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NOVEMBER 15–21, 2012 | VOL. 32 NO. 20 E D I T O R I A L

Editor Scott Wilson Managing Editor Justin Kendall Music Editor David Hudnall Staff Writers Charles Ferruzza, Ben Palosaari Editorial Operations Manager Deborah Hirsch Calendar Editor Berry Anderson Clubs Editor Abbie Stutzer Food Blogger, Web Editor Jonathan Bender Proofreader Brent Shepherd Contributing Writers Tracy Abeln, Theresa Bembnister, April Fleming, Dan Savage, Abbie Stutzer Intern Nadia Imafidon

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Looking into the future: The Pitch’s Innovation Issue. BY TH E P ITC H

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MORRISSEY heads to Lawrence in February. ANTON’S TAPROOM & RESTAURANT is still a work in progress. CHRISTOPHER WALKEN talks A Late Quartet.

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PLOG

FOX HOLE

Missouri now knows how Lake Lotawana’s CID went bust. It just can’t punish anybody.

n a blustery late-October evening, a parade of SUVs, sedans and trucks weaved through the immaculately paved roads of a subdivision just south of the city of Lake Lotawana. They motored past a beige stone sign proclaiming the name of the expanse — Foxberry Estates — and down a divided street with a row of a dozen or so three-bulb streetlights guiding them toward a little building called “the clubhouse.” Inside the clubhouse, about 30 residents of the Lake Lotawana Community Improvement District walked past a tabletop map showing the unrealized Foxberry empire. In the building’s conference room, the neighbors gathered to listen to Deputy State Auditor Harry Otto debrief them on the failed CID. There was little small talk as the neighbors flipped through copies of the audit report. One gray-haired man in a suit muttered “wow” to himself as he read the damning findings. Then LO G flanked by two other MOLREINPE AT Otto, state auditors, began unG ON O M/PL packing the political and P IT C H .C O domestic ramifications of the CID’s collapse — starting with the announcement that the CID was the only such subdivision in Missouri ever to file for bankruptcy. “For better or for worse, and I guess for worse, you’re a little bit unique to be in the condition you’re in,” he told his audience. The bankruptcy itself wasn’t news. The CID went belly-up in 2010. The evening’s jolts were in discovering just how badly the CID had been operated. A CID is an area, defined by its municipality, that can sell bonds for special projects and levy special assessments on property to pay off the bonds. CIDs can also raise the sales tax, typically by 1 percent. The revenue raised is used to finance what the state Department of Economic Development’s Business and Community Services Division defines as “public-use facilities and establishing and managing policies and public services relative to the needs of the district.” Property owners who want to start a CID must petition their municipality and show in detail how it will function. The city then must pass an ordinance creating the CID. For instance, Main Street Corridor Development Corporation (MainCor) has a CID, as does downtown Kansas City, Missouri, and the River Market. There are even CIDs with a single property owner. This summer, the City Council approved a CID that includes only the Ameristar casino. The City Council is now considering limiting the use of CIDs. The Lake Lotawana audit report’s 17 pages lay out the ways in which the developers in charge of the CID mismanaged the district, which the city authorized in 2005. It’s a baffl ing history that brings into question the use of special districts anywhere. (Kansas City, Missouri’s City Council is currently

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weighing whether to curtail its use of CIDs, with Lake Lotawana an illustration of the argument against.) Developers within the Lake Lotawana CID earmarked CID funds to build a sewer plant and lines for the 352 new homes and big-box businesses planned for the area. It was a modest goal that the CID’s board of directors turned into a spectacular botch. The CID board issued $8.85 million in bonds to construct the sewer plant and its accompanying system. The bonds were a rarely used kind called “bond anticipation bonds.” How rarely used? Otto had to look them up. “The first time I read it and got into this,” he told the homeowners, “I said, ‘What is a BAB?’ ” The CID planned to pay off the BABs by issuing more common, longer-term bonds. But that never happened. The CID ran out of money. And there was another problem with the $8.85 million in BABs: The CID spent only $4.7 million for the wastewater treatment plant. “It’s a bit unusual to see someone borrow the interest,” Otto said at the meeting. “When you go borrow money for your house, you borrow the amount, and then you pay the interest. You don’t up the loan so that you have money to pay the interest on the bigger loan.” Otto explained to the homeowners that the board apparently planned to pay interest on the bonds with the money remaining in its coffers — the $4.15 million not spent on the plant. But in March 2010, the cash ran out, and the CID defaulted on the bonds. The audit shows another glaring shortcoming of the CID: Developers didn’t pay as much assessment as they should have, which would have provided the CID with needed revenue. “For example, the total special assess-

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One interpretation of the auditor’s report. ment calculated for 2009, 2008 and 2007 was $2,047,836 for the development companies,” the audit report reads. “But the amounts actually billed only totaled $25,216.” The total assessment for Gibson’s General Store, one of only two businesses in the CID, were calculated at $15,627, but the billed assessment was only $2,502. “These special assessments, although they were written up, were never collected,” Otto said. “The bills for these assessments didn’t go out to the developers. They did go out to the homeowners.” The audit cites numerous other flaws with the CID’s management and rates it as “poor,” the state’s lowest possible audit score. Among the audit’s other findings: The board did not keep minutes for closed meetings; the CID didn’t submit annual financial reports to the State Auditor’s Office (as required by law); and two members of the board (developers Klonda Holt and Pat Holt) voted to lend $60,000 to their own company, Lightfoot Development LLC. The property owned by that business was foreclosed on in December 2010. The loan to Lightfoot Development went through in January 2010, just two months before the district defaulted on its bonds. Lightfoot has since filed for bankruptcy. A separate $100,000 loan was made to Lone Summit Development Group, which also had members on the CID’s board. Neither loan has been repaid. The city of Lake Lotawana seems shy about the doomed CID it spawned. The Pitch requested a map of the CID from Lake Lotawana’s city clerk. She said the city didn’t have a map of the district but could provide the pitch.com

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legal definition of the CID boundaries. Asked for that definition, however, the clerk said Mayor Howard Chamberlin would consider sending the documents only after The Pitch filed a formal Sunshine Law request. Chamberlin, who ran unopposed for his office in 2009, spoke at the meeting, mostly to criticize the scope of the audit. He felt that the audit hadn’t gone deep enough, and he asked the auditors why they were unable to kick board members out of the CID and charge them with crimes. “We don’t carry guns. We don’t have badges,” Otto told him. Chamberlin, a doppelgänger for the deadpan Breaking Bad assassin Mike Ehrmantraut, wouldn’t comment for this story. He said only that he didn’t want to put anything on the record while the CID was in bankruptcy. Only 28 homes have been built on the CID’s 352 lots, and just two businesses have opened: the Lone Summit Bank and Gibson’s (a BP gas station and convenience store). The latter is named for owners John and Judy Gibson, of the Lone Summit Development Group. Judy Gibson is a member of the CID board. A few months before the CID’s default, Lone Summit Bank was put under an FDIC consent order. It was sold to a Kansas bank earlier this year. Development that might rescue the CID is unlikely to happen anytime soon. A bankruptcy judge gave the CID until 2016 to pay off its bonds and dropped the interest rate from the original 7.75 percent to 1.5 percent. But even at the reduced rate, the CID isn’t on track to retire the bonds on time. “I would say it’s going to be really iff y,” Otto said in the meeting with homeowners. Bill Lloyd, executive vice president and chief lending officer of Midwest Independent Bank, which owns the majority of the CID bonds, is more blunt. “There’s no way in hell that they can pay the principal on the bonds by the time they mature in 2016,” he tells The Pitch. “I mean, there’s just not money to pay that.” He adds that he has never seen bonds fail like this, and that Midwest Independent just wants to recoup its investment. After the meeting, The Pitch approached about a dozen angry homeowners from the CID, all of whom declined to speak on the record. Some said they were afraid to talk because one resident was sued for defamation by one of the people associated with the developers. (That case was settled out of court.) All of them, however, are in similarly bad straits. Special assessments have been levied against them to pay the bond interest, and there’s no new retail development nearby to contribute to the bill. “If they don’t pay that special assessment, there’s a lien generated against that property,” Lloyd explains. “If they don’t pay for three years in a row, their property is sold in a tax sale on the courthouse steps. It’s a pretty rotten deal for them.”

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There has to be a better way.

Those seven words unite the entrepreneurs featured in our Innovation Issue, part of The Pitch’s ongoing effort to tell the stories of Kansas City’s big thinkers and doers. Each of these startups has come up with a better way to do something that most of us take for granted, and we're talking to them as Global Entrepreneurship Week unfolds. The Kauffman Foundation initiative, designed to inspire the next generation of innovators, culminates with Startup Weekend (Friday night, November 16, through Sunday night, November 18). It's just the latest proof that the better way to the next big idea runs through Kansas City.

L o o k i n g i n t o t h e f u t u r e : T h e P i t c h ' s I n n o vat i o n I s s u e Photography by Sabrina Staires

Meat Market AgLocal agitates for a more direct route from sustainable farm to conscious table.

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his is the meat of our operation,” AgLocal co-founder Naithan Jones jokes as he descends into the basement of the Historic Theatre Building in Mission. Meat is the backbone of Jones’ startup, AgLocal, an online platform connecting producers, wholesalers and retailers of humanely produced meats. About 200 farms, distributors and retailers across the United States have already signed up. Jones developed the idea while working at the Kauffman Foundation. He ran it by his wife’s family — farmers in western Kansas who don’t produce meat — and his brother, who is a chef. They liked the idea, and Jones quit his job to start AgLocal. While networking, he met his co-founder, developer Jacob McDaniel. “The reason I’m doing this is that it’s hard, and I want to be remembered for something that meant something,” Jones says. “And I realize this is bigger than me. This means something to other people — clearly, by the amount of attention the company has gotten without having any outbound PR. All the support we get, it’s moving.” Jones and his crew — seven employees and two contractors — have developed a catchy slogan: “Power to the meat lover.” It’s a mantra that clearly resonates. In April, months before AgLocal’s official launch, Fast Company published a glowing profile of the young business. More outlets — Mashable, NPR, TechCrunch, Forbes — followed with equally positive stories. One early fall afternoon, Jones gives The Pitch a tour of his subterranean office space. AgLocal���s business director, Katie McCurry,

Jones: raw and ready works at a computer station as a TV glows behind her. On this day, she and her co-workers are focused on the October 5 launch of AgLocal’s “EatClear” campaign — a push for restaurants to offer more sustainable meat — at the American Royal. Jones believes that carnivores want more transparency: Where did the beef on their plates come from? How was the cow raised? And he believes that they’re willing to pay more for the knowledge, wait a little longer for their food to cook, and eat a little less if they know they’re consuming a better product. “We think that’s going to be a trend that doesn’t go away,” Jones says. “And we think convenience is now giving way to empowerment. If I’m putting this in my body, how do

you care about me? And so you’re seeing these menus now with at least one farm option.” In a marketplace dominated by factory farming and fast food, Jones says, “the people who are producing our food don’t care about us.” He goes on: “They don’t care if it’s packed full of carcinogens and disgusting hormones or if my kids are going to be dealing with things that generations prior didn’t deal with as far as illness and pathogens.” Jones wants to change that ambivalence by giving consumers a platform, via Twitter and the hashtag #EatClear, to address restaurants directly. AgLocal monitors the hashtag and attempts to connect those restaurants with farms using sustainable models. “It’s our way of giving a personal touch to consumers who want to see this changed,” he says. “The #EatClear is almost like calling 911.”

In late October, AgLocal launched its first online marketplace, with about 20 San Francisco and Kansas City restaurants participating. The decision, Jones says, to start in San Francisco was based on that city’s “mature sustainable-food movement.” “It’s almost low-hanging fruit to get users,” Jones says. “And they’re going to be our most willing participants as far as test users, so we’re going to get a lot of data from them about what’s right and what isn’t right.” The company plans to use feedback from the Bay Area to tweak AgLocal for a city-bycity rollout. “Best-case scenario: 18 months before the product is just ubiquitous,” Jones says. “By that time, we’re able to support all of the demands; no matter what city you’re in, we’re able to match it to supply.” After that, he says, AgLocal could become the “Amazon of meat.” The online bookseller allowed indie book publishers to compete with the big guys. He wants to do the same thing for meat producers. He says he can help bridge the gap for the “ag of the middle,” the producers who are too big to sell directly and too small to participate in the commodities market. “AgLocal has the unique ability to match all of that supply to the market, which isn’t happening right now,” Jones says. “It’s an opportunity to build something beautiful for these folks.” AgLocal’s beginning may be on social media and in restaurants, but its future is in a mobile app. “In the epic cage-match battle between consumer and restaurants, we ultimately decided that we could serve the consumers by being where they are and scale it that way,” Jones says. “So we [will] eventually create an app that goes direct to the consumer. But right now, if we scale it to restaurants, we’re essentially where consumers are.” —JUSTIN KENDALL continued on page 8

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Bragging Rights Who has the best fans? Fannect wants to know.

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ho are the best fans in the nation? The question has been debated on bar stools and message boards across the country, with no clear scientific answer. Until now. So say Hunter Browning and Will Coatney, whose Fannect app may at last definitively rank the most devoted fanbases in sports — and determine every pro team and university’s No. 1 fan. “The most fundamental core of Fannect is proving who has the best sports fans,” Coatney, 24, says. In the past, he adds, there was no metric “to quantitatively prove who has the best fans.” So the two men have set out to build a platform that would fill that void. “I wanted to let fans compete to be the best fan at their school and also earn their school points,” says Browning, an 18-year-old freshman at the University of Kansas. (He’s about to take a semester off to focus on Fannect.) “We want this to be the platform to measure fans’ passion, dedication and knowledge of their team and of their team against other teams.” Browning was watching a Chiefs game when he first wondered how fans could become more engaged in the action. Coatney, whom Browning had met through a mutual friend, brings a Web-development background and a lot of connections to complement his partner’s training in engineering and physics. It’s a combination with serious legs: Fannect has raised $300,000 so far, a figure likely to grow after launch. When Fannect goes live November 20 (pending Apple’s approval), it will feature every major NCAA school as well as every

MLB, MLS, NHL, NFL and NBA franchise. The app — so far only for Apple, though a website will allow anyone to play — is designed to capture the social aspect of sports. It combines the functionality of Foursquare with a social component similar to Facebook. As on Foursquare, fans check in, in this case with games and watch parties. Those check-ins earn points, as does getting a picture taken with players and coaches, guessing scores and building a roster of friends. “Since we’re all fans, we really do get what fans are looking for,” Browning says. Which means that even the sign-up process is a game. In a note that recalls the exclusivity of Facebook’s first period, Fannect users must hit a threshold (100 people) to unlock a favorite team or school. Networks for KU and Mizzou, Sporting KC, the Royals and Chiefs have already activated, Browning says. He adds, “We expect the other networks to be turned on within days.” Browning and Coatney subscribe to the mantra that an app dies without regular updates, so they’ve lined up more games to launch after the first 30 days.

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Their hope is that, a year from now, Fannect will have become a major part of college and pro sports. They envision fans whipping out their smartphones for bragging rights. Both men admit that they’d like for ESPN, Yahoo or some other company with deep pockets to buy Fannect eventually, so that they can pursue other projects. Browning says it’s not about money — he just wants Fannect to pay for his deeper scientific ambitions. He studied at Blue Valley Schools’ Center for Advanced Professional Studies and taught himself quantum mechanics and nuclear physics through MIT online programs in high school, and he holds patents that may lead to a hydrogen fuel cell to power cars. (“We didn’t get to take it as far as the theory would permit because we ran out of money,” he says.) The idea is for the next thing to benefit more people than just sports fans. “You only have so long that you’re here,” Browning says. “You might as well make some impact.” —JUSTIN KENDALL

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Browning and Coatney: winning the game

Rush: verified

aybe you have the kind of eyes that give you away. Now, though, your eyes — specifically, the blood vessels in the whites of your eyes — might keep all your secrets. “Each section of the white of your eye is the equivalent of a fingerprint,” says Toby Rush, EyeVerify CEO and founder. “It’s like four fingerprints staring at you.” EyeVerify’s authentication system, Rush adds, is easy compared with retina- and iris-scanning identification systems, which require special lighting. EyeVerify works with a cellphone camera. “All you have to do is hold it roughly in front of your eye, look right, look left, turn it around and it’ll be done,” he says. “It’s that simple.” Reza Derakhshani, an associate professor at the University of Missouri–Kansas City, and Arun Ross, an associate professor at West Virginia University, first developed eye-vein verification in 2005. They received a patent in February 2008. After Rush came across the concept in September 2011, he negotiated


a worldwide license for the technology and started EyeVerify the following January. Rush, who had spent the previous 13 years working in the mobile and wireless fields, raised $1.4 million in seed money from Think Big Ventures and a number of angel investment groups. A team of 12 people — five full-time employees, including Derakhshani, who is EyeVerify’s chief scientist as well as director of UMKC’s Computational Intelligence and Bio-Identification Technologies Lab — is working to make the application accurate and easy to use. If they succeed, Rush expects numerous industries to start relying on the company’s eye-vein biometrics for such everyday needs as money transfers, prescription records and building access. From deactivating your burglar alarm to activating your gun or weapon to accessing your medical history, there’s no shortage of uses for a portable technology that lets you prove you are who you say you are. “It is quintessentially who you are,” Rush says, talking up the benefits of biodentity software over the usual typed passwords. “Everything else is a proxy. Because you have a password, we assume you are who you are. Because you know this string of numbers, we’re going to assume that you are who you say you are. None of them actually answer the question. But we are definitely answering the question. … We’ve got to make it dead simple and accurate every time. That’s really the focus.” Besides countering identity theft, Rush says EyeVerify is also part of the Web’s evolution, moving a computer user away from anonymity toward verifiability. “I want to be known as a real person online,” he says, “and know that I’m dealing with who I want to deal with online.” A pilot program began this fall, ahead of a planned EyeVerify launch next spring. Rush says five companies are testing the application. He won’t name them, but he says they are “the biggest names in town in banking and health care.” “We’re going to protect your ID,” Rush says. “We’re going to make it convenient to share your identity with your phone and then the various applications.” EyeVerify is targeting a number of consumer and commercial industries besides banking and health care: government, travel, higher education, hospitality and gaming. But what Rush wants most is for the eyes to have it on Election Day. He believes his product could greatly increase voter participation. “It’s still my favorite application idea for the technology,” he says. So when voters choose the next U.S. president, the phrase “voter ID” may have an altogether new meaning. —JUSTIN KENDALL

Analyze This Lucky Orange takes real-time Web analytics to new levels.

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rian Gruber found himself in a room full of fans during an early October gathering of developers and visionaries at the Kauffman Foundation’s 1 Million Cups. The founder of Lucky Orange was explaining his startup, which provides a suite of tools for real-time Web analytics, when a couple of his clients professed their love of Lucky Orange and pledged to pay more for the service. “That keeps happening,” Gruber, 29, says of clients publicly singing his praises. “I did a webinar yesterday, and I was very shocked by how many people in the chat room were like, ‘We love Lucky Orange. It’s awesome.’ I didn’t expect that.” Driving his clients’ enthusiasm is an informational mother lode that Lucky Orange provides website owners, allowing them to see almost everything visitors do on their sites. Every Lucky Orange client gets an online dashboard that looks as if it came from the NORAD command center. The top-right corner of the screen shows the number of current visitors. A map indicates where in the world they are. A continuously updated list shows incoming visitors, how they were directed to the site and how long they’ve been on it. Clients can switch to heat-map images of their sites that show where visitors are clicking and moving the mouse. Website owners can also record mouse movements, chat with visitors and send them polls. The goal: Help website owners design better pages based on how visitors interact with their sites. Wearing a faded Royals hat and a winter coat inside his drafty Overland Park office, Florida native Gruber says he built websites for a living for several years. But he grew weary of his clients valuing how the site looked over how it worked. “Building other people’s websites means you have many different bosses,” Gruber says. “And each time

you build a new site, you have another boss. And I think I got tired of that.” So four years ago, Gruber switched professions. He trained violent and bite-prone dogs and built websites as a hobby. Two years ago, he launched Lucky Orange. He has been running it full time for about a year and a half, and he says his business’s growth has largely been due to its enthusiastic customers. “I think the tool just got so interesting that it was worth talking about,” Gruber says. “When somebody sees how it works, then they get it. They’re like, ‘Wow, it does that? That’s ridiculous.’ ” Using only word-of-mouth marketing, Gruber has amassed about 6,000 users, including some major corporations. “I remember, in the beginning, I had a customer call in [needing help],” he says. “I said, ‘OK, what’s the URL of your website?’ And they said, ‘Samsclub.com.’ It was the Web team for Sam’s Club trying it on a few pages.” A not-uncommon challenge for Gruber and startups: finding the time to get everything done. “At a lot of startups, they work around the clock. They never stop,” he says. But

Gruber: Web history buff Gruber won’t let work consume him. He carves out time for his wife and son, who is almost 3. Plus, his faith — he’s a modern Orthodox Jew — mandates that he step away from the grind from Friday evening until Saturday night. “I have a family, he says. “I can’t work forever. I need to come home.” Gruber isn’t marketing Lucky Orange, and he doesn’t have to. The word of mouth brings him from 10 to 20 new sites a day. Business is so good that he’s looking to hire his first employee. This also means that investment-capital firms are trying to buy Lucky Orange. But Gruber isn’t interested in selling out. “I don’t know exactly if it’s a greedy thing or a fear thing or a wise thing,” Gruber says. “I don’t know what the motivation is, but I’ve yet to convince myself that, ‘OK, I want to go get capital.’ ” Gruber says he might take an investor later on, but he doesn’t sound committed to the idea. “Maybe this is it,” he says, “I don’t like bosses.” —BEN PALOSAARI continued on page 10

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Revolutionary Road Tim Sylvester has a vision for the road of the future.

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im Sylvester’s pride and joy is a pair of flat, gray slabs of concrete on northbound Interstate 35, between the Gardner Drive and city of Gardner exits. The 31-year-old founder and sole employee of Integrated Roadways talks about his company’s precast modular pavement as one would a wunderkind kid brother. “If you go out there looking for them, you’re not going to find them because they’re so smooth and so quiet,” a beaming Sylvester says of the two 6-by-12-foot slabs. If drivers haven’t noticed Sylvester’s road work, they may soon. Sylvester believes that old methods of paving roads with wet concrete and asphalt should be retired and that cities and states should adopt his prefabricated concrete sections that, in effect, tile traffic lanes. Sylvester says his slabs offer a faster, longer-lasting option for repairing deteriorating roads and provide easy access to underground utilities. Road crews can pry up a damaged section and replace it, rather than repaving the damaged area. Sylvester says his chunks of pavement last from two to four times longer than traditional concrete and asphalt, and the easier installations mean shorter road closures. In September, Sylvester approached the Kansas Department of Transportation about testing his road-repair system. KDOT agreed to pay for a road crew if Sylvester brought the concrete.

Sylvester jumped on the opportunity to demonstrate his unproven concept. Despite the crew’s inexperience with the material, they easily pulled off the replacement, Sylvester says, cutting away a piece of road big enough for the prefabricated slab and lowering it in. “I literally gave the crew no direction at all,” Sylvester says as a video of the installation plays on a laptop in his office in a University of Missouri–Kansas City building. “They knew that they were going to pick it up off the truck and drop it in.” In five minutes, the first slab was placed. There was an initial hiccup: The concrete had to be removed so that the bottom of the hole could be leveled. The job was done in 45 minutes. “The second one [installation] took 20 minutes, but the actual installation to get it in the space went from five minutes to one minute,” Sylvester says. A couple of hours after the work was completed, the lane reopened to traffic (a problem with a grout pump slowed down the finish). Sylvester estimates that the old way of repaving the same section of road would have taken between four and 12 hours longer. Integrated Roadways’ concrete could be ready for traffic in 45 minutes. Sylvester is looking for more opportunities to show off Integrated Roadways’ pavement. His next chance: 5,000 square feet of parking lot at the AMC 30 movie theater in Olathe. Then Sylvester will get a shot at using his precast pavement for the parking lot of UMKC’s new Bloch Executive Hall. Since Sylvester started working full time on Integrated Roadways in February, he has made one major change to his business model. Realizing that state agencies and municipalities are unwilling to pay more money for an unknown, if better, product, Sylvester needed to find a way to make his young company

financially palatable. The solution: customer financing. Sylvester says he and a partner (a realestate developer whom he would not name) plan to offer long-term financing to cities and private-property owners. “That gives us the ability to motivate private investors for public-works projects, which is huge,” he says. “I mean, public-works projects are so friggin’ underfunded.” Sylvester believes he can convince cities that it’s worth taking on more nonbond debt to improve their roads. “Kansas City spends $8 million a year on infrastructure,” Sylvester says. “The Federal Highway Administration says Kansas City should spend $30 million a year. Well, where are they going to get that money?” Google Fiber also presents an opportunity for Integrated Roadways. Sylvester envisions sensors embedded in slabs that can detect traffic speed, potholes and traffic information. Road problems could

Eastern Promises The sun rises on fundraising tool RAZ Mobile.

I

t’s like watching the lions eat the Christians,” says Dale Knoop, founder of the fundraising app RAZ Mobile. The 52-year-old entrepreneur and Sprint veteran is a relentlessly upbeat guy, and he sounds sunny even pronouncing this opinion. He can afford to — he’s only talking about Monday’s Chiefs game in Pittsburgh. “I’ve got Heath Miller,” he says, naming the Steelers tight end on his fantasy-football team. Miller won’t have a great night once Pittsburgh QB Ben Roethlisberger gets knocked out of the game. But the big-picture wisdom of Knoop’s roster choice is undeniable. And when the subject turns from football to technology, you’re even more likely to pay attention to what Knoop does. At Sprint, where he worked from 1996 to 2006, he was in the trenches for the ascent of smartphones. “The corporate thing gave me tremendous opportunity to learn about mobile data,” he says. And another 20-month tour of duty there, which ended this 10 T H E P I T C H 4 THE PITCH

past March, reinforced his belief that anything worth doing is worth doing with a mobile app. It also honed his touch with investors. After Knoop left the Overland Park telecom company last spring, he devoted his energy full time to RAZ. By early October, his new venture’s capitalization had vaulted over $1 million, with an $800,000 injection from an angel investor announced that month. But that shouldn’t be a surprise, given that what RAZ does is as simple as a RoethlisbergerMiller completion: The app connects organizations looking for money with donors.

N O V E M B E R 1 5 - 2 1 , 2 0 1 2 pitch.com M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X pitch.com

Knoop keeps finding angels. “We looked at the marketplace and saw that nonprofits were being left behind,” Knoop says. “They’re so scrutinized at how they spend their money that they can’t necessarily get into developing a platform like ours. We wanted to introduce a brand-new day in fundraising.” Knoop’s timing is perfect. While nonprofits forced to slash budgets are re-examining the traditional direct-mail approach to fundraising, smartphone users, primed by the habits of online commerce and the SMS altruism

Sylvester: road ready be quickly solved. The future of modular roads could also include heating systems to melt road ice, charge electric cars as they drive and guide self-driving cars. Sylvester admits, however, that Integrated Roadways has a long way to go before his vision of road revolution can get under way. The present takes precedence over the future for now, so Sylvester is focusing on the three projects he has lined up. “I’ve met with a dozen municipalities that have said, ‘Tim, we love the technology, we love your vision, we love everything about this, but we cannot contract with you for a $1 million project if we can’t go look at what you’ve already done,’ ” he says. “Until these demos, these showcases are completed, I’m a guy in a room talking about how cool it’s going to be.” —BEN PALOSAARI

that now trails every natural disaster, are increasingly ready to commit themselves to one-touch giving. RAZ’s model, however, departs from the “text this number to give $10 to the Red Cross” model. It’s designed, Knoop explains, to lower a nonprofit’s costs, allow variable dollar amounts and, most of all, keep the donor-recipient channel open between transactions. He goes on: “An educated donor is a loyal donor, and a loyal donor gives repeatedly. Table stakes these days is engaging donors constantly rather than with direct mailings once or twice a year. It’s easy and more rewarding to use a steady product.” RAZ, which doesn’t charge for texting, makes its money by charging the donor-seeking groups a fee of $29 to use the app’s platform and collecting 6 percent of donated funds. So now there’s an app that takes good works mobile. “I’m driven by the fact that I think I’m here to apply what I know and go help as many people as I can,” Knoop says. “I pray that RAZ helps millions and millions of people.” And why shouldn’t it? As Knoop points out, “You can’t meet anybody who doesn’t care about some cause.” — SCOTT WILSON

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WEEK OF NOVEMBER 15-21 | BY BERRY ANDERSON

BODY-ROLLING REMIX

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“Belly dancing is finally taking off,” says dancer, teacher and writer Nicole English. Having inherited the dance gene from her mother, Gloria English (a former dancer with the KC Civic Ballet), she grew up watching modern and contemporary dance and picking up Middle Eastern moves. In fusing those influences, she has created a genre that she calls “American-style belly dance.” See her at 7:30 p.m. when she and the rest of the performers of Belly Dance United present Evolve at Off Center Theatre in Crown Center (2450 Grand, 816-842-9999). Tickets cost $15. The Pitch spoke with English about her dance odyssey. The Pitch: How has belly dancing changed over time? English: Authenticity was an issue when I first started. I learned all the authentic moves from Middle Eastern people themselves, but I also added high kicks, back bends and splits. In the early days, I was criticized for that, and I fell out of favor because I was too innovative. Belly dance flatlined for a while, and then all of a sudden, there was a rebirth. Our own American style has taken root now. We still refer to it as belly dance, but now it may be time for it to establish itself as a legitimate genre. It needs to be taught within the confines of classical dance and get recognition as a complex dance form. What should people expect from Evolve? The concept is about transition. … “Culture Clash” is about different forms of dance integrated into belly dance: Irish, flamenco, jazz, hip-hop. For “War to Peace,” I will be a warrior dancing with real swords. — NADIA IMAFIDON

ART Don’t overlook Overlook.

19

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FILM No lie: Lincoln is good.

24 Get ready for Ha Ha Tonka Thanksgiving.

T H U R S D AY | 11 . 15 | TREND BEND

Just when you’re all stocked up on gold accessories and knit tweeds, it’s time to switch it up again. Spring 2013 is upon us, fashionista girlfriends! Where are your sporty dresses, luxe leathers and bold stripes? Good thing Fashion Group International has your backs. The E R MO Spring/Summer 2013 Ready to Wear Trend Presentation features AT E N I ONL .COM speakers from area retailPITCH ers such as the Bunker, Madewell and Halls, so you can learn what’s hot and what’s not. Tickets cost $20 for FGI members, $30 for nonmembers. The 7 p.m. presentation is preceded by a cocktail and networking party at 6, and it all goes down in the Atkins Auditorium at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art (4525 Oak,

EVENTS

dance full of A belly c n es inf lue

MIKE STRONG

MUSIC

DAY

11.17

SATUR

PAG E

816-751-1278). See kansascity.fgi.org for more information.

F R I D AY | 11 . 16 | MASH OF THE TITANS

What do college-age urban gods and goddesses look like? Get an idea tonight at the Beaumont Club (4050 Pennsylvania, 816-561-2560) when the National PanHellenic Council of Greater KC puts on its Greek Gods and Goddesses Party. Should it please the gods, there will be a date auction, a two-step contest (led by De Barker) and, of course, networking opportunities, starting at 8:30 p.m. Feel immortal for $15 in advance; see greekgods.kcsoul.com.

RIOT UP NORTH

A year ago this weekend, Trivia Riot — that long-cherished weekly brainiac challenge — moved up McGee Street, continued on page 14

F R I D AY | 1 1 . 16 |

WATER OF LIFE

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his past St. Patrick’s Day, New York Times Magazine writer Rosie Schaap referred to Irish whiskey as “easy to be around, kind of the golden retriever of spirits.” Tonight, find your new go-to at the KC Irish Center’s Irish whiskey tasting, which offers two options: The basic tasting features Jameson, Bushmills, Powers, Tullamore Dew, Paddy and Knappogue, and the premium tasting gets you an additional four labels, including Middleton Very Rare. Tickets ($35 for basic, $50 for premium) are available online at irishcenterkc .org. The doors open at 6:30 p.m., and the tasting starts at 7. The Irish Center is located on the lower lever of the west wing of Union Station (30 West Pershing, 816-474-3848). pitch.com

NOVEMBER 15-21, 2012

THE PITCH

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D AY

11.17

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continued from page 13 from the Brick to Retro. Tonight, the awardwinning quiz relocates again, past the river to Helen’s JAD Bar & Grill (2002 Armour Road, North Kansas City, 816-471-4567). Host Roland Reschke just reached his own milestone: the five-year mark of leading this two-hour game. He estimates that he has written approximately 20,000 questions. “It will remain our usual challenging game with a broad range of categories mixing pop culture and more educationally sophisticated material,” he says. Trivia Riot now starts at 7:30, but look for extended happy-hour prices: $8 Bud Light and Miller Lite pitchers and $3 wells. The $5-aperson buy-in remains the same.

S AT U R D AY | 11 . 17 |

GUITARS AND CADI-STRAPS

Gear geeks, take stock of your guitar-wizardry arsenal. Will you ever learn how to use that effects pedal? Have you still not found the perfect amp to complement your Fender Precision Bass? Patrick Deveny feels you. He’s the dude behind Jaykco guitar straps, and today he’s setting up a guitar-gear swap meet at RecordBar (1020 Westport Road, 816-753-5207). “Any guitar, bass and music gear is welcome: pedals, amps, microphones, PA gear, all that,” he says. “Just no schoolband instruments.” Tables are first-come, first-served to the public. (Dealers, you’re welcome, but bring your own tables.) Jaykco straps — styles worn by Neko Case, Elvis Costello and Jeff Tweedy — are also available for trade for vintage straps and pedals of all kinds. The commerce happens from 2 to 6 p.m., and admission is free. E-mail patrick@ jaykco.com for more information.

LET IT RIDE

We can’t skate for shit, but we know for sure that the Girl Skateboard Mouse video from 1997 is generally epic. One of its 14

THE PITCH

NOVEMBER 15-21, 2012

pitch.com

directors, Spike Jonze, put his mitts on Pretty Sweet, the new video from Girl and Chocolate. It premieres at 9:30 and 11 p.m. at Screenland Armour (408 Armour Road, North Kansas City, 816-421-9700). Tickets cost $8. Watch the trailer and buy tickets at screenland.com/armour.

S U N D AY | 11 . 18 | THE TRYPTOPHAN TRIP

You’re thankful for wine, aren’t you? How about local wine? Jowler Creek Vineyard & Winery (16905 Jowler Creek Road, Platte City, 816-858-5528) wants to help you pick out the perfect bottle to go with your turkey-day dinner, E R O M and it doesn’t matter if you’re going plain Hungry-Man, working T A INE ONL .COM the deep-fried bird or H C PIT rocking a Tofurky. Try all seven of Jowler Creek’s wines (we lean toward the Chambourcin when it comes to poultry), with small plates of traditional Thanksgiving bites, for $5. A rich Norton with stuffing? A bold blush with your pecan pie? You decide. The Thanksgiving wine pairing runs from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. yesterday and today. See jowlercreek.com for more information.

EVENTS

M O N D AY | 11 . 19 | ALL ROADS LEAD SOUTH

Jasper Mirabile Jr. recently returned from a trip to Rome, which he says reminded him of the simple, classic flavors and ingredients of the Old World: pecorino, black pepper, oxtails. He’s bringing all of these together for what’s he’s calling “A Roman Holiday Experience” —


ESDAY

1 1 . 21

WE D N

e” by Fortun f Good “Men o e d Moss Richar

Theater Presents

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LIGHT SHOW & 6 DJ’s! a cocktail reception and cooking demo, at his namesake restaurant (1201 West 103rd Street, 816-941-6600) at 7 p.m. “I’ll do a study of two different pastas,” Mirabile tells us. Expect sugo all’amatriciana (a traditional sauce with guanciali, pork-cheek bacon) and cacio e pepe (a cheese-and-pepper sauce). Tickets run $45 a person; reserve your space at jasperskc.com.

T U E S D AY | 11 . 2 0 |

EVERYONE IS VIP IN 2013 WILL WE MAKE IT TO 12.21.12?? Buy your tickets before the Mayan calendar ends on 12.21 & get last years pricing of $40

M O N D AY | 1 1 . 1 9 |

(limited to the first 400) A NIGHT TO REMEMBER

Last Christmas Eve, Dee Dee Pearson was killed inside her apartment, after her assailant learned that she was transgender. Remember her and other victims of transgender hate crimes at the Transgender Day of Remembrance at 7:30 p.m. at the J.C. Nichols Fountain (northeast corner of 47th Street and Main). “This is a solemn occasion each year when the transgender community and allies worldwide take time to remember nonconforming people worldwide who have been killed for being themselves,” says Sandra Meade, chairwoman of the Kansas Equality Coalition. Look for the event at facebook.com/tdorkansascity2012.

W E D N E S D AY | 11 . 21 | THE REAL WORLD

BIG HOOPIN’

G

rand Boulevard between 13th and 14th streets is ground zero for NCAA craycray tonight. The College Basketball Experience Classic kicks off at 6:30 p.m. at the Sprint Center (1407 Grand, 816-949-7000), and the tournament (which goes through tomorrow night) includes KU, Texas A&M, Saint Louis University and Washington State. Tickets start at $17; see sprintcenter.com.

Drawn from the permanent collection of the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art (4420 Warwick, 816-753-5784), Scanning the Horizon features photographs, prints, watercolors and other works on paper that follow the artists out of the studio and into the land of the living. Admission is free, and the museum is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. today. See kemperart.org for more information.

After Decemeber 21st $47 advance tickets $55 at the door. Largest indoor party in KC! Lowest all inclusive price in KC! Entrance one hour early (7pm)

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E-mail submissions to Filter editor Berry Anderson at calendar@pitch.com. Search our complete listings guide online at pitch.com.

pitch.com

NOVEMBER 15-21, 2012

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S TA G E

STATE’S RITES

The Kentucky Cycle takes commitment — and rewards it.

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NOVEMBER 15-21, 2012

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D E BO R A H HIRS CH

also a mirror held up to a compromised culture, one whose people, these characters, might ultimately find redemption.

Also Playing

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B O B PA I S L E Y

unger for land dominates history, right up to the present day. And that drive to stake territory is the force behind the long, violent Kentucky Cycle. Robert Schenkkan’s Pulitzer Prize–winning saga tells two centuries of a sadly American story, with nine one-act plays unfolding across two productions that total nearly seven hours. It doesn’t feel quite that long sitting through both parts (performed in repertory) at the Metropolitan Ensemble Theatre. The production, directed by Karen Paisley, is admirable in its scope (30 actors) and methodical in its pacing, giving weight to Schenkkan’s words and their cadence. Across both halves, the ensemble is strong, and several leading actors stand out, including Scott Cordes, Matt Leonard, Chris roles through the decades. Leonard returns Roady, Manon Halliburton, Michael McIntire, as Michael Rowen’s son, Patrick, battling his Jordan Fox, Bob Paisley and Jessica Franz. father, now portrayed by Cordes. (Cordes covStill, it takes commitment. ers five Rowen incarnations, Leonard three, The minimalist staging suggests an Andrew among other small roles.) Wyeth painting, and many scenes are comThe Rowens aren’t the only family in the forposed like artwork. The opening is a choreoest. A neighboring homestead is owned by the graphed tableau, as though the actors inhabit Talberts, and a family descended from slaves a glass-enclosed museum exhibit. Then the becomes part of the generational drama. (The story unspools into knots of murder, decepprogram includes a family tion, greed, corruption and tree, which proves useful.) revenge — all of it tangled The Kentucky Cycle These Hatfields and McCoys around a plot of land sought Through December 2 at don’t allow ambitions to fade by one sociopath in 1775, and Metropolitan Ensemble or old resentments to lie. then by his dysfunctional Theatre, 3614 Main, The stage is built inches progeny. 816-569-3226, metkc.org from the first row of seats, In Part I, Michael Rowen and the cast members travel (Leonard), desperate for a Next to Normal the aisles in a proximity piece of land, cheats and kills Through November 18 at Just that wrests your attention. Earl Todd (Roady), a trapper, Off Broadway Theatre, 3051 As Part I keeps stacking and then does the same to Central (in Penn Valley Park), its brutalities, you long for the American Indians with 816-405-9200, some disengagement, a little sheandher productions.com whom Todd traded. Next, refuge. But vivid images imhe kidnaps and rapes a napress and remain in mind: a tive woman, Morning Star lone trapper by a campfire, a tribe of Cherokee, (Halliburton), enslaving her as his wife. And Morning Star giving birth alone, a courtship on Rowen’s crimes are just beginning. a hillside, a Civil War drowning. Starting with this ugliness, the Cycle’s first It is 1885 by the time Part II begins. The five one-acts are a virtual assault on the senses. Rowen family is courted by smooth-talking And that unease deepens as the family’s brutal J.T. Wells (McIntire), a rep for a mining comhistory repeats itself. pany salivating over the land’s mineral rights. We see the actors in Part I reappear in many

BY

Before a fall: McIntire, Freeman, Kyle Dyck, Cordes and Halliburton. In flirting with the Rowens’ young daughter, Mary Anne (Hannah Freeman), he displays whatever side of his salesman self a situation demands. In the four one-acts comprising Part II, we move into the early 20th century and a more contemporary morality tale: poor versus rich, have-nots versus haves. In this case, that means owners and miners in 1920s Kentucky. The Rowens have lost their coveted land to the mining company and become dependent on the dangerous work it brings. As in John Sayles’ 1987 fi lm, Matewan, the harsh treatment of coal workers and the violence surrounding union organizing are depicted in stark terms. Here, Paisley takes a dominant role as the adult Mary Anne, struggling to get by with her family in a workers’ camp. The length of this drawnout segment, however, lessens the impact of its final moments. Against a landscape turned to waste by strip mining, the decades 1954–1975 complete The Kentucky Cycle, and a relatively swift denouement closes the story’s circle. Onstage as in history, greed is a powerful motivator. But this Kentucky isn’t just a microcosm of America’s murderous Manifest Destiny. It’s

pitch.com

he small She & Her Productions has taken on this month’s other production of a Pulitzer-winning drama, this one a rock musical that picked up three Tony Awards. Next to Normal (book and lyrics by Brian Yorkey, music by Tom Kitt), directed by Tiffany Garrison-Schweigert, arrives on the heels of the touring Broadway show, which came through Kansas City in June and played the Kauffman Center. That’s a tough act to follow, but this is a moving, funny play no matter where it’s seen, or how often. With 37 musical numbers and seven musicians (directed here by Jim Vinkenberg), the two acts (and two and a half hours) are no small undertaking. The very competent live band hits all the right notes, but their volume often overpowers the dialogue and lyrics, even with miked actors. And that’s a shame because those actors render the songs beautifully. The plot follows a nuclear family confronting a member’s chronic bipolar disorder. Diana Goodman (Kristin Leathers) suffers the manicdepression. Her husband, Dan (Robert Hingula), hopes treatment brings healing. Teenage daughter Natalie (Deanna Mazdra) feels her mother’s neglect. And adolescent son Gabe (Daniel Beeman) vies for attention. Doctors (Graham Fairleigh) and Natalie’s boyfriend (Matthew King) add dimension to the story. Dan holds this family together, and Hingula (a lawyer by day) centers this production as well in a sensitive portrayal of a husband who loves his wife and wants their life to return to the way it once was. And Beeman’s Gabe lends a powerful presence. Some of the script’s demands are difficult to pull off, but it’s next to impossible not to feel the impact of this Next to Normal.

E-mail deborah.hirsch@pitch.com

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ART

THE POWER OF 10

BY

THER E S A B EMBNI S T E R

Don’t miss Spray Booth’s understated Overlook.

Left: Joe Johnson's “Panorama, Atlantis. Reno NV”; above: Philip Heying's “Sunbathers Beside Hetchy Hetchy Reservoir During a Drought”

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nassuming in its execution and devoid of any overarching theme, Overlook is exactly the kind of exhibition that’s easy to, well, overlook. But that would be a mistake. Gallerist Andrew Lyles and photographer Ah-ram Park have selected 10 photographs by six local and regional artists, and their straightforward installation allows each work to make a separate case for itself. Every image here — portrait, still life, landscape and interior — holds your gaze and stands up to scrutiny. “I simply saw a group of photographers taking really honest photographs from all walks of life,” Park says when I ask him how he and Lyles organized Overlook. The photographers (all of them men) vary in their interests, ages and levels of experience. What their works here share is that honesty, a quality essential to print photography’s enduring appeal in a digital-image-saturated age. These images each capture a scene or a moment as it occurred, as the photographer understood it, then hold it for intense observation. They aren’t Instagrams, meant to be glanced at more than examined. With his two photographs of Missouri River scenes, Kevin Sisemore suggests a modern-day version of George Caleb Bingham, an artist whose paintings of life along the Missouri River during the mid-1800s earned him a place in American art history. Sisemore’s “River Front Park” captures a folksy scene of a man and a woman sitting on a fallen tree’s trunk on a riverbank, fishing. But the image has environmentalist undertones — trash litters the ground near the fishers’ perch. There’s a similar note in

lighter than the surrounding greenery. The eerie radiance (achieved with mirrors?) is a memorable effect. Michael Boles’ “Spider Plant,” an image of a potted houseplant balanced on a slanted windowsill with the Stuart Hall Building visible through a grimy window in the background, is too plain. More arresting is his “Target,” a photograph his “Summer Flood,” in which a rising river of a gun-range outline of a human form, riddled with bullet holes and hung on a wall surrounds the trunks of two trees just on the painted solid gray. What appears to be a wrong side of the water’s edge. cone-shaped floor lamp casts an ominous Philip Heying also turns his attention shadow. to changing waterlines in “Sunbathers Barrett Emke’s color-saturated portraits, Beside Hetchy Hetchy Reservoir During a Drought.” In this black-and-white photo, “Shannon” and “Michael,” take us to some kind of party: Royals paraphernalia hangs two nude women lie on an incline of sandy earth angling down toward a reservoir that in the background of the shots, and woodsupplies drinking water to San Francisco. paneled walls and shiny red streamers The women’s bodies blend into their sur- are also visible. The visual noise extends to the subjects’ elaborate roundings as the cur vattire. The young man in ing lines of the dirt that Overlook: “Michael” is dressed in a mark the receding water A Group Photography velvet blazer, white face draw your eyes from the Exhibition pa i nt a nd a t u rquoi s e uprooted tree trunks and Through November 18 cross on a chain around rocks farther back into the at Spray Booth Gallery, his neck, and the woman in scene. 130 West 18th Street, “Shannon” is decked out Joe Johnson contribsprayboothgallery.com in th ick black eyeliner utes a landscape of sorts: and leopard-print hoop a photograph of a phoearrings. Both wear serene expressions, at tograph of a landscape (New Zealand’s home with — or unaware of — their surroundLake Pukaki), projected on a screen in a ings. Lyles and Park have hung the portraits casino in Reno, Nevada. In stark contrast to the greenery of Sisemore’s photos, John- across from each other, a tease that forces son’s photo fits a simulated landscape inside you to wonder how they would appear side by side but allows “Michael” and “Shannon” something gaudy, man-made, mechanical. to avoid each other’s gazes indefi nitely as This is Overlook edging toward the surreal. they avert their eyes from the picture plane. Misha Kligman, known primarily as a Overlook is as humble as exhibitions get painter, contributes two photos that also toy these days. It features no apps, has no accomwith perception. Their titles — “Reflection/ Projection (I)” and “Reflection/Projection panying text, and comes down in another week without fanfare. But it’s also smartly (II)” — are coolly scientific, but the images’ put together, and a neat reminder of a galethereal illumination and sylvan environs lery’s first mission: Give a viewer good works call to mind fairy tales. In one, a thin silver to look at. line bisects the composition, which is otherwise fi lled with dense brush and trees. In the other, a square area in the center appears E-mail feedback@pitch.com

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THE PITCH

NOVEMBER 15-21, 2012

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FILM

SPIRIT OF ’65

BY

S C O T T W IL S ON

Spielberg and Day-Lewis make a dream of Lincoln.

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INVITES YOU AND A GUEST TO SEE

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t’s a fact: A book about Abraham Lincoln is published every 15 minutes. In the nearly 150 years since he was assassinated, so much has been written about the 16th U.S. president that 27 such volumes are just about his hatbands. Yet there’s still appetite enough that Bill O’Reilly can slap his name on a $28 erratarama about the Great Emancipator’s slaying and score a best-seller. Meanwhile, every 45 minutes or so, someone tells a lie about Steven Spielberg. It’s de rigueur now to disparage or dismiss history’s most successful movie director — he’s too sentimental, too manipulative, too predictable. These protests usually take the form of defensive denial: “Hey, man, I don’t even remember the third time I saw Jurassic Park.” But film is a happily manipulative medium as well as a purely voluntary experience. We strap ourselves into the harness of suspended disbelief, and we complain equally when it sags and dips our knees in the dirt (too real!) and when it launches us too high (fake!). Either way, can we really be made to feel anything that isn’t somewhere waiting to be triggered? Maybe we want to — and maybe that’s why people still line up to see Spielberg’s movies. Besides, movies don’t arrive much more blue-chip than his new Lincoln. It stars Daniel Day-Lewis, widely regarded as the best actor working in film. It’s heavily based on historian Doris Kearns Goodwin’s 2005 juggernaut, Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln, with a script by the justly lauded playwright Tony Kushner. Throw all their trophies in a buggy, and the horse might have to think it over — and that’s before you toss in Tommy Lee Jones’ and Sally Field’s Oscars and Joseph Gordon-Levitt’s Teen Choice awards. The weight of all that pedigree sounds oppressive, but Lincoln is not a fussy epic. It’s swift (a modest two and a half hours), vivid and witty. By Spielberg standards, it’s both homespun and talky. (In the early going, its ricocheting dialogue and glimmers of idealism feel like something rifled from Aaron Sorkin’s middle West Wing drawer.) It is also, by some distance, the best-acted of Spielberg’s movies. There’s no verb left for what Day-Lewis does onscreen, and that’s been true for a while. But whatever studied calculations led him to his Lincoln, with this pained carriage and this cracker-barrel voice and these bottomless silences, the result is seamless and organic — not a performance or even another of his extreme inhabitations but a possession. Spielberg’s deepest art here is in the way he understands what his star is doing: playing a ghost. His and Day-Lewis’ Lincoln is our collective dream of someone unknowable, an ethereal character who over and over materializes unexpectedly to tell some small but important story and disappear again into the dark. (Several of these short duets occur when Lincoln wakes someone.)

Day-Lewis looks at history. After a battlefield prologue and a kind of post-prologue that introduces the president in 1865, Lincoln comes to us in a dream — one of his own. Director of photography Janusz Kaminski, after two scenes shot in virtual darkness, bathes Day-Lewis in distorted, bent-sepia light to indicate the migraine vision rushing past. With that, Kaminski and Spielberg (borrowing from their Saving Private Ryan palette of lead and mud) turn up their lamplight just enough to suggest a constant shroud. We won’t really see daylight until the republic is restored, until Lincoln leaves us. While he remains, he must pass the 13th Amendment. Not much of a cliffhanger, but that’s where the rest of the cast comes in. As each player is introduced, Kushner asks us to keep a mental tally of votes for and against the amendment, tracking loyalties as they shift. Cadging those votes for the White House are a trio of historical composites played by James Spader, Tim Blake Nelson and John Hawkes, whose progress we monitor by listening for the corn-pone theme that John Williams has given them, a recurring Hee Haw cue interrupting an otherwise low, stately score. All you really have to do, though, is watch Jones, who plays abolitionist Thaddeus Stevens with a merkin on his head and an authentic political weariness everywhere else. He, David Strathairn and Sally Field (as, who else, the damaged Mary Todd Lincoln) match DayLewis, coaxing notes from him that few others have. Stevens’ turn alone with that apparitional Lincoln is as good as this kind of scene gets. Concentrating on the last four months of Lincoln’s life keeps the drama tight and sharp, but it lets Spielberg achieve something else, too. If last year’s War Horse was his unabashed ode to Technicolor John Ford, then his shadowy Lincoln answers Ford’s deeply moral blackand-white classic Young Mr. Lincoln, from 1939. What David Thomson, writing about Saving Private Ryan, has called “the tremor of decency” runs through both directors’ works. In Day-Lewis, it finds a once-in-a-career anchor.

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20

THE PITCH

NOVEMBER 15-21, 2012

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BY

CHARLES FERRUZ Z A

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rooklyn is roughly 1,100 miles from Kansas City, but there’s a shortcut: Giuliano Monetti Jr.’s restaurant, in Lee’s Summit. His year-old Monetti’s Taste of Italy feels like a tribute to the Bensonhurst neighborhood where he grew up. He might have called the place Monetti’s Taste of Brooklyn. Monetti has an accent thicker than a slab of the lasagna here (his mother’s recipe, like many of the dishes served in this storefront dining room). When he isn’t cooking in the kitchen, he’s roaming the dining room. He chats with his patrons and sometimes spontaneously bursts into song. (His tenor is surprisingly melodic.) His wife, Barbara, sings, too. Last Wednesday, the pair hired a local quintet called the Five Goombas to entertain customers. Only three of them showed up (“The other two don’t do E MOR every performance during the week,” Monetti explained), but they T A E IN ONL .COM brought along a karaoke PITCH machine so that when they took a break from belting out Garlic knots: worth spoiling dinner for. Frank Sinatra and Dean Martin, Barbara could churches, good neighborhoods, nice people,” do a Patsy Cline number. he tells me. “They needed a family-operated “She’s half Italian, half German,” Monetti restaurant that serves good food.” told a diner who asked him whether Cline was And lots of it. I don’t generally like to take Italian, “Barbara, that is — not Patsy.” leftovers home, but I never left Monetti’s withMonetti wasn’t cooking that night, and his out a Styrofoam box or two tucked under my hands and arms were splattered with paint arm. They say that overly generous restauand caked with drywall dust. He has been rant portions are a Midwestern tradition, but doing construction work every day next door, Monetti insists that it’s another thing we have as he did while preparing for the opening in common with Brooklyn. “No one’s gonna of Taste of Italy. “This place was an Indian leave my place hungry,” he says. restaurant before we took it over,” he says. At Monetti’s, no one even gets to the dinner “There wasn’t anything here. I built almost course hungry. His appetizers are oversized everything.” If everything goes according to — a bowl of crispy, slightly salty calamari plan, he’ll open a lounge and banquet hall in fritti could have fed all five of the Goombas the neighboring space December 1. had they shown up. And though the puff y, “It’s gonna be beautiful,” he says of the house-made focaccia is satisfying, Monetti addition, which will double the size of the also offers his yeasty garlic knots (baked existing restaurant. “We’ll start serving a Sunpizza-dough balls dripping day brunch unlike anything with garlic butter and herbs) that’s out here: a carving staMonetti’s Taste that are too tempting to pass tion, Italian and American of Italy up. They’re delicious, but a dishes, $3 bottomless mimoCalamari fritti.......................$9 lot of starch. I was ready to sas. Wait until you see it.” Meat lasagna .......................$13 pass out before the spaghetti Monetti opened his first Chicken fontina...................$14 Three-cheese baked ziti....$12 and meatballs arrived. restaurant, a Warrensburg Veal piccata .........................$17 Another night, I stayed pizzeria, back in 2004. (He Tiramisu ................................ $5 disciplined (just one knot) built the stone facing for this and waited for the newest newer restaurant’s woodpasta on the menu here: a fired pizza oven himself.) bowl of fettuccine tucked under a thick blanBut the former United Airways mechanic ket of cream sauce blended with rich fontina wanted a bigger canvas for his culinary talcheese. Bits of tomato and asparagus peeked ents — he makes most of the dishes here, infrom the pasta, which hid cardboard-thin cluding a savory, heavily herbed vinaigrette slices of grilled chicken sliced off the stringidressing, from scratch. He decided that Lee’s est fowl in the barnyard. Summit was the place. The four-layer lasagna made up for that I can’t imagine a community less like misfire, though. Despite his Sicilian heritage, Brooklyn than Lee’s Summit, but Monetti Monetti brews a sugo that steers clear of the sees the similarities. “Lots of families, lots of

sugary marinara beloved by Old World aunts (including my own). The sauce is robust and distinctly savory. And I give Monetti points for using real clams — steamed littlenecks on the half shell — in his spaghetti and clam sauce. If you don’t count the bocce-ball-sized meatballs, there’s not much in the way of beef on this menu — no steaks, no beef tips in marsala wine sauce. He does offer three fi ne veal dishes, with the caveat that Midwestern veal isn’t as tender as the kind he used to get in Brooklyn. Maybe so, but his veal piccata, swathed in a silky lemon-caper sauce, is as fi ne a dish as you’ll fi nd in this part of the metro. Veal gives some diners pause nowadays, but Monetti shrugs. “My customers want it, so we serve it,” he says. For the PETA crowd, there’s always the eggplant parmesan. Besides, Monetti isn’t immune to progressivism. He offers gluten-free pasta upon request, and there are six meatless pasta dishes here — a good proportion of this relatively small menu. The dessert list offers just a few dishes, of which my favorite is a very light but creamy and potently rum-flavored tiramisu. (Monetti is tinkering with a special version: “I made a pumpkin-spice tiramisu. It’s incredible. You’ll have to call me to find out if we’re serving it.”) Rum cake and a chocolate mousse are choices, too, but I’ll take the spumoni. Many local restaurants have given up on that dessert, once a staple on every Italian-American dolce menu, but Monetti is stubbornly old-school. This isn’t suburbia, after all — it’s Brooklyn.

Have a suggestion for a restaurant The Pitch should review? E-mail charles.ferruzza@pitch.com

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THE PITCH

NOVEMBER 15-21, 2012

www.uptownartsbar.com pitch.com

D

erek Kean and Matthew Berkland were hungry. With a few spare hours to fill after a tech conference in San Francisco, the pair set out to explore one of the nation’s leading food-truck scenes. The only problem was that they couldn’t find any trucks. “We weren’t from there. We didn’t know where we were going,” Kean says. “And we found that apps weren’t very reliable. They said the trucks were in one place, but they weren’t there. Walking around and reading 3,000 tweets and trying not to get lost is harder than it sounds. Eventually, we just gave up.” But they didn’t stop wondering how many other eaters out there were being foiled on city streets every day, just waiting for an app that could direct them. The solution came while the two were volunteering at Startup Weekend Kansas City in April. (The next startup weekend kicks off Friday, November 16.) While developing a mapping program for another startup hopeful, they realized that a location-based app could help eaters pinpoint food trucks (and assist chefs who may not have learned to tweet and drive). Truckily was born that weekend. The seven-month old company provides marketing and business services to food trucks and a location-based application for eaters. With Kansas City enjoying a food-truck boom and a technology boom, Truckily looks set to emerge as the bridge between the two economic drivers. “There have been attempts to combine the food-truck and technology worlds,” Kean says. “But a lot of times it’s been one-sided. It’s either tech guys trying to produce a truck site or truck guys trying to make something technological. We built it with some of the trucks from Kansas City right from the get-go.” So while they sampled meatballs in the Crossroads and tacos downtown, they asked food-truck proprietors to sample their software. “It was a bit like asking your parents and grandparents to design an iPhone app,” Kean says. “But what we realized was that everything needed to be the push of a button, rather than something that had to be typed.” Truckily geared up over the summer, after the company was accepted into the ARK, a mentoring program and technology-business accelerator in Fayetteville, Arkansas. The business incubator provided Truckily $18,000 in funding in exchange for a small equity stake in the company. In August, Kean, 27, left his job in digital marketing at Barkley, and Berkland, 29, left his position as a lead software architect with Centralized Showing Service Inc. They’ve spent the past three months developing the app, with ongoing input from such local food trucks as Indios Carbonsitos and the Magical Meatball Tour. Their model calls for trucks to pay a monthly subscription fee; eaters use Truckily for free. In addition to learning a truck’s loca-

Your modern hunter-gatherer tool. tion (organized according to a potential diner’s geographic proximity and food preferences), users also see descriptions, photos, menus, payment options, and a truck’s friendliness toward dietary restrictions. Last Thursday, the duo presented a working demo to potential investors and ARK program organizers. A beta launch in Kansas City is slated for the coming month. (Get it at signup@ truckily.com.) “People in Kansas City will get to see it before any city,” Kean says. “We hope to have all of the food trucks in Kansas City signed up by the end of the beta period. But in order for this to make sense financially, we have to take it national.” That rollout is tentatively planned for January or February. “The good thing about food trucks is that it’s a testing platform,” Kean says. “Chefs can work out dishes or restaurant concepts. With Truckily, we’re just doing the same thing.”

E-mail jonathan.bender@pitch.com

FI N DI NG TRUCKS R I G H T N OW If you need help finding mobile food before Truckily’s launch, blogger David LaCrone (of Kansas City Lunch Spots) has put together a fairly comprehensive collection of Twitter feeds from local food trucks. You can follow him on Twitter (@davelacrone) or see the feed online (kclunchspots.com/food-truck-feed/). Meanwhile, now that Kean and Berkland have eaten their way through Kansas City’s food-truck scene, they’re ready to reveal a current favorite. Both men are partial to the paella at El Tenedor. “The Fork,” as the truck is known (facebook .com/ElTenedorKC), is run by Carmen Cabia, familiar to many from her days in the kitchen at Lil’s on 17th. It was there that she perfected the recipe that she now dishes out from her silver trailer.


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NOVEMBER 15-21, 2012

THE PITCH

23


MUSIC

ROAD-TESTED

Ha Ha Tonka roots down in

BY

KC after a European jaunt.

D AV ID HUDN A L L

F

resh off their first European tour, localish roots-rockers Ha Ha Tonka set up at RecordBar for a homecoming show the night before Thanksgiving. The Pitch recently engaged in a trans-Atlantic correspondence with drummer Lennon Bone in anticipation of the gig. The Pitch: It seems like rootsy Americana bands from the United States go over really well in Europe. Are you finding that to be true? Lennon Bone: I think so. It seems that Europeans are just really into music, so I’m not sure it matters if it’s Americana. All I’ve really seen is that people over here are much more open to checking new bands out on a whim, something we don’t seem to have the luxury of in America.  Have you guys toured Europe before? What do your audiences look like over there? We’ve never been to Europe before this tour unless it’s for vacation or something. I’ve never been at all until now. The crowds have all been so welcoming. There have, of course, been some sporadic smaller audiences, but E R O M nothing less than 30 people. I think our biggest T crowd was close to 150 A INE ONL .COM with quite a few gigs just H C PIT under that. To give you an example of how people just come out because they want to try something new, we played a café at 4 p.m. on a Sunday and over 50 people came. We do pretty well in certain markets of the States, and we’d probably never get that kind of crowd out at that time. It’s also different in that, minus a few shows, we’ve been the only band on the bill. There’s not a lot of supporting artists over here in smaller venues. How do you think people in Europe even find out about Ha Ha Tonka?  Promoters over here seem to take great care of bands and actually promote the hell out of the shows. In Madrid, for instance, so many people came up to me and said they either read about it in a local publication or got a flier at another show or something. It’s not that the promotion seems any different physically from the States; it just seems that there’s more care put into it, more work done, if that makes any sense. And people seem to respond to that. We’ve had some people that stumbled across something online, and some that have been fans for a few years even. One gal in Germany drove 300 kilometers to see the gig. That’s a pretty trippy thing when you’re thousands of miles away from home in a town you’ve never been. Any good road stories? There have been so many amazing experiences, honestly. One of my favorites was here in Ireland a couple of days ago. We stopped at this lighthouse in Hook Head. It’s the oldest working lighthouse in the world. Brian was signing the guest book, and they asked where we were from and why we were there. When

M US I C

24

THE PITCH

Now that Mumford & Sons is, like, the biggest he told them, they immediately looked up one band in the world, are you getting compared of our music videos on YouTube and played with them a lot? And how annoying is that? it over the television. I have a picture of the Also, I would imagine it’s probably pretty good whole room crowded around and watching. They seemed to dig it and gave us a private for business, right? You know, over here, I only heard the Mumtour of the lighthouse, made us all cappucford reference a couple of times. We seemed cino for the road. It’s just remarkable how to get more Fleet Foxes comparisons, which is sweet and appreciative people seem to be for us trying to bring our music over here. awesome. People obviously talk about Mumford, though. The States seem to hold them at a Ireland and Spain especially. We’ve also been higher standard than what I’ve discussed with lucky to play some really historic venues over people over here. Here it feels more like a lohere. Last night’s pub has an annual gig for Hendrix’s bass player, who played his last cal band got huge, and they’re super-proud of them. Plus, I think when you see our live show gig ever there. People like McCartney and Neil Young have also graced that tiny stage. as your first taste of us, you don’t necessarily get the same vibe as Mumford. I feel like we’re Crazy to think about. more rock and roll. Maybe Who of the four of you is I’m wrong. We have songs the least suited for life abroad? Ha Ha Tonka, that could couple well with I’d say we’ve all adapted with Not a Planet their style, but hopefully it pretty well on all counts, Wednesday, November 21, expands to something that’s minus the higher alcohol at RecordBar still just us as well. As far as content in the beers. Espebeing good for business, I cially in Belgium. That ain’t guess it’s good. But we’re not the Lumineers no PBR they’re giving bands over there. Only or something, who I think hug the Mumford the best and as many as you want. That’ll corner a bit closer and also have a huge hit. A sneak up on you quicklike. huge hit would be better for business. Haha.  Were people over there talking a lot about Do you ever want to punk on Mumford & the election? Everybody is. It seemed so weighed for Sons because they’re from fancy London and you guys are from real-deal Ozark country? Obama as well. Everybody wanted him to Ha! Well, let’s get them to take us on the win, and they were talking about how the reroad first, then we’ll see what kind of punking sults would affect them as well. Ireland has an we can come up with.  open gambling law. I guess it was 8-to-1 odds What’s the plan for this Thanksgiving show that Obama would win. The country stood to and beyond? lose so much money that they paid out early.

NOVEMBER 15-21, 2012

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Missouri minstrels: Ha Ha Tonka We, of course, have our big Thanksgiving shows in Kansas City, St. Louis and Chicago. We will do one brand-new tune that we’ve been road-testing for a bit. We’re trying to work up a couple of tunes off of Death of a Decade that we don’t usually play live as well. I think the show is going to be a blast. We’re trying to make these Midwest Thanksgiving gigs an annual thing, and this will be the second-annual. Then we’re going to hibernate for a while and try to work on a new record. Are you all going to Springfield after the holidays or staying here, or what? Nobody lives in Springfield anymore. I’d say KC is more home base now. Brett and I both live here, and we write and rehearse at my house. Brian is in Santa Barbara, California, the little bit that we’re home, and Luke bounces between a few places during the off time. We’ll have a big dinner with close friends at my place to celebrate the holiday.

E-mail david.hudnall@pitch.com

WRITE FOR THE PITCH Do you go to a lot of concerts? Do you have opinions about local bands? Do you write? The Pitch is looking for freelancers for its music section and music blog. Holler at us for details: david.hudnall@pitch.com. M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X

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1


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NOVEMBER 15-21, 2012

THE PITCH

25


MUSIC | STREETSIDE

WHERE THE BEST MUSICIANS IN THE WORLD PLAY

KNUCKLEHEADS

RED ZONE

F re e S h u tt le in S u rr o u n d in g A reth e a

NOVEMBER

presents

13: The Red Elvises 15: SIMO (Think Cream at the Filmore) 15: Davina and The Vagabonds 16: The Greencards NOV 17: RADNEY FOSTER Unplugged & Lonesome

presents A Living Room Session only 60 tickets will be sold

NOV 17: SONNY LANDRETH WITH LEVEE TOWN

best slide guitarist on the planet

TICKETS N OW ON SALE!

17: Maria the Mexican with special guest Patrice Pike 20: Rick Estrin & The Nightcats 21: Trampled Under Foot @8pm 23: Mark Chesnutt with The Belairs 24: The Belairs

For more info & tickets: knuckleheadskc.com 2715 Rochester, KCMO

816-483-1456

26

THE PITCH

An Election Night party with our local Republicans

BY

D AV ID HUDN A L L

I

was in New York City the night Barack Obama was elected president in 2008. It seems impossible that I would experience a bigger party in my lifetime — hundreds of thousands of people in the streets, cheering, chanting, dancing, crying, hugging, smiling. I must have given out a thousand high-fives. When Obama was re-elected president this November, I was hanging out with Republicans in a banquet hall at the Marriott Courtyard in Briarcliff Village, in North Kansas City. The mood was — how should I describe it? — less joyous. I had planned to only stop by the party (which was being thrown for Rep. Sam Graves, a Republican congressman from Missouri) on my way to some Democratic shindigs. I figured I’d roll in, ask some folks why they hate poor people so much, tip back a domestic beer or two, and be on my liberal way. But within about 20 minutes of arriving, I knew I wouldn’t be leaving until the networks called it for Obama. Watching the returns with a bunch of like-minded friends suddenly sounded boring. I wanted to see the looks on these people’s faces. The party was not a closed event, but RSVPs were required, and I didn’t send mine until about 7 p.m. Sneaking into hotel event spaces is really easy, though. The restrooms are usually out in the public area, so people are constantly coming and going. I skipped the check-in line and walked with purpose past a security guard, right into the party. Full success. You guys: It’s all about confidence. A bluegrass band called the Souvenirs, or possibly the Souvineers (I’ve been unable to confirm their existence on the Internet), was performing at an unobtrusive volume on a small stage against a wall near the entrance. In one corner of the room, a man from Weston Tobacco was seated and cutting cigars at a folding table. Large TVs occupied the other three corners of the room — two set to Fox News, one set to KMBC Channel 9 for local election coverage. There was an open bar (free wine and beer; $9 for a cocktail) and a nice buffet spread, with roast-beef sandwiches and a mashed-potato bar. “Have you ever worked a Democratic event?” I asked one of the caterers. “Who pays more?” She hadn’t worked a Democratic event before. “What’s up with those little fudge things that were out here earlier?” I said. “With the nuts. Those all gone or do you guys have a second tray coming out later?” A larger stage had been assembled at the head of the room. Every 45 minutes or so, the party’s host, Platte County Presiding Commissioner Jason Brown, would take the mic and deliver updates and welcomes. Around 9 p.m., he invited Graves (whose “war room” was apparently somewhere in the hotel) onstage. Graves was wearing one of those V-neck pullover windbreakers that dads wear on the golf course.

NOVEMBER 15-21, 2012

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“It’s a good night for Republicans in northwest Missouri, but it’s not so good everywhere else,” he said. Then he said something about Obama’s runaway spending and shook his head in disapproval. He looked oddly resigned for a guy who would go on to win his race with 65 percent of the vote. Possibly he had seen early polling from the Missouri Senate race and was re-evaluating his decision to come out in favor of Todd Akin post“legitimate rape.” That’s pure speculation on my part. The party was robust — perhaps 250 people at its height — and split about 50–50 between white people and minorities. Just kidding! It was all white people! Actually, to be fair, I did see one black person, a young woman in her early 20s. “Are you, like, in the Young Republicans Club?” I asked. “Sort of,” she said. “I was. I’m out of school now, though.” Akin was on the TV in front of us delivering his concession speech. I took in his comb-over one last time. “What do you think about Akin?” I asked. “You think he got a bad rap?” She scrunched her nose. “I’m not really into him as much,” she said. “How come? You mean just because he doesn’t believe in rape?” I pretended to be confused, but she picked up on my irony and laughed. “It sucks because I think Missouri could have really gone red if he hadn’t screwed everything up,” she said. “A real shame,” I said. I spent most of my three hours (three hours!) there participating in some variation of this: shuffling back and forth between the TVs, sidling up to people, making chitchat, and trying to elicit from them outrageous

Graves: too legitimate to quit. conservative opinions that I could then ridicule in this column. I wanted some latent racism. I wanted to hear the word communist. I wanted to meet some fucking birthers! But the crowd was genera lly wellbehaved. The best I got was an old man in a black jacket and a black cowboy hat who hopped up out of his chair and grumbled, “I can’t watch this shit anymore,” after they called Pennsylvania for Obama. Mostly what I heard from people was that they were “scared” of what Obama would do to this country with another four years. But when I asked follow-up questions, I could never puzzle out exactly what it was they were afraid of. “I don’t think my heart can handle watching this anymore,” a friendly 50-ish woman told me after Wisconsin went blue. She drifted aimlessly into the crowd. There was real sorrow in her eyes, and I felt bad for her. I could relate, sort of: I remember the utter despair I felt on Election Night in 2004. I wanted to hug her and whisper in her ear, Unless you are a millionaire, you will probably be better off under Obama. Instead, I pulled up a chair and soaked up the schadenfreude of watching Fox News call an election for Barack Hussein Obama. As a bonus, I witnessed the live, nationaltelevision meltdown of Karl Rove, a truly evil motherfucker. When I could no longer bear to look at Rove’s huge, wet, larded face, I turned and saw most of the partygoers quietly filing out. Back in my car, alone, I allowed myself the smile I’d suppressed all night, and I let out a deep sigh of relief. Then I headed out in search of some people to high-five.

E-mail david.hudnall@pitch.com pitch.com

MONTH


EARTH FIRST!

WED. NOV. 14

kcmo

7PM BOB WALKENHORST & FRIENDS 10PM MV&EE/HARMED BROTHERS/ LOADED GOAT/TOMVANDENAVOND THURS. NOV.15

7PM TRIVIA CLASH 10PM TWILIGHT SAD/ERRORS/LA GUERRE FRI. NOV. 16

7PM DRUNKARD’S DREAM 10PM NEW RIDDIM/FIREDOG SAT. NOV. 17

2PM JAYKCO GUITAR GEAR SWAP 10PM BLUE RIDDIM BAND/ BLACK CRACK REVIEW SUN. NOV. 18

JEFF HARSHBARGER PRESENTS AN ALTERNATIVE JAZZ SERIES MON. NOV. 19

7PM SONIC SPECTRUM MUSIC TRIVIA 10PM EARTH/EAGLE TWIN/STEBMO TUES. NOV. 20 DAYTIME PARTY/LIONHORSE WED. NOV. 21 7PM BOB WALKENHORST & FRIENDS 10PM HAHA TONKA/NOT A PLANET THANKSGIVING OPEN AT 9PM SUNDIVER/ CLAIRAUDIENTS/RADIO HIGH see www.therecordbar.com for our weekly events

1020 westport rd. kcmo 64111*816-753-5207

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NOVEMBER 15-21, 2012

THE PITCH

27


MUSIC

RADAR

M U S I C F O R E CAST

BY

Other shows worth seeing this week.

D AV ID HUDN A L L

T H U R S D AY, N O V E M B E R 15 Dropkick Murphys: Uptown Theater, 3700 Broadway, 816-753-8665. Asher Roth, Kids These Days, Chuck Inglish, Chase Compton, and more: 7 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. State Radio, Sarah Jaffe: The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483. Unwritten Law, Versus the World, Donner Diaries: The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. The Wallflowers, My Jerusalem: The Midland, 1228 Main, 816-283-9900.

F R I D AY, N O V E M B E R 16 Close to Home, the Atlantic, Sovereign States, Conflicts, the Runaway Sons, Shed the Dreamer: 6:30 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. RNDM, Gull: The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483.

S AT U R D AY, N O V E M B E R 17

Supersuckers, with Cherokee Rock Rifle and Radkey

An anomaly on the late 1990s Sub Pop gravy train, Supersuckers was cheekier and rowdier than its more artfully conscious labelmates. Grunge, punk, classic rock and, later, country, all filtered into the band’s sound, but only to serve the group’s primary intent: rocking with its collective cock out. Local openers Cherokee Rock Rifle and Radkey make a nice fit along these lines. Friday, November 16, at the Riot Room (4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179)

The Empty Spaces, with Fullbloods

I wrote about Ross Brown’s solo project, Small Victories, a few weeks back. It’s a fine local pop album, and I recommend checking it out. Brown is an active musician around town, and this pre-Thanksgiving bill is a sort of Brown special, which sounds a bit gross now that I’m typing it but should actually be cool. Come hear the man play guitar and sing with Fullbloods, a twangy indie-rock outfit, and drum with the Empty Spaces, a sparser, brattier surf-rock act. Wednesday, November 21, at the Brick (1727 McGee, 816-421-1634)

Titus Andronicus

Not since the Replacements has a band hit on the powerful nexus of punk and rock as convincingly as Titus Andronicus. A bold person might also suggest that these Jersey dudes are improving on the model. The ’Mats were content to play the role of lovable losers. But Titus Andronicus is swinging for the fences in earnest, with glorious reckless energy. Its latest, Local Business, is a restrained effort compared with The Monitor, the group’s bombastic, bagpipe-and-saxophone-filled, Civil War–themed 2010 album. But it’s still chockablock with contagious, fist-pumping punk shout-alongs, and the live show is a reliably fun, sweaty affair. Tuesday, November 20, at the Jackpot (943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-832-1085)

Bruce Springsteen

Bruce Springsteen is probably my favorite rock star of all time, and a big part of the reason is that when he fails, he fails spectacularly. Take Wrecking Ball, his latest, pretty terrible album. I don’t want to beat up on this thing too bad, but let’s just say it contains rapping, jaw-dropping moments of unironic self-parody, and a verse in which he rhymes “cat” with “hat.” It is essentially a dare to his fans: You were having a hard time defending me to your friends who think I’m insane and ridiculous before? Well, how about

F O R E C A S T

28

Clockwise, from left: The Boss, Titus Andronicus and the Twilight Sad now? I’ll accept that dare: “Land of Hope and Dreams,” which appeared on his 2001 live album and reappears on Wrecking Ball as a studio cut, is an epic, inspiring, amazing song, one of his best. And it goes without saying that he is going to burn the goddamn Sprint Center to the ground Saturday, because he’s fucking Bruce Springsteen, and that’s how he rolls. Saturday, November 17, at Sprint Center (1407 Grand, 816-949-7000)

Shoegaze? Post-punk? Mopey-ass new wave? It has never been entirely clear to me what sound the Twilight Sad is going for because I am too distracted by singer James Graham’s super-thick Scottish accent. All I picture is Groundskeeper Willie sulking in some dark janitor’s closet. But if you have a Joy Division type of soul, I’d say this is one of the better bands going right now. Its most recent, No One Can Ever Know, is possibly even bleaker than its title indicates. Thursday, November 15, at RecordBar (1020 Westport Road, 816-753-5207)

M O N D AY, N O V E M B E R 19

The Meditations, Soul Rebel and the Beast, DJ Stiga, DJ Jabberock: The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390.

W E D N E S D AY, N O V E M B E R 21 Ha Ha Tonka, Not a Planet: 9 p.m. RecordBar, 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Ashley Ray and Logan Mize: The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390.

FUTURECAST NOVEMBER FRIDAY 23 Mark Chesnutt, the Bel Airs: Knuckleheads Saloon MONDAY 26 Paul Banks, Conner: The Granada, Lawrence THURSDAY 29 Tyler Ward: The Granada, Lawrence

K E Y ...............................................................Scottish

............................................. Literary Punk Rock

.......................................................... Party Rock

...............................Seasonal Affective Disorder

.............................................................. Bombast

..........................................................Devil Horns

....................................................... Garden State

.................................................. Locally Sourced

..............................................................Brooding

.......................................................RIP, Clarence

pitch.com

Matisyahu: Uptown Theater, 3700 Broadway, 816-753-8665. Mod Sun, Pat Brown, Gee Watts, Rich Brown, Jet Moran: The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390.

T U E S D AY, N O V E M B E R 2 0

The Twilight Sad

......................................................Holiday Cheer

NOVEMBER 15-21, 2012

S U N D AY, N O V E M B E R 18

The Australian Pink Floyd: Uptown Theater, 3700 Broadway, 816-753-8665.

..................................................Pick of the Week

THE PITCH

Radney Foster: 8 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Sonny Landreth, Levee Town: 8:30 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Lecrae, Trip Lee, Tedashii, Pro, KB, Andy Mineo: Memorial Hall, 600 N. Seventh St., Kansas City, Kan., 913-371-7555. Metalocalypse: Dethklok, with All That Remains, Machine Head, the Black Dahlia Murder: The Midland, 1228 Main, 816-283-9900. Play On! Bach Aria Soloists and Heart of America Shakespeare Festival: 7:30 p.m. Kansas City Central Library, 14 W. 10th St., 816-701-3400. Randy Rogers Band, Jesse Harris and Jeff Perkins: 8:30 p.m. The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390.

pitch.com

DECEMBER SATURDAY 1 Chris Isaak: Uptown Theater Killswitch Engage, Shadows Fall, Acaro: The Beaumont Club

M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X

THE PITCH

1


THREADZ BY HEADZ FOR THE HEADS CLOTHING - JEWELRY ACCESSORIES - ART

OFFICIAL CROSSROADS TICKET OUTLET

1607 Westport Rd. KCMO 816-442-8400

Mon - Thurs 12-9pm • Fri - Sat 12-10pm • Sun 12-6pm

SaTurDay NighT  ViBraTioNS  hoSTeD By 95.7  The ViBe

Mon - Thurs 12-9pm • Fri - Sat 12-10pm • Sun 12-6pm

Saturday, November 17, 2012

LEVEE TOWN @KNUCKLEHEADS

17SATURDAY

ThuNDer From DowN uNDer

NOVEMBER

Saturday, November 24, 2012

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HEAR THEM BEFORE YOU SEE THEM

//FREE MUSIC PLAYER ON THE MUSIC HOME PAGE OF PITCH.COM

Big BaD VooDoo DaDDy Thursday, December 6, 2012

ZAPPA PLAYS ZAPPA Thursday, December 13, 2012

UPCOMING SHOWS: 11/16 11/21

11/30 12/14

Kilroy Presents: Best of Cover Wars Kilroy Presents: Club Wars Expo 1-800-745-3000

Blue Corner Battles Flirt Friday

  •  VooDooKC.com

Know When To Stop Before You Start.® Gambling Problem? Call 1-888-BETSOFF. Subject to change or cancellation. Phone and online orders are subject to service fees. Must be 21 years or older to gamble, obtain a Total Rewards ® card or enter VooDoo ®. ©2012, Caesars License Company, LLC.

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NOVEMBER 15-21, 2012

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29


NIGHTLIFE THE HOME FOR LIVE MUSIC NORTH OF THE RIVER!

WED 11/14 LADIES NIGHT - DJ DANCE PARTY 8PM THU 11/15 TBA FRI 11/16 GROOVE PILOTS 9PM SAT 11/17 UNLIMITED BLUES BAND 7PM & LONESOME JAKE 9PM SUN 11/18 OPEN JAM HOSTED BY K.C. KELSEY HILL 7PM MON 11/19 MONDAY NIGHT FOOTBALL 7PM TUE 11/20 ACOUSTIC JAM SONG WRITERS EXPO 7PM WED 11/21 THANKSGIVING EVE HOUSE PARTY W/ LEVEE TOWN 8PM THU 11/22 THANKSGIVING NIGHT TURKEY JAM 6PM FRI 11/23 TEQUILA SAT 11/24 TAKING ALL YOUR DANCE REQUEST DJ HOWEY 8PM SUN 11/25 OPEN JAM HOSTED BY THE PETE CARROLL BAND 7PM MON 11/26 MONDAY NIGHT FOOTBALL 7PM TUES 11/27 TELE-TUESDAY HOSTED BY OUTLAW JIM AND THE WHISKEY BENDERS 7PM

Send submissions to Clubs Editor Abbie Stutzer by e-mail (abbie.stutzer@pitch.com), fax (816-756-0502) or phone (816-218-6926). Continuing items must be resubmitted monthly.

T H U R S D AY 15 ROCK/POP/INDIE Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Sons of Great Dane, Middle Class Fashion, Bruiser Queen, 9 p.m. The Eighth Street Taproom: 801 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-6918. Up the Academy, Pagiins, 69 Noses. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Forrester. Mike Kelly’s Westsider: 1515 Westport Rd., 816-931-9417. Frankowski & Ripple Effect.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL

6948 N. OAK TRFY, GLADSTONE MO | 816.468.0550 FIND US ON FACEBOOK - THE HIDEOUT BAR AND GRILL

MON: RUR A FRI 11/16 L GRIT 6PM, KARA OKE 10PM MARK HEL SOUTHERLA SAT 11/17

EN ND CHRIS GILLET, SIMON , ASHLEY CMOMBS, KLAAS HBERZ, UBNE ILLE MIKAL SH R, SHAWN HANSERN, AP

IR WED 11/2 AUTOMATIC, LORO, GRANVILLE NA KAY 1 EMPTY SPACE FRI 11/23 RUN LITTLE RABS, FULL BLOODS, BIT JOHN VEL GHE SAT 11/24 BAND 13 & THE PRODIGAL SONS, THE CAVE S, TREE, K NIFE CRIM E

B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Samantha Fish. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Grand Marquis. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Jimmie Bratcher, 7 p.m.; Davina and the Vagabonds, 8 p.m.; J.D. Simo, 8 p.m. Trouser Mouse: 625 N.W. Mock Ave., Blue Springs, 816-2201222. Cadillac Flambe.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS Kanza Hall: 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park, 913-451-0444. Wade Bowen.

JAZZ The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. Matt Otto. Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Jerry Hahn and Roger Wilder. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Damon Parker. Take Five Coffee + Bar: 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park, 913948-5550. Kerry Strayer and the New KC Seven.

COMEDY Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. Tony Rock. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Greg Warren.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS

We Deliver!

FRANK JAMES

SALOON

Lunch Buffet, Salad Bar Daily Food & Drink Specials Bloody Mary Bar & Breakfast Pizza Buffet Sundays 11am - 2pm Karaoke Sundays 6-10 • Happy Hour 3-6

11/16 coyote bill boogie band CHECK FACEBOOK 11/21 outlaw jim FOR UPDATES & the whiskey benders

10919 NW 45 Hwy (3.5 mi west of I-29)

Parkville, MO 816-505-0800

J. Murphy’s Irish Pub and Grille: 22730 Midland Dr., Shawnee, 913-825-3880. Ladies’ night. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Trivia Clash, 7 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Replay Lounge Chili Cook-off, 10 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. MBird’s Artist Showcase, 7:30 p.m.; Uptown Heat, 10:30 p.m. The Well: 7421 Broadway, 816-361-1700. Thursday Night Football.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Jerry’s Bait Shop: 302 S.W. Main, Lee’s Summit, 816-525-1871. Jerry’s Jam Night, 9 p.m. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Justin Andrew Murray Open Jam, 8 p.m.

VA R I E T Y Fishtank Performance Studio: 1715 Wyandotte, 816-8097110. The French Cabaret: Love at the Louvre, 8 p.m.

F R I D AY 16

Happy Hour Specials til 6pm!

ROCK/POP/INDIE

Bar

“Where somebody might know your name”

Fri Nov 16 The Perils ft. Carly Steele Watch the Chiefs on our HUGE 10’ TV! Knockout Pool Tournament on Tuesdays [150% Payback, $10.00 Entry Fee] Karaoke Dance Party Saturday Night Shuffleboard! Daily Food Special [Sun & Wed Steak Night] CLOSED THANKSGIVING

MON-THU: 3:00PM - 1:30AM | FRI-SUN: 11:00AM - 1:30AM /garrettsbar 30

THE PITCH

6505 Nieman Rd in Shawnee 913.608.5995

The All-Star Rock Bar: 7210 N.E. 43rd St., 816-452-2660. Route 291. Clarette Club: 5400 Martway, Mission, 913-384-0986. Albert Flasher. Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Apollo Run, New Cassettes, 8:45 p.m. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 302 S.W. Main, Lee’s Summit, 816-525-1871. On the Fly. The Levee: 16 W. 43rd St., 816-561-2821. The Patrick Lentz Band.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Trampled Under Foot. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. The Scott Moyer Band, Two Headed Cow. Gusto Coffee Bistro: 3390 S.W. Fascination Dr., Lee’s Summit, 816-767-1100. Euphorics. The Hideout: 6948 N. Oak Tfwy., 816-468-0550. The Groove Pilots. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Valency.

NOVEMBER 15-21, 2012

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Mike Kelly’s Westsider: 1515 Westport Rd., 816-931-9417. River Cow Orchestra, Busted Saints.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS Bar West: 7174 Renner Rd., Shawnee, 913-248-9378. The Outlaw Junkies. Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. Brother Bagman, Stonebelly. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Tyrannosaurus Chicken. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. The Greencards, 8 p.m.

DJ The Eighth Street Taproom: 801 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-6918. Mingle with Team Bear Club. The Quaff: 1010 Broadway, 816-471-1918. DJ E. The Well: 7421 Broadway, 816-361-1700. DJ Ashton Martin.

ACOUSTIC Great Day Café: 7921 Santa Fe Dr., Overland Park, 913-6429090. Half-Price Buddha.

JAZZ The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. Mike Metheny, Stan Kessler, Hermon Mehari. The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Mark Southerland, Helen Gillet, Simon Berz, Chris Combs. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Lonnie McFadden, 4:30 p.m.; Dan Doran Band, 9 p.m.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS The Beaumont Club: 4050 Pennsylvania, 816-561-2560. Greek Gods and Goddesses Party, with DJ Q. The Blue Line: 529 Walnut, 816-472-7825. Red Friday. The Brooksider: 6330 Brookside Plz., 816-363-4070. Team trivia. Helen’s Just Another Dive: 2002 Armour Rd., North Kansas City, 816-471-4567. Trivia Riot with Roland, 7 p.m.

M E TA L / P U N K Aftershock Bar & Grill: 5240 Merriam Dr., Merriam, 913-3845646. Harvest the Flesh, Collapse, Hellbeast, the Lantern Hill Nightmare, and more. Gran-Daddy’s Barbeque: 1447 W. 23rd St., Lawrence, 785830-8665. Bread and Butter.

REGGAE RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. The New Riddim, Firedog, 9 p.m.

VA R I E T Y Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Raqs Broheme Bellydancers, 6 p.m.; Rags Boheme, a Kansas City Bellydance Soirée, bellydance dinner show, 6-9 p.m., $5 cover. VooDoo Lounge: Harrah’s Casino, 1 Riverboat Dr., North Kansas City, 816-472-7777. Best of Cover Wars.

The Hideout: 6948 N. Oak Tfwy., 816-468-0550. Lonesome Jake, Unlimited Blues Band, 7 p.m. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. The Brody Buster Band. The Levee: 16 W. 43rd St., 816-561-2821. Groove Agency. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Cold Sweat, 9 p.m. Trouser Mouse: 625 N.W. Mock Ave., Blue Springs, 816-2201222. Samantha Fish.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Granville Automatic. Kanza Hall: 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park, 913-451-0444. Jared Daniels Band.

DJ The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Goomba Rave, with Team Bear Club. The Eighth Street Taproom: 801 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-6918. Gold Label Soul with Hector the Selector. The Quaff: 1010 Broadway, 816-471-1918. DJ Chris.

JAZZ Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Angela Hagenbach Trio. Take Five Coffee + Bar: 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park, 913948-5550. Shay Estes, with Mark Lowrey. Tavern at Mission Farms: 10681 Mission, Leawood, 913-2136588. Candace Evans.

WORLD Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Maria the Mexican, Patrice Pike, 10:30 p.m.

COMEDY ComedyCity at Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-842-2744. ComedyCity After Dark, 10 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. Tony Rock, 7 & 10 p.m. Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. Dirty Dorothy, 10 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Greg Warren, 7:45 & 9:45 p.m.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Zach Meyers Benefit Poker Tournament, 2 p.m. Mosaic Lounge: 1331 Walnut, 816-679-0076. Mosaic Saturdays.

M E TA L / P U N K The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Hammerlord, the Runaway Sons, Expo ’70, Pizza Party Massacre.

REGGAE Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Ras Neville & the Kingstonians, 10 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Blue Riddim, Black Crack Review, 9 p.m.

S AT U R D AY 17

R O C K A B I L LY

ROCK/POP/INDIE

Aftershock Bar & Grill: 5240 Merriam Dr., Merriam, 913-3845646. Adam Lee and the Dead Horse Sound Company, Hot Knights with Hella Go-Go, Old Country Death Band, and more.

The All-Star Rock Bar: 7210 N.E. 43rd St., 816-452-2660. Local Stranger. Arts Asylum: 1000 E. Ninth St., 816-301-7444. California Voodoo, 9 p.m. Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. The Promise Makers, 7 p.m. E Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: R MO 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Son of Invention, Covered in Butter, Killing the Calm. S G IN Jackpot Music Hall: 943 MassaLIST E AT N I chusetts, Lawrence, 785-832-1085. ONL M The Dead Girls, North of Grand, Shy PITCH.CO Boys. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Shark Bait, 7 p.m. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 302 S.W. Main, Lee’s Summit, 816-525-1871. The Radio Flyers. Mike Kelly’s Westsider: 1515 Westport Rd., 816-931-9417. The Greyhounds. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-7497676. Fire Dog, Ash Reiter.

CLUB

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Mama Ray, 2 p.m.; Four Fried Chickens and a Coke, 9 p.m. Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. The Inwards, Cadillac Flambe, the Ned Ludd Band, 9 p.m.

VA R I E T Y Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Fish’s Fight Against Cancer, with Hotdog Skeletons, Sons of Great Dane, the Porcelain Gods, 9 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. The Art of Sweet Tease, 8 p.m.

S U N D AY 18 ROCK/POP/INDIE The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Trapper Schoepp & the Shades.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Lee McBee and the Confessors, 6 p.m.

DJ Hamburger Mary’s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-842-1919. Bad Music Sundays with Brett Dietrich, 3:30 p.m.

JAZZ The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Mark Lowrey Jazz Trio open jam session, 5 p.m.

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MONDAY:

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THE PITCH

31


RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Jeff Harshbarger presents an Alternative Jazz Series.

CLASSICAL Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Les Mengel Duo, 5-9 p.m.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Smackdown Trivia and Karaoke. Clarette Club: 5400 Martway, Mission, 913-384-0986. Texas Hold ’em, 7 & 10 p.m. The Eighth Street Taproom: 801 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-6918. Taproom Poetry Series. Frank James Saloon: 10919 N.W. Hwy. 45, Parkville, 816-5050800. Karaoke, 6-10 p.m. Saints Pub + Patio: 9720 Quivira, Lenexa, 913-492-3900. Free pool. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. Texas Hold ’em, 3 & 6 p.m.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Groove Station: 9916 Holmes, 816-942-1000. KC Blues Jam with Crosseyed Cat, 2-6 p.m. The Hideout: 6948 N. Oak Tfwy., 816-468-0550. Open blues jam, 7 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Open Jam with Levee Town, 2 p.m., free. R.G.’s Lounge: 9100 E. 35th St., Independence, 816-358-5777. Jam Night hosted by Dennis Nickell, Scotty Yates, Rick Eidson, and Jan Lamb, 5 p.m.

VA R I E T Y Fishtank Performance Studio: 1715 Wyandotte, 816-8097110. The French Cabaret: Love at the Louvre, 2 p.m. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 302 S.W. Main, Lee’s Summit, 816-525-1871. Psycho City Sunday.

M O N D AY 19 ROCK/POP/INDIE Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Umber, Damned By the Pope, 7 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Swearin’!

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. Lee Langston.

JAZZ Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Jazzbo. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Mark Lowrey Trio, 6 p.m.

COMEDY Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. MANic Monday on the main floor, 10 p.m., free.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS Hamburger Mary’s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-842-1919. Maryoke, 8 p.m. The Hideout: 6948 N. Oak Tfwy., 816-468-0550. Monday Night Football. The Well: 7421 Broadway, 816-361-1700. Monday Night Football. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. Texas Hold ’em, 8 p.m.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Jonny Green Open Mic and Jam Session, 7:30 p.m.

VA R I E T Y Californos: 4124 Pennsylvania, 816-531-7878. Opera Supper, 6-9 p.m.

T U E S D AY 2 0 ROCK/POP/INDIE RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Daytime Party, Lion Horse, 9 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. G. Green, Uzi Rash, Whyte Bitch, 10 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Wolwab, Last Night’s Regret, Orthon Anderthon.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Rick Estrin & the Nightcats, 7:30 p.m. Slow Ride Roadhouse: 1350 N. Third St., Lawrence, 785-7492727. Lonnie Ray Blues Band.

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NO R 1 5X-, 221 0 , 02 X 0 1 2 pitch.com pitch.com M OV N ETM H BXEX–X

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Howard Iceberg, Schwervon, 6 p.m.

JAZZ Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Max Berry and Rod Fleeman. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Rick Bacus and Monique Danielle. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Open Jam with Everette DeVan, 7 p.m.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483. Gak Attack. Bulldog: 1715 Main, 816-421-4799. Double-feature movie night. Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. Coda Pursuit Team Trivia with Teague Hayes, 7 p.m. MiniBar: 3810 Broadway. Sonic Spectrum Trivia: the Bizarre, Pop Culture and Travel, 7 p.m. Sherlock’s Underground Coffeehouse & Pub: 858 State Route 291, Liberty, 816-429-5262. Country and Western Tuesdays. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Tango night.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS DiCarlo’s Mustard Seed Mexican-Americana Restaurant & Bar: 15015 E. U.S. Hwy. 40, 816-373-4240. Blues, country and classic rock hosted by Rick Eidson and friends. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Dave Hays Band Open Jam. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Open Mic Night.

W E D N E S D AY 21 ROCK/POP/INDIE Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Space Junk. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Rock Paper Scissors.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. John Paul’s Flying Circus. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Billy Ebeling. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. The Brian Ruskin Quartet. Trouser Mouse: 625 N.W. Mock Ave., Blue Springs, 816-2201222. Brother Bagman.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS Mike Kelly’s Westsider: 1515 Westport Rd., 816-931-9417. Flood Fest, with DeadEye, Old Sound, the Wayward Bettys, AJ Young, Air Crew, Mason Pashia.

DJ Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. Sonic Spectrum with DJ Robert Moore, 10 p.m.

COMEDY Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. Tyler Craig. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. AJ Finney.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Super Nerd Night. Danny’s Bar and Grill: 13350 College Blvd., Lenexa, 913-3459717. Trivia and karaoke with DJ Smooth, 8 p.m. Ernie Biggs Dueling Piano Bar: 4115 Mill, 816-561-2444. Hump Day Party. 403 Club: 403 N. Fifth St., 913-499-8392. Pinball tournament, cash prize for winner, 8:30 p.m., $5 entry fee. Nara: 1617 Main, 816-221-6272. Ladies’ Night. The Roxy: 7230 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-236-6211. Karaoke. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Microphone Jack, 8 p.m. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. Trivia.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Guerrilla Movement, 10 p.m. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Jam Night, 9 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. James Inman’s Microphone: Comedy (or Whatever) Open Mic, 10 p.m.

VA R I E T Y VooDoo Lounge: Harrah’s Casino, 1 Riverboat Dr., North Kansas City, 816-472-7777. Club Wars Expo.


PRESENTED BY

NOVEMBER 24TH, 2012 TROLLEY CRAWL

PIRATES VS. NINJAS Who would win in a fight? Come dressed as your choice!

HOW TO VOTE:

• Take a picture as your choice in front of OR on the trolley • Tag The Kansas City Strip Facebook page • Most tags answers this long asked question!!! • Prizes for best dressed at participating bars:

* Indie On Main * Dark Horse Tavern * Luna Nightclub

Angels Rock Bar No Cover on Friday Drunken Fish Late Night Happy Hour-10pm to Close Fran's Restaurant

The Only Cigar Shop on the Strip. 10% Off Purchase of Cigars

Appetizer get Second of Equal or Lesser Value at 1/2 Price Firefly Brookside $5.99 Premium Breakfast on Fridays, $4 $4 Wells, No Cover All Night with Hickok's $5 Mojito $6 Black Margaritas Brooksider Sports Bar & Grill Bacardi & 360 Vodka Bombs after 10pm, Wristband Open 24 Hours Green Room Burgers and Beer $3 Draws and Free Queso with 2 Food $3 Corona Bottles Howl At The Moon Free Fry with Purchase of an Entrée Purchases, $3 House Margaritas Minsky's Pizza Charlie Hooper's Bar & Grille 2 for 1 cover Gusto $1 off Apps $2.50 Domestic Draws $3 Fridays- $1 Off Boulevard, $2 Yard Beers and $5 Grape Bombs Indie On Main Wells $12 Bucket of Beers and 50 Cents Saturdays $1 off Domestic Bottles $3 Domestics with wristband! Harpo's Restaurant Bar off Martinis Maker’s Mark Bourbon $2 Selected Shots The Blue Line Michael Forbes Grille House & Lounge Reverse Happy 930pm-1am. $2 Blue Line Beers $2 Blue Line Jersey Dog, Hot Dog Cart $5 Maker's Mark Cocktails 2 for 1 Wells $3 Margaritas 2 Jumbo Dogs for $5 and $1 Off Shots $3 Wells McFadden's Sport's Saloon Winslow's BBQ Any Sandwich $4 UV Flavors Cocktails Martini Corner $5 off Lunch or Dinner for Two Jerusalem Cafe Mosaic Lounge Haus $5 off Hooka No Cover Before 11pm Waldo $3 Radaberger Pilsner & Joe's Pizza Buy the Slice PBR Big Sky Bar 75th Street Brewery Agris-Pinot Gris 2 Slices for $5 $5 Jack Daniel’s Drinks $2.50 Wells, Bombs, and Pints! Sol Cantina Kelly's Westport Inn Bobby Baker's Lounge Pizza Bar $4 Trolley Margaritas & $2 Domestic Bottles & $3 Rock Lobster Shots $1 off Cover $3 Boulevard Wheat Pints $2.75 Pacifico Bottle Lew's Grill & Bar McCoy's Public House Shark Bar The Drop $2.50 Bud Light Draws $4.00 McCoy's Pints $4 Malibu Cocktails Quinton's $6 Specialty Martinis & Cocktails Tengo Sed Cantina Missie B's $3 Domestic Draws $3 Wells and a Free Cover Tower Tavern $3 El Jimador Margarita Complimentary Shot with wristband! The Dubliner Riot Room $3.50 Wells and Remedy Food + Drink $3.50 Boulevard Wheat on Fridays and $5 Jameson $3 Wells after Midnight 15% off with Wristband $10 Pizza 7pm-12am Free cover with Wrist Band Tanner's Bar and Grill Tea Drops Velvet DOG Z-Strike Bowling $2.50 Budlight 16 oz. Draws $1.00 Off a Cupcake or Regular Tea $1 off all Skyy Drinks 2 for 1 games, No cover on Fridays The Foundry The Well Bar-Grill and Rooftop Monaco $4.00 McCoy's Pints No Cover Free Spinach Dip w/any Purchase

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POWER & LIGHT DISTRICT 18th & VINE

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NOVEMBER 15-21, 2012

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S AVA G E L O V E

STRAIGHT UP THANKS absolutely changed my mind on gay marriage. I also live in Maryland, and, as you know, we voted last week to allow same-sex couples to legally marry. I was excited that I got to vote for marriage equality in my home state — even I agree that it’s fucked up that people get to vote on the civil rights of LGBT people at all. Thanks for all your writing over the years — it’s really made a difference in my love and sex life. And congrats to you and all gay people in the United States for the big wins last week in Maine, Maryland, Minnesota and Washington state.

Blowjob Boredom Blues Dear BBB: In sex comedies, sitcoms and

porn, head is always presented as the ultimate sexual experience, but in reality, some men just don’t dig head. But three cocksuckers is a pretty small sample. Let a few other guys suck your dick, but don’t stress out if nothing changes. It could be a preference and not a malfunction.

Just Some Straight Guy Dear JSSG: There’s something I want to say

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D A N S AVA G E

often — not to gloat, but I just did). Anyway, my problem is that I don’t really enjoy receiving. I have received head from three guys, which I realize is not a large sample size, but every time it has been a nonevent. It’s almost like I can’t even feel a mouth on my dick. How do I fix this?

Dear Dan: Reading you over the years has

about the votes — and about the voters — in Maine, Maryland, Minnesota and Washington state. But first I want to say this to all my fellow queers: We built this. The breakthroughs we saw last week, which included the election of the first openly gay person to the U.S. Senate (Wisconsin’s Tammy Baldwin) — we made that. LGBT people came out, fought back and changed the world. We have a fuck of a lot left to do — repeal DOMA, pass ENDA, unfinished business with DADT (trans people are still barred from serving), defending the rights of queers around the world — but LGBT people have made tremendous progress since Stonewall. It has gotten better for us because we came out and fought to make it better. We demanded better. Now here is what I want to say to straight people: Thank you. I know so many straight people in Washington state, where I live, who worked unbelievably hard on the campaign to win marriage equality for their gay and lesbian friends, family members and neighbors. I know straight people in all four states who voted, gave money, worked phone banks and knocked on doors — all in an effort to make it possible for same-sex couples to marry. Gays and lesbians are a tiny percentage of the population. And while we laid the groundwork for the breakthroughs we saw last week in Maine, Maryland, Washington and Minnesota — we built this — we didn’t build it on our own. The majorities in the state legislatures in Maine, Maryland and Washington that voted to make same-sex marriage legal? Straight. The governors who signed laws making same-sex marriage legal? Straight. The overwhelming majority of people who voted in favor of marriage equality in all three states after anti-gay bigots forced public votes on our civil rights? Straight. The majority that voted against writing anti-gay bigotry into Minnesota’s state constitution? Straight. And the president who took a huge political risk and came out for marriage equality before his re-election campaign? Straight. It has gotten better for us — better, not perfect — but it hasn’t gotten better for us in a vacuum.

BY

Dear Dan: My wife and I have been together

It has gotten better for us because straight people have gotten better about us. Rights are rights. They shouldn’t be put up for a vote. And we shouldn’t have to say “thank you” when they’re recognized. The sad fact is that we have had to fight for our rights. But here’s the happy fact: We didn’t have to fight this one alone. Thousands and thousands of straight people stood with us and fought for us. We had help. And that’s what we should thank the straight people for. Not for granting us our rights — rights are rights are rights — but for joining our fight. Last week on my blog, I floated the idea of having a big party for all the straight people who came through for us in Maine, Maryland, Minnesota and Washington state. But all those straight people wouldn’t fit in a single ballroom. But we can fit them on a single Tumblr page. Queers? If you know a straight person in Maine, Maryland, Minnesota or Washington — if you know a straight in any state or the District of Columbia — who donated money, phone-banked, went door to door, or took a political risk on our behalf, take your picture with that straight person, write a few words about what they did, and post it to straightupthanks.tumblr.com. We saw a huge breakthrough in the struggle for LGBT equality last week. And it wouldn’t have happened without the help of so many righteous, kick-ass straight people. I’ll bet every queer person reading this knows a straight person who they should thank. I certainly do. Thank them in a public way: Go to straightupthanks.tumblr.com, click “submit a post,” share a photo and thank a straight ally. Because we literally couldn’t have done it without them.

Dear Dan: I am a 20-something bi guy who loves sucking cock. I especially enjoy when the recipient really enjoys himself (which is

for 20 years. I love to receive oral, but my wife has no interest when I try to return the favor. She claims it does nothing for her. We celebrated Obama’s re-election with a bottle of wine in the bedroom. When I made a move downstairs, she didn’t stop me. However, she said it tickled her like crazy. Is this common? Is there something I can do to make this experience less hilarious for my wife?

What’s So Funny? Dear WSF: Some women struggle with hangups or body issues that make it difficult for them to relax and enjoy being on the receiving end of oral sex. But some women who don’t struggle with hang-ups or body issues simply don’t enjoy receiving oral sex. If your wife is generally comfortable in her own skin and with her own body, you may have to take her word for it when she says that oral sex does nothing for her. But if it truly does nothing for her — “nothing” would include “annoy” and “turn off ” — maybe she can lie back and enjoy what it does for you. Dear Dan: I am a 22-year-old female who’s only ever achieved orgasm during fellatio, and my boyfriend will not perform fellatio on me! I have tried bringing it up during sex, but he didn’t cooperate. He told me that he didn’t want to do that to me because a mutual female friend told him that I didn’t want him to do that to me. I did tell her that at the beginning of our relationship, but I don’t feel that way anymore! I’m way too embarrassed now to ask again because it would feel like I was begg ing him for fellatio. Please help me!

Need to Get Mine Dear NTGM: Try asking your boyfriend for cunnilingus, not fellatio. If that doesn’t do the trick — if he doesn’t start eating your pussy — then DTMFA. Find the Savage Lovecast (my weekly podcast) every Tuesday at thestranger.com/savage.

Have a question for Dan Savage? E-mail him at mail@savagelove.net pitch.com

MONTH


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THE PITCH

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NOVEMBER 15-21, 2012

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CORNER OF MADISON & W. 73RD ST.

KANSAS CITY, MO 64116

Ward Pkwy., south on W. 73rd St. Piano tuning tools, boxes of tuning pins & piano parts, 14k wht. gold case woman’s wristwatch, 10k & sterling jewelry, Cambridge, Fenton, Fostoria, violin, piano, organs, English bone china cups/ saucers, 1977-78 maps w/ oil co. adv., books, Rockwell series of plates, other collectibles, furn., tools, new items inc. Weedeater blower/vac, appliances, much more. Terms: Cash or check w/ proper ID. Concession. Restrooms. www.angelfire.com/mo/doubledauction

DOUBLE D AUCTION SERVICE

DAVID B. GREENWOOD, AUCTIONEER 816-630-2109 KC # & FAX or 816-419-7900 CELL

Research Subjects Do you have ASTHMA? Physicians at the Asthma Clinical Research Center at Truman Medical Center Hospital Hill are currently recruiting for studies for Astma Patients.

• You must be at least 18 years old. • On asthma medications and your asthma is controlled. • All study related care is provided at no cost for those who take part. • Financial compensation for participation is available. This Asthma Center is one of 18 prestigious Centers of Excellence funded by the American Lung Association. Please call 816-404-5503 for screening and to learn more about this research study.

pitch.com

NOVEMBER 15-21, 2012

THE PITCH

37


MAC PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

MACAPARTMENTS.COM FEATURED PROPERTY :

PARK CENTRAL APARTMENTS STUDIOS STARTING AT

$599

Pet friendly, Gated Parking, Dishwasher, Central Air, Granite Countertops

877-453-1039 350 E. Armour, KCMO

HILTON PRESIDENT IS NOW HIRING

Reservationist u Servers u Housekeeping u Public Area Cleaner u

Other Openings available, call our Job Hotline. 816-303-1696 Pre-screen Interviews: Monday, Wednesday & Friday 9:00am - Noon & 1-3pm

1329 Baltimore Kansas City, MO 64105

38

THE PITCH

NOVEMBER 15-21, 2012

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NORTHLAND VILLAGE $100 DEPOSIT ON 1&2 BEDROOMS

$525 / up Are you out of housing options? Have Credit Problems? Previous Evictions?

We rent to the rent challenged

Holiday Apartments Studios BRING THIS Downtown Area

$110/WEEK $150/DEPOSIT*

* Restrictions apply

Month to All Month Lease! Utilities On Site Loundry Facility Cable TV

Paid

AD IN FOR $20 OFF YOUR FIRST 2 WEEKS

Holiday Apartments (816) 221-1721

Large 1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apts and Townhomes Fireplace, Washer/Dryer Hook-ups, Storage Space, Pool.

I-35 & Antioch • (816) 454-5830

Stonewall Court Apts 1-Bdrms starting at $395 central air, secure entry, on site laundry, on bus line, close to shopping, nice apts, Sections 8 welcome $100 Deposit (816) 231-2874 M-F 8-5 office hours

WILLOWIND APARTMENTS

I

1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apartments Starting @ $475

3927 Willow Ave • KCMO 64113 816.358.6764

KC pitch.com

NOVEMBER 15-21, 2012

THE PITCH

39


APTS/JOBS/STUFF

®

816.218.6759

JOIN OUR TEAM! LEARN A NEW SKILL! EARN EXTRA MONEY!

Liberty Tax Service’s Basic Income Tax classes teach you the ins and outs of individual income tax preparation. No prior tax experience is necessary to enroll and take the class. Enroll and you’ll be on your way to the pursuit of a new career! • Classes meet for 3 hour sessions, 2 days a week • Class options available in morning and evening • The course lasts 6 weeks • Convenient locations in Kansas and Missouri • Friendly, knowledgeable instructors Call our toll-free hotline

1-888-319-5858

OBAMANATION! USinDistress.com Uptown Expansion

Now hiring: event staff, sales staff, wait staff, event planners, marketing personnel, security personnel & supervisors. Email info to: lsells@uptowntheater.com

or send an email to LibTaxKC@gmail.com to register or for more info. Tell your friends and family about Liberty Tax School, and you could qualify for our referral bonus!

ALLSTARS Gentlemans Club NOW HIRING

Law Offices of David M. Lurie

DWI, SOLICITATION, TRAFFIC DEFENSE, INTERNET-BASED CRIMES816-221-5900

http://www.the-law.com

CLUBEROTICAKCXXX.NET #1 Lifestyle House Party In KC

Parties Every Fri. & Sat.

NOW join us for Suite Parties Limo Available 913-238-4339 www.lifestylesofkc.com

CASH FOR CARS

Wrecked, Damaged or Broken. Running or Not !

Cash Paid ! www.abcautorecycling.com 913-271-9406 ERICA'S PSYCHIC STUDIO

$10

Reunites Love- Depression-Finances Success 100% Guaranteed Results !

816-965-7125

Readings

Entertainers. All Shifts. No Experience Necessary 785-841-4122

$99 DIVORCE $99

Simple, Uncontested + Filing Fee. Don Davis. 816-531-1330

CONCERTS CONVENTIONS SPORTING EVENTS EVENT STAFF, USHERS, TICKET TAKERS

APPLY IN PERSON 4050 Pennsylvania Ste. 111 KCMO 64111 OR ONLINE www. crowdsystems.com EOE

$150 Deposit, All Utilities Paid, Laundry Facilities. Holiday Apts, 115 W. Harlem Rd, KCMO 816-221-1721

DUI/DWI, KS, MO

P.I.--Work Comp.--Bankruptcy Reasonable rates! Susan Bratcher 816-453-2240 www.bratcherlaw.biz

Attorney since 1976: 913-345-4100, KS/MO. Injuries, workers comp, criminal, divorce, DUI, traffic, and more. Low fees, Call Greg Bangs.

WE CAN HELP

ACCURSO & LETT Experienced & Affordable

AFFORDABLE TUITION Two week program-Job placement assistance FT, PT, Parties, Weddings, Always in demand! Call 816-753-3900 TODAY !!!

ALLSTARS Gentlemans Club NOW HIRING Entertainers. All Shifts. No Experience Necessary 785-841-4122

$99 DIVORCE $99

Simple, Uncontested + Filing Fee. Don Davis. 816-531-1330

HOTEL ROOMS A-1 Motel 816-765-6300 Capital Inn 816-765-4331 6101 E. 87th St./Hillcrest Rd. HBO,Phone,Banq. Hall

$37.06 Day/ $149 Week/ $499 Month + Tax U-PICK IT SELF SERVICE AUTO PARTS

$$ Paying Top Dollar $$ For Junk Cars & Trucks Missouri: 816-241-7548 Kansas: 913-321-1000

AFFORDABLE ATTORNEY

SPEEDING, DWI, POSSESSION, ASSAULT

BED BUGS? 1-800-GOT-BUGS

Missouri- 816-587-4LAW(4529) Kansas- 913-402-6069 www.accursoandlett.com GET PAID TO DRINK and TEXT!

Tarot Readings Crystal Readings

FREE CONSULTATION Call: The Law Office of J.P. Tongson (816) 265-1513

LAW FIRM

Brand Ambassadors Wanted! Immediate earnings potential. Company car program, team bonuses, and more! Positions available now. Start part time or full time. Training provided. Work at home, in person, or both. Receive FREE energy drinks and pay for referrals. Call or TXT 816-520-5456 or email applynow@centurylink.net

Psychic Readings Palm Readings

SPEEDING DWI CRIMINAL SOLICITATION Call Tim Tompkins Today KCTrafficlawyer.com 913-707-4357 816-729-2606

TRAFFIC & DWI DEFENSE

INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL BARTENDING

NOW HIRING FOR

DOWNTOWN AREA STUDIO APT $110/WEEK Min.

Total Pest Control

OBAMANATION! USinDistress.com Uptown Expansion

Now hiring: event staff, sales staff, wait staff, event planners, marketing personnel, security personnel & supervisors. Email info to: lsells@uptowntheater.com

SPEEDING DWI CRIMINAL SOLICITATION Call Tim Tompkins Today KCTrafficlawyer.com 913-707-4357 816-729-2606

Locally Owned Since 1939 99.7% Toxin Free w/n an hour We can help you pass Coopers 3617 Broadway, KCMO 816.931.7222

* DWI * * CRIMINAL * * TRAFFIC * Practice emphasizing DWI defense. Experienced, knowledgeable attorney will take the time to listen and inform. Free initial phone consultation.

THE LAW OFFICE OF DENISE KIRBY 816-221-3691


The Pitch: November 15, 2012