time. Like a photo album. Yeah. The original idea was just to do it really fast and just have it for ourselves, but I’m just not really capable of thinking small, so it’s just become a full-fledged thing. I’m working with a friend of mine, a budding producer and also a musician: David Bennett from the band Akkilles. He has built a great home studio and is probably my best friend in town. It was a good opportunity to work with a good friend and support him. I think it sounds pretty good for how we’ve done it. What was the best part of recording this? Spending time with your bandmates? It was such a collective experience. I just have so much love for David and Leslie, and my other bandmates. It would be really nice to have something like that, where you could just put a nice bow on the end of an experience or a time period and then usher in a new experience. Yes, and that is exactly what’ll happen. But then it’ll become its own thing. My first record, The Beginning EP, was all about my first girlfriend. But when I made it, I was with someone else, and now when I listen to those songs, I don’t think about the first person. I think about the person that I loved when making it.  

E-mail feedback@pitch.com


pitch.com

august 8 -14, 2013

the pitch

29


MUSIC

RADAR

M U S I C F O R E CA S T

BY

Other shows worth seeing this week.

D AV ID HUDN A L L

T H U R S D AY, A U G U S T 8 Billy Currington: KC Live Stage at the Power & Light District, 14th St. and Grand. Yonder Mountain String Band, Devil Makes Three: 7 p.m. Crossroads KC at Grinders, 417 E. 18th St., 816-472-5454.

F R I D AY, A U G U S T 9 Matt Nathanson: 8 p.m. KC Live Stage at the Power & Light District, 14th St. and Grand. Corey Smith, the Dirty Guv’nahs: 7 p.m. Crossroads KC at Grinders, 417 E. 18th St., 816-472-5454. Paul Thorn with Cassie Taylor: 9 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456.

S AT U R D AY, A U G U S T 10 Paul Thorn: 9 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456.

S U N D AY, A U G U S T 11 Kottonmouth Kings, Dutch Newman, Taste Bud G-Spot, Naydivz: 7 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390.

W E D N E S D AY, A U G U S T 1 4

The Pitch Music Awards

Air-guitar hero and Dead Girls drummer Eric “Mean” Melin once again hosts our annual Pitch Music Awards. In addition to Melin and a few other guest appearances, you get performances from old-school jumpin’-jazz group Grand Marquis, thundering psych from the Conquerors, and hearty cock rock from Cherokee Rock Rifle — for an $8 entry ($25 if you want in on the two-hour open bar at the adjacent Conspiracy Room starting at 6 p.m.). It’s one of the best Sunday parties of the year, and not to be missed. Sunday, August 11, at the Uptown Theater (3700 Broadway, 816-753-8665)

Bruno Mars

It is very hard not to like Bruno Mars, who is now filling arenas with a high-energy stage show that’s as appealing to teens as it is to baby boomers. Mars is part Michael Jackson, part Sam Cooke, part Prince and part Elvis (he was doing professional impersonations of the King at age 4). He plays guitar, he dances charismatically, he tips his fedora like a gentleman. He’ s a song-and-dance man who channels

soul, funk and R&B influences from the past, but in a way that feels seamlessly modern. You have to go back to MJ to find a pop star who has arrived so fully formed. Friday, August 9, at Sprint Center (1407 Grand, 816-949-7000)

Hockey

For its first album, 2009’s Mind Chaos, Hockey wrote a batch of songs from its home in Portland, Oregon, that resembled the work of acts popular in New York at the time: MGMT, the Strokes, LCD Soundsystem. The group has since relocated to New York and accordingly made an album — this year’s Wyeth Is — whose beachy synth-pop vibe feels very West Coast. Opener Swimm’s danceable psych pop should be a natural lead-in. Tuesday, August 13, at the Riot Room (4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179)

Chance the Arm

celebrating the release of its new album, The Green Groves of Erin. Joining in the festivities: the Clementines, Burning Tide, Mad Libby and Killing the Calm. No word yet on what color beer will be served. Friday, August 9, at VooDoo Lounge (Harrah’s Casino, 1 Riverboat Drive, North Kansas City, 816-472-7777)

The Hips, with Forrest Whitlow

A classic townie band in the best possible sense, the Hips is made up of former and current members of Lawrence acts Drakkar Sauna and Fourth of July. The group plays about once a quarter, and rarely outside Lawrence, and that’s a pity because its groovy-goofy roots pop is pretty on-the-nose. For this, the first KC show that I can recall, they’re joined by long-running KC singer-songwriter Forrest Whitlow. Saturday, August 10, at the Brick (1727 McGee, 816-421-1634)

Listen up, laddies: Chance the Arm, a local seven-piece of Irish rock traditionalists, is

F O R E C A S T

30

Bruno Mars (left) and Hockey

K E Y

..................................................Pick of the Week

............................................................ Huge Star

...............................................................Very Hip

.................................................. Locally Sourced

............................................... Coastal Dynamics

............................................Moves Like Jackson

.......................................................Possible Jigs

.......................................................Pyrotechnics

...................................... Not at All Like the Sport

the pitch

august 8 -14, 2013

pitch.com

Insomniac Folklore, Loaded Goat, Pioneer: 10 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Lawson: 9:30 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Paula Nelson Band: 8 p.m. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club, 3402 Main, 816-753-1909.

FUTURECAST AUGUST SATURDAY 17 The Spinners, the Emotions: Kemper Arena SUNDAY 18 Peter Frampton’s Guitar Circus with B.B. King, Sonny Landreth and Davy Knowles: Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts SATURDAY 24 Journey: Kansas Star Arena, Mulvane

SEPTEMBER TUESDAY 3 Steely Dan, Deep Blue Organ Trio: The Midland TUESDAY 17 Andrew W.K., Six Percent, American Ghouls: The Granada, Lawrence THURSDAY 19 Dane Cook: The Midland FRIDAY 27 Tommy Emmanuel: The Midland

OCTOBER TUESDAY 8 Franz Ferdinand: The Granada, Lawrence FRIDAY 11 ZZ Ward, the Wild Feathers, James Bay: The Midland SATURDAY 12 Tim McGraw: Kansas Star Arena, Mulvane MONDAY 14 The Moody Blues: The Midland TUESDAY 15 Hanson: The Granada, Lawrence


98285.3 – WEEKLY NKC~VOODOO LOUNGE PRINT – 08-08-2013

ROBERT CRAY August 23, 2013

KPRS PRESENTS: WHITE LINEN PARTY September 1, 2013

DAVE MASON

EDDIE GRIFFIN

TRAVIS

STEVE VAI

September 21, 2013

September 15, 2013

September 29, 2013

October 27, 2013

UPCOMING SHOWS: 8/9

Project Backstage Presents:

8/17

Revive

Chance the Arm CD Release

8/24

Revive

8/10

VooDoo Presents: Cole Porter Band

8/30

Kilroy Presents: Rebella Rising

8/16

Flirt Friday

12/8

Blue October

1-800-745-3000

• VooDooKC.com

Know When To Stop Before You Start.® Gambling Problem? Call 1-888-BETSOFF. Subject to change or cancellation. Phone and online orders are subject to service fees. Must be 21 years or older to gamble, obtain a Total Rewards ® card or enter VooDoo ®. ©2013, Caesars License Company, LLC.

pitch.com

august 8 -14, 2013

the pitch

31


NIGHTLIFE Send submissions to Berry Anderson by e-mail (berry.anderson@pitch.com), fax (816-756-0502) or phone (816-218-6775). Continuing items must be resubmitted monthly.

T H U R S D AY 8 R O C K / M E TA L / P U N K Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. John Velghe & the Prodigal Sons with Lyal Strickland, 7 p.m. MiniBar: 3810 Broadway, 816-326-8281. Glow God, Torben, 10 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Jabber Josh, Cricket Wand, 10 p.m.

B L U E S / R O C K A B I L LY B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. John Paul’s Flying Circus. Danny’s Big Easy: 1601 E. 18th St., 816-421-1200. Millage Gilbert Big Blues Band, 7 p.m. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Grand Marquis. Jazz: 1859 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-328-0003. Rich Berry. Trouser Mouse: 410 S. Hwy. 7, Blue Springs, 816-220-1222. Shinetop and Hudspeth.

I N D I E / P O P / E X P E R I M E N TA L Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. My Rotten Self, the Caves, Alien Jones, 9 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Rev Gusto, We Leave at Midnight, Instant Karma, the Seen, 10 p.m.

JAZZ/LOUNGE The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. Bill McKemy Quartet. Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Joe Cartwright & Duck Warner. Green Lady Lounge: 1809 Grand, 816-215-2954. Steve Hall Quartet with Laura Chalk, 8 p.m. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Rich Hill and Joe Lisinicchia, 6 p.m.

COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS Californos: 4124 Pennsylvania, 816-531-7878. Whiskey for the Lady, 9 p.m. Fuel: 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park, 913-451-0444. Drew Six. KC Live Stage at the Power & Light District: 14th St. and Grand. Billy Currington.

COVERS The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483. Found a Job, Spud Patrol, 8 p.m. The Dubliner: 170 E. 14th St., 816-268-4700. Garry Lincoln Duo. Tomfooleries: 612 W. 47th St., 816-753-0555. Gov’t Cheez, 10 p.m.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS The All-Star Rock Bar: 7210 N.E. 43rd St., 816-452-2660. Shut Up and Rock Jam, 7:30 p.m. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Acoustic open jam with Billy Ebeling, 7 p.m.

32

the pitch

august 8 -14, 2013

SINGER-SONGWRITER Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. John Keck’s Devils and Angels, 8 p.m. Lake House Pub: 27909 E. Colbern Rd., Lee’s Summit, 816-5785770. Singer-songwriter Showcase, 7 p.m., free, The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. M-Bird Songwriter’s Showcase with Megan Birdsall, 7:30-10:30 p.m.

VA R I E T Y The Chesterfield: 1400 Main, 816-474-4545. Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz, 8 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. Brad Williams, 7:30 p.m. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Afro Kilo. Moxie Bar & Grill: 4011 N. Oak Tfwy., North Kansas City, 816455-9600. Xtreme music bingo, 10 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Trivia Clash, 7 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Moustache Bandits, St Dallas & the Sinners, the Magnificent Bang Bangs, 8 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. J. Chris Newberg, 8 p.m. Starlight Theatre: 4600 Starlight Rd., 816-363-7827. Footloose ’80s Afterparty, 10:30 p.m. The Velvet Dog: 400 E. 31st St., 816-753-9990. Beer pong Thursday. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. Trivia, 9 p.m.

F R I D AY 9 R O C K / M E TA L / P U N K The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Crossed Wires, Deco Auto, the Quivers, 10 p.m. Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. The Waspmen, the Garage Kings, Patrick Quinn, 9 p.m. Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. The Monarchs, Guns on Mars, the Perfect Persuit, After Nations, 9 p.m. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Jim Kilroy’s Club Wars, 8 p.m. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Linear Symmetry. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Red Kate, the Rackatees, the Uncouth, 10 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. The Sluts, Paris Is Burning, Mime Game, Pioneer, 8 p.m.

B L U E S / R O C K A B I L LY Fat Fish Blue: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-3474. Jeremy Butcher and the Bail Jumpers, 9 p.m. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Billy Ebeling and the Late for Dinner Band. Jazz: 1859 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-328-0003. Cold Sweat. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Project Mayhem with Fred Fendorf, 5:30 p.m.; J. Love Band, 9 p.m.

DJ Beer Kitchen: 435 Westport Rd., 816-389-4180. DCal. Empire Room: 334 E. 31st St., 816-561-1300. Friends with Benefits Fridays.

pitch.com

The Foundry: 424 Westport Rd., 816-960-0866. DJ Leo Night Us. Milieu: 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park. DJ Dynamic. MiniBar: 3810 Broadway, 816-326-8281. Tropical Fantasiez with Margo May and Paige Wishart, 10 p.m., free. The Quaff: 1010 Broadway, 816-471-1918. DJ E. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. DJ Proof.

JAZZ/LOUNGE The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-4748463. Eddie Moore & the Outer Circle; Indigo Hour with BMW, 5:30 p.m. MORE Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Eddie Charles Trio, 7-11 p.m. S G IN Green Lady Lounge: 1809 Grand, LIST E AT N I 816-215-2954. Maggie Pruitt Trio, ONL M 5:30 p.m.; Mark Lowrey, 9 p.m. PITCH.CO The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Patrick Gilbert, 5 p.m.; Bram Wijnands Trio, 7 p.m. Mutual Musicians Foundation: 1823 Highland Ave., 816-4715212. Late-night jam session, 1 a.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Lonnie McFadden, 4:30 p.m. Take Five Coffee + Bar: 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park, 913948-5550. Gerald Spaits, 8 p.m.

CLUB

COVERS The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483. Coversmith, 8 p.m. The BrewTop Pub and Patio: 8614 N. Boardwalk Ave., 816584-9292. The Disappointments. The Dubliner: 170 E. 14th St., 816-268-4700. The Transients. Fuel: 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park, 913-451-0444. Wonderfuzz. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Public Safety Issue, 9 p.m.

EASY LISTENING/ACOUSTIC MiniBar: 3810 Broadway, 816-326-8281. Nathan Smith, Ryan Lee Toms, Curtains, 10 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Gypsy Sparrows, Ashes & Immortality, John Goolsby, 10 p.m.

Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Wrath & Ruin, Beneath Oblivion, 10 p.m.

B L U E S / R O C K A B I L LY B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Mama Ray’s Jazz-Meets-Blues Jam, 2-5:30 p.m. Fat Fish Blue: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-3474. Mojo Roots. Jazz: 1859 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-328-0003. Lonnie Ray Blues Band. The Kill Devil Club: 61 E. 14th St., 816-877-8312. Grand Marquis. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Doghouse Daddies, 5:30 p.m.; Cadillac Flambe, 9 p.m. Trouser Mouse: 410 S. Hwy. 7, Blue Springs, 816-220-1222. Ben Miller Band.

I N D I E / P O P / E X P E R I M E N TA L Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. Janet the Planet, 10 p.m. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Brain Food.

DJ Ambassador Hotel: 1111 Grand, 816-298-7700. Gossip at Reserve Bar, 8 p.m., free. Black & Gold Tavern: 3740 Broadway. Downlow with DJs Z Sonic and Wstendgrl. Californos: 4124 Pennsylvania, 816-531-7878. DJ Martin Bush. Milieu: 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park. DJ Mike Scott. MiniBar: 3810 Broadway, 816-326-8281. DJ Brent Tactic, 10 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Johnny Quest, 10 p.m.

HIP-HOP/RAP The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483. Staxx, 8 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Sudden Death: Producer Battle, 10 p.m.

JAZZ/LOUNGE

Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. Brad Williams, 7:30 & 9:45 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. J. Chris Newberg, 7:45 & 9:45 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Big Goody Girls Burlesque Revue, 9:30 p.m. Whiskey Tango: 401 S.E. Outer Belt Rd., Grain Valley, 816-8475650. True Fight Fan present Fight to the Finish, 6 p.m.

The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. James Ward Band. Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Angela Hagenbach Trio, 7 p.m. Green Lady Lounge: 1809 Grand, 816-215-2954. Eboni Fondren, 5 p.m.; Shades of Jade, 9 p.m. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Midtown Quartet. Johnny Cascone’s Italian Restaurant: 6863 W. 91st St., Overland Park, 913-381-6837. Jim Mair Duo, 6:30 p.m. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Joe DeFio, 5 p.m.; Bram Wijnands Trio, 7 p.m. Mutual Musicians Foundation: 1823 Highland Ave., 816-4715212. Late-night jam session, 1 a.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Tim Whitmer & KC Express, 4:30 p.m.

S AT U R D AY 10

WORLD/REGGAE

R O C K / M E TA L / P U N K

Californos: 4124 Pennsylvania, 816-531-7878. Born in Babylon, 9 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Hearts of Darkness, 8 p.m. Take Five Coffee + Bar: 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park, 913948-5550. Brazilian jazz with Shay Estes, 8 p.m.

VA R I E T Y

Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. US Americans, Kisser, Faultfinder, the Conformists, 9 p.m. MiniBar: 3810 Broadway, 816-326-8281. Lazy, Nature Boys, Slum Party, 10 p.m.


BLUEGRASS/COUNTRY

M O N D AY 12

DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS

Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Copper Creek, 5:30 p.m. Kanza Hall: 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park, 913-451-0444. Drake White and the Big Fire, Mudflap Mafia, free. Shots: 11703 E. 23rd St., Independence, 816-833-5021. Outlaw Junction. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Quirk & Ruckus, 10:30 p.m.

JAZZ/LOUNGE

Bleachers Bar & Grill: 210 S.W. Greenwich Dr., Lee’s Summit, 816-623-3410. Texas Hold ’em, 7 & 9:15 p.m. Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. Team Trivia with Teague Hayes, 7 p.m. Duke’s on Grand: 1501 Grand, 816-527-0122. Xtreme League Trivia, 8 p.m. Flying Saucer: 101 E. 13th St., 816-221-1900. Trivia Bowl, 7:30 & 10 p.m. Hamburger Mary’s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-842-1919. Trivia Slugfest, 7 p.m. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Karaoke. MiniBar: 3810 Broadway, 816-326-8281. Karaoke with Paul Nelson. Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. Gayme Night, 7:30-10 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Karaoke with Baby Brie, 10 p.m. The Roxy: 7230 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-236-6211. Karaoke. Saints Pub + Patio: 9720 Quivira, Lenexa, 913-492-3900. Karaoke, 9 p.m. Tower Tavern: 401 E. 31st St., 816-931-9300. Trivia, 8 p.m. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. Chess Club, 7 p.m.

COVERS The BrewTop Pub and Patio: 8614 N. Boardwalk Ave., 816584-9292. Dolewite. Cricket Wireless Amphitheater: 633 N. 130th St., Bonner Springs, 913-721-3400. Monsters of Mock with ONE, Almost Kiss, Looks That Kill, Madman’s Diary, 6 p.m. The Dubliner: 170 E. 14th St., 816-268-4700. Saucy Jack. Fuel: 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park, 913-451-0444. Mikey Needleman Band, 9 p.m.

S U N D AY 11 I N D I E / P O P / E X P E R I M E N TA L Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. E-100, Saything, Hidden Pictures, 10 p.m.

JAZZ/LOUNGE Green Lady Lounge: 1809 Grand, 816-215-2954. Paul Shinn Trio, 7 p.m. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Rich Hill’s jazz brunch, 11 a.m.; Mark Lowrey jazz jam, 6 p.m.

EASY LISTENING/ACOUSTIC Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Mengel Brothers Duo, 5-9 p.m. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Rich Berry. Jazz: 1859 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-3280003. Brendan MacNaughton. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-894-9676. Lauren Anderson, 9 p.m. Johnny’s Tavern: 13410 W. 62nd Terr., Shawnee, 913-962-5777. Chill with Phil. Shots: 11703 E. 23rd St., Independence, 816-833-5021. Earl Baker Band, 8-11 p.m. Tomfooleries: 612 W. 47th St., 816-753-0555. Phil and Gary, 8 p.m.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Groove Station: 9916 Holmes, 816-942-1000. KC Blues Jam with Crosseyed Cat, 2-6 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Open Jam with Levee Town, 2-7 p.m. R.G.’s Lounge: 9100 E. 35th St., Independence, 816-358-5777. Jam Night with Dennis Nickell, Rick Eidson and Jan Lamb, 5 p.m.

VA R I E T Y The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Smackdown Trivia and Karaoke, 8 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. Brad Williams, 7 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Precedence Over Programming, the God Project, Filth Pro, 8:30 p.m. Shots: 11703 E. 23rd St., Independence, 816-833-5021. Karaoke with Mike Perez, 3 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. J. Chris Newberg, 7 p.m.

The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. Clint Ashlock and Allie Burik. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Mark Lowrey Trio, 6 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Millie Edwards and friends, 7 p.m.

VA R I E T Y The BrewTop Pub and Patio: 8614 N. Boardwalk Ave., 816584-9292. Trivia Bingo, 10 p.m. The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Rural Grit Happy Hour, 6-9 p.m.; karaoke with Kelly Bleachmaxx, 10:30 p.m. Bulldog: 1715 Main, 816-421-4799. Trivia with Matt Larson, 8 p.m. Green Room Burgers & Beer: 4010 Pennsylvania, Ste. D, 816216-7682. Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz, 8 p.m. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Jazzbo, 6-9 p.m. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. McMonday Karaoke, 9:30 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Sonic Spectrum Music Trivia, 7 p.m.; Rory Cameron, Andrew Ashby, 9 p.m.; Fortunate Youth, Arm the Poor, 10 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Sam’s Club Karaoke, 10 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Blue Monday poetry and open mic, 8-10 p.m.; Comedy Night with Norm Dexter, 10 p.m.

T U E S D AY 13 B L U E S / R O C K A B I L LY Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Mark Montgomery. Jazz: 1859 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-328-0003. Andy Dewitt.

DJ The Gusto Lounge: 504 Westport Rd., 816-974-8786. Tape Deck Tuesdays with DJ HoodNasty, 10 p.m. Sol Cantina: 408 E. 31st. St., 816-931-8080. DJ Highnoone and DJ Ashton Martin, 9 p.m.

JAZZ/LOUNGE Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Terry Hancock Duo. Green Lady Lounge: 1809 Grand, 816-215-2954. Kathleen Holeman, 5:30 p.m.; T.J. Erhardt, 9 p.m. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Hermon Mehari Trio, 6 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Open Jam with the Everette DeVan Trio, 7 p.m.

COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. The Harmed Brothers, 9 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Miss Major & Her Minor Mood Swings, 7 p.m.

COVERS RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. The Crayons, 7 p.m. Tomfooleries: 612 W. 47th St., 816-753-0555. The Transients, 9 p.m.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Danny’s Big Easy: 1601 E. 18th St., 816-421-1200. Open jam with El Barrio Band, 7 p.m. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Dave Hays’ open electric blues jam, 8 p.m. Slow Ride Roadhouse: 1350 N. Third St., Lawrence, 785-7492727. Open jam with the Lonnie Ray Blues Band, 6-10 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Open Mic Night. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Ensemble Tuesdays — R&B jam and open mic, 7 p.m.

VA R I E T Y Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Elkheart’s Downtown Outlaw Fiasco, the Medicine Theory, 7 p.m.

W E D N E S D AY 1 4

The Velvet Dog: 400 E. 31st St., 816-753-9990. Backyard Jam with DJ Lee, 9 p.m.

JAZZ/LOUNGE Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Max Groove Trio, 6 p.m. Green Lady Lounge: 1809 Grand, 816-215-2954. Organ Jazz Trio with Ken Lovern, 8 p.m. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Rich Hill, 6 p.m.

COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Outlaw Jim & the Whiskey Benders, 8 p.m.

DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS The All-Star Rock Bar: 7210 N.E. 43rd St., 816-452-2660. Ultimate Karaoke. The Blue Line: 529 Walnut, 816-472-7825. Karaoke. Charlie Hooper’s: 12 W. 63rd St., 816-361-8841. Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz, 7:30 p.m. 403 Club: 403 N. Fifth St., 913-499-8392. Pinball tournament, 8:30 p.m. Hurricane Allie’s Bar and Grill: 5541 Merriam Dr., Shawnee, 913-217-7665. Bike night. J. Murphy’s Irish Pub and Grille: 22730 Midland Dr., Shawnee, 913-825-3880. Karaoke, 9 p.m. Jake’s Place Bar and Grill: 12001 Johnson Dr., Shawnee, 913962-5253. Karaoke. Kanza Hall: 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park, 913-451-0444. Country dance lessons, 8-9 p.m. Michael’s Lakewood Pub: N. 291 Hwy. and Lakewood Blvd., Lee’s Summit, 816-350-7300. Humpday Comedy Night, 9 p.m. The Quaff: 1010 Broadway, 816-471-1918. Karaoke. Retro Downtown Drinks & Dance: 1518 McGee, 816-4214201. Karaoke with DJ Jason, 8 p.m. The Roxy: 7230 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-236-6211. Karaoke. Snow & Co.: 1815 Wyandotte, 816-214-8921. Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz, 7:30 p.m. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. Trivia, 8 p.m.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS

R O C K / M E TA L / P U N K MiniBar: 3810 Broadway, 816-326-8281. Wartorn, Vomit Assault, Pisskorpse, 10 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Bob Walkenhorst, 7 p.m.

B L U E S / R O C K A B I L LY B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Shinetop Jr., 7-9 p.m. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Dan Bliss. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Carl Butler’s Gospel Lounge, 7:30 p.m. The Levee: 16 W. 43rd St., 816-561-2821. The Lonnie Ray Blues Band, 8 p.m. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Brody Buster Trio, 7 p.m.

DJ Frank James Saloon: 10919 N.W. Hwy. 45, Parkville, 816-5050800. MOKAN Twang Vinyl Country Night, 8 p.m., no cover. The Gusto Lounge: 504 Westport Rd., 816-974-8786. Vinyl Awareness with Bill Pile, Mike Scott, DJ Clockwerk and DJ Rico.

pitch.com

Black & Gold Tavern: 3740 Broadway. Bourbon & Bands Open Jam. Ernie’s Steakhouse & Kross Lounge: 605 N. Sterling, Independence, 816-254-9494. Blues jam hosted by Rick Eidson. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Acoustic jam session with Tyler Gregory. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Jam Night, 9 p.m. Take Five Coffee + Bar: 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park, 913948-5550. Open mic with Philip Wakefield, 7-9 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Poetic Underground open mic series, 9-11 p.m. Woodsweather Café: 1414 W. Ninth St., 816-472-6333. Blues Jam with the Dave Hays Band, 7-10 p.m.

VA R I E T Y Californos: 4124 Pennsylvania, 816-531-7878. Westport Girlz, 8 p.m. Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. Tango dance night, 8 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. John Wayne and the Pain, Arm the Poor, Spawn Breezy, 7:30 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. A.J. Finney, 8 p.m.

august 8 -14, 2013

the pitch

33


S AVA G E L O V E

BROS

Dear Dan: I’m a 25-year-old male and the legal guardian of my 15-year-old brother. He’s gay. Our parents took care of “the talk” and taught him how to use condoms. But he has started dating a senior at his school who is about to turn 18 and is a sleazeball: entitled, narcissistic, drives a BMW paid for by his rich parents. He has no respect for my brother. He grabs my brother’s ass or says things like “You really look fuckable in those jeans.” I told him to stop that behavior, and he replied, “Sorry, I can’t keep my hands off such a hottie.” My parents would probably know what to do, but they’re dead. I laid down the law and told him that he couldn’t see his boyfriend anymore, but he has continued to see him behind my back and now doesn’t tell me anything going on with his life. My brother is smart, plays lots of sports, and is really involved at school. I’m afraid this loser is going to destroy all that. I’m new to all of this parenting stuff. As a parent yourself, what would you do?

HAVE A TASTE OF . . . .

Carmel Cream

W ET WAR M & J U I C Y 3 6 D - 2 2 - 3 6 • 1 0 0 % N A STY

& READY TO DO IT ALL

248.796.1967

GET ON TO OFF. GET OFF TRY FOR FREE!

816-533-0046 More local numbers: 1.800.777.8000 Ahora en Español / 18+

The fastest growing social network for men who like men

Kansas City’s

HOTTEST GAY CHATLINE 816-841-1588 913-279-9212 30 minute FREE TRIAL

New Parent Needs Help

18+

WARNING HOT GUYS!

Kansas City

( 816 ) 326.9926 ( 913 ) 904.9974

FREE to listen & reply to ads!

FREE CODE: Pitch Weekly For other local numbers call:

1-888-MegaMates

TM

24/7 Customer Care 1(888) 634.2628 18+ ©2013 PC LLC 2544

34

the pitch

august 8 -14, 2013

pitch.com

Dear NPNH: I’m so sorry about the loss of your parents. You deserve praise for taking your brother in and taking him on. That said … There’s nothing inappropriate about a 17-year-old kid dating a 15-year-old kid. You may be tempted to alert the authorities after your brother’s asshole boyfriend (BAB) turns 18, but BAB is protected by your state’s age-ofconsent laws, which treat sex between a minor and an adult differently if the adult is within three years of the minor’s age. And it’s entirely appropriate for a 17-yearold gay boy to grab his 15-year-old boyfriend’s ass, and for a 17-year-old to tell his 15-year-old boyfriend that he looks fuckable in his jeans. But speak up when BAB behaves like an asshole in front of you. (“Now is not the time, guys.” “Knock that shit off, please.” “I don’t want to hear about my brother’s sex life any more than he wants to hear about my sex life.”) If BAB doesn’t listen, ask him to leave — your house, your rules. But unenforceable rules, like “You may not see this guy,” will only undermine your authority and drive them into each other’s arms. And if your brother isn’t supposed to be seeing this guy, he won’t turn to you for advice if BAB is pressuring him to do anything dangerous. Your brother needs to be able to talk about his relationship with you. If BAB is as shallow and materialistic as your letter makes him sound, odds are good that he’ll tire of your brother soon enough. This is a problem that is likely to solve itself. Dear Dan: My dad just died. He was a pedophile. A lot of stuff is coming up for both my brother

BY

D A N S AVA G E

and me now. We know about many things he did, but some things happened when we were too young to be sure about. My bro just said he’s had dreams throughout his life — more lately — about a cock being in his mouth. He’s hetero and has been married for more than 20 years. He wonders if other straight men have dreams like this or if it’s some manifestation of abuse. He’s afraid to ask any of his straight male friends.

The Brothers Grim Dear TBG: “Having dreams like that does not

mean a man is gay or otherwise into penises,” said Dr. James Cantor, a psychologist, associate professor at the University of Toronto, and editor in chief of Sexual Abuse: A Journal of Research and Treatment. “Gay men usually dream (and fantasize while masturbating) about men in general: muscles and faces, celebrities and crushes, the range of their favorite sex acts, etc. I haven’t heard a gay man describe dreams restricted lifelong to just penis-in-mouth.” Cantor offers a caveat for other readers: “For a long time, many folks believed that such dreams were repressed memories trying to surface. In fact, harm has been done by wellmeaning ‘therapists’ who wound up creating false memories of abuse.” So for the record: “Having such dreams, by itself, does not mean a person was abused.” What is odd is the long-standing, repetitive nature of your dreams. “If life is going generally well, and this is just a harmless eccentricity, so be it. If your brother is experiencing more general distress, then that distress — from childhood abuse, the death of your father or something else — could be targeted with a licensed therapist. Because you say lots of stuff is coming up for you both, an objective outsider/listener can help in sorting it out.”

Dear Dan: What do you say to a college-age

brother who tells you more about his sex life than you want to hear? I don’t need to know how much pussy he’s getting. I used to tell him about my “triumphs,” but we were in high school, and I’ve matured. He was a late bloomer, is kind of insecure, and he’s excited to be doing well. But I don’t want to hear about it anymore.

Brotherly Boundaries Dear BB: “There are two kinds of guys in the world: guys who can’t stop talking about all the pussy they’re getting, and guys who are actually getting all sorts of pussy.” The Savage Lovecast is at savagelovecast.com.

Have a question for Dan Savage? E-mail him at mail@savagelove.net


KC’s Got Some Pretty Little Women . . And You’l Find ‘Em At Bazooka’s! 1717 Main St. Kansas City, MO 816/421.1915 facebook.com/bazookasshowgirls bazookasshowgirls.com Now Taking Applications for Bazooka’s Showgirls Entertainers. Apply Today at Bazooka’s!

Dating Easy made

Kansas City

(816) 326.9936 (913) 904.9977 FREE TO LISTEN & REPLY TO ADS! FREE CODE: Say “Pitch Weekly” For other local numbers call

1-888-MegaMates

TM

24/7 Friendly Customer Care 1(888) 634.2628 18+ ©2013 PC LLC

www.MegaMates.com

3111

pitch.com

august 8 -14, 2013

the pitch

35


licensed massage Alexis Massage NEW LOCATION

10Am - 7pm mON - sAT cool rooms • showers available cash / visa / mastercard / Call for appT.

913-940-8874 OR 913-400-3515 The BesT AsiAn MAssAge in Town • Five New Young Asian Girls Work Everyday•

WAlk-iNS OPEN 7 DAYS -10:30AM-10PM WElcOME 913-469-1616 Deep tissue / Swedish /4 hands Let us pamper your body with exquisite skill CASH / Credit / Debit

MASSAGE

13410 CoLLege BLVD LeneXA,Ks 66210

4-Handed Massage Walk-Ins Welcome 7 days a week (913)362-2000

10729 Shawnee Mission Parkway Shawnee, KS 66203

• G RA N D O P E N I N G • ALL A SIAN STAFF The Best Asian Massage

OPEN 7 DAYS • 10AM - 10PM

WALK-INS WELCOME Credit Card • Debit Card •Cash

6505 E FRONTAGE RD #27 MERRIAM, KS

913.789.7226

Soft Breeze Spa

how does half off sound? .com 36

the pitch

august 8 -14, 2013

pitch.com

Haskell

X

Alabama

Lawrence, KS 2331 Alabama Street Suite #103

Naismith

785-856-4994 23rd Street


ATTENTION: EX-OFFENDERS & AT RISK JOB SEEKERS Do you need job placement assistance? Do you need your criminal record expunged?

Classifieds

Vehicle & housing available for Felons & At Risk Job Seekers Printing and general office services available Wills, Divorces, Child Support, Civil & Criminal Motions Filed Contact: Beyond The Conviction for these and other career and life barrier removal services. (Some SeRViCe FeeS APPly)

816-842-4975 or 816-718-7423 • beyondtheconviction.org Sí Habla Espanol/Asian/Korean

NOW HIRING FOR

CONCERTS CONVENTIONS SPORTING EVENTS EvENt StaFF, USHERS, tIckEt takERS

APPLY IN PERSON 4050 Pennsylvania Ste. 111 KCMO 64111 OR ONLINE www. crowdsystems.com EOE

HILTON PRESIDENT IS NOW HIRING

AM Outlet Manager Part-time AM Busser u On-Call Banquet Server u Part-time Maintenance Engineer u

u

Other Openings available, call our Job Hotline. 816-303-1696 Pre-screen Interviews: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday & Friday 8:30am - Noon & 1:00-3:00pm

1329 Baltimore Kansas City, MO 64105 pitch.com

august 8 -14, 2013

the pitch

37


Discover a career with purpose... Programs in massage therapy, medical assisting, fitness training, nutrition & wellness. Campuses in KC & Lawrence

1.866.443.9140 www.wellsping.edu

CHANCE TO WIN FREE TICKETS MOVIE PASSES MORE+

FOLLOW + US

@PITCHSTREET

WE ARE CURRENTLY HIRING FOR ASST. FOOD & BEVERAGE MANAGER RESTAURANT SUPERVISOR MAINTENANCE COORDINATOR [Electrical/HVAC, Plumbing, etc...]

COCKTAIL SERVER LINE COOK BARISTA

APPLY IN PERSON ANYTIME: 200 W. 12TH ST, KCMO | EOE | GREAT BENEFITS/GREAT LOCATION

38

the pitch

august 8 -14, 2013

pitch.com


BUY Are you out of housing options? Have Credit Problems? Previous Evictions?

We rent to the rent challenged

Holiday Apartments $126/WEEK FREE $150/DEPOSIT* Studios Downtown Area

* Restrictions apply

Month to Month Lease! On Site Loundry Facility

All Utilities Cable TV (816) 221-1721 Paid

APPLICATION WHEN YOU BRING IN THIS AD

SELL RENT

p Park Apartments

First Class Living in Downtown Overland Park

2 BR/1 Bath in Overland Park

Only $655!

913.381.6666 • www.parkapartments.org theparkaptsleasing@yahoo.com 79th & Metcalf, Overland Park KS

Bring in this ad for $10 off application fee or deposit!

2, 3, AND 4 BEDROOM HOMES FOR RENT IN MIDTOWN KC

&

For Qualified Applicants

• NO APPLICATION FEE • $250 deposit

Classifieds

Ask about specials on select homes!

816.309.4264

Want a New Career?

pitch.com/virtualjobfair pitch.com

august 8 -14, 2013

the pitch

39


APTS/JOBS/STUFF

®

816.218.6702 816.218.6759

INJURED?

AUTO ACCIDENT? CALL 816.977.2680 435 Nichols Rd, Ste. 200 • KCMO 64112 • donovan@plazainjurylaw.com

PlazaInjurylaw.com

$99 DIVORCE $99

Simple, Uncontested + Filing Fee. Don Davis. 816-531-1330

INJURED IN AN AUTO ACCIDENT? Call 913-789-7477 For Your Free Copy Of

"KANSAS & MISSOURI AUTO ACCIDENT VICTIM'S GUIDEBOOK" Written by: Mike Sexton

SPEEDING DWI CRIMINAL SOLICITATION Call Tim Tompkins Today KCTrafficlawyer.com 913-707-4357 816-729-2606 99.7% Toxin Free w/n an hour We can help you pass Coopers 3617 Broadway, KCMO 816.931.7222

HOTEL ROOMS A-1 Motel 816-765-6300 Capital Inn 816-765-4331 6101 E. 87th St./Hillcrest Rd. HBO,Phone,Banq. Hall

$37.06 Day/ $149 Week/ $499 Month + Tax

Psychic Readings Palm Readings

[816] 965-7125

Tarot Readings Crystal Readings

AUGUST 8-14, 2013

Attorney since 1976: 913-345-4100, KS/MO. Injuries, workers comp, criminal, divorce, DUI, traffic, and more. Low fees, Call Greg Bangs.

Need PC Help? I'll Come To You! Zombie Free Computer Services Call Nick @ (913) 633-0538

FREE BANKRUPTCY CONSULTATION

BANKRUPTCY, KS, MO

LAW OFFICE OF JENNIFER DODSON

TONS OF COOL STUFF !

THURSDAY NIGHT AUCTIONS

Furniture, antiques, collectibles, art, artifacts, oddities, autos, retro/vintage, gold/silver, jewelry, militaria, vinyl, music & more.

1801 Guinotte KCMO 64120 816.960.4664 www.atakc.com

SpeedDateKC.com

15 dates in ONE night! Local KC Events Last 14 events SOLD OUT EARLY!

P.I.--Work Comp.--DUI/DWI Reasonable rates! Susan Bratcher 816-453-2240 www.bratcherlaw.biz

Commercial Truck & Auto Accident Victims

Call to Learn your Rights! Brady & Associates Law Office, 913-696-0925 Mbradylaw.com - Licensed in Missouri and Kansas

* PA Y M E N T P L A N AVA I L A B L E *

435 NICHOLS ROAD STE 200 KCMO 64112

816.977.2763

W W W. J D O D S O N L AW. C O M

We are a debt relief agency. We help people file for bankruptcy relief under the Bankruptcy Code. The choice of a lawyer is an important decision and should not be based solely on advertisement.

ERICA'S PSYCHIC STUDIO

$10

Reunites Love- Depression-Finances Success 100% Guaranteed Results !

816-965-7125

Readings

KC MARRIOTT-Downtown

Eat Local with friends

NOW HIRING

Asst. Food & Beverage Mgr-Restaurant Mgr-Maintenance Coordinator-Cocktail Server-Line Cook-Barista Apply In Person Anytime 200 W. 12th St.

Scared? Anxious? Confused?

Help Is Here!

DWI, Solicitation, Traffic, Internet Crimes, Hit & Run, Power & Light Violations. 816-221-5900 - www.The-Law.com David Lurie Attorney

$99 DIVORCE $99

Simple, Uncontested + Filing Fee. Don Davis. 816-531-1330

p>

Restaurants

AFFORDABLE ATTORNEY

SPEEDING, DWI, POSSESSION, ASSAULT FREE CONSULTATION Call: The Law Office of J.P. Tongson (816) 265-1513

Need PC Help? I'll Come To You! Zombie Free Computer Services Call Nick @ (913) 633-0538 Attorney since 1976: 913-345-4100, KS/MO. Injuries, workers comp, criminal, divorce, DUI, traffic, and more. Low fees, Call Greg Bangs.

CASH FOR CARS

Wrecked, Damaged or Broken. Running or Not !

Cash Paid ! www.abcautorecycling.com 913-271-9406

>

Restaurant Guide

TONS OF COOL STUFF !

THURSDAY NIGHT AUCTIONS

Furniture, antiques, collectibles, art, artifacts, oddities, autos, retro/vintage, gold/silver, jewelry, militaria, vinyl, music & more.

1801 Guinotte KCMO 64120 816.960.4664 www.atakc.com

SpeedDateKC.com

15 dates in ONE night! Local KC Events Last 14 events SOLD OUT EARLY!

INJURED IN AN AUTO ACCIDENT? Call 913-789-7477 For Your Free Copy Of

"KANSAS & MISSOURI AUTO ACCIDENT VICTIM'S GUIDEBOOK" Written by: Mike Sexton

lifestylesofkc.com

NEW LOCATION-call for details House Parties Every Friday & Saturday Night. Hot Tub, Dance Pole, Live DJ, Pool Table 913-742-0022

* DWI * * CRIMINAL * * TRAFFIC * Practice emphasizing DWI defense. Experienced, knowledgeable attorney will take the time to listen and inform. Free initial phone consultation.

THE LAW OFFICE OF DENISE KIRBY 816-221-3691


The Pitch: August 8, 2013