Issuu on Google+

OCTOBER 25–31, 2012 | FREE | VOL. 32 NO. 17 | PITCH.COM

bond, n o i l l i 's $1 m e t o N n f Liz Va o y r e t ngs. s i y t n m u e a h h T d other n a x x ll Si plus Ji

: Inside

gdon ull Ri H y c n By Na

her d n a gers o R a c Jessi drive l e e h CartW rge. u s l i reta e l i ob KC’s m


2

T H E P I T C H O C T O B E R 2 5 - 3 11, Chipotle_Boorito_KC_ThePitchWeekly_O.indd

2012

pitch.com

10/4/12 11:28 AM


P

Gift guide NOVEMBER 22

Deadline November 14

Featuring light, entertaining editorial on gift-giving ideas and holiday party planning.

P NEW YEAR’S

2013

GUIDE DECEMBER 13

Deadline December 6

Contact your The Pitch Account Executive or 816-218-6735. pitch.com

O CTO B E R 2 5 -31 , 20 1 2

THE PITCH

3


OCTOBER 25–31, 2012 | VOL. 32 NO. 17 E D I T O R I A L

Hair models wanted for exchange with portfolio. Done by professional stylist. Great hair services for less

Editor Scott Wilson Managing Editor Justin Kendall Music Editor David Hudnall Staff Writers Charles Ferruzza, Ben Palosaari Editorial Operations Manager Deborah Hirsch Calendar Editor Berry Anderson Clubs Editor Abbie Stutzer Food Blogger, Web Editor Jonathan Bender Proofreader Brent Shepherd Contributing Writers Tracy Abeln, Theresa Bembnister, April Fleming, Nancy Hull Rigdon, Matt Pearce, Dan Savage, Abbie Stutzer Intern Nadia Imafidon

A R T

Art Director Ashford Stamper Contributing Photographers Angela C. Bond, Chris Mullins, Lauren Phillips, Sabrina Staires, Brooke Vandever Design Intern Chloe George

P R O D U C T I O N

find us!

91st & Metcalf, OP, KS | 913-341-7286 MitsuSatoHairAcademy.com

Production Manager Christina Riddle Multimedia Designer Vu Radley

A D V E R T I S I N G

Sales Manager Erin Carey Senior Classified Multimedia Specialist Steven Suarez Classified Multimedia Specialist Andrew Disper Multimedia Specialists Michelle Acevedo, Kirin Arnold Director of Marketing & Operations Jason Dockery Digital Marketing Manager Keli Sweetland

All services done by students with supervision.

C I R C U L A T I O N

THE POP-UP TRAIL

B U S I N E S S

Mobile retailers look

Circulation Director Mike Ryan

Accounts Receivable Jodi Waldsmith Publisher Joel Hornbostel

p

to the next frontier.

S O U T H C O M M

BY N A N C Y H U L L R I G D O N

Chief Executive Officer Chris Ferrell Chief Financial Officer Patrick Min Chief Operating Officer Rob Jiranek Chief Marketing Officer Susan Torregrossa Chief Technology Officer Matt Locke Business Manager Eric Norwood Director of Digital Sales & Marketing David Walker Director of Accounting Todd Patton Creative Director Heather Pierce Director of Online Content/Development Patrick Rains

N A T I O N A L

A D V E R T I S I N G

VMG Advertising 888-278-9866, vmgadvertising.com Senior Vice President of Sales Susan Belair Senior Vice President of Sales Operations Joe Larkin

8

TAKE TWO On the seventh day, Woodsweather II rests, thank God. BY C H A R L E S F E R R U Z Z A

B A C K P A G E . C O M

23

Vice President Sales & Marketing Carl Ferrer Business Manager Jess Adams Accountant David Roberts

D I S T R I B U T I O N

The Pitch distributes 45,000 copies a week and is available free throughout Greater Kansas City, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for $5 each, payable at The Pitch’s office in advance. The Pitch may be distributed only by The Pitch’s authorized independent contractors or authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of The Pitch, take more than one copy of each week’s issue. Mail subscriptions: $22.50 for six months or $45 per year, payable in advance. Application to mail at second-class postage rates is pending at Kansas City, MO 64108.

O U TSI DER AR T Ponyboy’s relentless shock-and-awe campaign B Y B E R RY A N D E R S O N

28

C O P Y R I G H T

The contents of The Pitch are Copyright 2012 by KC Communications, LLC. No portion may be reproduced in whole or in part by any means without the express written permission of the publisher. The Pitch address: 1701 Main, Kansas City, MO 64108 For information or to leave a story tip, call: 816-561-6061 Editorial fax: 816-756-0502 For classifieds, call: 816-218-6759 For retail advertising, call: 816-218-6702

ON T HE COVE R

6 7 8 13 17 19 21 23 24 28 34 38

PITCH QUESTIONNAIRE PLOG FEATURE F I LT E R ART STAGE FILM CAFÉ FAT CITY MUSIC NIGHTLIFE SAVAGE LOVE

MEANWHI LE AT PI TC H. C O M

PHOTOGRAPHY BY BROOKE VANDEVER

4

THE PITCH

O CTO B E R 2 5 -31 , 20 1 2

pitch.com

pitch.com

ESQUINA sold, INTORNO to open in its place. ERASE your LIBRARY FINES by donating food to Harvesters. EARWAXX RECORDS in Gladstone is closing.

M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X

THE PITCH

2


pitch.com

O CTO B E R 2 5 -31 , 20 1 2

THE PITCH

5


When you are ready to learn to protect yourself and those you care about, She’s A Pistol, LLC is here to help!

QUESTIONNAIRE

JILL SIXX

Slaughter Movie House creator

Woman-owned personal protection and self-defense training, services and supplies company.

TRAINING CLASSES AVAILABLE 5725 Nieman Rd • Shawnee, KS

913.248.3288

S A B R I N A S TA I R E S

ShesAPistol.com

Hometown: Kansas City, Missouri

What TV show do you make sure you watch?

Current neighborhood: JoCo … not excited

American Horror Story and The Walking Dead (Big surprise, huh?)

Who or what is your sidekick? My 3-pound,

Lil Wayne

about it.

black teacup Chihuahua, Pepper!

take(s) up a lot of space in my iTunes:

What movie do you watch at least once a year? What career would you choose in an alternate reality? Pop star

This is hard. … First one that comes to mind: The Devil’s Rejects.

What was the last local restaurant you patronized? Caddy Shack. The pizza is incredible.

What local tradition do you take part in every year? Santa-Cali-Gon Days and the Renais-

Where do you drink? Horror conventions. I’ve

been so busy that when I am in town, I stay home and sleep like an old lady.

Celebrity you’d like to ride the Mamba with at Worlds of Fun: Leonardo DiCaprio

What’s your favorite charity? JazzBeats, a local charity dedicated to finding a cure for pancreatic cancer.

Favorite person or thing to follow on Twitter: Tom Six, the writer-director of the Human

Favorite place to spend your paycheck: Road

Person or thing you find really irritating at this moment: Money

What local phenomenon do you think is overrated? Barbecue. I’m vegetarian.

late to the party.

Finish this sentence: “Kansas City got it right when …” We got an Alamo Drafthouse movie “Kansas City needs …” Like everyone says,

What is your most embarrassing dating moment? Dates? What are those?

theater.

better public transportation.

the law is interesting.

“On my day off, I like to …” Go on adventures and take photos. A couple of weeks ago, I drove to Stull, Kansas (that according to legend is one of the gateways to hell).

Describe a recent triumph: I was asked to host a horror film festival, Shock-O-Rama’s Gorefest, in Minneapolis October 26. I am bringing with me the three feature films and two of the shorts that I’ve already played here in KC, so it’s kind of like I’m taking Slaughter Movie House on the road!

“In five years, I’ll be …” Hmm … maybe living somewhere else?

pitch.com

Interesting brush with the law? No brush with

“People might be surprised to know that I …” Love nature and love to be in the middle of nowhere. My dream is to one day have a cabin in the mountains, maybe in Arkansas.

O CTO B E R 2 5 -31 , 20 1 2

Last book you read: The Hunger Games. I’m

Favorite day trip: I love to go on adventures, and I like to be outside (weather permitting). Whether it be somewhere haunted like Atchison, Kansas, or somewhere beautiful like Weston Bend State Park.

Blue Koi, my favorite restaurant on this Earth.

THE PITCH

Centipede franchise

trips and movies

Where do you like to take out-of-town guests?

6

sance Festival

The next Slaughter Movie House at Czar is 7 p.m. Monday, November 5. See jillsixx.blogspot.com.


PLOG

THE HEIRESS

BY

M AT T P E A RCE

Liz Van Note forges ahead with her defense in the killing of her millionaire father.

1305 Union Ave KCMO 816-221-0711

S

omeone broke into William Van Note’s three-story Lake of the Ozarks home on October 2, 2010, and shot him in the head. The crime was simple, but the aftermath hasn’t been — the 67-year-old Liberty man was a millionaire. Van Note’s 59-year-old girlfriend, Sharon Dickson, was shot three times in the back of the head. Dickson, the heir to a share of Van Note’s fortune, died. Van Note survived — and then he didn’t. Van Note’s daughter, Susan Elizabeth “Liz” Van Note, now his would-be heir, showed up two days later at the hospital where her father was in a coma and hooked up to a ventilator. She brought with her a legal document giving her the power to tell doctors to pull the plug on her father, which she claimed was his wish. So they did, and Van Note died. Liz and William Van Note had a strained relationship at times, though they had patched things up a little in recent years. Van Note’s money now fell to his daughter. Two years later, the spin around that series of events has taken on a criminal torque, and William Van Note’s fortune is at the center of a three-suspect murder case. In September, a grand jury indicted Liz Van Note, alleging that she shot her father and forged the pullthe-plug papers with the help of a Shawnee couple, 42-year-old Desre Lechele Dory and 43-yearLO G MOLREINPE AT old Stacey Nicole Dory. ON M / P L O G Camden County proseP IT C H .C O cutors charged Van Note with first-degree murder. The Dorys’ connection to Van Note is unclear — Camden County Prosecutor Brian Keedy would tell The Pitch only that Stacey Dory and Liz Van Note attended high school together. Prosecutors charged the Dorys with seconddegree murder, saying their forgery resulted in William Van Note’s death. It’s been a tumultuous ride for Liz Van Note, a bankrupted Lee’s Summit lawyer who specializes in the very issues entangling this case. Her legal website, which is still live online, advertises seminars in which she would give advice on estate planning and do-not-resuscitate orders. “In this class we will discuss the basic elements of an estate plan by defining wills, powers of attorney, powers of attorney for health care and non-probate transfers,” the website reads. Another on end-of-life care adds, “For ourselves, our families and our loved ones, it’s time to get the facts straight.” New facts in this case have observers wondering if William Van Note’s money is going toward the legal defense of the daughter accused of killing him. On October 4, Liz Van Note posted an eyegrabbing $1 million cash-only bond — a rarity in most murder cases and especially eyebrowraising for Van Note. Three years ago, she had

kansas city service filed for Chapter 7 bankruptcy protection. In federal-court filings, her listing of possessions and debts was a woe-is-me document straight out of recession America. She was underwater on her mortgage, owing more on her $210,000 Longview Farm Villas home in Lee’s Summit than it was worth. She also owed tens of thousands of dollars in other personal and medical debts. Squaring up with her creditors was unlikely. Her work as a lawyer was bringing in a little more than $3,000 a month, and she was receiving $400 a month in child support for her son, now in the seventh grade. So she filed for, and received, bankruptcy protection. Yet Van Note’s posting the $1 million cash bond apparently means that she has become a millionaire since her bankruptcy. “In some time subsequent to that, is my guess, she amassed this million dollars she used to put down for her bond,” Kansas City lawyer Erlene Krigel, the trustee for Van Note’s bankruptcy case, tells The Pitch. If Van Note already had the money when she filed for bankruptcy, it would indicate that she had committed fraud, Krigel says. “She’s the one who prepared her documents and signed them under oath, and she testified under oath.” Van Note’s Overland Park defense attorney, Tom Bath, didn’t respond to The Pitch’s requests for comment. Bath told The Kansas City Star that he didn’t know where she got the bond money and implied that a friend might have given it to her. But you don’t have to look far to find a potential source of the money. What about the $1.8 million in assets that William Van Note left behind to be disbursed by a Clay County probate court? After her father’s death, Van Note was in charge of managing this portion of her father’s estate. After prosecutors leveled a murder charge against Van Note, the court stripped her of the job and appointed independent attorney David Holdsworth to safeguard it. “Were those assets used to raise a million dollars? I don’t know,” Holdsworth tells The Pitch. “But I would say the bulk of that probate estate she has already distributed to herself.

Liz Van Note (left) and the Dorys allegedly forged the pull-the-plug documents. Legally, there’s nothing on the face of it that’s wrong with her distributing it to herself.” If Liz Van Note did take the money, the real question may be why she sat in jail for a month before paying the $1 million cash bond. Holdsworth says the exact amount of William Van Note’s assets that his daughter allocated to herself isn’t clear yet because Liz Van Note managed the money herself with minimal supervision from the court. “This is a huge job,” Holdsworth says of the estate that he now has to evaluate. “It’s very complex.” The $1.8 million of William Van Note’s money being sorted out by probate court may be only a slice of the wealth that has been transferred since his death. Some close to the case have estimated that his estate is worth anywhere from $8 million to $10 million. But without third-party management of all the assets, it’s hard to know what has gone where. (Andy Dickson, Sharon Dickson’s son, has been fighting Liz Van Note’s claim to the money. He declined to comment for this story.) If Liz Van Note is convicted of killing her father — her attorney has conceded that Van Note forged the hospital documents but says there’s no evidence that she was at the scene of his shooting and Dickson’s killing — she’ll lose her right to the money in both the probate court and under Missouri nonprobate statutes. Until then, she’s free and, according to her attorney, spending time with her son. Prosecuting attorney Keedy wouldn’t discuss the possibility that Liz Van Note has used her father’s money for her defense. Keedy also didn’t think much of the suggestion that a newly minted millionaire might be a flight risk. “That’s the purpose of the bond, to give her lots and lots of incentive to show,” Keedy says of Van Note’s impending trial. “If she decided she didn’t want to show up, she’d be forfeiting a million dollars. Most people wouldn’t want to do that.”

E-mail feedback@pitch.com pitch.com pitch.com

THE

SIMPLE

SOLUTION

PRE-MIXED SYNTHETIC URINE KIT Kit Contains:

• 3.5 oz of the highest qualit y sunthetic urine available • Adjustable belt • T wo heat pads • Temperature label

1 YEAR SHELF LIFE

BEST Selection of Glass in KC! 11-8 Mon - Sat • Noon - 6 Sun 3617 Broadway KCMO 64111

816.931.7222 facebook.com/coopersbroadway

OMCOTN O TBH E RX 2 5 - 3X1,, 220 00 1 2X X–X

TT HH EE PP II TT C CH H

7 1


The

P

ll B y N a n cy H u

8 THE PITCH 2 THE PITCH

O CTO B E R 2 5 -31 , 20 1 2 M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X

pitch.com pitch.com

p u p o

e h y by B r o o k p a r g o t o h P | R ig d o n

Va n d ever


AS POP-UP RETAILERS HITCH ONTO THE WEST BOTTOMS, CARTWHEEL’S JESSICA ROGERS LOOKS TO THE NEXT FRONTIER.

T

l i a r T

he powder-blue bus, its red octagon stop sign altered to read SHOP, towers above a handful of table displays. In this restaurant lot, artists sell their creations: quirky jewelry, retro clothing, apple pie (the fruit picked from a local tree, the dessert from a family recipe, of course), jars of old-school collectibles such as red-plastic cowboys and Indians. It is, one seller on this September Saturday says, “like a mobile Etsy.” At the heart of the sprawl stands Jessica Rogers, a spunky brunette in a vintage dress and cowboy boots. You could call her Kansas City’s pop-up pioneer. Consider what the 27-yearold art-school graduate from Florida has done in one year. In October 2011, she debuted CartWheel. The shop, which was in a camper trailer for several months before moving to the blue bus, sells what she calls her “retro chickie” handmade jewelry, clothing and other items, along with her friends’ goods, including stationery and CDs. Kansas City’s first nonfood business on wheels has paved the way for other mobile shops. Last summer, Rogers spearheaded what became the restaurant-lot market. The Gypsy Market Royale pops up outside the West Bottoms’ Genessee Royale Bistro the first Saturday of each month and, sometimes, the third Saturday. Kansas City’s mobile retail scene, which came on the heels of the local food-truck craze, is part of a bigger we’re-settingup-shop-right-here phenomenon — a bazaarlike collection of vendors here, a trading post there. Rogers and other pop-up-minded people, though, aren’t confining their fetish to retail. They mean to take art and education, among other things, on the road. For her, the mobile mindset boils down to a personal mission. “It’s all about bringing people together,” she says.

N

ot everyone has hopped aboard the pop-up retail wagon. Some brick-and-mortar merchants say these transient sellers unfairly swoop in and poach from a clientele they’ve worked hard to build, and they do it while escaping the rent and overhead expenses that factor into a traditional Darwinian control in the marketplace. This conflict came to a head in July. On First Friday, Rogers parked CartWheel at her usual spot in the West Bottoms, 12th Street and Hickory: the bull’s-eye of the multiblock area that becomes resale-shopping central the first weekend of each month. CartWheel was one of several pop-up businesses on the street that day. There were a few food trucks and pop-up retail shops, including Whatchamacallits, where Wade Morton and Todd Brezinka sell nostalgic knickknacks such as California Raisins figurines behind a heavy wooden, turquoisecolored counter. As Rogers, Morton and Brezinka tell it, all was well until a burly man came toward them, permit in hand. Pack up, he demanded, already angry. These streets are reserved. No, the vendors said, reaching for their paperwork. City employees arrived to settle the permit battle. The pop-ups lost. The man with the winning permit was West Bottoms power player Monty Summers. He’s president of Group Real Estate, which owns 14 buildings in the area (making many of the resale shops there his tenants). He’s also president of two other organizations: Full Moon Productions, which runs the haunted houses in the warehouses, and the West Bottoms Business District Association. His property ownership has allowed Summers to buy a festival permit from the city, according to city officials. The permit gives him control over street vendors working several blocks. Summers didn’t respond to calls seeking comment on the dispute. His second-in-command and niece, Amber

Arnett-Bequeaith, tells The Pitch that taking pop-ups off the streets was about fairness, safety, calming chaos and an actual festival. “These pop-ups, they aren’t paying rent and they aren’t paying for any of the advertising that these businesses are,” says Arnett-Bequeaith, who serves as vice president of the real-estate and haunted-attractions companies. She points out that rent from the brick-and-mortar shops helps fund trash collection, weed and graffiti cleanup, and security from off-duty police officers, among other services she says her two companies provide. “They are trying to piggyback on someone else’s hard work and dollar.” The pop-up scene outside the warehouses the first weekend of the month had grown to include people selling from tables in the middle of streets, sidewalks and parking lots, which Arnett-Bequeaith says blocked access to the 20 established shops and caused traffic concerns — pedestrian and vehicle. She says weekends can bring more than 5,000 people to the area. Arnett-Bequeaith says the permit is permanent and she has worked out agreements to allow food trucks on the streets, but with restrictions on where and when they can sell. And each pays a fee. Would she let pop-up retailers back in? “If they are willing to pay, I’m willing to sit down and talk to them about a business agreement,” she says. But some vendors argue that public streets and sidewalks should remain fair game. “He found this loophole, and now he has a monopoly on the area,” Brezinka says of Summers. “It doesn’t seem fair.” So the banned retail pop-ups have turned their efforts to an event several blocks southwest of the Monty Summers zone — the gypsy market. Rogers helps manage Genessee Royale, and her boss, Todd Schulte, gave the OK for use of the restaurant lot. Rogers’ bus is now a regular here and at First Fridays in the Crossroads, and she has sold at other festivals and markets around town. “We’re excited to be part of getting this end of the West Bottoms going,” Rogers says of the gypsy market. “And besides, we’re different from the other end. We’re more youthful, funkier.”

T

he July West Bottoms snafu was the first time that Rogers had been asked to leave while selling, but others have made it clear in advance that she isn’t welcome. A couple of weeks before this spring’s Brookside Art Annual, she asked to join. She says she received an e-mail response that her presence would be disrespectful to the artists who signed up a year ago. Food trucks and restaurants had a disagreement similar to the West Bottoms retail argument, recalls John Pajor, with KC Bizcare, though the result was friendlier. Restaurant owners went back and forth on whether food trucks were stealing or drawing business at First Fridays in the Crossroads before deciding the more, the merrier. The settlement, however, came with some rules. The food trucks have their own designated area, called the Truck Stop. Pajor says all involved seem to be happy with the setup. “I think the arrangement adds to the festival atmosphere down there,” Pajor says. “You really feel like there’s a party going on.” He recalls Rogers’ call to him last fall as the first time he had heard plans for a retail business on wheels. After Rogers started CartWheel, at least a couple of other mobile shops hit his radar. An Airstream trailer carries MoVi, a vintage-meetsmodern clothing boutique. A weathered, UPS-like truck holds Blue Collar Antique and Restoration and its spiffedup masculine finds, such as foundry continued on page 10

pitch.com O C T O B E R 2 5 - 3 1 , 2 0 1 2 T H E P I T C H pitch.com M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X T H E P I T C H 3

9


$1,299.95

CRICK CAMERA SHOP

7715 State Line Rd • 816.444.3390 www.crickcamera.com

The Pop-up Trail continued from page 9 molds turned into décor. And another mobile clothier is rumored to be in the works. To avoid issues with the city, pop-up owners must conquer a paperwork checklist similar to that completed by traditional businesses. Pop-ups need sales-tax identification numbers, a registration with the Missouri Secretary of State’s office, and a business license. Completing the process costs less than $100. Kansas City, Missouri’s most restrictive rule for pop-ups is an ordinance mandating that street vendors stay at least 50 feet away from established businesses selling similar items. Rogers and her pop-up pals say they haven’t brushed up against this dictate, and she says the run-in with Monty Summers remains the most significant issue they’ve had so far. Pajor says the question of where to sell poses the biggest challenge for pop-ups. The low-cost, relatively easy model lures new businesspeople, but they still depend on customer volume. A year ago, when vendors asked him where they could sell, he referred them to Nate’s Swap Shop on East 63rd Street. Now, marketplaces are sprouting faster than he can track and include Katz Midtown Market. In September, Redeemer Fellowship church turned the former Katz Drug Store site, at Westport Road and Main Street, into a community building that holds an indoor and outdoor market the first Saturday of each month. Farmers, artists and other vendors sell goods there, and visibility is substantial. “All this spontaneous retail has spawned in recent months,” Pajor says. “It’s amazing how resourceful these people are. It’s fascinating to sit back and watch this.” Observers of the pop-up culture also are looking at the local undertaking called POP. Backed by a Charlotte Street Foundation and Spencer Museum of Art Rocket Grant, POP’s organizers have launched what they call a “series of social happenings.” So far, the events have consisted of such things as yoga classes, dinners and a barter-driven art market, each with separate temporary locations. The artists behind the project say the point is to find common ground with various community groups 10 4 TTHHEE PPIITTCCHH

TO 2 5 -X3,1 ,2 0 20 pitch.com MOOC N TB H EXRX–X 0 1X2 pitch.com

Local artists sell handmade items inside CartWheel. while blurring the lines between art and life. “We’re taking a lesson from the classic lemonade stand here,” says Lacey Wozny, who brainstormed POP with Maria Calderon. “You’re street-level in a really immediate way, where you’re inviting participation from a broader audience that wouldn’t necessarily feel comfortable walking into a known entity.” Rogers’ CartWheel was among the vendors at last month’s POP Trading Post, where no money was allowed. The currency for these goods and services was in trade only. The University of Missouri–Kansas City’s Gallery of Art in the Fine Arts Building held the public event two Thursdays in September, and for a week, the gallery displayed a shrine representing the alternative exchange. Its title: “Locality As Reliquary.” “We’re a rich, rich community in noncurrency ways,” says Wozny, who previously served as assistant director at Grand Arts and completed a fellowship with Mildred’s Lane Historical Society and Museum. “Who doesn’t want to walk up to a bus painted in bright colors like CartWheel and shop? Or a tiny Airstream trailer serving tapas, with a beautiful woman sticking her head out the window?” she adds, referring to El Tenedor KC. “And it’s all within the backdrop of a cityscape where you have the whole landscape before you rather than just more stores and walls. You feel like you’ve been let in on a secret.”

F

ind the one thing you’re really good at and stick with it.” Rogers heard that over and over again while growing up and as a student at Savannah College of Art and Design in Savannah, Georgia. The mantra didn’t sit well with her. “Why do I have to find this one thing?” she wondered. “Why can’t I make art, bring people together and teach?” She majored in fiber and minored in printmaking, a coupling that she says catered to her broad ambitions by allowing her to dabble in screen-printing and weaving and felting and points in between. She designed leggings


with a trippy pattern (“rastapasta,” she called it) one day and made pretty earrings from feathers the next. In 2008, she found an instructor who recognized Rogers’ ambition. The teacher proposed an idea: Rogers could run an art-reuse center, a place to sell used art supplies and hold workshops — similar to Kansas City’s ReStore shops, Rogers says, but with art. She liked the business plan and came up with a name that put a playful twist on the recession she was about to graduate into: Recess. But the deal involved buying property, so Rogers shelved the idea and moved on. After graduation, she and her dog went on a six-month cross-country car trip that stopped for a visit in Kansas City with an art-school friend who had grown up here and had landed a job with the Plug Projects art space. Rogers kept going, eventually landing in Brooklyn, but a week into her New York move, she was broke. Her Plug Projects friend offered her a roof over her head, and Rogers returned to Kansas City in September 2009. She took a position running an after-school art program for children at the Mattie Rhodes Center, then began teaching at the Kansas City Art Institute while serving as a manager at the Genessee Royale. A West Coast vacation during the summer of 2011 left her awed by the pop-up business scenes in California and Oregon. She saw parking lots full of trailers, trucks, buses and tables offering burgers and bracelets and clothes and collectibles and on and on. “You’d see them in grungy areas and then in nice neighborhoods,” Rogers says. “What an opportunity to reach a broad market.” A mobile shop in Portland particularly caught her eye. Vintage clothing and handmade accessories were for sale in a converted camper trailer called Wanderlust. It had opened in the fall of 2010, when Portland had a few hundred food trucks but no mobile fashion shops. In less than two years, its business has grown enough that owners Vanessa and Dan Lurie have opened a second Wanderlust, this one in a brick-and-mortar storefront. In June, Wanderlust was featured on the Today show as well as in USA Today. Both stories focused on the boom in mobile businesses on the nation’s streets. Restaurants, hair salons, florists and clothing are increasingly on the go in cities such as Austin, Los Angeles, New York and Boston, according to USA Today. Some of these places have put tougher

restrictions on their traveling businesses. In downtown Boston, nonfood mobile retailers can sell under a hawker and peddlers license, but not between the hours of 8 a.m. and 8 p.m., according to a September article on The Atlantic’s Cities blog. Even then, they must move after every sale or every five minutes, whichever comes first. The owner of a truck business selling men’s apparel is leading a petition for change, the story says. What Rogers had seen in Portland fueled her next chapter. “I can do this in Kansas City,” she recalls thinking. Two weeks after returning from her West Coast trip, she bought a 1969 Wigwam trailer off Craigslist. Driving to her Waldo home one night, she thought of what she would call her new endeavor. “I knew I wanted a name that was playful, jovial, youthful and made sense,” she says. “I was thinking out loud: ‘It’s a cart. And it’s on wheels … CartWheel!’ ” Several months after the business made its October 2011 debut, Rogers found a more spacious home for her shop: a bus whose days of transporting the elderly to a church in Greenfield, Missouri, had ended. After gutting and refitting mobile space No. 2, Rogers passed the first camper to a friend in St. Louis, who transformed it into The ReTrailer: a mobile tea parlor. Inside CartWheel, the patchwork covers on the few remaining bus seats complement the free-spirited mood set by her eclectic mix

Rogers now calls Waldo home. of merchandise. (She made the covers from her grandmother’s quilts.) Rogers’ items — glitzy cow-tooth-pendant necklaces, reupholstered chairs — sit alongside clothing and ceramics from friends and acquaintances. Prices start at a couple of dollars. Tags higher than $50 are rare. “All along, I’ve wanted CartWheel to be a way to connect local artists and then connect their handmade stuff to people who aren’t already familiar with them,” Rogers says. “You can build community everywhere the bus goes.” Rogers and the Genessee Royale teamed up with Garnet Griebel of Scarlett Garnet Jewelry to kick off the Royale market. Griebel’s studio sits across the street from the restaurant lot, inside the Livestock Exchange Building. Another of the restaurant’s neighbors, Amigoni Urban Winery, also promotes the market. From this foundation, the market has grown through word of mouth. All are welcome, and the organizers haven’t yet discussed the idea of charging vendors to sell. (Rogers does not collect payment from those who sell their items aboard her bus.)

Shops nationwide carry Scarlett Garnet, and Whatchamacallits also sells in River Market Antiques and 600 Central. Others, though, hope that the gypsy market can attract a steady enough customer base to make a single-site business work. Billy Emerson has sold his goods as a vendor inside West Bottoms shop One Man’s Treasure and at events such as the Greaserama car show; he wants his truck-based Blue Collar to become his main location. For some vendors, it’s too soon to know how mobile they want to be. Rachel Rolon sells her beer bread and bagels under the name Black Dog Bakery, her black dog by her side. For now, she relies on a mix of shoppers seeking out this place as well as those stumbling upon it — people like Ashley Rippeto. On the first Saturday in September, Rippeto and two of her friends ate lunch at Genessee Royale and then couldn’t resist browsing Rogers’ bus. They left with a bag of finds. “This is how the West Bottoms is,” Rippeto says. “You never know what you’re going to see. There’s always something new and fun.” So here Rogers is, doing those three things she wanted to do back in art school: Make art, bring people together and teach. She can’t yet live on CartWheel alone, but she’s seeing a steady increase in profits and she has big ideas for the future. Some disused Kansas City building might yet house Recess, for instance — that old art-school idea. Such a place could anchor the warehouse art mecca she dreams of creating, a place for artist residency programs and mixed studio and living spaces, and maybe even live music. For now, she’s moving CartWheel forward, brainstorming with the skillsand-networking nonprofit Kansas City Freeskool to find ways to take her bus on the road as part of a grassroots educational effort. She’s trying to form a mobile business association and find more pop-up-friendly spots, and she aims to grow the Gypsy Market Royale. “My dream is to fill up that whole lot,” she says with a wide, confident smile as she points toward the Genessee Royale’s 50-space parking blacktop. “It’s just a matter of hooking up all the right people.”

“Th is is how th e West Bott oms is. You never know what you’re going to see.”

E-mail feedback@pitch.com

pitch.com C TOONBTEHR X2X–X 5 -3X 1 ,, 2200102X TTHHEE PPIITTCCHH 11 pitch.com OM 5


12

THE PITCH

O CTO B E R 2 5 -31 , 20 1 2

pitch.com


WEEK OF OCTOBER 25-31 | BY BERRY ANDERSON

17

PAG E

AY TUESD

10. 30

ART Refuse (emphasis on first syllable) at two galleries.

ith ime w Story t is Sedar David

21

PAG E

FILM

THIS AMERICAN STORYTELLER

Cloud Atlas loses you.

Mike Daisey’s This American Life segment “Mr. Daisey and the Apple Factory” torpedoed the radio show’s credibility for a time earlier this year, but it’s fair to remember that one of the program’s favorite voices has always been best when his stories are wholly unverifiable. “David Sedaris has never been presented as a journalist,” Alicia Shepard, former NPR ombudsman, once reminded The Washington Post. “He’s a storyteller. It’s acknowledged that he’s making things up.” And for his appearance at the Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts (1601 Broadway, 816-994-7200), Sedaris has made up new stories. He locally debuts the fresh material — possibly some from his book Let’s Explore Diabetes With Owls, set for release next spring — at 7:30 p.m. For tickets ($43–$52), see kauffmancenter.org or call 816-994-7222.

28 PAG E

MUSIC Ponyboy rides its obsession.

T H U R S D AY | 10 . 2 5 | HAUNTED BURLESQUE

The Burlesque Downtown Underground’s Fifth Annual Halloween Show Spooktacular! Spooktacular! should push your heart rate up enough to maybe work off that Clark bar you stole from your nephew’s goodie bag. See performances by Vic Sin, Lunaire D’Etoile, Foxy Von Trap and others at the 8 p.m. show. It’s in the Red Room at Nica’s 320 (320 Southwest Boulevard, 816-471-2900). Cover is $10. Don’t wear sweatpants. (There’s an encore Wednesday, October 31, at the same time.)

F R I D AY | 10 . 2 6 | ONSTAGE NOW

Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson President Andrew Jackson was a major baller. So insists this musical, which transports rock and continued on page 14

F R I D AY | 10 . 2 6 |

A LETTER TO DADDY

T

he original sleeper creeper from 1962 — What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? — is showing at Tivoli Cinemas (4050 Pennsylvania, 816-561-5222) in restored digital DCP. Relish the wigged-out hysteria and real-life loathing of Bette Davis and Joan Crawford in their psycho-biddy horror film today at 4:30 and 7:30 p.m. See tivolikc.com for prices and other show times. pitch.com

O CTO B E R 2 5 -31 , 20 1 2

THE PITCH

13


10.26

re than ep mo Irma V eye. e th meets

NOVEMBER 1 | 5 -7PM | $5 Enjoy a glass of wine & take a self-guided tour of historic Corinthian Hall, the home of Kansas City Museum RSVP @ Kansascitymuseum.org ONLINE OFFER! GO TO THE MUSEUM WEBSITE TO RECEIVE BUY 1, GET 1 FREE ADMISSION VOUCHER!

KANSAS CITY BALLET PRESENTS

FREE FIRST FRIDAYS AT THE BOLENDER CENTER

FRI NOV 2 | 6 - 7:30PM | “NUTCRACKER” EXCERPTS WWW.KCBALLET.ORG FOR MORE INFO

DON IPOCK

HARD HAT HAPPY HOUR

FRIDAY

continued from page 13 dance numbers to the 19th century. It plays through Sunday, November 4, at the Unicorn Theatre (3828 Main, 816-531-7529). See unicorntheatre.org for information, times and tickets. (Reviewed on page 19.) Horrorshow VI Six scary, adult-themed one-acts from EMU Theatre haunt the Lawrence Arts Center (940 New Hampshire, 785-843-2787). See the show tonight and tomorrow, and also Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. Reserve a seat at emutheatre.com. The Kentucky Cycle Part I The first in a two-part series of one-act plays about three Kentucky families over 200 years. (The Kentucky Cycle Part II begins Thursday,

S AT U R D AY | 10 . 2 7 |

Broadway

I-3

5

All events take place in the Michael and Ginger Frost Studio Theater at the Todd Bolender Center for Dance & Creativity

Bolender Center 500 W. Pershing Kansas City, MO

KCB Public Events 2012-2012 SEASON

ARTISTIC DIRECTOR WILLIAM WHITENER 14

THE PITCH

O CTO B E R 2 5 -31 , 20 1 2

Union Station

Pershing

pitch.com

DOUBLE DETOURS

H

ere at Filter, we like to keep y’all in the know. For example: We’re pretty sure you’ve heard about National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, but many of you may not know about the Making Strides Against Breast Cancer Walk at Liberty Memorial Park (100 West 26th Street). The fourth annual 5k begins at 9 a.m. today (with walk-up registration starting an hour earlier). If you’re not among the roughly 3,000 participants signed up so far, you’ll at least want to reroute your morning around the closed-off streets in this map. But you’re in, right? See makingstrideskansascity .org for more information.

November 8, and runs in repertory with Part I.) Showing through Sunday, December 2, at the Metropolitan Ensemble Theatre (3614 Main, 816-569-3226). See metkc.org. The Lady From the Sea Henrik Ibsen’s symbol-laden play about love and choices runs through Sunday, October 28, at UMKC’s Spencer Theatre (4949 Cherry); purchase tickets at umkctheatre.org or call 816-235-6222. Master Class Spinning Tree Theatre’s production offers Cynthia Hyer as Maria Callas in this play examining the original diva’s life. It’s inside Off Center Theatre in Crown Center (2450 Grand, 816-842-9999) through Sunday, October 28. Tickets and times at spinningtreetheatre .com. (Reviewed in our October 18 issue.) The Mystery of Irma Vep (A Penny Dreadful) Ron Megee and Mark Robbins borrow from all the classics in this monster comedy with plenty of shape shifting and transformations. Through Sunday, November 18, at the Kansas City Repertory Theatre (Copaken Stage, 1 H&R Block Way, corner of 13th Street and Walnut, 816-235-2700). See kcrep.org. The Threepenny Opera The classic by Bertolt Brecht and composer Kurt Weill, directed by Ric Averill, plays tonight through Sunday, at the Lawrence Arts Center (940 New Hampshire, 785-843-2787) with accompaniment by the Free State Liberation Orchestra. See lawrenceartscenter .org. (Reviewed on page 19.)

S AT U R D AY | 10 . 2 7 | LACE UP YOUR AGGRO SHOES

After watching the promo video for the Rugged Maniac 5k, we can tell you that the obstacle race promises most, if not all, of these things: mud, beer, barbed wire, topless people, fire, barfing, dirty-water splashes, E R O M live music, camaraderie, skinned knees, and perT sonal feelings of badass A INE ONL .COM achievement. Now if H C PIT that’s not living, we don’t know what is. Register on the morning of the race for $98 at Snow Creek Snow Ski Area (1 Snow Creek Drive, Weston, 816-640-2200), then get down like a maniac. For more information, see ruggedmaniac.com.

EVENTS


FIYO ON THE BAYOU

Can you picture 55 separate small fires floating down Brush Creek? Then you’ve been to one of the three previous WaterFire events. Barnaby Evans’ public-art installation (an idea that he originated in 1994 in Rhode Island) pushes 55 mini bonfires down the creek, accompanied by 15 live music and dance performances. Expect a crowd between Broadway and J.C. Nichols Parkway beginning at dusk tonight (and going till midnight). For more information, see waterfirekc.com.

S U N D AY | 10 . 2 8 | CRAIC LITE

Not every Irish music act wants to put on an upbeat hoolie like the Elders do, or a rowdy Dropkick Murphys–type throwdown or an Eddie Delahunt tears-in-your-Guinness affair. Take Celtic Thunder, for instance. The classical-crossover ensemble lines up

soft hits and choreography, with highly PBSfriendly results. Expect dazzling green lights, dramatic effects and handsome young Irish faces. And remember that Celtic Thunder has special love for KC — its DVD Voyage was shot at the Midland (1228 Main, 816-283-9921) — the same spot for this 8 p.m. show. Tickets cost $47.25–$72.25; see midlandkc.com.

M O N D AY | 10 . 2 9 | BITCH ENVY

Sure, Cosmopolitan is still the only item in your grocery store that offers good tips on oral sex (start in a candlelit room while Justin Timberlake’s Futuresex is on at low volume) and how to deal with your man’s small penis (no lube, lots of foreplay). But one former Cosmo editor has moved on to solve other riddles. Kate White, the magazine’s editorin-chief from 1998 till this year, is now an accomplished mystery novelist. Of course,

W E D N E S D AY | 10 . 3 1 | Amber ponders Macabre’s scorpion king.

she’s also a media player, and she’s at Unity Temple on the Plaza (707 West 47th Street, 816-561-4466) at 7 p.m. to talk about her new career manual, I Shouldn’t Be Telling You This: Success Secrets Every Gutsy Girl Should Know. Your ticket to her version of the media big time costs $25 and includes a copy of White’s hardcover and admission for a guest. See rainydaybooks.com or call 913-384-3126.

T U E S D AY | 10 . 3 0 |

PAGES 26 & 27

BAY OF PRINTS

HAUNTED HOUSES ROUNDUP

It’s nearing last call for an art show we like: Contemporary Cuban Printmaking. The exhibition, put on by the Taller Experimental De Gráfica at the Carter Art Center at Metropolitan Community College–Penn Valley campus (3201 Southwest Trafficway, 816-604-4278), includes 74 arresting images dating as far back as the 1910s. The gallery is open 1-5 p.m. today, and the show stays up through Saturday, November 3. (Philip Laber, an art professor at Northwest Missouri State University, speaks at 6 p.m. Friday, November 2.) For more information, see mcckc.edu/pennvalley/art.

LIBERTY CORN MAZE

Spookiness:

The John Wornall House Museum (6115 Wornall, 816-444-1858, wornallhouse.org) Slaveholder John Wornall tried to remain neutral during the Civil War, and he kept his estate open as a hospital for the wounded after the Battle of Westport. It’s said that dead soldiers’ spirits linger on the property. See if you can hear them on guided, hourly lantern-lighted tours of the house beginning at 6 p.m. Friday, Saturday and Wednesday (cost is $15). Reservations are required; some tours are sold out.

Gore:

Spookiness:

Macabre Cinema (1222 West 12th Street, 816-842-0320, fullmoonprod.com) Perhaps the least unnerving of the West Bottoms haunts, Macabre Cinema re-creates 30 horror-film scenes. Some — Friday the 13th, say — are easy to lose your way in. Others, such as Children of the Corn and From Dusk Till Dawn, might lose you. It’s open Friday through Wednesday, and tickets cost $20.

Gore:

Spookiness:

Spookiness:

Gore:

Gore:

3rd Street Asylum (Corner of Third Street and Cedar in Bonner Springs, 3rdstreetasylum.com) Among the 30 entertainers at this onceabandoned school (built, legend has it, on an Indian burial ground): a pair of short twin-girl psycho clowns. Xanax-up before this one, folks — its terrifying finish is not for the fainthearted. It’s open Friday, Saturday and Wednesday at 7 p.m. (also Friday, November 2), and cost is $18.

Chambers of Edgar Allan Poe (1100 Santa Fe, 816-842-0320, fullmoonprod.com) This West Bottoms house is full of dark hallways, darker corners and pitch-black creeps. Watch out for spinning tunnels and dropping floors. It’s open Friday through Wednesday, and tickets cost $20.

LIBERTY CORN MAZE

The La rg Corn M est a in Miss ze ouri!

1000 X 1000 ft maze will feature The American Farmer (who feeds the world), the child, and The Harvesters logo

“Mascara Munguenda” by Rafael Zarza E-mail submissions to Filter editor Berry Anderson at calendar@pitch.com. Search our complete listings guide online at pitch.com.

pitch.com

Friday 5:00 pm to last admission 10pm Saturdays 10 am to last admission 10 pm Sundays 10 am to last admission 5 pm Open until Sunday October 28th Last Weekend

Not scary, Just fun! Located just 2 miles south of Liberty, Missouri

17607 Ne 52nd St, Liberty, MO 64068

LibertyCornMaze.com

O CTO B E R 2 5 -31 , 20 1 2

THE PITCH

15


n i k g c ht u b SUNDAY: MISSION

8pm to Midnight

OLATHE 8pm to 11pm

missionbowl.com

OUR 2013 SEASON Mention THE PITCH and receive an additional 10% off your subscription!*

$1.00 per game $1.00 per shoes $1.00 10oz Rolling Rock or PBR Draft Beer $1.00 food specials at Strike Zone Grill

5399 MARTWAY MISSION, KS 913.432.7000

1020 S. WEAVER ST. OLATHE, KS 913.782.0279

Professional, Award-Winning Productions for as little as $15 per show! *Offer valid thru November 1

(816) 221-6987

www.MTHKC.com

DOG TAGS BOOTS UNIFORMS ACCESSORY ITEMS FOR COSTUMES VINTAGE CLOTHING

816-452-2002

434 NE 32nd St Kansas City, Missouri 64116 16

THE PITCH

O CTO B E R 2 5 -31 , 20 1 2

pitch.com

Tuesday - Saturday 10am - 6pm Sunday & Monday closed


ART

REFORMATION HARDWARE

At Telephonebooth and the Late Show, the rites of refuse

FIND THE

BY

THER E S A B EMBNI S T E R

Perfect

PLACE TO

ENJOY AUTUMN!

Check out these decks & patios for great outdoor dining & drinking! From left: “Whistle” by Katherine Perryman, “Bull Headed” by Mark Westervelt, and “Branded” by Colby K Smith

A

t first look, you might think that Katherine crocheted fabric in a thick, white-chocolatecolored shell. Perryman picks her materials based not Perryman stocks her studio — an “island of on what they look like but what they do — or misfit materials,” she calls it — with detritus. what she suspects they might do. It’s full of bits rescued from the clearance Playfulness and unpredictability form the bins of hardware, fabric, surplus and dollar basis of her methods. She’s confident enough stores. She picks up what others cast out: to allow her materials to take over by choosing an afghan, for instance, or a metal-frame forms that highlight the ways those materials lawn chair. behave (or adopting unorthodox and someThe latter, an old-school backyard staple, times destructive processes to observe their has given part of itself to “Whistle.” A greenresponses). She has started sculptures, she admits, by and-white polypropylene-fiber strap from “dumping a bucket of paint on a form, set- the seat twists around and around itself as it spills out of the top of a plywood form, loopting it on fi re, or sawing something in half.” ing up again to end in the crevice bisecting It’s not the usual trial-and-error approach, the wood. It resembles a tongue — one of then, but something more aggressive and impulsive. Yet the works in Residue and several times that Perryman implies human anatomy here. In other pieces, pantyhose Extraction, Perryman’s fascinating solo show look like intestines, hanging fabric calls to at Telephonebooth, don’t feel improvised mind sagging breasts, and or stumbled upon. Her ablatex paint resembles skin. stract, often candy-colored Residue and Extraction: “I’m interested in the wall-hanging sculptures Katherine Perryman synthetic and the organic instead convey the decisive Through October 27 at together, instead of those motion of her technique Telephonebooth, 3319 Troost, being separate entities,” while offering absorbing 816-582-9812 she tells me. cross-sections of it. The In “Bones and all” narpieces seem caught in the New Work: Colby K row strips of felt fall limply midst of change, frozen Smith, Mark Westervelt over the lip of an ovalmidevolution. Through October 27 at the shaped form. Pale peach on “I try to strike that balLate Show, 1600 Cherry, the inside and lined with a ance with a level of fresh816-474-1300 blue-and-white ridge not ness to make the work feel unlike the puff y edge of a like it just happened, or pizza crust, the shape recalls a mouth (or a like it’s just about to fall apart,” she says. She finds that balance in “Spinster,” a number of body orifices, for that matter), work that’s also a good example of the sheer with the long, thin strips of felt suggesting stray hairs. entertainment available from her sculp“Bones and all” is Perryman at her most tures. Examining them, you feel an urge to guess the steps she took in their construc- grotesque. Yet the color palette is undeniably cheerful, and the shape is flat-out funny. tion. My guess is that, for “Spinster,” she laid an afghan over a wooden backing after Disgust, humor, glee — these responses are byproducts of the artist’s unselfconscious dipping the bubble-gum-pink, netlike blanket in latex paint. Under the added weight working methods. Her offbeat process makes of the paint, the acrylic yarn stretches and each new look at these pieces unpredictable. You don’t know quite what she has done to hangs lower. The dried paint encases the

her treasure trove of trash or how you’ll react to the results — other than with some delight.

F

or the October exhibition at the Late Show, gallery owner and self-described “art pimp” Tom Deatherage matches two artists with an eye for the overlooked. Mark Westervelt makes art out of dried paint scraps that have fallen to his studio floor, while Colby K Smith gives discarded building materials a second life as wall-hanging sculptures. Westervelt calls his peculiar medium “paint skins,” and the ones on display here are downright charming. Each of the 41 intimately sized collages on paper depicts a figure (most often solitary) against a blank background. Assembled from simple silhouettes of arms, legs, torsos and heads cut from the swirling-patterned paint chips, the androgynous figures contort themselves into positions difficult to execute comfortably in real life. Some walk on all fours like a dog, and others lie on their backs, legs akimbo, or perch on a single appendage, striking a shaky balance. Using tiny marks, Westervelt bestows his paint people with distinctive facial features. A few appear to wear masks or have mythical half-man, half-beast attributes. Smith combines bits and pieces of abandoned building materials into compact sculptures the same way a poet arranges words to create a sentence. Smith’s talents lie in choosing and arranging. He seems to have a thing for stripes and rectangles. Many of his 12 sculptures feature vertical bands arranged side by side at right angles. At times, his work is almost camouflaged by the Late Show’s corrugated-metal walls, but the simple forms allow his materials to shine. Carefully selected and placed in close proximity to one another, the timeworn surfaces of his wood, drywall, screens and veneer really sing.

E-mail feedback@pitch.com

B.B.’S LAWNSIDE BAR-B-Q 1205 Easts 85th St. KC,MO 816-822-7427

LUCKY BREWGRILLE 5401 Johnson Dr Mission, KS 913-403-8571 luckybrewgrille.com

BLUE BIRD BISTRO 1700 Summit KC,MO 816-221-7559 bluebirdbistro.com

MAMA TIO’S Inside Town Pavillion on 11th St between Main & Walnut KC,MO 816-221-0589 mamatios.com

BRIO TUSCAN GRILL 502 Nichols Drive KC,MO 816-561-5888 brioitalian.com THE BROOKSIDER 6330 Brookside Plaza KC,MO 816-363-4070 brooksiderbarandgrill.com CHEZ ELLE 1713 Summit St KC,MO 816- 471-2616 chezelle.com CZAR 1531 Grand Boulevard KC,MO 816- 221-2244 czarkc.com GARRET’S BAR 6505 Nieman Rd Shawnee,KS 913-608-5995 facebook.com/garretsbar FUEL 7300 W. 119th St OP,KS 913-451-0444 fuelkc.com KNUCKLEHEADS 2715 Rochester KC,MO 816-483-1456 knuckleheadskc.com THE LEVEE 16 W. 43rd St KC,MO 816-561-5565 thelevee.net LITTLE EGYPT 3927 BROADWAY KC,MO 816-753-8988

MCCORMICK & SCHMICK’S 448 W 47th Street KC,MO 816-531-6800 mccormickandschmicks.com MICHAELANGELOS ITALIAN GRILL 17104 E. 24 Hwy. Independence, MO 816-257-1122 POWER & LIGHT DISTRICT 13th and Main KC,MO 816-842-1045 RAOUL’S VELVET ROOM 7222 W. 119th St OP,KS 913-469-0466 raoulsvelvetroom.com RECORD BAR 1020 Westport Road KC,MO 816-753-5207 therecordbar.com RIOT ROOM 4048 Broadway KC,MO 816-442-8177 theriotroom.com 403 CLUB 403 N. 5th St. Kansas City, KS 913-499-8392 77 SOUTH 5041 W. 135th St. Leawood, KS 913-742-7727 77south.net

pitch.com CT 5 - 3X 1 ,, 2200102X TTHHEE PPIITTCCHH 17 pitch.com OM OONBTEHR X2X–X 1


An Intimate Evening with

LINDSEY BUCKINGHAM

Don’t miss the chance to see this rock legend! 7 p.m., Sun., Nov. 4

www.jccc.edu/TheSeries | 913-469-4445

Performing Arts Series Johnson County Community College | NO ONLINE FEES | FREE PARKING

4.776x5.29buckingham.indd

18

THE PITCH

O CTO B E R 2 5 -31 , 20 1 2

pitch.com

star


S TA G E

ACTION JACKSON

Beyond the Schoolhouse Rock frontier rides Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson.

T

CYNTHIA LEVIN

MACK LETHAL

I

Andrew Jackson (Shea Coffman) takes a timeout with his wife, Rachel (Katie Karel). Brecht and Weill took as their template an early 18th-century work called The Beggar’s Opera. In their version, every street pauper needs a pimp. Spiked with the music of 1920s Berlin, the story takes place in early 19thcentury England, around the time of Queen Victoria’s coronation. At the center of this corrupt society is the notorious London criminal

D E BO R A H HIRS CH

Captain MacHeath. He has no morals but lots of ambition, and — as portrayed here by the talented Kansas City actor and singer Seth Golay — no shortage of appeal. In conflict with MacHeath is J.J. Peachum, the beggars’ boss. He readies his charges to set up along the new queen’s parade route and to look down-and-out with bogus sores, limps and disabilities. “If suffering is real,” Peachum says, “no one believes it.” (Veteran Kansas City actor Jim Korinke shows off his musical side in an adept performance.) Peachum’s alcoholic wife (a fine Sarah Young) unwittingly hooks up her daughter, Polly, with MacHeath. Among other things, Mack is known for his many “marriages,” and so he elopes with Polly in a questionable ceremony. (Breanna Pine brings a beautiful voice and a charming vulnerability to a Polly who can’t quite mask her hardness.) Peachum solicits police help but gets mixed results from Chief Jackie “Tiger” Brown (expertly portrayed by the show’s director, Ric Averill), an old army buddy of MacHeath’s. Also central is Jenny, the brothel’s madame (the strong Kitty Steffens) and an old flame of MacHeath’s. The show is big. Averill marshals 18 cast members playing more than 30 characters — beggars, thieves, prostitutes, police, a reverend and “businessmen” — plus the 12-member Free State Liberation Orchestra (conducted by Carlos Espinosa), playing 20 instruments and accompanying 24 songs. It’s also thematically rich and musically rewarding. Its three hours never drag (there are two intermissions) but instead keep us engaged with an underlying — and relevant — social commentary.

E-mail deborah.hirsch@pitch.com

A L S O P L AY I N G : T H E L A DY F R O M T H E S E A

H

enrik Ibsen had a thing for trapped women, and in 19th-century Norway, the limits of social station left many women feeling trapped. Ibsen’s access to the female psyche still feels insightful today. His 1889 play, The Lady From the Sea, remains a layered, absorbing work about relationships and yearning, one that zeroes in on an entirely different sort of woman’s right to choose. This UMKC Theatre production, directed by acting professor Theodore Swetz, features graduate-level acting, production and design students, all of whom do good work — from the beautiful sets and lighting to the period costumes and the professional performances. (Some appeared recently in the Shakespeare Festival and the Fringe Festival.) The show began previews last week and opens Wednesday, October 24, for a run through Sunday, October 28, in the Spencer Theatre (4949 Cherry, 816-235-6222, umkctheatre.org).

Courtney Salvage as Ellida

B R I A N PA U L E T T E

hink politics are lie-filled, money-driven and negative now? Go back a couple of centuries and 38 presidents and ask Andrew Jackson — or, anyway, the rock-star version of Old Hickory portrayed in the Unicorn Theatre’s Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson. Those wealthy New England Congress fucks would rather tax us and play polo all day than defend the frontier, this Jackson complains in “I’m Not That Guy.” The brisk, sharp Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson doesn’t offer the defi nitive explanation of how its subject becomes that guy — soldier, president, shaper of the young United States. But it makes a vigorous case for the rock musical (something KC has seen a lot of lately), and it won me over from its first number. Directed by Cynthia Levin, this Unicorn Theatre and UMKC Theatre coproduction of the Tony Award nominee is a comic-book, SNL version of history, squeezed through a Twitter feed. Alex Timbers’ book and Michael Friedman’s music and lyrics put a satirical spin on the man and his American era, and the issues under hot debate then — states’ rights, federal power, the rich versus the common citizen, “foreigners” — don’t sound like a past that’s past. In tight, pop-idol jeans, Shea Coffman is the iconoclastic Jackson: slaveholder and rated in the performance, and cast members sometimes ruthless solder, then politician Vi Tran, Matthew Rapport, Sam Wright and and, ultimately, the seventh president. He was Jacob Aaron Cullum sometimes play as well. a candidate — AJ! AJ! AJ! — people “wanted The talented Katie Karel is the longto have a beer with.” And despite the onesuffering Rachel, the love of Jackson’s life. act, 90-minute show’s breakneck pace and They meet when he’s recuperating from a abbreviated length, Coffwound, and their lustful man manages to give this bloodletting is a funny, if obBloody Bloody figure — “who put the ‘man’ vious, metaphor for his life. Andrew Jackson in ‘Manifest Destiny’ ” and Hu morou s a n ac h ro Through November 4 at the “made Jefferson look like nisms pervade the show Unicorn Theatre, 3828 Main, a pussy,” the script says — — an Oval Office telephone, 816-531-7529, feelings, even some depth. video games, groupies and unicorntheatre.org That in-your-face tone hangers-on. But that’s part fits a Jackson who grew up of why this off beat musiThe Threepenny Opera humble to become a hotcal works as well as it does Through October 28 at the tempered and duel-prone — it’s a maverick about a Lawrence Arts Center, 940 man who often ignored maverick. New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-843-2787, orders and the rule of law. So if you’re tired of curlawrenceartscenter.org But this show isn’t all anrent political discourse, ger and punk. It depicts a there’s something tempocomplicated political figure rarily curative about watchdestined to have a major impact on this couning a commander in chief ride the presidential try’s course and character. It’s irreverent, desk like a skateboard and drop some musical but its bite is leavened by style and humor, f-bombs. thanks in part to Christina Burton’s spirited choreography. (And it’s not all irreverence. I can still hear Chioma Anyanwu’s voice in “Ten Little Indians,” a touching number that points to Jackson’s devastating policy toward Native Americans.) f you prefer your musical satire driven by The show and its capable cast of 12 use an anti-hero, then you know “The Ballad the entire stage, anchored by facades of a log of Mack the Knife.” The song opens German cabin and the White House (rendered askew, dramatist Bertolt Brecht and composer Kurt distorted as in a dream, by set designer Weill’s most durable collaboration, The ThreeMatthew Mott). A four-piece band, led by penny Opera, the still-vital 1928 work now Cody Wyoming (with music direction by onstage at the Lawrence Arts Center in a wellJeremy Watson), sits upstage and is incorpoexecuted, enjoyable production.

BY

pitch.com C TOONBTEHR X2X–X 5 - 3 1X, , 2200102X TTHHEE PPI ITTCCHH 19 pitch.com O M 1


PRESENTED BY

18th & Vine

Westport

P&L

Danny's Big Easy Get Your Wristbands here!

Angels Rock Bar No Cover Friday

16 & Grand Blvd

Drunken Fish Late Night Happy Hour-10PM to Close

Luna Free Champagne for all Bachelorette Parties, No Cover for Ladies

Dark Horse $2 Wells $2 domestic draws $12 Power Hours 8pm-10pm Fri & Sat Dave's Stagecoach Inn $3 Jameson Shots and $2 16oz Cans of PBR

Downtown

John's Big Deck (Upper) $3 Wells $4 Bombs and No Cover Anthony’s

2 for 1 Any items for late Night Menu wtih Purchase of Two Beverages

River Market

Hickok's $5 Mojito $6 Black Margaritas $3 Draws and Free Queso with 2 Food Purchases Brookside FireFly Minsky's Pizza Howl At The Moon Brooksider Sports Bar & Grill $4 Wells, No Cover All Night with $1 off Apps $2.50 Domestic Draws 2 for 1 cover $3 Corona Bottles Wristband $3 Wells $12 Bucket of Beers and Charlie Hooper's Bar & Grille Green Room Burgers and Beer 50 Cents off Martinis Maker's Mark Bourbon Fridays- $1 Off Boulevard, Free Fry with Purchase of an Entrée The Blue Line House & Lounge Saturdays $1 off Domestic Bottles Gusto $5 Maker's Mark Cocktails $2 Blue Line Beers $2 Blue Line Michael Forbes Grille $2 Yard Beers and $5 Grape Bombs Shots $3 Wells Reverse Happy 930pm-1am. McFadden's Sports Saloon Harpo's Restaurant Bar Winslow's BBQ 2 for 1 Wells $3 Margaritas $4 UV Vodka Drinks $2 Selected Shots $5 off Lunch or Dinner for Two Mosaic Lounge Jersey Dog, Hot Dog Cart Martini Corner No Cover Before 11pm 2 Jumbo Dogs for $5 and $1 Off Waldo Haus Bobby Baker's Lounge Any Sandwich $3 Radaberger Pilsner &Agris-Pinot Gris PBR Big Sky Bar $2 Domestic Bottles & $3 Rock Lobster Shots Jerusalem Cafe Sol Cantina Lew's Grill & Bar $5 Jack Daniel’s Drinks $5 off Hooka $4 Trolley Margaritas & $2.50 Budlight Draws Pizza Bar Joe's Pizza Buy the Slice $2.75 Pacifico Bottle Quinton's $3 Boulevard Wheat Pints 2 Slices for $5 The Drop $3 Domestic Pints $3 Wells and a Kelly's Westport Inn $6 Specialty Martinis & Cocktails Shark Bar Complimentary Shot with Purchase of a $1 off Cover Beverage $4 Malibu Cocktails Tower Tavern McCoy's Public House Remedy Food + Drink $3.50 Wells and Tengo Sed Cantina $4.00 McCoy's Pints 10% off with Wristband $10 Pizza 7pm-12 $3 El Jimador Margaritas Missie B's Velvet DOG The Well Bar-Grill and Rooftop Free Cover $1 off all Sky Drinks Free Spinach Dip w/any Purchase The Dubliner Monaco $3.50 Boulevard Wheat on Fridays and Riot Room New Stops No Cover Free cover with Wrist Band $5 Jameson $3 Wells after Midnight Tea Drops 75th Street Brewery Z-Strike Bowling Plaza 2 for 1 games, No cover on Fridays $1.00 Off a Cupcake or Regular Tea Café Al Dente Blanc Burgers + Bottles The Foundry Reverse Happy Tacos,Calimari, Ernie Biggs Dueling Piano Bar Westport $4.00 McCoy's Pints and Great Drink Specials! Fidel's Cigar Shop Torre's Pizzeria Figlio, The Italian Beer Kitchen Indie On Main Any Specialty Pizza for $10 and 2 $5 off Any Purchace 7-10pm Late Night Happy Hour Friday & Slices for $4 O'Dowds OutaBounds Saturday 11pm-1am Free Cover & $5 Boru Irish Vodka Buzzard Beach Westport Cafe and Bar Tanner's Bar and Grill Tomfooleries $1.25 Domestic Drafts $2.50 Wells Shot and a Beer for $5 Uptown Arts Bar Fri - Sat 9pm-Close $2.50 Californos Westport Coffee House Domestic Draws $2.75 Wells (Specials will be displayed next week) $5 off $12 purchase 15% Off Any Coffee Drink $4.50 Cuervo Margaritas Fran's Restaurant

Fidels' Cigar Shop

$5.99 Premium Breakfast on Fridays, $4 The Only Cigar Shop on the Strip. Bacardi & 360 Vodka Bombs after 10pm, 10% Off Purchase of Cigars Open 24 Hours

www.thekansascitystrip.com

20

THE PITCH

O CTO B E R 2 5 -31 , 20 1 2

pitch.com


FILM

LOOPERS

BY

S C O T T W IL S ON

Cloud Atlas, the Wachowski-Tykwer reincarnation fable, is born to lose.

INVITE YOU AND A GUEST TO A SPECIAL ADVANCE SCREENING OF

SHANE MAUSS OCT 24-28

• Comedy Central Presents • Conan • Live at Gotham OCT 31-NOV 4

COLIN CANE

• Comedy Central Presents RATED • Montreal Comedy

SPONSORED BY HOLLYWOOD CASINO FALL COMEDY SERIES Tue-Sun 7:45pm & 9:45pm - Just Added Late Show Fri/Sat 11:45 Every Weekend 913.400.7500 | WWW.STANFORDSCOMEDYCLUB.COM

G

reat news, you guys: The Matrix IV is out, and it’s way better than Matrix: Revolutions. It’s Matrix: Gumpalutions. That’s the easiest shorthand for Cloud Atlas, the Tom Hanks-starring, post-global epic that co-writers and –directors Tom Tykwer, Andy Wachowski and Lana Wachowski have composed from novelist David Mitchell’s muchadmired book. It’s a largely faithful adaptation, visually sumptuous and often tenderly acted. It’s also 165 inert minutes of proof that what we talk about when we talk about unfilmable is not can but should. The answer is no. The Wachowskis and Tykwer show no trouble filling the screen (not just dressing it). They find the novel’s themes and even articulate some of its best lines. But the result is something like an endless CGI-and-makeup demo reel, and you leave it wondering not where the novel’s soul went but whether it had one at all. Mitchell’s diagonal cross-section of human ambition and its byproducts (especially human bondage) is also a witty deconstruction of fiction’s evolution. Its widely varied sections visit Defoe and Joyce, wave at the oral tradition, and let detective pulp sit on your face for a little while, just for kicks. The characters span generations and civilizations, and the language rolls fluidly from the melodic to the guttural. It’s purpose-built for readers wanting a flamboyant challenge, yet even within its airtight architecture there’s room to breathe. Onscreen, though, Cloud Atlas leaks, loosing wafts of hot philosophical gas from a balloon shaped like Tom Hanks. See, Hanks, per the script’s design and like most every other actor here, plays multiple parts, the better to underscore — and underline and highlight and circle — that the Wachowskis and Tykwer have amplified the novel’s reincarnation motif. The clever thing about casting our most enduring Everyman as every man is self-evident. But typecasting is a bitch, and Hanks’ type is not every soldier, every astronaut or even every type-busting hit man. His type is one virtuous soldier, one virtuous astronaut and one virtuous hit man. And Mitchell isn’t much interested in virtue as we demand it onscreen. Cloud Atlas, to the extent that it addresses goodness and badness beyond having a few good people arrayed against a welter of pretty bad people, posits an axis of Samaritanism (that Hanks specialty) against an axis of greed. On that grid we meet Hanks and Jim Broadbent and Hugh Grant and Halle Berry, among others, as each portrays a plurality of people moving up and down their assigned axes. Whereas Forrest Gump — the red-state fantasy classic assembled by that other cold-eyed technocrat, Robert Zemeckis — gave us one incurious man galumphing down the decades, Cloud Atlas serves up several versions of the same clueless wanderers, all at the mercy of pattern. This is bad news for Hugo Weaving (a brilliant stage actor who deserves a better movie

LEGENDS 1867 VILLAGE WEST • next to Dave & Busters

LIVE Q&A WITH

Matthew LILLARD Lillard DIRECTOR MATTHEW FRIDAY AND SATURDAY AT 7PM

Man out of Tom: Hanks in Cloud Atlas. career), who must play an evil phantasm and an evil assassin and not much else. And it’s not great for Broadbent, tasked with widening his big British blue eyes when he’s innocent and narrowing them when he’s not, and not doing much in between. In a movie that intends spiritual enormity, he’s looped into a never-ending Benny Hill episode. But Hanks is Hanks, so his peeps get to climb out of the ooze now and then. His 19th-century ship’s doctor and Dickensian innkeeper and murderous writer exist in the book, but they feel tacked on here, a sop to a star eager to geek out with his bosses. And when his contract-mandated virtuous figure shows up — he’s some kind of goatherd in a post-meltdown Hawaii — the Hanks of Cast Away ought to feel pretty good. Not so. Hanks with a machete and a very limited vocabulary and a Name of the Rose wig plays like an awful joke. No one was asking to see Tompocalypto. Cloud Atlas is a big-canvas work that asks not for your usual suspension of disbelief but for the resumption of belief — in a greater power, in an order, in the thrill of upending that order once an age or so. That’s not a bargain most audiences are willing to strike, even those prepared by the memory of all that deep Matrix sagacity. “I’m glad I didn’t pay money to see that,” clucked several people leaving the Cloud Atlas screening I attended. And for a moment, as much as I disliked Cloud Atlas, I beamed at these people an ugly mental retort: You just didn’t get it. After all, this is the kind of movie that throws around the word amanuensis with impunity. Hey, you think the first time that young musical genius Robert Frobisher (Ben Whishaw) says he’s traveling to Belgium to act as amanuensis to a famous old composer, I never thought I’d hear the word amanuensis in a big CGI extravaganza. But even if you get Cloud Atlas, it holds you permanently at bay. By the time this overstuffed visual transcript is over, you think: Hmph. Amanuensis. Figures.

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 1 FOR TICKETS, LOG ON TO WWW.GOFOBO.COM/RSVP AND ENTER THE FOLLOWING CODE: PITCH6GK6 You must download a pass to gain admittance to the screening. No purchase necessary. Limit two (admit one) passes per person. Passes will be available while supplies last. This film is rated R for strong sexuality including graphic nudity and frank dialogue. Please note: Arrive early! Seating is first-come, first-served. Theater is overbooked to ensure a full house. Theater is not responsible for overbooking. Seating is not guaranteed. No one under 17 admitted without legal guardian.

OPENS FRIDAY OCTOBER 26TH AT

Screenland Armour SCREENLAND ARMOUR

408 ARMOUR RD.NORTH KC, MO. 64116

816-421-9700

FOR TICKETS WWW.SCREENLAND.COM

IN SELECT THEATERS NOVEMBER 9

KKFI Presents

kansas city pitch thursday, october 25

Democracy Now’s Award Winning Journalist 2.305x5.291

Amy Goodman:

Lh

The Silenced Majority Tour In Celebration of KKFI’s 25th Anniversary Special Guests: Spoken Word Artists The Recipe IBEW Local 124 301 E 103rd Terr KCMO (Go West at 105th and Holmes) Tickets: $25 GA Advance; $100 VIP; $150 VIP Couple; $10 Financially Challenged Advance Tickets: (816) 994-7869 Thursday, Nov. 1st, 6pm: VIP Meet and Greet and Gourmet Dinner 7pm: An Amy Goodman Give ‘Em Hell Speech and Book Signing

E-mail scott.wilson@pitch.com pitch.com O C T O B E R 2 5 - 3 1 , 2 0 1 2 T H E P I T C H 21 pitch.com M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X T H E P I T C H 1


Mediterranean

Restaurant & Bar

| 816 816.988.7958 8 16..98 16 988 8.79 .795 58

fe Fala

11867 8 6 7 SW S W SState t a t e Route R ou outt e 77,, B lue Springs, S pring pringss M MOO Blue

l

.

Gyros

.

Keb ab

s

Mon - Wed 11am - 12:30am Thurs - Sat 11am - 1:30am Sun 11am - 12am Blue Sp Springs’ Favorite Family Rest Restaurant

Serving breakfast all day, lunch & dinner.

Happy Hour: 3-6pm & 9pm-close

Offer expires November 5, 2012. Discounted item must be of equal or lesser value.

L I V E E N T E R TA I N M E N T F R I – S AT

320 E. 51st St. Kansas City, MO 816.756.5444 • saharakc.com

Better ollow us on

3611 Broadway • KCMO

acebook

a community bar celebrating the performing arts 4pm-1:30am Mon-Sat • 816-960-4611

GREAT COFFEE 7:00am to 10:00am Mon-Fri

Start your day with us!

UPCOMING SHOWS

Wed 10/24: Uptown Poetry Slam

Poetry competition hosted by Nightlife Jones. 9:30pm. $5

Thur 10/25: M-Bird’s Writer’s Showcase A weekly showcase of singer-songwriters hosted by Kansas City’s own Megan Birdsall. 7:30pm. $3

Wed 10/31: Halloween Costume Party with the Independent Filmmakers of Kansas City Screenings of local horror films, & costume costest. Proceeds benefit the Independent Filmmakers Coalition of Kansas City 7:30pm. $5 Cover or Free to those in costume

Check our website for other upcoming events

www.uptownartsbar.com

together.

$6 LUNCH SPECIALS Friday: Boiled Shrimp Dinner Saturday: Steak Night

LIVE MUSIC

WEDNESDAY,FRIDAY & SATURDAY

for Live Music Info Text “Matchbo x” @55678

2853 Southwest Blvd, KCMO (816) 753-9478

Breakfast

Catering

& Lunch

Gift Baskets

Breakfast: Mon-Fri 7-11am, Sat 7-12pm, Sun 8-1:30pm Lunch: Mon-Sat 11-3pm, Sun 11-1:30pm

409 W. Gregory, KCMO (816) 444-1933 • www.theclassiccookie.com

HAVE YOU TRIED

THE WOODSWEATHER CAFE? SERVING BREAKFAST, LUNCH & DINNER XMAS CURIOUS NOW AVAILABLE!

EVERY FRIDAY MEXICAN BUFFET FOR ONLY $7.99 FROM 4-9PM Now taking advance Tamale orders for holiday parties! 1667 SUMMIT KCMO

816-471-0450

Delicious Hot Dogs, Burgers & Brats

Open Mon-Sat

10am - 3pm Closed Sundays

Drive-thru or Dine-in

520 SW Boulevard

www.mofranks.com 22

THE PITCH

O CTO B E R 2 5 -31 , 20 1 2

pitch.com

Wed oct 31st Halloween Blues Jam 8pm Costume Contest $100 Prize!

BREAKFAST & LUNCH - MON THRU SAT BREAKFAST - LUNCH - DINNER - TUES THRU SAT

1414 W. 9TH ST. MINUTES FROM DOWNTOWN 816.472.6333|WOODSWEATHER.COM

“WE LOVE OUR CUSTOMERS”


CAFÉ

TAKE TWO

On the seventh day,

BY

Woodsweather II rests — thank God.

CHARLES FERRUZZA

Woodsweather II • 2510 Northeast Vivion Road, 816-452-2606 • Hours: 6 a.m.–10 p.m. Monday–Thursday, 6 a.m.–11 p.m. Friday–Saturday, closed Sunday • Price: $–$$

T

he story of the Woodswether Café should be as simple as a plate of eggs and bacon. But a restaurant is always more complicated than that. Woodswether started life in the 1990s as a modest West Bottoms diner, popular with truck drivers and blue-collar workers. Because it was stationed on curvy, hard-to-find Woodswether Road, it was painted with an outrageous mural depicting rabid cabbages, eggs with teeth and wacky rabbits. Jerry Naster, a former meat cutter at Snyder’s Supermarket, ran the place then (which is why it used to be known as Jerry’s Woodswether Café), and he learned to cook on the job. “When I bought the restaurant,” he says, “I didn’t even know how to boil an egg. Two of my waitresses had to show me how to cook eggs. But I just kept on cooking and learned how to make all kinds of things.” In 2005, Naster moved his restaurant off Woodswether Road, into a bigger building at 1414 West Ninth Street. Two years later, depressed about his wife’s death, Naster impulsively E R MO sold the place. (In 2010, he opened the compact Jerry’s Café at State T A INE ONL .COM Line and 103rd Street). H PITC John Cuezze a nd his wife, Joanne, operated the Woodswether Café until this past summer, when they sold it to Mark Anderson (who kept the menu and added a letter to the name to make it the Woodsweather Café). Here’s where the eggs in the tale get scrambled. Before selling the not-quite- original Woodswether, Cuezze and Tony Civella opened another restaurant and decided to call it Woodsweather II. Well, why not? It’s in the Northland, many miles from Woodswether Road, and it occupies a building once home to a gay bar called Wetherbee’s. And for the record, the new Woodsweather II is considerably more elaborate than its various relatives. There’s a glossy concrete floor, a sleek lounge area with a dance floor, and a dining room that manages to be both glitzy and utilitarian at once. If the old Woodswether was as familiar as an old shoe, this version — which sure doesn’t look like much from the outside — is as flashy inside as a rhinestone-encrusted Ferragamo pump. The menu is proudly unfancy. The old Woodswether in the Bottoms was famous for its hearty breakfasts, hefty hamburgers and home-style fare, and this new incarnation hasn’t made that many culinary changes. One of them, however, is significant: Woodsweather II is closed Sundays. (Cuezze is thinking of adding Sunday breakfast in the future. “This location is surrounded by churches,” he says.) The main reason that Woodsweather II isn’t

ANGELA C. BOND

CAFÉ

Civella’s attractive sister Fanny Jo, who is also a server here, makes the fried chicken from yet open Sundays is that it has become a rau- an old family recipe. And there’s a Thursday pasta special (with meatballs or a chubby link cous Saturday-night club scene. (The bar stays of Scimeca’s sausage): a pound of spaghetti open until 3 a.m. Fridays and Saturdays.) A band called Uncle Jam was rocking the dining or penne piled on a platter and smothered in that robust red sauce. room two weeks ago as the waitresses, serving Chef Jesse Vega, an almost iconic local platters of fried catfish and deep-fried shrimp a couple of hours earlier, delivered cucumber cook, oversees the kitchen, making real mashed potatoes every day and turning, gimlets and “Electric Lemonade” cocktails to through clever sleight of hand, inexpensive the post-supper crowd. steaks into damn good dinners — a 10-ounce “We’ve had people ask us to serve breakrib-eye here is $14 and infast at last call,” Cuezze says, cludes a spud and a side “but that’s too much presWoodsweather II dish. At that price, the meat sure on our staff right now.” Grilled 10-ounce doesn’t sit tall on the plate, In the cold light of day, rib-eye ..........................$13.99 Chicken Romano but it’s very satisfying. (The Woodsweather II reverts special ...........................$8.49 soothing sheen of melted to being an old-fashioned Pepper-jack Chianti butter helps.) diner, in the best sense of cheeseburger ............... $6.75 Thickness here is rethat word. The fries here Michael’s Reuben .......... $7.59 served for the half-pound are hand-cut, the slightly Thursday pasta cheeseburger transplanted sweet Sicilian sugo is simspecial ...........................$8.49 from the West Bottoms. A mered in the kitchen, and monster alive and well in the even the salad dressings are made in-house (except for the honey-mustard Northland, it’s topped with melted pepper jack and grilled onions and served on Texas because, a waitress explained to me, “mostly kids order it with their fried chicken fingers so toast. The other intact transfer is the Reuben, it has be more about the honey than the mus- one of the best such sandwiches in the city, tard”). Monday and Saturday nights, Tony piled high with tender corned beef, a jumble

Everything is big at Woodsweather II.

of tart sauerkraut and a dollop of house-made Thousand Island dressing. I’m not big on leftovers, but I have yet to leave this restaurant without a carryout container. The spaghetti on the plate of chicken Romano — Cuezze’s version of chicken parmesan, with a fried chicken patty drenched in red sauce and melted cheese — seemed to multiply after each bite. I swear I had more pasta at the end of the meal than I did at the beginning. (The place isn’t officially an Italian restaurant, but you wouldn’t know that with its specials, including a bow-tie pasta blanketed in a ridiculously rich cream sauce with both gorgonzola and parmesan.) Leftovers run out, though, and I’m glad I live far enough away to avoid impulsive drives northward to indulge my craving for uncouth food combinations. I can’t think of another place in town where I could take on a heap of all-you-can-eat boiled and spiced shrimp, a mess of fried jalapeño peppers, a cherry malt and a chocolate brownie a la mode. And that’s good. One Woodsweather II is all I can handle — too too much, mostly in a good way.

Have a suggestion for a restaurant The Pitch should review? E-mail charles.ferruzza@pitch.com

pitch.com C TOONBTEHR X2X–X 5 - 3 1X, , 2200102X T THHE E PPI ITTCCHH 23 pitch.com O M 1


FAT C I T Y

SETTING AND CLEARING

BY JONATHAN BENDER AND CHARLES FERRUZZA

Rounding up restaurants new, gone and soon to be. Live Music in the OSP Saloon at 7pm THURS OCT 25th: Sky Smeed TALLGRASS Brewery Sampling! FRI OCT 26th: L.A. Fahy SAT OCT 27th: Deep Fried Squirrel

S

Happy Hour 3-5pm Everyday $1 Wells & Domestic Pints Daily Lunch & Dinner Specials OSP Saloon

61 st & Nieman Rd 34th & Gibbs Rd Shawnee, KS Kansas City, KS 913-631-5716 913-677-1844 Sun-Thurs 11am - 9pm Sun-Wed 11am - 10pm Fri- Sat: 11am - 10pm Thur- Sat 11am - 11pm Coming Soon to K-10 & Woodland

facebook.com/ShawneePizza

Menu & online ordering at ShawneePizza.com

STALK US! WE DARE YOU

twitter.com/pitchstreet facebook.com/thepitch

oups, coffee, piping-hot burritos — a crop of new restaurants is dedicated to warming your frozen hands and cold insides this winter. Here’s a list of some new places and a few that have closed, along with a glimpse at what’s on the KC restaurant horizon. Freebirds World Burrito opens at 554 Westport Road Thursday, October 25. The first area location for the Austin, Texas, burrito exporter drew big crowds to Mission (6029 Metcalf) over the summer. The Westport location’s hours are 10:30 a.m.–11 p.m. MondayThursday, 10:30 a.m.–midnight Friday and Saturday, and 10:30 a.m.–9 p.m. Sunday. The new 810 Zone in Lee’s Summit (1672 Northwest Chipman Road) opened at the end of September. The sports bar is open 11 a.m.– midnight daily. Happy hour, with $2.50 drafts and well drinks, is 4–6 p.m. Monday–Friday. Frida’s Taqueria, Ivan and Mary Marquez’s fast-casual concept, has opened its doors at 6537 West 119th Street in Leawood. (Frida’s Contemporary Mexican Cuisine, the first restaurant opened by the Marquez family and its partners, moved in June to 7200 West 121st Street.) Here you order at a counter, where you can watch the prep work as it goes on behind glass partitions. The menu is uncomplicated: tacos ($2.50), burritas ($5.99), tamales ($2.99), empañadas (three for $6.50) and quesadillas for the kids. Frida’s Taqueria is open 11 a.m.–8 p.m. daily. Homer’s Coffee House has crossed the state line, opening in the Red Bridge Shopping Center at Holmes and Red Bridge Road. This is the second coffee shop for the Overland Park mainstay; the original location is at 7126 West 80th Street, just west of Metcalf. Bitterman’s Eye Candy & Vintage Market, a shop dedicated to antiques and old-fashioned candy, opened at 3107 Gillham earlier this month. It operates 11 a.m.–6 p.m. Thursday and Friday and 11 a.m.–4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Soup makers might be more accurate than the Farmers’ Almanac when it comes to predicting the weather. Todd Schulte, co-owner of Happy Gillis and the Genessee Royale Bistro, opened a new soup operation, Uncommon Stock, with Bill Haw Jr. last month. Schulte made and delivered soups with his Happy Soup Eater business before opening two restaurants with his wife, Tracy Zinn. The soup selection changes weekly at Uncommon Stock (549 Gillis), in the “garage” space next to Happy Gillis in Columbus Park. It’s open 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Friday and Saturday, and 10 a.m.–2 p.m. Sunday.

Coming Soon

S

osa’s 39th Street Diner opens in Decem-

ber. Restaurateur Anthony Sosa is taking over the former Nichol’s Lunch space at 3906 Waddell, which was most recently Mama’s 39th Street Diner. Sosa and business partner Carl Weiss plan to serve a menu of both American comfort foods and Mexican favorites. That

24

THE PITCH

O CTO B E R 2 5 -31 , 20 1 2

pitch.com

South of the Leawood border. means house-made cinnamon rolls and freshly baked breads alongside omelets and huevos rancheros in the morning and chicken-fried steak, fried chicken, pork tenderloins and beef burritos in the evenings. Cooper’s Hawk Winery & Restaurant is set to open on the Plaza in the former 810 Zone space at 4686 Broadway in December. The new location features a wine-tasting room, wine clubs and a 300-seat restaurant. Twin Peaks is changing the topography in Olathe. The Texas-based restaurant chain is set to take over the space at 14805 West 119th Street, formerly the home of My Big Fat Greek Restaurant. Its design is meant to evoke a mountain lodge — one that shows sports, offers draft beer served at 29 degrees, and employs women servers in tiny plaid tops and tinier khaki shorts. You like sushi, you really like it. That’s the conclusion we can draw from Drunken Fish’s announcement of a second local restaurant. The St. Louis import opened in the Power & Light District last March, at 14 East 14th Street, and now plans to drop anchor in Leawood. It’s taking over the former Fo Thai and Soy Asian Cuisine space (4331 West 119th Street) in the One Nineteen development, with an opening expected next May.

Closings

T

he Dairy Queen at 434 West 85th Street, in the fish-scented shadow of Long John Silver’s, has closed. Jalisco’s (in the Argentine neighborhood) has closed its location at 1411 South 26th Street in Kansas City, Kansas. The location at 5000 State Avenue is still open. After nearly three years of serving tea, cookies, scones and tasteful lunches at Shabby Hattie’s Tea Room & Boutique (113 North Main, in Parkville), owner Marcia Cherrito decided that the tea party was over. Shabby Hattie’s closed in September. Chubby’s on Barry has closed, leaving Northland folks craving “the Big One” to find it at Chubby’s on Broadway (3756 Broadway).

E-mail jonathan.bender@pitch.com


pitch.com

O CTO B E R 2 5 -31 , 20 1 2

THE PITCH

25


Special Advertising Section

5

$

M U SI C B Y

O DSTJ A R T IN G A T

L IQ U ID P O IS O N

10 :3 0 P M

COSTUME CONTEST AT MIDNIGHT 1ST

PLACE | 2ND PLACE ~ $25 ~ $50 SHOT PLACE & A DRINK

3RD

500 W. 75th St. KCMO

BLACK AND ORANGE BASH www.CAPA.com Come Support the Child Abuse Prevention Association in a Night of Boulevard Brews, Banter and Beguilement! Relive the 80’s with a live performance by the Blue Oyster Culture Club, enjoy an appetizer buffet, bottomless sodas and Boulevard beer. Be sure to register for CAPA’s Costume Contest and start collecting pledges now for the chance to win top notch prizes. Become a hero by preventing child abuse in Greater Kansas City area. 3RD STREET ASYLUM www.3RDSTREETASYLUM.com What are you afraid of? Find out a t the 3rd Street Asylum where your deepest fears come to life. Open 7 PM to Midnight, Friday and Saturday October 5 through 27, Wednesday, October 31 (Halloween), and Friday November 2.

26

KC FEAR FARM www.KCFEARFARM.com KC Fear Farm is the metro’s newest haunted attraction! OPENS SAT SEPT 29 at dusk! Brought to you buy the same folks who brought you KC Pumpkin Patch. You’ve never seen anything like this... it makes a haunted “house” look like child’s play! Come out to KC Fear Farm and we promise to scare and freak the daylights out you (literally). Located just south of Olathe off I-35, we are in the DARK and outside...perfect for freaks, clowns, zombies and mayhem. We have 5 terrific haunted areas on site, all included with admission: Field of Screams, Insane Reaction, Circus Asylum, Kansas Twister, & Buried Alive. MIDLAND RAILWAY www.MIDLAND-RY.org Join us for Night Trains of Terror, TERROR UNDER THE BIG TOP! The only haunted train in the KC metro! Friday & Saturday October 19, 20, 26 & 27. Train departs at 6:30, 8:00, and 10:00 pm. Sponsored by Midland Railway & Baldwin City Theater. Come join us at the Santa Fe Depot, 1515 High St., Baldwin KS. Call at 913-721-1211 or visit midland-ry.org for tickets!

HAUNTED HOUSE PARTY AT THE POWER & LIGHT DISTRICT SAT, OCT 27 Featuring DJ Mike Scott plus costume contests on the KC Live! Stage at Midnight. Over $5,000 in prizes Free event!

REMEDY www.WHATSYOURREMEDYKC.com Remedy the devil inside you and join us on Oct 27th for a night of terrifyingly great drinks (potions) and scary good music as we unleash our dark sides.

THE PITCH

pitch.com

O CTO B E R 2 5 -31 , 20 1 2

~

REMEDY

FOOD + DRINK

whatsyourremedykc.com /remedyfooddrink

Last chance to see...

Vote (TWICE) for Murder The Mystery Train

816-813-9654

www.kcmysterytrain.com

Thousands of Costumes Acccessories Accessories and Rentals 2020 Grand Blvd. Kansas City, MO 816.221.8600 kccostume.com


Special Advertising Section

Friday Scaring urday and Sat m to from 7p t .. or Midnigh he last until t removed. body is the on rd & d e 3 r at loc ner of Bonne s. a r n s o s i n c Ka day ar Ced ings, Satur Spr day & er, t, Fri Octob n Nigh 2nd e . in lowe Nov Hal riday & F

$1 OFf AdMisSioN wiTH tHiS AD

MR. GNOME @RIOTROOM

29

MONDAY OCTOBER

HEAR THEM BEFORE YOU SEE THEM

//FREE MUSIC PLAYER ON THE MUSIC HOME PAGE OF PITCH.COM

The La rge Corn M st a in Miss ze ouri!

LIBERTY CORN MAZE 1000 X 1000 ft maze will feature The American Farmer (who feeds the world), the child, and The Harvesters logo

Not scary, Just fun!

Friday 5:00 pm to last admission 10pm Saturdays 10 am to last admission 10 pm Sundays 10 am to last admission 5 pm Open until Sunday October 28th Last Weekend! Located just 2 miles south of Liberty, Missouri

17607 Ne 52nd St, Liberty, MO 64068

LibertyCornMaze.com pitch.com

O CTO B E R 2 5 -31 , 20 1 2

THE PITCH

27


MUSIC

OUTSIDER ART

Ponyboy's relentless shock-and-awe campaign

BY

BERR Y A NDER S ON

BUCK WILD

McVey (left) and Zey squirt the issue.

B

uck Angel is a female-to male transsexual whose résumé includes porn star, filmmaker, and transgender advocate. The score of his recent adult film, Sexing the Transman, was written and performed by Ponyboy. “I sent Buck some demos we were working on last spring, and he asked if he could use some of the music in the film he was working on,” McVey says. “Since most of the songs at that time were rather short, I suggested that we write some longer instrumental pieces for his film. I’ve known Buck for a couple of years. I think [he’s] a great guy, and his work is groundbreaking not just for trans porn but porn in general.”

L

prison sex and dungeon floors. A man in a dog uka Magnotta is a small-time porn actor who is being held on charges that he collar graces the album’s cover; the phrase daddy’s whore sticks out in recollection. A killed and dismembered Lin Jun, his lover, then mailed Jun’s body parts to government humorous undercurrent runs through it, and offices and elementary schools in Canada. He if there’s any genius to McVey’s work — and there might be — it’s rooted in the mystery of was captured in Berlin after an international how seriously he wants to be taken. manhunt. Magnotta has also been accused With Ponyboy, McVey is communicating of torturing and killing kittens, then posting similar ideas as half of a noisy, grunge-rock video evidence online. duo, along with David Zey, who plays drums. Pussy Killer, a new EP from Lawrence’s McVey studied at the Conservatory of RecordPonyboy, is a six-song concept album about Magnotta. It is about as dark and grotesque as ing Arts and Sciences in Tempe, Arizona, and Pussy Killer reveals some of those stuyou might imagine. dio chops: It’s layered, tight and surprisingly “I became fairly obsessed with the case professional-sounding. It does not, of course, while Magnotta was on the run in Europe,” Ponyboy frontman Charles McVey tells The Pitch. possess much commercial appeal. McVey shrieks terrifying lyrics over stabbing bass “I don’t identify with, or approve of, the kinds of things Magnotta is accused of, but I found lines, industrial synths and distorted guitars. “Writing Pussy Killer wasn’t cathartic in myself intrigued by the idea that this crime any way, and I don’t think occurred because Magnotta that the message will reach wanted to be famous. I tried Ponyboy a large enough audience to to research as much about With Pale Hearts and be considered important or him and his past as I could, Sister Rat, Thursday, October leave any social impact,” as well as other known serial 25, at the Replay Lounge McVey says. “I think we killers, when working on the made an interesting project songs.” (In a mission stateon a limited budget, and I’m OK with that.” ment that McVey published with the album, Arguably the most disturbing aspect of he adds, “It is my attempt at creating a diaMagnotta’s story is “1 Lunatic 1 Ice Pick,” an logue about the sensationalization of violence 11-minute video that he released to a shock site and a man’s desire for fame at any cost.”) called Best Gore before he was apprehended. McVey has a history of gravitating toward In it, a naked man, tied to a bed frame in a sexually confrontational subject matter. His dimly lit room, is stabbed several times with 2007 solo album, Modern Living (which I both an ice pick and a kitchen knife. The reviewed in these pages), was, essentially, original video also reportedly contains acts melancholic piano rock set to lyrics about 28

THE PITCH

O CTO B E R 2 5 -31 , 20 1 2

pitch.com

of necrophilia. McVey and Zey recorded a song called “1 Lunatic 1 Ice Pick” for Pussy Killer in which McVey, in effect, scores the scene. “I downloaded it and watched it while I recorded all the guitar and vocal parts,” he says. “So what you are hearing is my interpretation and reaction to what is happening onscreen. … It was an exhausting process mentally, and I was haunted by images for days after.” Naturally, McVey and Zey also shot a video remake of “1 Lunatic 1 Ice Pick” to accompany Pussy Killer. “The video is intended to be a response or a fan letter of sorts to Magnotta from a ‘Luka fan,’ and we shot it in my living room with just a couple of friends helping us,” McVey says. “It ended up being kind of a crash course in homemade gore and special effects, but it was fun in a creepy way. We have gotten more feedback from the video than any other part of the project.” So is McVey a monster himself? Are these the types of dark thoughts swimming around in his brain all day? “I’m actually really sensitive to things like this — I can’t stand shock videos or really gory images,” McVey explains. “I could never do anything like that, and it makes me wonder how a person can become that detached from their own humanity. Strangely, I found myself sort of hypersensitive after completing the project. … As far as Pussy Killer is concerned, it’s really just art for art’ sake.”

E-mail berry.anderson@pitch.com pitch.com

MONTH


pitch.com

O CTO B E R 2 5 -31 , 20 1 2

THE PITCH

29


WHERE THE BEST MUSICIANS IN THE WORLD PLAY

KNUCKLEHEADS F re e S h u tt le in S u rr o u n d in g A reth e a

OCTOBER

24: Pete Anderson 24: Carl Butler’s Gospel Lounge 25: Rosie Ledet 26: Jeff Bergen’s Elvis Show 26: Turnpike Troubadours

OCT 27:

Halloween Party w/ Krazy Kats & Raildogs

Photo Booth, Hayride, Horror Movies , Costume Contest, Oldies & Classic Rock N Roll

presents

OCT 30 The English Beat

w/ Special Guest The Pinstripes 31: Carl Butler’s Gospel Lounge 31: The Black Lillies

NOVEMBER NOV 1

TICKETS N OW ONFlores SALE! & Rosie

Marti Brom

2: Rusted Root CD Release Show 3: 4 Fried Chickens & A Coke & Chris Beard Blues Band 9,10,11: Paul Thorn

For more info & tickets: knuckleheadskc.com 2715 Rochester, KCMO

816-483-1456

30

THE PITCH

O CTO B E R 2 5 -31 , 20 1 2

MUSIC | STREETSIDE

FAST FORWARD

Danica Patrick checks in at Hotel; an afternoon with our local clairvoyants

BY

D AV ID HUDN A L L

D

anica Patrick, a woman who races with the big boys, is one of NASCAR’s biggest stars. She’s famous outside the sport because she is also youngish (30) and attractive. In the future, when marketing firms have the technology to design and create celebrity spokeswomen, their droids will possess the Patrickian ideal: rugged masculinity paired with feminine beauty. Tissot, a Swiss watchmaker, already employs Patrick to this end, and last Thursday the company teamed with Halls Kansas City to throw a party at Hotel, the Power & Light nightclub. Patrick, in town for last weekend’s NASCAR festivities at the Kansas Speedway, was the guest of honor. A rig of lights, a red carpet and a photo backdrop with Tissot’s logo were positioned outside Hotel’s doors. Camera crews from local TV stations loitered around, waiting for Patrick to arrive. Grand, between 13th Street and Truman Road, was blocked off: Patrick would be making a grand entrance in her race car. As showtime approached, clusters of people emerged from P&L bars and gathered along the curb, turning their heads south, as though awaiting a northbound bus. Waitresses from McFadden’s, in green jerseys and matching knee-high socks, puffed on cigarettes and chatted. “Is there a parade coming through?” asked an older man passing by. “No, some NASCAR driver is going to drive up the street here in a second.” “Then what? Is that it?” “I guess so.” The man moved along. An engine roared in the distance. It was foreboding, like a spaghetti-western whistle. A minute later, Patrick drove her race car, not especially fast, from where it was stationed on Truman Road, up the two blocks of Grand to the red carpet. She drove in darkness because there are no headlights on NASCAR cars. There also are no doors. She climbed out the window. Patrick wore tight red pants, a navy mesh blouse, a black leather jacket, and heels. For a few moments, she looked confused. Where were her handlers? An odd silence descended. Some bulbs flashed, and the TV crews jockeyed for position, but nobody spoke. Then a few women with clipboards emerged and began managing the situation. An older, wealthylooking woman posed with Patrick in front of the car. Then they posed together in front of the Tissot backdrop. “Now just Danica,” one of the clipboard women instructed. Patrick then set about answering questions from the local TV outlets. Yes, she was excited to be here in Kansas City. She was also excited about her race car, excited about working with Tissot, excited about the Tissot watch she was wearing. One reporter asked what she likes to do for fun. “Where do I start,” she said. “I like travel, food, wine, playing games with my husband at home.” Then, with a rehearsed, droidlike sass, she added: “It’s not always fun for him because I get competitive.” During the race on Sunday, Patrick got com-

pitch.com

petitive with another driver whom she thought was bumping her car on purpose. She retaliated by trying to crash his car. But her attempt backfired, and she ended up crashing her own car. “I have to stand up for myself,” she said after the race, less excited now.

T

he best thing I saw last weekend was at a Ramada Inn, near where Front Street meets Interstate 435. This hotel, whose doors may also be a time warp back to 1986, was hosting a psychic fair. I did not know psychic fairs existed, but when I started telling friends I was going, they were all, “Oh, yeah, the thing down off Front Street.” It turns out that this psychic fair has been going on for 42 years. I don’t believe in tarot, crystals or zodiac signs. Still, I have always harbored a secret desire to visit a psychic. That a person could tell me things about my future is a concept that I find absolutely irresistible. Also, I like the idea of an older woman touching my hands. Not in a sexual way or anything. More like in an intimate, motherly way. God, I’m lonely. At Shawl City, I mean the psychic fair, there were readers (various types of seers) and vendors, who sell necklaces, stones and books about herbs and spiritual growth. Toward the back of the wood-paneled room, a woman sat inside a hut-shaped object while a Native American man paced around her and blew on a didgeridoo. A woman wearing a gold crown spoke to a fairgoer from her booth. Beside her, a cross-eyed psychic was eating a bag of Cheetos. I can’t vouch for her clairvoyance, but she has chosen one of the only professions in the world where being cross-eyed gives you a leg up. That must count for something. There also were lectures. Along with about 10 other people, I watched one called “Gallery Health Readings,” delivered by a soft-spoken elderly man named Clinton. He used to be a farmer, but then one day when he was out in the fields, a plant spoke to him and revealed its healing powers. Ever since, he has been devoted to listening to herbs and learning about how they can improve our health. After

Danica hits the wall. introducing himself, Clinton offered to “scan” us. People would tell Clinton of an ailment they had, and he would stare at them in silence for five seconds or so, and then tell them what was causing their ailment and what to take for it. One woman said she had a stomach problem. “You have a hiatal hernia,” he said after a few moments. “No, I don’t,” she said. “I was just evaluated for that.” She wasn’t being combative; she was just hoping for a reassessment. Clinton scanned her again. “Well, this is where it gets difficult,” Clinton said. “You have your truth, and I have mine. And mine is that you have a hiatal hernia. Of course, you must go with your own truth.” Sensing negative body feelings around a different woman, he stopped the scan and had everyone in the room do an exercise. “I absolutely love and honor myself,” we repeated, as we tapped at various pressure points on our bodies. It was a little bit like the hokeypokey. The psychic I later met with was maybe 55 years old, and I chose her because she looked less insane than the others. This did not turn out to be true. “Are you David?” she asked, glancing at the sign-in sheet. I told her that I was. “I will be right back,” she said, rising. “I’ve got to go to the …” and then she pointed down at her crotch. When she returned and we started in, I came to see that a fair setting is a terrible environment for a session with a psychic. There’s no privacy. There was a row of chairs to my immediate right, a sort of waiting area, and the people sitting there could hear every word I said. Everywhere behind me, there were people walking around, talking, laughing. I kept hearing that goddamn didgeridoo off in the corner of the room. “What do you want to know about?” the psychic asked, petting the tiny mat of rabbit fur on the table between us. “Lots of things,” I said.

E-mail david.hudnall@pitch.com pitch.com

MONTH


pitch.com

O CTO B E R 2 5 -31 , 20 1 2

THE PITCH

31


MUSIC

RADAR

M U S I C F O R E CAST

BY

Other shows worth seeing this week.

D AV ID HUDN A L L

T H U R S D AY, O C T O B E R 2 5 Josh Abbott Band, Whiskey Myers: The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Beats Antique, Lynx, Cloud Dog: The Beaumont Club, 4050 Pennsylvania, 816-561-2560. Big Gigantic: Liberty Hall, 644 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1972. Rosie Ledet: 8:30 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Grace Potter and the Nocturnals: Uptown Theater, 3700 Broadway, 816-753-8665.

F R I D AY, O C T O B E R 2 6 A Journey Into the Dark with Amphion Men’s Ensemble of Kansas City: 7 p.m. Rolling Hills Presbyterian Church, 9300 Nall, Overland Park, 913-642-9100. Freaker’s Ball with Chevelle, Saving Abel, 10 Years, Red Line Chemistry, Striving For Cairo: The Midland, 1228 Main, 816-283-9900. Jucifer, Black Christmas: 10 p.m. Replay Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676.

S AT U R D AY, O C T O B E R 2 7

Sonic Spectrum Tribute to the Ramones

Pretty much everybody who plays guitar can play Ramones songs, so in terms of skill level, there’s not a tremendous barrier to performing for a Ramones tribute. It’s more about energy and attitude — isn’t that what they always say about punk music? — and the locals whom organizer Robert Moore has assembled to play this show (Radkey, plus some patched-together bands featuring members of Deco Auto, the Quivers, the Latenight Callers, Pizza Party Massacre and more) are generally in possession of it. Sunday, October 28, at RecordBar (1020 Westport Road, 816-753-5207)

Justin Bieber

It’s been a rough month for Justin Bieber. He vomited onstage twice during the first show of his Believe world tour. Then, two weeks ago, a bizarre “scandal” involving a stolen laptop and a dick pic turned out to be a Biebssanctioned hoax/publicity stunt for his new song. Worst of all, that new song, “Beauty and a Beat,” is a stinky turd, even by overproduced, trend-chasing tween-pop standards. Lucky for Biebs, these gaffes have negligible impact on his earning potential or superstar status. It’ll take more than a couple of youthful indiscretions to bring low the most Googled human on the planet. Friday, October 26, at Sprint Center (1407 Grand, 816-949-7000)

Madonna

The latest Madonna album, released back in March, is called MDNA. There are, by my count, three interpretations of this title. One is that it’s just Madonna’s name without the vowels. Another is that it represents the core essence, or DNA, of Madonna (represented here by the letter M). The third is that it’s a mischievous twist on MDMA, the chemical name for Ecstasy. I’d buy any and all of these, but I wouldn’t buy the album based on its singles. Despite two hot guests (Nicki Minaj and M.I.A.), a reasonably catchy chorus, and a video showcasing Madonna’s still-amazing body, “Give Me All Your Luvin’ ” can’t obscure the fact that it’s the work of a 54-year-old woman trying to horn in on the market share of pop stars half her age. And good luck finding a memory eraser after listening to “I Don’t Give A,” which contains, in addition to a shudderingly tasteless dubstep wobble, the lyric Working out, shake my ass, I know how to multitask/Connecting to the Wi-Fi, went from nerd to superb. Tu esday, October 30, at Sprint Center (1407 Grand, 816-949-7000)

OFF

Hammy comedian-actor Jack Black tears an organ of some kind (a heart? balls?) out of another man’s body in OFF’s recent video for “Wrong.” It’s a bloody scene and an appropriate prelude to the band’s show here in Kansas City, which falls on Halloween. OFF is a group of middle-aged vets from old hardcore bands — Keith Morris (Circle Jerks, Black Flag), Dimitri Coats (Burning Brides), Steven Shane McDon-

F O R E C A S T

32

Never grow up: Bbr and Mdna ald (Redd Kross) and Mario Rubalcaba (Rocket From the Crypt, Hot Snakes) — but sounds far more vital than some dime-store nostalgia act. Which is to say, they are still roaring loud and pissed as hell. OFF’s self-titled debut, released back in the spring, has an almost perverse immediacy: It’s 16 songs in 16 minutes. Some of the songs are only 45 seconds long. Wednesday, October 31, at RecordBar (1020 Westport Road, 816-753-5207)

Starfucker

That Starfucker can pack midsize venues all across the country is an exceptional feat when you think about it. Here’s an indie band that has received virtually no love from new-media gatekeepers like Pitchfork and Stereogum, and has a name that’s unspeakable and unprintable by the old-media gatekeepers. How do they do it? By writing very danceable psych-pop songs, performing them with gusto, and letting word of mouth take it from there. The Portland, Oregon, act’s latest, 2011’s Reptilians, splits the difference between the hit-heavy first MGMT album and the outer-space wall of sounds of Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots. Side note: Say hi to Mike Nolte if you bump into him; the Ghosty bassist and local recording engineer is running sound for the band on this tour. Monday, October 29, at the Granada (1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390)

FuntCase, Schoolboy, Nerd Rage, and more: The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483.

T U E S D AY, O C T O B E R 3 0 The English Beat, the Pinstripes: 8 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Gwar, Cattle Decapitation, Legacy of Disorder, Troglodyte, Moire: The Beaumont Club, 4050 Pennsylvania, 816-561-2560. Young Prisms, Night Moves: 10 p.m. Replay Lounge, 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676.

W E D N E S D AY, O C T O B E R 31 Datsik, Terravita, xKore, Getter: The Midland, 1228 Main, 816-283-9900. EOTO, NMEZEE: 9 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Fang Island, Anamanaguchi, Moon King: Jackpot Music Hall, 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-832-1085. Halloween with MarchFourth Marching Band, AfroBreakBeats: The Beaumont Club, 4050 Pennsylvania, 816-561-2560.

NOVEMBER

K E Y ................................................ Punks Screaming

.............................................Fake British Accent

.................................................. Post-Pubescent

..................................................................... Boo!

...........................................Weeping Tween Girls

........................................................ Dance Party

........................................ Black Leather Jackets

....................................................Muscular Arms

........................................... Unfortunate Name

.......................................................Barre Chords

pitch.com

Celtic Thunder: The Midland, 1228 Main, 816-283-9900. Electric Guest, No, Line & Circle: The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390.

FUTURECAST

.................................. Possible Kabala Bracelets

O CTO B E R 2 5 -31 , 20 1 2

S U N D AY, O C T O B E R 2 8

M O N D AY, O C T O B E R 2 9

..................................................Pick of the Week

THE PITCH

Academy of St. Martin in the Fields Chamber Ensemble: Yardley Hall at JCCC, 12345 College Blvd., Overland Park, 913-469-8500. Minus the Bear, Cursive, Girl in a Coma: The Beaumont Club, 4050 Pennsylvania, 816-561-2560. Red Hot Chili Peppers: Sprint Center, 1407 Grand, 816-283-7300. Right Between the Ears: Liberty Hall, 644 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1972. Stand Up for Synergy, featuring Howie Mandel: Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater, 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233, kcimprov.com.

pitch.com

THURSDAY 1 Snow Patrol, Noel Gallagher’s High Flying Birds, Jake Bugg: The Midland FRIDAY 2 Dan Deacon, Height with Friends, Chester Endersby, Gwazda, Alan Resnick: The Granada, Lawrence SATURDAY 3 Matt and Kim: Liberty Hall, Lawrence

M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X

THE PITCH

1


The T he SPOT for

CREEPY CRAWL!

BLUES

in Johnson County

WED. OCT. 24

7PM BOB WALKENHORST & FRIENDS 10PM DREAMWOLF/CRUSHED OUT/ DAN TEDESCO THURS. OCT. 25 7PM TRIVIA CLASH 10PM REGGIE B & THE SOLUTION/ LEONARD D-STROY

OCTOBER 31ST 7PM

COSTUME CONTEST (PRIZES TOP 3)

PRIZE GIVEAWAYS ALL NIGHT SPOOKY FOOD & DRINK SPECIALS

FRI. OCT. 26 6PM THE DOO DADS 10PM DIOS DE LA MUERTA PARTY MAKING MOVIES/DJ BRENT TACTIC SAT. OCT. 27

SPOOKY MARTINI’S & $1 VODKA WORMS

Wed OCT 24

Rick Bacus Trio 7-10PM Thur OCT 25

Justin Andrew Murray Open Jam 8-11PM Fri OCT 26

Sat OCT 27

Jacque Garoutte (of Levee Town) 5:30-7PM Levee Town 8-11PM

Friday, October 26, 2012

SUN. OCT. 28

MON. OCT.29 7PM SONIC SPECTRUM MUSIC TRIVIA 10PM APPROPRIATE GRAMMAR/ DAVID GEORGE & THE CROOKED MILE/ TIL WILLIS TUES. OCT. 30

PARTY MONSTER VII Saturday, October 27, 2012

7PM ROCK PAPER SCISSORS 10PM HELL NIGHT PARTY FOUND A JOB: TALKING HEADS TRIBUTE/ INTO YOU LIKE A TRAIN: PSYCH FURS TRIBUTE/ UNDERHOUSE DOGS: MORPHINE TRIBUTE

Tues OCT 30

Dave Hays Band Open Jam 8:30P-12:30A

ROB SCHNEIDER

see www.therecordbar.com for our weekly events

135TH ST. & QUIVIRA

Saturday, November 3, 2012

SUN. 12PM-12AM MON.TUES.SAT. 4PM-1:30AM WED-FRI 12PM-1:30AM KITCHEN OPEN LATE

12056 W. 135th St. OPKS 913-239-9666 www.quasimodokc.com

1020 westport rd. kcmo 64111*816-753-5207

Y A D I R F FIRST

Every First Friday the place to be is the Indie on Main for the First Friday Pitch Party! Become an Indie “Rock Star” and get Happy Hour drink prices all night!

MONSTER BASH

7PM DOLLAR FOX 10PM LEE LANGSTON PRESENTS SOUL ICONS: STORYTELLERS 8PM SONIC SPECTRUM TRIBUTE : THE RAMONES

Ryan Harvey (solo) 5:30-7PM The Hatchlings 8-11PM

Y T R PA

kcmo

THUNDER FROM DOWN UNDER

JOIN US

Saturday, November 24, 2012

FROM 7-9PM

SONG TITLES FOR SQUARES! WITH

We play the song, you mark the square! Prizes include restaurant Gift Certificates, Pitch Swag and tickets to your favorite Midland shows!

9PM TO CLOSE ITS THE

FIRST FRIDAY AFTER PARTY

with KJ David

BIG BAD VOODOO DADDY

Thursday, December 6, 2012

UPCOMING SHOWS: 11/2 Kilroy Presents: The Fall Free-for-All 11/9 Flirt Friday 1-800-745-3000

11/10 Pure Empire 11/16 The Best of Cover Wars 12/13 Zappa Plays Zappa

  •  VooDooKC.com

1228 Main St., Kansas City, MO 816.283.9950 Know When To Stop Before You Start.® Gambling Problem? Call 1-888-BETSOFF. Subject to change or cancellation. Phone and online orders are subject to service fees. Must be 21 years or older to gamble, obtain a Total Rewards ® card or enter VooDoo ®. ©2012, Caesars License Company, LLC.

pitch.com

O CTO B E R 2 5 -31 , 20 1 2

THE PITCH

33


NIGHTLIFE Send submissions to Clubs Editor Abbie Stutzer by e-mail (abbie.stutzer@pitch.com), fax (816-756-0502) or phone (816-218-6926). Continuing items must be resubmitted monthly.

T H U R S D AY 2 5 ROCK/POP/INDIE Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Daytime Party, the Voice Issue, Lion House, the Kessel Run. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. The Rackatees, the Last Slice, American Dischord, 8 p.m.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. John Paul’s Flying Circus.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Whitey Morgan & the 78s, 7:30 p.m. Kanza Hall: 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park, 913-451-0444. Noe Palma. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Michael Shultz.

DJ Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. DJ Short Pants the Boss on the patio, 10 p.m.

HIP-HOP RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Reggie B and the Solution, Leonard Dstroy, 9 p.m.

JAZZ Hotel Phillips: 106 W. 12th St., 816-221-7000. Candace Evans Duo. Mutual Musicians Foundation: 1823 Highland Ave., 816-4715212. Shades of Jade. West Chase Grille: 11942 Roe, Leawood, 913-663-5400. Rob Scheps, Shunzo Ohno, and Ron Carlson Trio.

COMEDY Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. Jay Phillips. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Shane Mauss, 8 p.m.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS Bleachers Bar & Grill: 210 S.W. Greenwich Dr., Lee’s Summit, 816-623-3410. Extreme Bingo. The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Pumpkin carving. Buzzard Beach: 4110 Pennsylvania, 816-753-4455. Trivia, Ladies’ Night, and DJ HoodNasty. Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Hot Caution Thursdays, 10 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Trivia Clash, 7 p.m. Sherlock’s Underground Coffeehouse & Pub: 858 State Route 291, Liberty, 816-429-5262. Karaoke, ladies’ night. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. MBird’s Artist Showcase, 7:30 p.m.; Uptown Heat, 10:30 p.m.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS

DJ The Gusto Lounge: 504 Westport Rd., 816-974-8786. I Heart Gusto with DJ C Mac, DJ B-Stee, DJ Archi. Hotel: 1300 Grand, 816-226-3232. Haunted Hotel after-party. The Quaff: 1010 Broadway, 816-471-1918. DJ E. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-7497676. DJ Kimbarely Legal on the patio, 10 p.m. The Union of Westport: 421 Westport Rd. Beauty Magic Zombie Edition.

ACOUSTIC Bar West: 7174 Renner Rd., Shawnee, 913-248-9378. Dan Brockert.

JAZZ The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. Horace Washington, Everette DeVan. Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Angela Hagenbach, 7 p.m. Lucky Brewgrille: 5401 Johnson Dr., Mission, 913-403-8571. Rob Scheps, Shunzo Ohno and Ron Carlson Trio. E The Majestic Restaurant: 931 MOR Broadway, 816-221-1888. Patrick Gilbert, 5 p.m.; Bram Wijnands, Barry Springer, Tommy Ruskin, S G IN 7 p.m. LIST E AT N I Take Five Coffee + Bar: 5336 W. ONL M 151st St., Overland Park, 913-948PITCH.CO 5550. Passport, with Beau Bledsoe.

CLUB

COMEDY Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. Jay Phillips. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Shane Mauss, 7:45 & 9:45 p.m.

SINGER-SONGWRITER

Bleachers Bar & Grill: 210 S.W. Greenwich Dr., Lee’s Summit, 816-623-3410. Open Juke Box. The Blue Line: 529 Walnut, 816-472-7825. Red Friday. The Brooksider: 6330 Brookside Plz., 816-363-4070. Friday team trivia, 7 p.m. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Revolution Circus. 110 Main Street: 110 Main, Parkville, 816-505-2227. Boo! and Brew Final Friday Halloween Party, 6 p.m., $20. Valentine Room at the Uptown Theater: 3700 Broadway, Ste. 300. The Night Halloween Blacked Out Part II.

ROCK/POP/INDIE The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Haunted Creepys, DJ Thundercutz, Cave Girls, and the Brick birthday celebration; Steady States, Drew Black and Dirty Electric, Across the Earth. The Brooksider: 6330 Brookside Plz., 816-363-4070. Halloween party, with the Zeros. Clarette Club: 5400 Martway, Mission, 913-384-0986. Johnny Rampage. Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Rob Foster and Dudes, 6 p.m.; ShowBaby, Run With It, Uncountable Kings, 9 p.m. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 302 S.W. Main, Lee’s Summit, 816-525-1871. Halloweek, with Rock Cove. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Jeff Bergen’s Elvis Show, 7 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. The Doo-Dads, 5 p.m.; Day of the Dead Party with Making Movies, DJ Brent Tactic, 9 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. The Noise FM, Heroes + Villains, Not a Planet, Shadow Paint, 9 p.m.

O CTO B E R 2 5 -31 , 20 1 2

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS The All-Star Rock Bar: 7210 N.E. 43rd St., 816-452-2660. Outlaw Jim and the Whiskey Benders. The Blue Line: 529 Walnut, 816-472-7825. One More Round. The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Junior Brown; Team Bear Club after the show. Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. Mr. Marco’s V7, Jorge Arana Trio, Quirk and Ruckus, and more. Gran-Daddy’s Barbeque: 1447 W. 23rd St., Lawrence, 785830-8665. Megan Leigh, 7 p.m., free. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Dumptruck Butterlips. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Turnpike Troubadours, with Shane Smith, 9 p.m.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS

F R I D AY 2 6

THE PITCH

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL Dynamite Saloon: 721 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8562739. Pat Nichols. Fat Fish Blue: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-3474. Crosseyed Cat. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Lonnie Ray Blues Band. The Levee: 16 W. 43rd St., 816-561-2821. The Good Foot.

Jerry’s Bait Shop: 302 S.W. Main, Lee’s Summit, 816-525-1871. Jerry’s Jam Night, 9 p.m.

Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. Elaine McMilian’s Songbirds in the Round.

34

Trouser Mouse: 625 N.W. Mock Ave., Blue Springs, 816-2201222. In the Grove. The Well: 7421 Broadway, 816-361-1700. The Patrick Lentz Band.

pitch.com

EASY LISTENING Great Day Café: 7921 Santa Fe Dr., Overland Park, 913-642-9090. Soular.

FOLK The Granada: 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Quiet Corral, Communist Daughter, Skypiper.

M E TA L / P U N K Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Kahldera (CD Release), Wrath and Ruin, Klehma, On the Shoulders of Giants.

VA R I E T Y Midland Railway: 1515 W. High St., Baldwin City, 785-5946982. Night Trains of Terrors, 6:30, 8 & 10 p.m.

S AT U R D AY 2 7 ROCK/POP/INDIE The Brooksider: 6330 Brookside Plz., 816-363-4070. Halloween party, with the Zeros. Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Cavern Club. Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. Halloween Party with Nuthatch-47, Filthy 13. Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Atlas, Jared Bond and the Tornadoes, 6 p.m. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785832-1085. The Noise FM, Spirit Is the Stairs, Heartscape Landbreak, We are Voices. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Hearts of Darkness, Heartfelt Anarchy, Mask and Glove, 8 p.m.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Mama Ray Jazz Meets Blues Jam, 2 p.m.; the Hatchlings, 9 p.m. The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. The Delta Saints, Cornmeal. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. The Garrett Nordstrom Situation. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. SUNU, DJ Proof Halloween Party. The Levee: 16 W. 43rd St., 816-561-2821. The Groove Agency, 10 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Janet Jameson, 9 p.m. Trouser Mouse: 625 N.W. Mock Ave., Blue Springs, 816-2201222. Four Fried Chickens and a Coke. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Jonny Green and Band, 8 p.m.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Head for the Hills, Brother Bagman, the Supermassive Black Holes, Danny McGaw, 9 p.m. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Deadman Flats, Rex Hobart and the Misery Boys.

DJ MiniBar: 3810 Broadway. DJ Rico. The Quaff: 1010 Broadway, 816-471-1918. DJ Chris. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. The Warm Up with Wolfgod, 6 p.m.; Thrift Store 45s on the patio, 10 p.m.

JAZZ The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. The Rob Scheps, Shunzo Ohno Quintet, with Roger Wilder, Bob Bowman, Brian Steever. Hotel Phillips: 106 W. 12th St., 816-221-7000. The Stan Kessler Duo, with Harry Miller. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Tim Whitmer & KC Express, 4:30 p.m. Piropos Grille: 4141 N. Mulberry Dr., North Kansas City, 816-7413600. Candace Evans. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Lee Langston presents “Soul Icons,” 9 p.m.

AMERICANA RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Dollar Fox, 6 p.m. Take Five Coffee + Bar: 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park, 913948-5550. Lauren Krum Ensemble.

COMEDY Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. Dirty Dorothy on the main floor, 10 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Shane Mauss, 7:45 & 9:45 p.m.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS The All-Star Rock Bar: 7210 N.E. 43rd St., 816-452-2660. Halloween Festivities with Alice Sweet Alice, and Hybrid, 3 p.m. The Blue Line: 529 Walnut, 816-472-7825. Halloween Party with Cover Me Bad, and costume party. Hamburger Mary’s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-842-1919. Charity Bingo, 5 p.m.; Maryoke, 9 p.m. Hotel: 1300 Grand, 816-226-3232. Haunted Hotel: KC Live’s Haunted House Party; Hotel Saturdays. Howl at the Moon: 1334 Grand, 816-471-4695. Howl-O-Ween. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Halloween party, with Looks That Kill. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 302 S.W. Main, Lee’s Summit, 816-525-1871. Halloween party, with Crush.

pitch.com

MONTH


DJ E. S

D O ALS FOPECI

WEDNESDAY

October

31

DRINK LS SPECIA

LOSE

9p.m.-C

COSTUME CONTEST

$500 CASH PRIZE for Best Costumes

1010 BROADWAY • 816.471.1918

/therealquaff • www.thequaffkc.com TICKETS

presents

in advance at knuckleheadskc.com

THREADZ BY HEADZ FOR THE HEADS CLOTHING - JEWELRY ACCESSORIES - ART

OFFICIAL CROSSROADS TICKET OUTLET

1607 Westport Rd. KCMO 816-442-8400

Mon - Thurs 12-9pm • Fri - Sat 12-10pm • Sun 12-6pm

Tues Oct 30 @ 8 pm Advance tickets $15

WHERE THE BEST MUSICIANS IN THE WORLD PLAY

KNUCKLEHEADS Mon - Thurs 12-9pm • Fri - Sat 12-10pm • Sun 12-6pm

2715 Rochester • KCMO • 816-483-1456 pitch.com

O CTO B E R 2 5 -31 , 20 1 2

THE PITCH

35


We Deliver!

FRANK JAMES Sundays 11am - 2pm

Karaoke Sundays 6-10 • Happy Hour 3-6

lls CHECK 10/26 river rock FACEBOOK FOR 11/9Costume nace brothers e House Halloween Bash UPDATES ris Williams 10919 NW 45 Hwy Parkville, MO (3.5 mi west of I-29)

816-505-0800

1515 WESTPORT RD. • 816-931-9417

WED 10/24 CATHY HAWES ACOUSTIC SHOWCASE THU 10/25 RIPPLE EFFECT FRI 10/26 SUPER MASSIVE BLACK HOLES & FRIENDS UNPLUGGED SAT 10/27 RIVER COW ORCHESTRA W/ BUSTED SAINTS

LIVE MUSIC. NO COVER

SALOON

WED 10/24 CATHY HAWES ACOUSTIC SHOWCASE THUR 10/25 RIPPLE EFFECT FRI 10/26 SUPER MASSIVE BLACK HOLES & FRIENDS UNPLUGGED Lunch Buffet, Salad Bar SAT 10/27 RIVER COW ORCHESTRA W/Specials BUSTED SAINTS Daily Food & Drink TUE 10/30 CRITTERS TY-DYE TUESDAY Mary Bar & Breakfast Pizza Buffet WED 10/31Bloody SCOTTY MCCORMICK ACOUSTIC SHOWCASE

TUES 10/30 CRITTERS TYE-DYE TUESDAYS WED 10/31 SCOTTY MCCORMICK ACOUSTIC SHOWCASE WIFI NOW AVAILABLE!

CHECK OUT THE NEW ALL DAY HAPPY HOUR

$4.95 DAILY LUNCH SPECIALS • NIGHTLY DINNER & DRINK SPECIALS

EVERY 1st MONDAY: Slaughterhouse Movie Night / Food & Wine Specials NEW

Food Hours Hours: TUE-SAT, 3PM-Midnight TUE Elkheart’s Downtown Outlaw Fiasco / Taco Tuesday WED Guerilla Movement Presents 2 - 4 - 1 KC’s Best Burgers THU Hot Caution Downtown / Philly Thursday

EVERY WEDNESDAY Lonnie Ray Blues Band EVERY THURSDAY Live Reggae with AZ One

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 26th

The Good Foot - 10pm SATURDAY, OCTOBER 27th Camp Harlow - 5pm Groove Agency - 10pm NIGHTLY SPECIALS

FOOD AND DRINK

PATIO & DECK BANQUET & PRIVATE PARTY FACILITY

KANSAS CITY'S BIGGEST $1 HUMPDAY PARTY

THURSDAY-SATURDAY: KANSAS CITY'S ORIGINAL DUELING PIANO SHOW

SUNDAY:

SINGER-SONGWRITER SUNDAY AND KANSAS CITY'S ONLY ADULTS ONLY, DRINK ALONG SPELLING BEE FROM 8-10

OO CT R X–X 2 5 -X3 ,1 ,2 20001X2 M NOTBHE X

MONDAY:

MAN CAVE MONDAYS - FOOTBALL, GAMES, & CHEAP BEER

TUESDAY:

PINT NIGHT WITH DJ HIGHNOONE AND ASHTON MARTIN pitch.com pitch.com

T U E S D AY 3 0 ROCK/POP/INDIE Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. The Kickback, Bears and Company, the Atlantic.

S U N D AY 2 8

B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Hudpseth and Meade, 6 p.m. Slow Ride Roadhouse: 1350 N. Third St., Lawrence, 785-7492727. Lonnie Ray Blues Band.

ROCK/POP/INDIE

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS

The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Elixir on Mute, David Hasselhoff on Acid, Parts of Speech, 8 p.m.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL

Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Sunday Funday with DJ G Train on the patio.

ACOUSTIC Trouser Mouse: 625 N.W. Mock Ave., Blue Springs, 816-2201222. Acoustic Showcase.

Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Evergreen Grass Band.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Horror Remix, Gak Attack (after show). Bulldog: 1715 Main, 816-421-4799. Double feature movie night. Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. Coda Pursuit Team Trivia with Teague Hayes, 7 p.m. The Granada: 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Foxy by Proxy Halloween Extravaganza.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Dave Hays Band Open Jam. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Open Mic Night.

W E D N E S D AY 31

JAZZ

ROCK/POP/INDIE

Californos: 4124 Pennsylvania, 816-531-7878. Bram Wijnands Swingtet vs. Anna Lee & the Lucky So & Sos, 6 p.m. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Dan Bliss. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Patrick Gilbert, 11 a.m.; Mark Lowrey Jazz Trio open jam session, 5 p.m.

Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Dean Monkey & the Dropouts, Up the Academy, the Gleaners, This Is My Condition, 10 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Monster Ball 2012, 8 p.m.

CLASSICAL

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL

Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Les Mengel Duo, 5-9 p.m.

B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Hudpseth and Meade, 7 p.m. Trouser Mouse: 625 N.W. Mock Ave., Blue Springs, 816-2201222. Halloween party, with the Nace Brothers.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS

Now open 7 days a week with drink specials nightly: WEDNESDAY:

36 2 TT HH EE PPIITTCCHH

Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. A Rockabilly Halloween Show.

DJ

p

Visit www.erniebiggs.com for specials and line up. Like us on Facebook for upcoming promotions and special offers.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS

1531 Grand

SAT 11.03 Woody Pines FRI 11.30 Broncho

R O C K A B I L LY

Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Truckstop Honeymoon, Cowgirl’s Train Set, 6 p.m.

Friday, October 26th KCMO (816)10:00 421-0300 The Good Foot pm Saturday, October 27th UPCOMING LIVE ACTS SAT 10.27 HeadHarlow for the Hills Camp 5:00 pm WED 10.31 Slaughter Movie House Halloween Costume Bash Groove Agency 10:00 pm THU 11.02 1st Fridays w. Chris Williams

Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Chocolate and wine tasting, 6 p.m. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Costume contest, with DJ Lazer. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Karaoke Idol with Tanya McNaughty.

B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Lee McBee and the Confessors.

SIGHTS SOUNDS Food by: IMPERIAL FLAVOR

czarkc.com

KC Live! Block at the Power & Light District: 14th St. and Grand. Haunted House Party. Martini Corner: 31st St. and Oak. Halloween on the Hill. Pizza Bar: 1320 Grand, 816-221-8466. Rocky Horror Pizza Bar. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. The Creepy Crawl, 1 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Creepy Crawl. Shark Bar: 1340 Grand, 816-442-8140. Welcome to the Jungle. The Union of Westport: 421 Westport Rd. Creepy Crawl. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Houston Hughes Poetry Reading, 6 p.m.; Guitar Summit, 10 p.m. Z Strike: 1370 Grand, 816-471-2316. Zombie Apocalyose.

The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Smackdown Trivia and Karaoke. Buzzard Beach: 4110 Pennsylvania, 816-753-4455. Airport Novels, and costume party, 9 p.m. Clarette Club: 5400 Martway, Mission, 913-384-0986. Texas Hold ’em, 7 & 10 p.m. Frank James Saloon: 10919 N.W. Hwy. 45, Parkville, 816-5050800. Karaoke, 6-10 p.m. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Revolution Circus. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 302 S.W. Main, Lee’s Summit, 816-525-1871. Psycho City Sunday, 9 p.m.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Groove Station: 9916 Holmes, 816-942-1000. KC Blues Jam with Crosseyed Cat, 2-6 p.m. Take Five Coffee + Bar: 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park, 913948-5550. Jazz Jam with Nick Rowland and Sansabelt.

M O N D AY 2 9 ROCK/POP/INDIE Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Sons, Ravenhill, Perelandra, In Water at the Box, 7 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. David George and a Crooked Mile, Appropriate Grammar, Til Willis, 9 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Mr. Gnome, Coward, Glad Ghosts, 8 p.m.

DJ Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Liquid Lounge DJs, 10 p.m., free.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Rural Grit Happy Hour, 6 p.m. Californos: 4124 Pennsylvania, 816-531-7878. Martin Tanner Productions: Bones of Butterflies.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Deadman Flats, Honky Suckle. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Alexis Barclay Band. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. The Black Lillies, 8 p.m.

DJ The Gusto Lounge: 504 Westport Rd., 816-974-8786. Blood Bath. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. DJ Kool Ed on the patio, 10 p.m.

JAZZ Californos: 4124 Pennsylvania, 816-531-7878. BCR, 8:30 p.m. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Patrick Gilbert, 6 p.m.

COMEDY Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Colin Kane.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Halloween party, dress as your favorite blues singer, 6 p.m. The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Lucky 13, Halloween, and the Brick’s birthday celebration. Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Slaughter Movie House , 7 p.m. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Cirque du Risque presents Bloodbath Burlesque. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 302 S.W. Main, Lee’s Summit, 816-525-1871. Outlaw Halloween. Johnny’s Tavern - Lawrence: 410 N. Second St., Lawrence, 785-842-0377. Halloween costume party, 9 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Halloween Costume Party and Film Screenings, hosted by the Kansas City Independent Filmmakers Coalition, 7:30 p.m.


$2 Happy Hour Specials til 6pm!

Bar

“Where somebody might know your name”

Sat 10/27 Halloween Party Costume Contest Cash Prizes Watch the Chiefs on our HUGE 10’ TV! Knockout Pool Tournament on Tuesdays [150% Payback, $10.00 Entry Fee] Karaoke Friday & Saturday nights. Shuffleboard! Daily Food Special [Sun & Wed Steak Night] MON-THU: 3:00PM - 1:30AM | FRI-SUN: 11:00AM - 1:30AM 6505 Nieman Rd in Shawnee /garrettsbar 913.608.5995

975 Kansas Ave Kansas City, KS 913.233.0201

SUNDAY & MONDAY NIGHT

Poker and Pool Tournaments

FRI 10/26 STEADY BLACK ANSDTATES, DREW ACROSS TH DIRTY ELECTRIC , E EAR SAT 10/27 BRICK 13TH TH B -D AY HAUNTE DJ D CREEPYS, MON 10/29 THUNDERCUTZ CAVE GIRLS, RURAL GRIT 6PM, KARA TUE 10/30 OKE 10 PM BINGO 8PM WED 10/31 HAUNTE DEREK WDE HAPPY HOUR W/ A BSTER RTIST SAT 11/03 JEFF HA CLIFT HINRESHBAGER, BRAD C S, J ASHLEY OX, TUE 11/06 MIL ELECTION NIGHT W/ M LER & THE TADY ARK SOUTHER BROTHERS LAND

Groove S tation

STREET TEAM

Each week, Pitch Street Team cruises around to the hottest clubs, bars and concerts. You name it, we will be there. While we are out, we hand out tons of cool stuff. So look for the Street Team... We will be looking for you!

presented by:

9916 Holmes Rd. Kansas City, MO 7 DAYS: 11AM-1:30AM

816-942-1000

Your favorite local bar out south

Grown up atmosphere with ALL your favorite music

REALLY HAPPY HOURS MON-FRI: 3-7pm CASH PRIZES • DRINK SPECIALS

ding Guide Perfect Wed @ OPCC Bridal Show

Perfect Wedding G uide Bridal Show @ OP CC

Hilloween @ Starlight Parktoberfest

Upcoming Events

10.25 - Grand Opening of Freebirds in Westport 10.27 - Halloween Event @ KC Live Block 10.30 - English Beat @ Knuckleheads 10.31 - Tallgrass Halloween Party @ Waldo Pizza

See more on the “promotions” link on the p pitch.com

O CTO B E R 2 5 -31 , 20 1 2

THE PITCH

37


S AVA G E L O V E

CHANGE OF PACE Dear Dan: What do I say to my straight 14-year-old son about porn, if anything? My sister says all the research shows my son has been looking at porn for three years already. Am I too late?

Distressed Anxious Dad Dear DAD: “The average age a child first views Internet pornography is 11,” Matt Lauer warned parents on Today seven years ago. But the alarming statistic turned out to be bullshit. In 2005, Seth Lubove, a writer for Forbes, traced the stat back to its source. The Today show got it from The Boston Globe, which got it from Family Safe Media, which got it from Internet Filter Review (a website that markets content-blocking software). Internet Filter Review got it from The Drug of the New Millennium, a self-published book about the dangers of porn addiction. Lubove tracked down the self-published author, who couldn’t recall where he got that stat. Lubove reviewed actual research done by legit social scientists and reported that most kids don’t start actively seeking online porn until age 14. So you’re not too late. Here’s what I think you should tell your son about porn: There’s a lot of it out there, some of it’s pretty fucked up, and he can get in huge and potentially life-derailing trouble if he gets caught watching or downloading the wrong kind of porn. You should tell your son that the sex in porn bears about as much resemblance to real-life sex as action movies bear to real-life life. And warn him that a lot of porn is made by and for guys who are angry and resentful, and their anger and resentment creep into a lot of porn. If you put it in your straight son’s head that the poisonously misogynist shit he’ll see in some porn is there to appeal to angry losers who can’t get laid, your son will be less likely to internalize it. Finally, if your son is watching porn, he’s masturbating. Tell him to vary his routine: left hand, right hand, a little lube, a lot of lube, fi rm grip, loose grip. You don’t want your son to ruin himself for partnered sex by using the “death grip.” And send him to makelovenotporn.com for a brisk, sexpositive porn-versus-reality check. Dear Dan: Awhile ago, I broke up with my

long-term boyfriend. A few months after the breakup, I met someone new and we started sleeping together. It was the best sex of my life, wild, passionate and unpredictable. New Guy wasn’t looking for anything serious, and neither was I, so we kept things casual. After a couple of months of amazing sex, my longterm boyfriend came back into the picture. I told him I’d been seeing other people but that I missed him and wanted to make things work between us. But when we have sex, it just seems so dull and average compared with the volcanic sex I was having during our time apart. Do I

38

THE PITCH

O CTO B E R 2 5 -31 , 20 1 2

pitch.com

BY

D A N S AVA G E

sacrifice an amazing sex life for a happy life of decidedly average sex with the man I love?

Missing Amazing Sex Dear MAS: You’re not going to be happy having safe, boring, predictable sex with Mr. Long Term for the long term, right? Tell him the truth: The sex has to get better. Maybe Mr. Long Term is the problem (lousy at sex) or maybe it’s the combo of you and Mr. Long Term (maybe you two don’t click sexually), and the relationship is doomed no matter what you do. But there’s a chance your problem is a relatively common hang-up. It’s possible that you or Mr. Long Term, or you and Mr. Long Term feel inhibited during sex because you’re in love, and people who are in love are supposed to have sex one way (you’re supposed to make safe, boring, predictable love). But people who aren’t in love are free to have sex another way (wild, passionate and unpredictable fucks). Fuck each other like the stakes are low — like it’s casual and could end at any time. The “lovemaking” inhibition can be literally fucked death, if it’s the problem here. Once you’ve fucked it good and dead, you’ll see that you can have a happy life; a committed relationship; and wild, passionate, unpredictable sex — with the same person! But you gotta want it bad enough to fuck for it. Dear Dan: I’m a straight woman in a monogamous, long-distance relationship with a straight man. Last weekend, I went out with my roommate (also a straight woman, also in a committed relationship). We went to a club, took some E, and did way too many tequila shots. We stumbled home and ended up finger banging each other in my bed. I have never had sexual feelings for my roommate, and she says she doesn’t have them for me. Do I have to tell my boyfriend about this indiscretion? I know he would be confused and upset. It was a strange, one-time thing.

Not a Lesbian I Think Dear NALIT: If it was a one-time thing, if you learned your lesson, if you’re sure it won’t happen again, if you didn’t contract anything, you don’t need to disclose this indiscretion. Chalk it up to the E and the tequila, change your sheets, scrub under your fingernails, and spare your boyfriend the upsetting details. Dear Dan: Gay Republicans, Dan. Why? How?

Confused Dear C: Self-loathing, that’s why. Homophobia, that’s how.

Find the Savage Lovecast (my weekly podcast) every Tuesday at thestranger.com/savage.

Have a question for Dan Savage? E-mail him at mail@savagelove.net


FREE PARTYLINE

1-712-432-7900

MEET SEXY SINGLES , REAL HORNY LOCAL GIRLS Chat , Connect or Live 1-ON-1!

(800) 409 - MEET 6 3 3 8

*Free Bonus Minutes with Package Purchase

LICENSED MASSAGE

Alexis Signature Service OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

BODY SHAMPOOS & SHOWER SHAMPOOS AVAILABLE

6505 Frontage, Suite 27 Merriam, KS Cash / Debit Mastercard / Visa 913-940-8874 • 913-400-3515

Royal Massage Open 7 days a week • Walk-ins Welcome

GRAND OPENING SPECIAL $10 OFF

Swedish • Deep Tissue • Lomilomi • 4-hands

913-888-8855

12104 W 87th St Parkway, Lenexa KS 66215 cash / debit / Visa / Mastercard

CC Massage & Spa 707 Main Street Eudora, KS

(10 min east of Lawrence on Hwy 10)

LIC # 12-004

(785) 542-2364

* * NEW LOCATION * *

140 N. 130th

Bonner Springs, KS (913) 721-1111

••NOW OPEN••

Green Spa 13027 Kansas Ave. Bonner Springs, OPEN KS 66012 7 DAYS A WEEK

913-745-4107

Soft Breeze Spa Haskell

X

Alabama

Lawrence, KS 2331 Alabama Street Suite #103

Naismith

785-856-4994 23rd Street

pitch.com

O CTO B E R 2 5 -31 , 20 1 2

THE PITCH

39


40

THE PITCH

O CTO B E R 2 5 -31 , 20 1 2

pitch.com


NOW HIRING FOR

CONCERTS CONVENTIONS SPORTING EVENTS EVENT STAFF, USHERS, TICKET TAKERS

APPLY IN PERSON 4050 Pennsylvania Ste. 111 KCMO 64111 OR ONLINE www. crowdsystems.com EOE

SAD & BLUE? LIVING WITH DEPRESSION?

Research Subjects Do you have ASTHMA?

Compensation up to $800 for your time. Health insurance is NOT required.

Physicians at the Asthma Clinical Research Center at Truman Medical Center Hospital Hill are currently recruiting for studies for Astma Patients.

If ongoing symptoms of depression are keeping you from the activities you enjoy, take part in this clinical research study. IP CL & CA ! LL

• You must be at least 18 years old. • On asthma medications and your asthma is controlled. • All study related care is provided at no cost for those who take part. • Financial compensation for participation is available.

877-233-6271 www.YourDepressionOptions.com

This Asthma Center is one of 18 prestigious Centers of Excellence funded by the American Lung Association. Please call 816-404-5503 for screening and to learn more about this research study.

pitch.com

O CTO B E R 2 5 -31 , 20 1 2

THE PITCH

41


DO YOU WANT TO HELP KANSANS MAKE THEIR VOICES HEARD? Kansas Grassroots is seeking hardworking, committed, dependable people to contact voters.

$9-$11/hour Flexible Hours Part-time positions available

Contact tj@kansasgrassroots.com or call 913-244-8082

HEAD HOUSE HAIR PARLOUR extensions. straight razor shaves. pin-ups. dreds.

We are looking for EXPERIENCED BARBER who can straight razor shave. We are also looking for EXPERIENCED STYLIST who works with weave and all curly hair types.

MAC PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

MACAPARTMENTS.COM FEATURED PROPERTY :

PARK CENTRAL APARTMENTS STUDIOS STARTING AT

$599

PLEASE CALL 816.518.8193 FOR MORE INFO

NOW HIRING FOR THE FOLLOWING TEMPORARY POSITIONS… • 2ND PARTY VENDER AUTO INDUSTRY PORTERS /TAPERS/INSTALLERS CASINO AREA • PACKERS/ASSEMBLY/ PRODUCTION HWY AREA • MEAT PACKERS PRODUCTION EXPERIENCE HELPFUL

Valid Driver’s License Randolph/NKC/Ameristar N. Independence 291/24 Martin City, MO

APPLYMUST IN PERSON MONDAY THRU THURSDAY BETWEEN 9 AM TO 11AM PASS BACKGROUND AND DRUG TEST. NO PHONE CALLS, INQUIRE IN PERSON DURING APPLICATION ACCEPTANCE HOURS.

1531 Swift Ave, K.C, MO 64116 PLEASE REFERENCE THIS PUBLICATION!

ATTENTION: EX-OFFENDERS & AT RISK JOB SEEKERS Do you need job placement assistance? Do you need your criminal record expunged? Wills, Divorces, Child Support, Civil & Criminal Motions Filed Contact: Beyond The Conviction for these and other career and life barrier removal services. (SOME SERVICE FEES APPLY)

816-842-4975 or 816-718-7423 beyondtheconviction.org

42

THE PITCH

O CTO B E R 2 5 -31 , 20 1 2

pitch.com

Pet friendly, Gated Parking, Dishwasher, Central Air, Granite Countertops

877-453-1039 350 E. Armour, KCMO


WALLSTREET TOWERS PENTHOUSE 1101 WALNUT UNIT 2004

OPEN THIS SUNDAY Oct. 21st 2pm-4pm

The very finest Kansas City has to offer. One of a kind features, -Wall of Windows, fantastic views -Flowing open floor plan, high ceilings, chef ’s kitchen, stainless appliances, granite counter tops & lovely cabinetry. -Countless amenities Endless pool, hot tub, outdoor grills, putting green, party room with full kitchen, movie theater, gym & coffee bar. -Complete building maintenance. Relax, enjoy the beautiful evening sunsets. Just steps from the Kauffman Center, Sprint Center, Crossroads Art District & Rivermarket. The Best Urban Gem

REDUCED $200,000.

5220 Business For Sale

Home/Childcare Business for Sale 10712 E. 43rd Street, Kansas City MO 64133

Refurbished in 2007, including electrical wiring, plumbing, ceilings, walls, insulation, roof, siding, hardwired for fire, handicapped accessible, & Rolox Windows. All business equipment, appliances, etc., included & living quarters are furnished. Great opportunity for graduate in ECE to work and live. Each level is 1006 S.F. (upper childcare, lower-living area). Meets all state & local licensing requirements.

Must see to appreciate. Asking price $97,500. Call Lisa @ (816) 719-0260.

Are you out of housing options? Have Credit Problems? Previous Evictions?

We rent to the rent challenged

Holiday Apartments Studios BRING THIS Downtown Area

$110/WEEK $150/DEPOSIT*

* Restrictions apply

Month to All Month Lease! Utilities On Site Loundry Facility Cable TV

Paid

AD IN FOR $20 OFF YOUR FIRST 2 WEEKS

Holiday Apartments (816) 221-1721

$599,000.

Fabulous furnishing negotiable. TAX ABATED 100% through 2015 & 50% through 2030. 2 secure/assigned parking. Our 24hr Doorman will welcome you... located 1 Block East of 11th & Main Street.

FOR FURTHER ASSISTANCE PLEASE FEEL FREE TO CONTACT

MARY SWORD 913.980.5454

NORTHLAND VILLAGE $100 DEPOSIT ON 1&2 BEDROOMS

$525 / up Large 1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apts and Townhomes Fireplace, Washer/Dryer Hook-ups, Storage Space, Pool.

I-35 & Antioch • (816) 454-5830

Stonewall Court Apts 1-Bdrms starting at $395 central air, secure entry, on site laundry, on bus line, close to shopping, nice apts, Sections 8 welcome $100 Deposit (816) 231-2874 M-F 8-5 office hours

WILLOWIND APARTMENTS

1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apartments Starting @ $425

3927 Willow Ave • KCMO 64113 816.358.6764

CHANCE II WIN FREE TICKETS MOVIE PASSES MORE+

FOLLOW + US

@PITCHSTREET pitch.com

O CTO B E R 2 5 -31 , 20 1 2

THE PITCH

43


APTS/JOBS/STUFF

816.218.6759

HOTEL ROOMS A-1 Motel 816-765-6300 Capital Inn 816-765-4331 6101 E. 87th St./Hillcrest Rd. HBO,Phone,Banq. Hall

$37.06 Day/ $149 Week/ $499 Month + Tax

DUI/DWI, KS, MO

P.I.--Work Comp.--Bankruptcy Reasonable rates! Susan Bratcher 816-453-2240 www.bratcherlaw.biz

GET PAID TO DRINK and TEXT!

Brand Ambassadors Wanted! Immediate earnings potential. Company car program, team bonuses, and more! Positions available now. Start part time or full time. Training provided. Work at home, in person, or both. Receive FREE energy drinks and pay for referrals. Call or TXT 816-520-5456 or email applynow@centurylink.net

Personal Injury & Employment Law

Brady & Associates Law Office. 913-696-0925 Licensed In Missouri, Kansas and Colorado. WWW.MBRADYLAW.COM

AFFORDABLE ATTORNEY

SPEEDING, DWI, POSSESSION, ASSAULT FREE CONSULTATION Call: The Law Office of J.P. Tongson (816) 265-1513

U-PICK IT SELF SERVICE AUTO PARTS

$$ Paying Top Dollar $$ For Junk Cars & Trucks Missouri: 816-241-7548 Kansas: 913-321-1000

CASH FOR CARS

Wrecked, Damaged or Broken. Running or Not !

Cash Paid ! www.abcautorecycling.com 913-271-9406 ADOPT: College Sweethearts, Happy Creative Home, Laughter, Security, At-home Parent, Beaches. Expenses paid 1-800-362-7842 James & Helene

Law Offices of David M. Lurie

http://www.the-law.com U-PICK IT SELF SERVICE AUTO PARTS

$$ Paying Top Dollar $$ For Junk Cars & Trucks Missouri: 816-241-7548 Kansas: 913-321-1000

CASH FOR CARS

Wrecked, Damaged or Broken. Running or Not !

Cash Paid ! www.abcautorecycling.com 913-271-9406 99.7% Toxin Free w/n an hour We can help you pass Coopers 3617 Broadway, KCMO 816.931.7222 ERICA'S PSYCHIC STUDIO

$10

COMMERCIAL - RESIDENTIAL - INDUSTRIAL INSTALLATION - REPAIR - SERVICE

WE SERVICE ALL MAKES AND MODELS

913-742-1477 866-570-9475

waterheatermanllc@hotmail.com 24 HOUR EMERGENCY SERVICE

Limo Available Models Wanted 913-238-4339 www.lifestylesofkc.com

$150 Deposit, All Utilities Paid, Laundry Facilities. Holiday Apts, 115 W. Harlem Rd, KCMO 816-221-1721

$150 Deposit, All Utilities Paid, Laundry Facilities. Holiday Apts, 115 W. Harlem Rd, KCMO 816-221-1721

Water HEATER SPECIALIST

Parties Every Fri. & Sat.

DOWNTOWN AREA STUDIO APT $110/WEEK Min.

DOWNTOWN AREA STUDIO APT $110/WEEK Min.

AFFORDABLE TUITION Two week program-Job placement assistance FT, PT, Parties, Weddings, Always in demand! Call 816-753-3900 TODAY !!!

Starting @ 8pm

SPEEDING DWI CRIMINAL SOLICITATION Call Tim Tompkins Today KCTrafficlawyer.com 913-707-4357 816-729-2606

DWI, SOLICITATION, TRAFFIC DEFENSE, INTERNET-BASED CRIMES816-221-5900

INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL BARTENDING

CLUBEROTICAKCXXX.NET #1 Lifestyle House Party In KC Halloween Party this Sat. Night & Oct 31st

Reunites Love- Depression-Finances Success 100% Guaranteed Results !

816-965-7125

Readings

$99 DIVORCE $99

Simple, Uncontested + Filing Fee. Don Davis. 816-531-1330

BED BUGS? 1-800-GOT-BUGS Total Pest Control

Locally Owned Since 1939 Attorney since 1976: 913-345-4100, KS/MO. Injuries, workers comp, criminal, divorce, DUI, traffic, and more. Low fees, Call Greg Bangs.

The road to DEBT RELIEF and a fresh start. Accurso and Lett Law Firm Experienced and Affordable MISSOURI:

816-587-4LAW (4529) KANSAS: 913-402-6069

www.AccursoAndLett.com

ADOPT: College Sweethearts, Happy Creative Home, Laughter, Security, At-home Parent, Beaches. Expenses paid 1-800-362-7842 James & Helene

GET PAID TO DRINK and TEXT!

Brand Ambassadors Wanted! Immediate earnings potential. Company car program, team bonuses, and more! Positions available now. Start part time or full time. Training provided. Work at home, in person, or both. Receive FREE energy drinks and pay for referrals. Call or TXT 816-520-5456 or email applynow@centurylink.net

* DWI * * CRIMINAL * * TRAFFIC * Practice emphasizing DWI defense. Experienced, knowledgeable attorney will take the time to listen and inform. Free initial phone consultation.

THE LAW OFFICE OF DENISE KIRBY 816-221-3691


The Pitch: October 25, 2012