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NOVEMBER 8–14, 2012 | FREE | VOL. 32 NO. 19 | PITCH.COM

NOVEMBER 8–14, 2012 | VOL. 32 NO. 19

MITSU SATO HAIR ACADEMY

E D I T O R I A L

Editor Scott Wilson Managing Editor Justin Kendall Music Editor David Hudnall Staff Writers Charles Ferruzza, Ben Palosaari Editorial Operations Manager Deborah Hirsch Calendar Editor Berry Anderson Clubs Editor Abbie Stutzer Food Blogger, Web Editor Jonathan Bender Proofreader Brent Shepherd Contributing Writers Tracy Abeln, Theresa Bembnister, April Fleming, Amber Fraley, Matt Pearce, Dan Savage, Abbie Stutzer Intern Nadia Imafidon

We do hair and love it!

Thinking of a career change? Become a hairstylist!

ALONE IN KC If you’re looking for new friends in KC, you’re not alone. But you’re alone. BY M AT T P E A R C E

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A R T

Art Director Ashford Stamper Contributing Photographers Angela C. Bond, Chris Mullins, Lauren Phillips, Sabrina Staires, Brooke Vandever Design Intern Chloe George

P R O D U C T I O N

Production Manager Christina Riddle Multimedia Designer Vu Radley

“KC’s Best Hair School!!”

A D V E R T I S I N G

Sales Manager Erin Carey Senior Classified Multimedia Specialist Steven Suarez Classified Multimedia Specialist Andrew Disper Multimedia Specialists Michelle Acevedo, Kirin Arnold, Collin Click, Page Olson Director of Marketing & Operations Jason Dockery Digital Marketing Manager Keli Sweetland

913-341-7286 find us on: mitsusatohairacademy.com

HERE AND THERE Mapping Jamilee Polson Lacy’s scattered Charlotte Street debut. BY THERESA BEMBNISTER

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C I R C U L A T I O N

Circulation Director Mike Ryan

B U S I N E S S

Accounts Receivable Jodi Waldsmith Publisher Joel Hornbostel

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S O U T H C O M M

Chief Executive Officer Chris Ferrell Chief Financial Officer Patrick Min Chief Operating Officer Rob Jiranek Chief Marketing Officer Susan Torregrossa Chief Technology Officer Matt Locke Business Manager Eric Norwood Director of Digital Sales & Marketing David Walker Director of Accounting Todd Patton Creative Director Heather Pierce Director of Online Content/Development Patrick Rains

N A T I O N A L

A D V E R T I S I N G

VMG Advertising 888-278-9866, vmgadvertising.com Senior Vice President of Sales Susan Belair Senior Vice President of Sales Operations Joe Larkin

B A C K P A G E . C O M

Vice President Sales & Marketing Carl Ferrer Business Manager Jess Adams Accountant David Roberts

D I S T R I B U T I O N

The Pitch distributes 45,000 copies a week and is available free throughout Greater Kansas City, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for $5 each, payable at The Pitch’s office in advance. The Pitch may be distributed only by The Pitch’s authorized independent contractors or authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of The Pitch, take more than one copy of each week’s issue. Mail subscriptions: $22.50 for six months or $45 per year, payable in advance. Application to mail at second-class postage rates is pending at Kansas City, MO 64108.

NAAN SO FAI R Saffron could be a winner, if the spice is right. BY A P R I L F L E M I N G

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C O P Y R I G H T

The contents of The Pitch are Copyright 2012 by KC Communications, LLC. No portion may be reproduced in whole or in part by any means without the express written permission of the publisher. The Pitch address: 1701 Main, Kansas City, MO 64108 For information or to leave a story tip, call: 816-561-6061 Editorial fax: 816-756-0502 For classifieds, call: 816-218-6759 For retail advertising, call: 816-218-6702

ON T HE COVE R

DET H K L O K

ENTER TO WIN TWO TICKETS TO DETHKLOK ON NOV 17 at The Midland by AMC. Register at www.PITCH.com ILLUSTRATION BY SHANNON FRESHWATER

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NOVEMBER 8 -14, 2012

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PITCH QUESTIONNAIRE PLOG TECH FEATURE F I LT E R ART PAGES FILM CAFÉ FAT CITY MUSIC NIGHTLIFE SAVAGE LOVE

MEANWHI LE AT PI TC H. C O M

“I need a hundred beers, EXACTLY one hundred. Thank you.” - NE

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ZAARLY storefronts arrive in Kansas City. TECATE has plenty of fans at Port Fonda. GHOSTY does another Daytrotter.

M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X

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NOVEMBER 8 -14, 2012

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Hometown: Kansas City, Kansas

What’s your favorite charity? Seaturtle.org

Current neighborhood: Kansas City, Missouri

What TV show do you make sure you watch? Sons

Who or what is your sidekick? My wife

take(s) up a lot of space in my iTunes:

What career would you choose in an alternate reality? Superhero or secret agent

Jimmy Buffett and Bob Marley

What was the last local restaurant you patronized? Don Chilito’s. Unlimited chips and salsa

Kill Bill Vol. 1 and Vol. 2

What movie do you watch at least once a year?

and sopapillas!

Where do you drink? Most of the time at home Favorite place to spend your paycheck: Micro Center

What local phenomenon do you think is overrated? Facebook! Ironically, friends who know me are not my friends on Facebook.

Where do you like to take out-of-town guests?

KANSAS

CITY'S

ENTERTAINMENT RESOURCE NEWS • EVENTS

• FOOD • MUSIC • FILMS

ACCESS INFO ANYWHERE

What subscription — print, digital, etc. — do you value most? UnderwaterTimes.com

Nebraska

“Kansas City screws up when it …” Closes roads

Although a long time ago, getting busted in the Worlds of Fun parking lot by the girl’s father and WoF security. You can only imagine …

town area. Much has changed since I left many, many years ago. I have a lot of exploring to do. for extended periods of time, especially consecutive bridges over the river.

“On my day off, I like to …” Explore Kansas City and see what has changed. Usually involves a stop at Whole Foods as well. “In five years, I’ll be …” Even older and hopefully more wiser.

pitch.com

Person or thing you find really irritating at this moment: Election ads

Finish this sentence: “Kansas City got it right when …” They started investing in the down-

extremely old-fashioned and chivalrous. To this day, I still open the car door for my wife.

NOVEMBER 8 -14, 2012

Favorite person or thing to follow on Twitter: Neil

deGrasse Tyson

Last book you read: Sick Puppy by Carl Hiaasen

“People might be surprised to know that I …” Am

THE PITCH

Celebrity you’d like to ride the Mamba with at Worlds of Fun: Bill Murray

City Market

“Kansas City needs …” What most cities in America need: great public-transit systems.

4

of Anarchy

Favorite day trip: Henry Doorly Zoo in Omaha, What is your most embarrassing dating moment?

Interesting brush with the law? Again a long, long time ago … going to a party that had been broken up by the police and getting pulled over. Fortunately, the officer knew my uncle, who was also on the police force. Describe a recent triumph: Getting hired in

January as displays curator of the first aquarium in Kansas City and the best sea life in the United States. The Kansas City Sea Life Aquarium (2475 Grand) is open 10 a.m.–8 p.m. Sunday–Thursday and 10 a.m.–9 p.m. Friday and Saturday. For more information, see visitsealife.com/kansas-city.

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PLOG

KANSAS, F*CK YEAH!

Kansans take pride in a

BY

potty-mouthed Facebook page.

A MBE R F R A L E Y

ike most Kansans, Will Averill is stubbornly proud of his home state. The Lawrence comedy writer and performer is also defensive. So when Averill moved to Norwich, England, eight years ago to live with his then wife, he was surprised to hear the stereotypes from folks across the pond. “I kept hearing Toto jokes and Dorothy jokes, even in England,” Averill says, “which I never thought I’d get.” B y 20 0 7, he’d h ad G O L enough. Averill decided P E MORINE AT to publicly address his ONL M / P L O G heritage — and take a P IT C H .C O jab at his British compatriots — by turning his frustrations into a comedic poem called “Fuck You, I’m From Kansas.” Two inches of snow in Norwich, and this city shuts down. “There just isn’t enough grit!” Fuck You, I’m from Kansas Where grit comes from the inside Where blizzards bury children in as little as eight minutes And you just deal with it. Socialized health care? Fuck You, I’m from Kansas If you get cut, you die. Simple as that. The epic, which goes on for a few minutes, became a staple of Averill’s comedy act in performances at Edinburgh’s Fringe Festival, and at London’s Bang Said the Gun poetry competition, which he won. In 2011, Averill and his wife divorced, and the comedian returned stateside. His fi rst summer back in Lawrence, Averill performed “Fuck You, I’m From Kansas” during a bawdy sketch-comedy show, Victor Continental, at a sold-out Liberty Hall, and brought down the drunken house. “It seemed like there was something there,” Averill says, “but I wasn’t quite sure what it was.” On a lark, he created a F*ck You, I’m From Kansas Facebook page. The homage to his home state’s tag line: “A page dedicated to Kansas art, artists, culture and character. Flyover my ass!” “I started it very much in the vein of ‘Fuck You, I’m From Kansas’ the poem,” he says. “The initial tone was very much, ‘Hey, fuck you! Biggest prairie dog. We’ve got the largest ball of twine, motherfuckers!’ Just sort of throwing things out there.” Averill invited five friends to join the page. Sarah Mathews, part owner of the bar Frank’s North Star Tavern, in Lawrence, monitored the first-day stats. Within a half-hour of going live, the page received 37 likes. “The day Will started it, that night I texted him and said I’d stay up until it hit 1,000 likes,” Mathews says. “I fell asleep at midnight, and it was only at 800. But when I woke up the next morning, it was way over a thousand.”

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PHOTOS COURTESY F*CK YOU, I’M FROM KANSAS

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From left: Sarah Mathews, Will Averill and Jacqueline Grunau strike a John Brown pose.

The thousand-likes-a-day trend continued for a solid week. Averill’s friend Jacqueline Grunau and Mathews — both comedy performers in Victor Continental — helped him keep fresh posts on the page. “There were so many revelations in that first week,” Averill says. “And discussions, too ... about what it was and what it could be.” The trio settled on a mix of genuine Kansas celebration, self-deprecation and irreverent humor. During the page’s early evolution, Averill worried that they’d run out of content to keep readers happy. Those fears evaporated as fans sent in a daily stream of suggestions and a slew of photos, ranging from beautiful Kansas landscapes to Kansas-themed tattoos to Beard Team Kansas (a group of hairy dudes, mainly from Emporia). Most days, FYIFK opens with a photo of a stunning Kansas sunrise and signs off with a glowing sunset. No matter how obscure a photo may be — a barn out in western Kansas or a distinctive tree along Interstate 70 — someone recognizes it. Grunau travels as part of her work with the Kansas Department of Health and Environment, and one day she snapped a photo outside Natoma, Kansas (population about 300), and posted it to FYIFK. Shout-outs from Natoma followed. “People from places like Natoma get a little bit of a voice whereas they wouldn’t, normally, outside their hometown or county paper,” Grunau says. “Clearly this site has struck a chord with so many people. We’re the laughingstock of the country so many times. But there are people here who are

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wonderful, amazing people with so much to offer, and we’re not those stereotypes we’re portrayed as.” Throughout the day, FYIFK features a mix of trivia, famous Kansans, and a hodgepodge of well-known and obscure places and things. A photo of Big Brutus, the world’s secondlargest coal-mining machine that was retired in West Mineral, Kansas, led to an outpouring of heartfelt memories from family members of the men who worked with it. “We’ve gained a real appreciation for how much these stories and photos mean to people,” Averill says. Every few days, FYIFK posts a “Kansas Badass of the Week,” highlighting interesting or notable but often not-well-known Kansans, such as women’s wrestling champion Mildred Burke (who competed for a couple of decades starting in the 1930s) and the world’s oldest college graduate, Nola Ochs (who received her degree in 2007 at age 95). FYIFK has also been known to hold dear sites in Kansas City, Missouri, like Kauffman and Arrowhead stadiums. “It should be noted that we love all Kansas City people, even if they’re from the Missouri side,” Averill says. And the fans have claimed FYIFK as their own. A typical Facebook message: “You actually make me proud that I live in Kansas. Thank you.” “There are a lot of Kansans who feel like we’re more than what we’re portrayed as in the media,” Averill says. “We’re more than the Westboro Baptist Church.” “Which we’ve banned,” Mathews cuts in. That’s true. Averill, Mathews and Grunau pitch.com

agree that pretty much anything about Kansas is fair game with two exceptions: The Wizard of Oz and Fred Phelps’ Westboro Baptist Church. “Well, maybe if it was the 100th anniversary of The Wizard of Oz we might post something about Dorothy,” Mathews says. “But never Fred Phelps.” “We try to make a balance of keeping the raw feeling to it,” Averill says, “but I wouldn’t want to go to making it completely milquetoast and Kansas tourism bureau with only pretty pictures.” A fan has suggested that FYIFK is doing more for Kansas appreciation than any Kansas tourism group. If Facebook “likes” are any measure, the fan may be correct. FYIFK’s Facebook page has more than 18,000 likes. Kansas Travel & Tourism? Fewer than half that many. About two months after starting the page, Averill and friends want to start an official FYIFK website. They say FYIFK has outgrown Facebook, and an official site would do the photos and stories justice. An official site would direct Kansans to noteworthy events, restaurants and destinations across the state. And they might sell T-shirts — not to make a quick buck but to fill merch requests from fans. “Who knows?” Averill says. “There could be a coffee-table book at the end of it, but we’ll see what happens. Every time I think I know what the end goal is, something comes from the site that makes me think it could be something else. You can’t pin it down to one type of person or one story. That’s been an eye-opener. “We’ve gotten all these stories and photos, and there are so many beautiful things here and so many people who are passionate about Kansas that I think we’re all kind of collectively saying, fuck it. We’re not going to be self-hating anymore,” Averill says. “This is a beautiful place.”

E-mail feedback@pitch.com M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X

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TECH

DOES COMPUTE

BY

JUS T IN K E NDA L L

S A B R I N A S TA I R E S

Hackers put Google Fiber to the test at this weekend’s Compute Midwest.

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hat can you make with Google Fiber? More than 100 developers want to answer that question this weekend, when Compute Midwest holds its hackathon at the Fiber Space (1814 Westport Road). Michael Gelphman, founder of Kansas City IT Professionals and organizer of Compute Midwest, says he isn’t sure what to expect when these programmers and app developers are given access to Google’s 300 Mbps Wi-Fi connection — a speed that’s 30 times the national average — and a computer with gigabit speed. At 9 a.m. Saturday, though, he starts finding out when work gets under way. And a little more than 24 hours later, we see results: At 10:30 a.m. Sunday, judges examine demos and award prizes, such as an iPhone 5, an iPad and a Kindle. “That’s the most exciting part, the unknown,” Gelphman says. “Who is going to show up, and what ideas can they come up with?” More definite is how Compute Midwest begins. The four-day conference kicks off Thursday, November 8, with a party from 6 to 9 p.m. at the Cashew (2000 Grand). The party gives way to a discussion of the future, with a 9 a.m. talk Friday at the Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts (1601 Broadway). “The goal of the conference is to help people think about what the future holds,” Gelphman says. “The community that we’ve built is very organic, and we wanted to deliver something that is also organic that didn’t feel overly commercial or anything like that. We wanted to give people the ability to hear from speakers who could talk about the future.” Gelphman has lined up a TED-worthy slate of speakers to give their views on technology advancements and the next big thing. Or, as he refers to them, “visionaries”: Naithan Jones, AgLocal founder and CEO Ben Milne, Dwolla founder and CEO Jason Hoffman, Joyent founder and CTO

Gelphman’s next big thing. Brad Abrams, Google product manager, Cloud platform team Scott Chacon, GitHub CIO Zach Kaplan, Inventables CEO Dan Levin, Box COO Michelle Munson, Aspera co-founder and CEO “There’s a lot of people doing great things,” Gelphman says. “We just wanted to hear from innovators who are building amazing companies — whether it was Cloud, mobile or whatever — that changed the way that people go about their daily lives.” The closing party takes place Friday night at 8, at Fuego in the Power & Light District. Gelphman says the wrap celebration comes on Day 2 because by Sunday — after a 24hour hackathon — everyone is likely to be exhausted. Compute Midwest is the next step in the evolution of Gelphman’s KCITP, a grassroots networking group. He says he has been building KCITP to go beyond happy hours and hackathons, with an eye toward setting up major conferences. “I just wanted to see how far we could go,” he says. “How big this thing got even surprises me. I knew I wanted to do something big, but this has gone beyond my expectations. This is definitely going to be an annual event. We want to keep doing bigger and bigger things because my whole goal is to make an impact and inspire people to build new ideas.” Tickets to the conference and the hackathon cost $329; startups, entrepreneurs and nonprofits can buy discounted tickets for $209. For more information, see computemidwest.eventbrite.com.

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I f yo u ’ r e l o o k i n g f o r n ew f r i e n d s i n KC , yo u a r e n ’ t a l o n e . B u t yo u ’ r e a l o n e . | B y M a t t P e a r c e little more than a year ago, I moved into a West Plaza apa r tment. It was neat and spacious, with hardwood floors for the rug I’d bought in Istanbul but never stepped on. And because it was walking distance from both the Plaza and Westport, I could mosey to a coffee shop or stagger home drunk from a bar without even glancing at my car. Best of all, it was cheap enough that I could live alone and realize one of the defi ning fantasies of many 20-something men: I’d be responsible for every mess I created, without fighting with a roommate for kitchen-counter space or bathroom time as if we were sharing the West Bank. This was city living as personal libertarian utopia. Affordable rent and abundant space, after all, are what Kansas City is supposed

to be about. After a rough few months in Washington, D.C. — where I hadn’t liked the government achievatrons I met at parties and where an invasive landlord (who was cheating on her property taxes) had kicked me out of an egregiously expensive apartment (which was being rented illegally) — I was ready to build a better life in KC. And a better life in KC was so easy — at first. The Lattéland on Jefferson Street had a fine patio, so I spent a lot of time reading outside there. The Cinemark a few blocks from my apartment cost only $6 a show, so I saw every Zac Efron and Ryan Reynolds abomination that rolled through. (Because for six bucks, I’ll watch anything in a theater.) These things I did alone, which was fine for a while. Yet the warning signs of loneliness started to emerge. The apartment I’d chosen for its spaciousness began to look to me

like that photo of Steve Jobs’ living room, which had nothing but a rug and a lamp. The cheap movies I saw were stupid romantic comedies, and watching them alone lost its irony. And there were no co-workers to run into at the coffee shop after work because I was a freelancer with no co-workers. One morning, I locked myself out of my apartment without my wallet or my phone. As I stood on my porch, sweaty from a morning run, I realized that I didn’t know my landlord’s number (or anybody else’s) and that I’d somehow managed never to meet or talk to any of my neighbors. I knocked on doors until someone I’d never seen before opened one. His hair was in dreadlocks, and the stench of weed smoke billowed from behind him when he invited me in. The fi rst thing I saw was a huge picture of a naked woman, and — as

with everything in his apartment — it made me want to know his story. The second thing I saw was a video camera conspicuously set up on a tripod in the middle of his living room. The third thing I saw was his girlfriend, standing by the camcorder. She kept her arms folded across the front of her bathrobe, impatient for me to use the phone and leave. I averted my gaze out of politeness, and my eyes dropped to an open duffel bag with a silver-and-black handgun peeking out of it. My neighbor handed me his phone with our landlord’s number dialed in. After I called, I thanked him before leaving. “No problem, man,” he said, shaking my hand. “See you around.” I never saw him again. I haven’t been in a neighbor’s apartment since. continued on page 10

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continued from page 9 ecently, I visited Beirut. I stayed with a Lebanese friend, in an apartment one floor above her parents’ place. Family networks are usually much denser in Lebanon than they are in the United States, with parents and cousins and offspring often cleaved together in tight geographic and social proximity. If I had locked myself out of the apartment in Beirut, I would have knocked on the door downstairs. And it became a pleasure gossiping each morning with her mother when she came up to say hello. In the States, I was living an hour from my parents’ Cass County home, and we saw one another for lunch maybe once a week. Last fall, I also spent a lot of time in downtown Cairo, which was like living inside a human beehive. The crush of people packed into small spaces, combined with more outgoing social norms between strangers, means that every time you step outside is a trip into the unexpected. It’s almost impossible not to meet people. To live in Cairo is to share in a high-density experience, one in which all the human molecules jostle together to create a kind of social friction you rarely see in Kansas City. I thought about all the times I’d walked along Roanoke Parkway without passing another person on foot. But you don’t have to travel abroad to know that the way we live in Kansas City — by ourselves, in spread-out homes, often away from our families and detached from our friends, wedged into our cars — is a historical aberration and exceptional compared with many other parts of the world. And in recent years, various media outlets have singled us out for some embarrassing stats, telling the rest of the country what we already knew about ourselves. In 2009, for example, Forbes crunched population data for America’s 40 largest metropolitan areas and ranked Kansas City dead last for the number of single people. Perhaps correspondingly, KC’s number of bars, restaurants and nightclubs per capita didn’t rank much better. That same year, according to U.S. Census data, more than 30 percent of American 20-somethings moved. No other age group uproots itself as frequently. We move because of new jobs or new relationships, and we arrive with few attachments. We’re looking for those bars and restaurants and clubs, and the ongoing renaissance of KC’s downtown offers some encouragement that life for young, urban-minded people is getting a little more vibrant. So maybe, I thought, it was time to look for some new friends. But when I set out to do that, I found that my fellow Kansas Citians were feeling all kinds of lonely. And some weren’t shy about admitting it. At least, that’s what I learned from Craigslist.

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hat’s the deal with the picture thing?” I wrote Dave in an e-mail. “Why do people trade them?”

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Dave’s Craigslist ad was listed under the site’s “strictly platonic” heading, which I decided to visit as an experiment. He said he was looking for a biking buddy so he could get in shape. When I responded to it, he immediately asked for my photo. With some apprehension, I passed along a Facebook snap. “lot of weird people…. lol” he responded in his e-mail. Then he asked me if I was gay or straight: “the reason I am asking is have a few people answer my add asking how hung am i, can I ride your cock. shit like that. I am gay but looking for a riding partner...BIKE RIDDING...lol.” “Haha I’m straight,” I responded. Dave’s ad was still far less odd than most of the others I’d seen. I’d just eyed a post for two “40-something-but-fit” businessmen who were looking for young, beautiful women to go camping with them. It’s totally not a sexual thing, of course, but maybe if things get sexual, we’re open to that too. We’re just looking for a little fun, went part of the plea.

“Yeah, it looks likes a lot of craiglisters don’t know the defi nition of ‘platonic,’ ” I wrote (with my own typos), already wondering whether Dave was one of them. His next e-mail landed with a thud: “ok cool I night be gay but I am very masculine ... you are cool with that?” Well, sure, of course. But this was still the Internet, and I decided to pass. Maybe Dave was just a regular guy, but Craigslist’s “strictly platonic” section is, like, 40 percent creepsters unaware that they’re creepsters or creepsters who know but just don’t care. The job of filtering is on the user, and it’s tiring. The other 60 percent of those posts, though, show a cross-section of all the ways you can feel lonely in recession America, where having and not having a job bring on

their own kinds of isolation. Typos began to take on a poignant edge. “Hi I’m a 33 year old man married and have 4 awesome kids...” read one post. “I was laid-off due to lack of work from the carpenter’s union,,, so here I am stay at home dad.... My two oldest are in school during the day and my 8 week and 2 year old boy are stuck in the house all day.. It is hard to do anything by myself so if your in the same situation we should get together for a play date.” “Working the graveyard shift andJust looking for someone who wants to chat,” said another. I imagined the vampire loneliness of having to sleep while all your friends are awake and active. The more I looked, the more it seemed that every kind of lifestyle bred its own special social vacuum. “Im a gwm [gay white male] in need of a ballroom dance partner. Im not effeminate and no one would ever suspect Im gay. I just want a dance partner.” “Single black woman looking to meet friendly guys outside of my race. Not looking for any relationship just someone to hang out with every now and then. If you are of the same race as myself please do not reply. Looking to try something different for a change.” “Want to hit the dating Scene [with a wingman]. Looking for someone who has had more experiences than myself.” “Gay boy here in KC looking for a woman to go shopping with ... I’m learning to crossdress so looking for all those sexy women clothes and need help.” I chatted with a divorced businessman who wanted a lunch-break buddy, and with a perfectly normal-sounding guy who wanted somebody to go with him to a nudist camp. And I met up with a friendly bouncer and UMKC student named George, who hung out with his buddies regularly but had trouble convincing any of them to come smoke shisha. We went to Jaskki’s, in the West Bottoms, and puffed on a hookah. Then I met up with a woman, an introvert

named Audrey, whose ad said she’d moved to Kansas City around a year ago but couldn’t remember the last time she’d gone out socially with anyone. We hung out for a while in the fiction section of Barnes & Noble and talked about our favorite writers. But I saw neither George nor Audrey again. Maybe because of the way we’d arranged our meetings, the energy in them was too low to demand follow-up. Or maybe because I hadn’t been serious enough about doing it. Making friends cold turkey turns out to be oddly like dating — sometimes you’re more into somebody than that person is into you, and the doubt and anxiety that come with that imbalance don’t feel good. And sometimes a response I sent to an interesting Craigslist ad was met with silence, as though we’d already broken up. Months later, one ad still stands out to me: “Married soldier here in need of friends, I came back from overseas and everything is different nothing is the same at home and with friends,” the post read. “Lots of

“I think the more important question is why NOT craigslist?” she replied. “It’s the mecca of all things weird and awesome/ creepy. In short, craigslist is like the online version of Walmart.” She’s not wrong. On the Internet, as in Walmart, you can get most of what’s on your list for relatively little trouble, and you bump into a lot of human randomness as you fi ll your cart. The Web has changed the way we can meet strangers, whether through Craigslist or via online dating or on Facebook, in a way that removes the old fi lters of family or work, and channels our preferences through personality-profi le algorithms and shared likes and detours into niche subcategories. It took the Internet, for example, to give us a name for the male fans of My Little Pony whom we now know as “bronies.” Social media makes it more likely that we’ll connect with people similar to us, in other places, rather than with the townies who live next door and may be a little more dissimilar. Instead of living vertically, in one city, we can live horizontally, across many cities. I have friends in New York, for example, and so the fire hose of my Facebook and Google news feeds sometimes means that I’m more aware of what’s happening in Brooklyn than what’s going on in Brookside. That’s a great way to keep up with faraway friends but a problem when you’re heading for drinks in Westport and not the East Village. And getting a grip on the social ladder in Kansas City requires a more old-school approach. If, for instance, you’ve moved here for work, networking is probably a priority — and you’ve probably discovered that Kansas City isn’t the easiest place for people to plug into. “If you don’t have somebody to show you around, it’s an intimidating city,” says Jessica Best, 30, who grew up in Independence and landed back in the city about

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ost Kansas Citians — most people everywhere — don’t make friends on Craigslist. So why were some people slumming it? Here I’m thinking about a 21-year-old named Taryn, who posted a request “to fucking pet a cat.” It oozed hipster aloofness. She probably already knew somebody with a cat — because, come on — so I asked her why she’d posted.

five years ago. “Where are you supposed to go? Where’s the nightlife? There’s sort of this strip downtown instead of this central location where people go. Instead, you say you’re going out to Westport or to Café Trio on the Plaza, or ‘I’m gonna go to P&L’ or, hell, the Crossroads. If you’re not from here, how would you know that? How would you know what you’re missing or what’s going on?” Best is a member of GenKC, a youngprofessionals networking group that coordinates with the various “young friends of” groups across the city, with the help of the Kansas City Area Development Council and the Greater Kansas City Chamber of Commerce. She says the struggle of establishing yourself in Kansas City centers on knowing where the doors are, continued on page 12

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Alone in KC continued from page 11 then figuring out which of them are open. Many Kansas Citians bond in sponsored networks: those “young friends of” as well as entities such as the Centurions Leadership Program. Locals still join the Kansas City Club, an older-skewing site for local hobnobbery since 1882. But there are now even tinier social groups that court outright snobbery. One such guild is the O.E. Ellis Society of Greater Kansas City, whose website announces: “The best way to be invited is: Don’t ask to be invited.” The site features a lot of photos of white guys wearing suits. “Nominees often must be ‘Rushed’ more than once in order to demonstrate their commitment, mettle, and that they are a good ‘personality-fit,’ ” the site continues, as the scents of bourbon and leather seem to waft from the screen. Are Kansas City women allowed in this club? It doesn’t look like it, but perhaps that doesn’t matter. After all, the club obviously benefits any woman lucky enough to have a man who joins. The site’s unattributed “New Members” section advises: “The wives (‘the O. “She” Ellis’ underground) have curiously strong bonds with one another as well. And this author can honestly say that the O.E. Ellis wives and girlfriends are some of the absolute best quality women in the city.” Like the lonely Craiglist soldier back from

12 4 TTHHEE PPIITTCCHH

war and cut off from his friends, O.E. Ellis didn’t respond to me. (I asked for a comment for this story, not an invitation.) But that’s fine. O.E. Ellis’ members and I would probably agree that I’m not the kind of guy they’re looking for. And not all clubs are worth joining.

S

o there’s the obvious end to this story, and it’s the way things go in every community you ever call home: It gets better. Not always a lot but always at least a little. Eventually everybody meets people, even if they’re not the friends you intended to have. Chel, 34, moved here from New York, an experience she says was like jumping from one genus of loneliness to another, each with its own quirks and mutations. “We were all lost and alone,” she says of being young in New York. “We were all lost and alone together. Every stranger was a potential friend. Every evening conversation could turn into a late-night conversation. I’m not talking about dating. I’m talking about finding your place, finding your people. “In KC,” she continues, “everyone is friendly to a fault, deeply kind. But the cutoff is: Everyone goes home to their families all the time. Kansas Citians will welcome you to their table — unless it’s family night. And it’s family night quite frequently.” But now she’s at home here. She says that’s because she made an effort to feel

NO ON VT EH M BXEX–X R 8X- 1, 42, 0200X1 2 pitch.com pitch.com M

that way and “because I networked the shit out of this place.” I never did learn my neighbors’ names, but I know the baristas at that Lattéland. I’m Facebook friends with more locals now, like that guy I met one night at a bar. He was drunk and he probably friended me so he could also friend the woman I was with, a college friend (visiting from London), whom he hit on when he met me. Still, I started to see him everywhere I went, and it was both a little nice and a lot like a sign: Person by person, my social life began to accrete human mass and then to exert its own gravitational pull. That’s the kind of thing that keeps a person in one place, and every time I left town to work on an assignment or visit a friend, the social snowball brought me back. But the less obv ious ending — or the most obvious ending of all — is that I’m now moving out, leaving Kansas City. I couldn’t say no to that great new job in Los Angeles, and by the time you read this, I’ll be in California. The pattern of solitude is going to repeat itself there. KC’s unwalkability and traffic and sprawl? You can multiply those complaints by a significant factor in L.A., where

once more I barely know anybody and barely know about the city. The job is also going to be my social life for a little while. That’s the cycle young professionals have agreed to, and it goes round and round. One day when I was packing up my big, cheap, gorgeous West Plaza apartment, I bumped into one of my neighbors as I went out for a run, one of my last in this city. He’s a chef, a little bit older, and I’d seen him out walking his dogs now and then, in the afternoon or late at night. We’d last exchanged words a couple of months ago, and I told him I was moving to Los Angeles. “I lived there for a year when I was 19,” he said. And, yeah, he remembered being a little lonely, but he told me he didn’t think much about that now. “You know, I used to spend a lot of time feeling victimized by everything, but it’s just bullshit,” he said. “You just make the best of it.” We shook hands. “It’s Matt, right?” he said, surprising me that he’d remembered my name from that brief conversation before. He said his name was Carl, and then we said goodbye.

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WEEK OF NOVEMBER 8-14 | BY BERRY ANDERSON

19

PAG E

HAITIAN DELIGHT

DAY SATUR

11.10

Compagnie de Danse — choreographer Jean-René Delsoin’s troupe of four dancers and three musicians — brings the modern soul and rural fire of Haiti to the stage through modern dance, traditional drums and lots of color. Broaden your worldview tonight at 8 at Johnson County Community College’s Yardley Hall (12345 College Boulevard, Overland Park, 913-469-4445). Tickets ($20–$30) are available by calling the box office or from jccc.edu/TheSeries.

ith ands w Join h C. C C J t Haiti a

ART La Esquina goes places.

21

PAG E

FILM James Bond never runs out of bullets.

26 PAG E

MUSIC Olassa squeezes out its first EP.

T H U R S D AY | 11 . 8 | THE SOCIAL NETWORK

OK, so the event is called Corporate Cocktails, and the organization putting it on is named Elite KC VIP. But don’t let that intimidate you. As far as we can tell, this is just a fine chance to drink cheap cocktails after work. “We encourage all professionals from every industry to E MOR come to our networking events as a chance to meet people with T A E IN similar interests and ONL .COM PITCH make connections with other Kansas Citians,” says Maria Olson, the happy hour’s organizer and Elite KC VIP’s chief operating officer. You can handle that! Show up at Luna (1520 Grand, 816-581-6440) between 6 and 7 p.m. for Skyy drinks, which come with your ticket ($10 advance, $15 at the door). After that, get half-

EVENTS

price drinks from 7 to 9. For more information, see elitekcvip.com.

LEGENDS AND LEGACIES

If you’ve never visited the Black Archives of Mid-America in Kansas City (1722 East 17th Terrace, 816-221-1600), today is your chance. The organization — housing manuscripts, photos, personal correspondence, oral histories and rare books about the AfricanAmerican experience in Missouri, Kansas, Iowa, Oklahoma and other parts of the Plains — has booked Randal Jelks, a professor of American studies at the University of Kansas, to speak about his biography of Benjamin Mays, the social activist and mentor to Martin Luther King Jr. Mays recognized the deep gap between our democratic ideals and our social practices, a gap that’s still plenty visible. Hear more at the free lecture, which starts at 6 p.m. For more information about the archives, see blackarchives.org. continued on page 16

F R I D AY | 1 1 .9 |

FLY ON

T

his New Year’s Eve, Quixotic is set to perform at San Francisco’s Sea of Dreams, a Burning Man -inspir ed throwdown also featuring Gogol Bordello and the Glitch Mob. See KC’s premier aerial supergroup tonight — before it gets famous — at the Lied Center (1600 Stewart Drive, Lawrence, 785-864-2787). Tickets top out at $38 (see lied.ku.edu), and the visual trip begins at 7:30 p.m. pitch.com

NOVEMBER 8 -14, 2012

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15

Kansas City Museum and the Consulate of Mexico in Kansas City present

FRIDAY

11.9

ke Six ma ird. Blackb

at SEPTEMBER 15 NOVEMBER 11, 2012 Union Station Paintings, sculptures, photographs and drawings, including Rivera, Tamayo and Iturbide, from the Collection of the Government of Mexico Free Admission with Suggested Donation

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continued from page 15

F R I D AY | 11 . 9 | HEY HEY, WE’RE EIGHTH BLACKBIRD

You could be forgiven for thinking (hoping!) that the new-music sextet Eighth Blackbird had moved from Chicago to Kansas City. In the days leading up to the ensemble’s KC Symphony appearance a couple of weeks back, Instagram silliness lit up its Twitter feed, and rehearsals looked from the outside a little like a Monkees episode. But return to the Windy City (and a vigorous tour schedule) the chamber group must, so don’t miss tonight’s 7:30 performance, an intimate bookend to that Kauffman Center gig. With mezzo-soprano Katherine Calcamuggio as guest, the Grammy winners open scores by Bermel, Muhly, Mackey, Ligeti and Corigliano. See conservatory.umkc.edu for details (including information about a couple of other events preceding this performance) and tickets ($25, $10 for students and UMKC staff). The show is at White Recital Hall (4949 Cherry). — SCOTT WILSON

S AT U R D AY | 11 . 10 | LIGHTEN UP

Check your Friday hangover at the door and get yourself to Diwali, or festival of lights, at the Battenfeld Auditorium at KU Medical Center’s Student Center (3901 Rainbow). At the annual celebration of the school’s Indian Association, beginning at 4:15 p.m., participate in earthen lamp painting, get henna tattoos, pay $6 to eat from an authentic Indian buffet, and watch Bollywood fusion dance and music performances. “Diwali marks the importance of a positive outlook on life,” says organizer Anand Saran. RSVP for the free event by sending an e-mail to 16

THE PITCH

NOVEMBER 8 -14, 2012

pitch.com

iakumc@kumc.com. The event page is on Facebook; search “Diwali at KU Med.”

CHEERIO, PIP PIP

The Bard of Avon chapter of the Daughters of the British Empire has spent 27 years attempting to civilize Kansas Citians who still brew tea from a bag and don’t know a scone from a biscuit. Today, those efforts reach their annual peak with the British Faire, which features a variety of vendors selling British goods E MOR (cheddar, cans of spotted dick, etc.) and offering afternoon tea with AT INE sandwiches and sweets. ONL .COM PITCH The fair runs 10 a.m.– 4:30 p.m. (with tea served, at intervals, between 11 a.m. and 2:45 p.m.) at the Lenexa Community Center (13420 Oak, at 93rd and Pflumm, 913-541-0209). Admission is strictly U.S. dollars: $14 (or $4 without tea). — CHARLES FERRUZZA

EVENTS

FACE TIME

This week, Mestizo, the JoCo restaurant and cantina that claims to represent the true cuisine and cultures of the Yucatán and Veracruz, celebrates its first anniversary. The secret of its success owes a lot to the celebrity chef behind it, Aarón Sánchez: the hombre famous for Centrico in New York City; one of People en Español’s “50 Most Beautiful People”; and the star of Food Network shows such as Heat Seekers and The Next Iron Chef. So it figures that the festivities (which kicked off Wednesday and end tonight) include an Aarón Sánchez look-alike contest. The grandprize winner gets dinner for four at Mestizo; a signed copy of Sánchez’s brand-new book, Simple Food, Big Flavor; an unopened bottle of 1800 Coconut tequila; and a one-night stay at Aloft Leawood. So your mustache, inked

Y S U N DA

1 1 .1 1 all for Last c vatore ro T Il

DON’T MISS KAREN ALMOND

THE ULTIMATE INTERACTIVE MUSIC EXPERIENCE.

biceps and custom Mozo Chef kicks are finally going to pay off. Get in the game at 5 p.m., then dance, drink and eat all night on the roof (5270 West 116th Place, Leawood). For details, see mestizoleawood.com or call 913-752-9025.

S U N D AY | 11 . 11 | VENI VERDI VICI

The highest of high drama, opera-style, concludes its run at 2 p.m. today at the Kauffman Center (1601 Broadway, 816-994-7222). The Lyric Opera’s four-act Il Trovatore includes gypsies, suicide, immolation and the oftrepurposed “Anvil Chorus.” Tickets cost $35– $160 — a fine cultural investment. (You can also catch it Friday, November 9, at 7:30 p.m.) See kauffmancenter.org for more information.

M O N D AY |11 . 1 2 | TEARS IN YOUR CHEAP BEERS

Hey, fair-weather fans! Don’t pretend that the Chiefs aren’t on Monday Night Football. Get that red hoodie on, get out of the house, and unleash your trash talk on Ben Roethlisberger at one of the proud neighborhood joints specializing in low-cash beers and high-volume sports viewing. The game starts at 7:30. The Brooksider (6330 Brookside Plaza, 816-363-4070). Have you been to the Brooksider since Labor Day? The place has remodeled its upstairs. Again. It’s worth a look, and so are the $2.50 domestic bottles (after 7 p.m.). Tommy Farha’s (8019 Wornall, 816-444-0990). You guys voted this place Best Neighborhood Bar in The Pitch’s Best Of Kansas City 2012. Good call. We like it because the bartenders don’t take any shit. Get $2 domestic longnecks all night. Ugly Joe’s (1227 West 103rd Street, 816-941-7702). This place has many, many televisions, so you never have to look away from the action while ordering more $6 domestic pitchers (starting at 7 p.m.).

Nancy Maultsby and Rafael Davila: punished. does it in his “Live Group Sex Therapy” act. He asks audience members to keep their phones on as he responds to probing questions about sex and love through interactive texting and polling. “He guarantees that the truth will get loose, and you will learn a lot while having fun,” says Jenna Olinksy, special events coordinator for the University of Kansas’ Student Union Activities. The offbeat group therapy is free for KU students (with ID) and $5 for the public, and takes place at 7 p.m. in the Woodruff Auditorium at Kansas Union (1301 Jayhawk Boulevard, on the KU campus in Lawrence, 785-864-7469).

BE A ROCK STAR Tickets start at $8*

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W E D N E S D AY | 11 . 1 4 | TAP ZONE

There’s no plot in Tap Dogs. The male dancers tell the story through the steel plates on the bottoms of their boots. Add flannel, denim and all the appropriate construction-site accoutrements, and you get the world-touring production that stops at the Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts (1601 Broadway, 816-994-7222). It plays through Sunday, with this evening’s performance at 7:30. Tickets cost $25–$60; see kauffmancenter.org.

T U E S D AY |11 . 13 | PENETRATING THE ISSUES

If you’re going to talk about sex, why not talk loudly and in public? That’s how radio comedian and relationship expert Daniel Packard

E-mail submissions to Filter editor Berry Anderson at calendar@pitch.com. Search our complete listings guide online at pitch.com.

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“BOND LIKE YOU’VE

STREET TEAM

Each week, Pitch Street Team cruises around to the hottest clubs, bars and concerts. You name it, we will be there. While we are out, we hand out tons of cool stuff. So look for the Street Team... We will be looking for you!

NEVER SEEN HIM BEFORE. IN A WORD:

WOW.”

Peter Travers

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ALBERT R. BROCCOLI’S EON PRODUCTIONS PRESENTS DANIEL CRAIG AS IAN FLEMING’S JAMES BOND IN “SKYFALL” JAVIER BARDEM RALPH FIENNES NAOMIEMUSICHARRIS BÉRÉNICE MARLOHE WITH ALBERT FINNEY AND JUDI DENCH AS “M” PRODUCERSCO- ANDREW NOAKES DAVID POPE EXECUTIVE WRITTEN BY THOMAS NEWMAN PRODUCER CALLUM MCDOUGALL BY NEAL PURVIS & ROBERT WADE AND JOHN LOGAN PRODUCED DIRECTED BY MICHAEL G. WILSON AND BARBARA BROCCOLI BY SAM MENDES FEATURING “SKYFALL” PERFORMED BY ADELE First Friday Indie Pitch Party @

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STARTS FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9

CHECK LOCAL LISTINGS FOR THEATERS AND SHOWTIMES

FIND MOVIE TIMES ON

ART

HERE AND THERE

Mapping Jamilee Polson Lacy’s

BY

scattered Charlotte Street debut.

THE RE S A BE MBNI S T E R

J

S A B R I N A S TA I R E S

amilee Polson Lacy greets me inside La Esquina. “Tell me about you,” she says with earnest enthusiasm, her smile warm. But I’m at the gallery to learn more about Lacy, the Charlotte Street Foundation’s fi rst curator-in-residence. Her inaugural Charlotte Street exhibition, Have I been here before?, is hours from its First Friday debut, and I expect to meet someone less calm and friendly. But the longtime resident of Chicago, who grew up in a small, rural town near Columbia, Missouri, isn’t putting up a front. On the eve of this show, which consists solely of Kansas City artists, she’s eager to have a genuine conversation. Lacy has been here only two months, but she has embraced the city and its artists with just that kind of openness and unadorned curiosity. It’s clear that she really does want people — local artists, for this exhibition’s purposes — to tell her all about themselves. “I wanted the show to be really collaborative so I could introduce myself to the city and have the city introduce itself to me,” she tells me as we stand in the gallery, surrounded by more than 60 paintings, drawings, sculptures, photographs and prints by 16 artists and one collaborative team. She’s co-teaching a course for the art department at the University of Missouri–Kansas City, and students there have assisted with theme attracted submissions by 39 authors. Selected quotes are scrawled on the walls graphic design and writing for this show. The Charlotte Street Foundation resi- alongside the art. Her own exhibition text centers on the dency marks a natural extension of her inway memory colors our perceptions of terest in urban space (and in collaboration). place. “Like the real things, memories of In Chicago, Lacy directed the Twelve Galplaces take up a lot of space,” she writes. leries Project, for which she and a team of “They crowd one another. They push and volunteers cleaned up empty rental spaces they shove. The mind’s eye for monthlong, site-specific struggles to keep order…. installations by emerging Have I been here before? Have I been here before? artists in neighborhoods Through December 22 at presents these memories throughout the city. CharLa Esquina, 1000 West and places in its own atlotte Street’s Urban Cul25th Street, 816-221-5115, tempt to capture just what ture Project was founded Charlottestreet.org is so familiar about this with the goal of activatplace, that place or any ing empty retail and office place.” She goes on to posit that artists in spaces in the urban core. Her tenure here includes curating two additional exhibitions this show have created images of real places informed by (or combined with) false memoat La Esquina. Since coming to Kansas City, Lacy has ries, a tactic that provokes the déjà vu referenced in the exhibition’s name. been to six or seven studios a week, she says, Even after you’ve read Lacy’s essay, and some of the works she has encountered on those visits appear at La Esquina (a few though, the works in Have I don’t feel unified by her thesis (or anyone else’s). She has in unexpected ways). She approaches artists chosen some good art — much of which stubwithout an agenda, endeavoring instead to bornly refuses to stand under the umbrella learn about their practices and add them to of her ideas about place and memory. These the network of connections she has made landscapes, domestic interiors and photoacross the country. “It’s important for me to meet with an graphs — the categories that dominate this show — aren’t easily reduced to the show’s artist and just be generous with them inhoped-for exploration of “this place, that stead of them giving to me,” she explains. place or any place.” Mike Sinclair’s photoLacy’s generosity and enthusiasm are graph of the old Katz Drug Store on the corvisible on the gallery walls. Have I been here before? has a great deal to look at, with many ner of Westport Road and Main Street, for example, shows us a building at a particular pieces hung closely together (in some cases, just inches apart), and also a lot to read. moment, but that’s not what makes the image Her open call for writing on the exhibition’s remarkable. Ditto Erin Noel Russell’s found

Lacy and some of the works she has assembled at La Esquina. snapshots, which she has altered with gold and silver leaf or muslin to eerily obscure the people who serve as their subjects. Trying to map what’s evocative in these works to Lacy’s thesis would be reductive to the art (and wouldn’t serve Lacy’s essay well, either). Judith G. Levy’s “Panoramic Postcards,” on the other hand, would seem a perfect fit to the show’s conceit. Her witty tableaus resemble antique postcards of tourist sites but are newly imagined destinations manufactured using depictions of various real locations, sliced up and recombined as dark figments of the collective subconscious. Levy uses the familiar quaintness of pennypostcard imagery to reopen dark chapters of American history, such as slavery and the U.S. government’s treatment of Native Americans. Yes, Levy’s art answers, we have been here before. But the fi rmness of that vision (along with its deeply nuanced execution) ends up out of sync with Lacy’s design. That’s a hazard of any wide-lens curatorial effort, though, and Lacy seems comfortable with the risks of letting the art speak for itself. She tells me that her aim in assembling Have I was to encourage multiple interpretations: “Unlike many shows where the curator sets up a fi xed relationship, that doesn’t happen here, thankfully.” Lacy’s decisions regarding the works’ display give plenty of opportunity for viewers to create their own connections among works, both written and visual. “They crowd one another. They push and they shove,” she muses in her essay. She’s talking about memory and its fragmentation, but the declara-

tion aptly describes how this show’s many individual pieces interact with one another. The proximity of so much formally accomplished and conceptually layered art is the most striking aspect of this show. At one point, I ask Lacy what she thinks about the art scene here, and she answers, “I’m amazed at the depth and breadth of the work being created.” And so she seems to have set out to illustrate that impression by including as much as this space would hold. Yet somewhere in all that pushing and shoving and instability, there are new ways to look at works that have been shown in Kansas City before. Even gallerygoers long on a first-look basis with pieces by John Ferry and Jaimie Warren won’t expect to see Ferry’s painterly interior studies on display above Warren’s photograph “Untitled (Naoko, Squid Teeth),” a close-up of teeth covered in an inky black substance. What either artist is saying about place or memory is debatable, but here Lacy shows how canny her instincts can be. Lacy’s fresh perspective, that of an eager and hardworking out-of-town curator, promotes reconsideration — if not exactly the kind she seems to have had in mind. Her first Charlotte Street exhibition falters under the weight of its rhetorical ambitions, but it demonstrates a surprisingly swift and unusually sympathetic comprehension of Kansas City’s artists. So I’ll take a cue from Lacy and remember Have I been here before? a little falsely, with a different title: I’m glad to be here!

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MOUNTAIN MAN

Cézanne pioneered modern art and loved the land, says biographer Alex Danchev.

BY

THE RE S A BE MBNI S T E R

A

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NOVEMBER 8 -14, 2012

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SARAH GROCHALA

C O U R T E S Y O F T H E N E L S O N - AT K I N S

pivotal figure in the transition from Impressionism (think Monet’s “Water Lilies”) to Cubism (Picasso), French PostImpressionist painter Paul Cézanne invented a new way to represent three-dimensional space on canvas, breaking traditions that had been in place since the Renaissance and influencing generations of artists to come. British author Alex Danchev discusses his new book, Cézanne: A Life, in a Rainy Day Books-sponsored talk at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art. In a phone conversation with The Pitch, Danchev explains what makes Cézanne such a noteworthy subject. The Pitch: You’re a professor of international relations. Why have you chosen art as one of your major areas of scholarship? Danchev: I try to combine the general realm of art or works of the imagination with the realm of politics and international relations. I teach on art and war, for example, and I often write biographies. We should be treating the lives of artists more like the world’s historical figures, to bring them out of the ghetto of art and into history. Cézanne was truly one of the world’s historical figures in the sense that he is one of the people who created the modern world for us. You begin your book by declaring Cézanne’s looked utterly new and strange and took some 1907 posthumous retrospective in Paris as the most consequential exhibition of modern getting used to. What was new about it was that he often dispensed with the conventions times. That’s a pretty bold statement. of painting that people had got used to, the Cézanne died the previous year. When usual sort of perspective, where things look he died, the people who knew most about smaller as they recede in space. That doesn’t him were his fellow artists: Renoir, Monet necessarily happen in Cézanne’s paintings. and so on. They collected his work. They Things might be at a slant, rather than tried to understand what he was doing. He straight up. The colors might be muddled; wasn’t really famous or well-known beyond those artists. Most people had never seen you might have a blue tree and some red sky. I admire all this because he made it work. He Cézanne’s work. They may have heard he made you see the world as was doing amazing painthe saw it — but a new world, ings, but they wouldn’t a Cézanne world. have been able to see any “He has become Several of Cézanne’s asbecause they weren’t in the great sociates described him as museums. They were in tormented with self-doubt. private collections. Sometormented artist That’s a recurring theme in thing like 56 Cézannes in in many the lives of modern artists the middle of Paris — that — the tormented genius in was more Cézannes than people’s eyes.” his studio. anyone had seen before. Cézanne is associated Ever yone went. People very much with the torcame from all over Europe ment of self-doubt. Probably the most faand North America to see for the first time mous article written about him is called what the legendary painter had been doing. Some of the visitors there used what Cézanne “Cézanne’s Doubt.” That was written by a philosopher [Maurice Merleau-Ponty] in had been doing in their own work. For ex1945, well after he died. It was an indication ample: Picasso, Braque and the Cubists. of just how much he was associated with the Early on in the book, you use a quote from idea of the great, tormented artist. He has painter and theorist Maurice Denis: “I have become the great tormented artist in many never heard an admirer of Cézanne give me people’s eyes. a clear and precise reason for his admiraPersonally, I think his torment has been tion.” How would you explain your admiration overdone. I try to explain how he was more clearly, precisely and succinctly? normal and less pathological than many If you spend 500 pages of a book explainpeople think. There’s a famous story of ing this, it’s difficult to explain it in a sentence or two. Cézanne painted like no one else be- Cézanne meeting van Gogh, another fafore him. Quite a lot of people say that. It mously tormented artist. And I think it’s only

Cézanne’s “Mont Sainte-Victoire” shows an object of the artist’s obsession, says Danchev (above). a story — it’s too good to be true. Van Gogh showed his work to Cézanne, and Cézanne said, “My God, you paint like a madman.” The very existence of this story is an indication of his association with torment. You devote several lines of your book to disputing prominent myths about the artist. What misconception is so strong that you expect it to linger even when you’ve disproved it? Probably the misconception, in my opinion, that he was pathologically afraid of women and, by extension, that he had difficulty conducting normal relations with people, including his own wife. I think that misperception is very deeply ingrained. I’ve tried to fight against it in my book. The Nelson-Atkins has one of Cézanne’s paintings in “Mont Sainte-Victoire” in its collection. That’s a subject Cézanne returned to over and over again. Can you explain his fascination with the subject? He painted that mountain about 40 times — a lot, a lot. He would be spending sometimes days, sometimes weeks looking at the mountain and painting the mountain. For him, it symbolized the land, the country, his country, that he felt he knew so intimately and meant so much to him. He had a profound understanding of the land. One of his friends was a geologist, and in one of his sketchbooks, there were sketches of the various periods of the Earth’s formation. Cézanne understood very deeply, very personally, how the land had got to be like that — why there were mountains, why there were forests, how long they had been there. He had a profound love of the land. He was in his own way an environmentalist, before the pitch.com

environmentalists. I think the mountains spoke to him in that context. You include a quote by Ernest Hemingway in the epilogue: “I learned to understand Cézanne much better and to see truly how he made landscapes when I was hungry.” What do you think he meant, and why did you include it? I was intrigued that Hemingway had spent so long looking at Cézanne’s paintings in Paris, and he felt he had gained something from looking at them for his own art. One of the things that interests me most about Cézanne is how he’s been an exemplary figure for all sorts of artists, writers, philosophers and poets, not just other painters, but all kinds of people — including, for example, Hemingway. I put him in as an example of that, of the sheer breadth of his influence. What he meant by it is hard to tell. I think it’s partly a joke on Hemingway’s part, in that some of the paintings he was looking at were still lifes and they were chock-full of things to eat while he was hungry. Perhaps that made him hungrier, or perhaps it sharpened his vision or senses, so he had a keener appreciation for what he was looking at. I think it’s partly a sly sense of humor on Hemingway’s part. Cézanne’s sense of humor was also a little sly in that it was hard to tell if he was being serious or being funny. Alex Danchev speaks about his book, Cézanne: A Life, at 7 p.m. Friday, November 9, in Atkins Auditorium at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, 4525 Oak. For details, see nelson-atkins.org or rainydaybooks.com/alexdanchev.

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FILM

BOOM BOOM

Sam Mendes gives James Bond license to look back in Skyfall.

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S C O T T W IL S ON

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ecause the latest James Bond movie arrives in U.S. theaters with breathless Internet praise following its overseas release a couple of weeks ago, let’s start by getting the superlatives out of the way. Skyfall is awesome. Daniel Craig is the best 007 since Sean Connery. Javier Bardem is the best Bond villain since Roger Moore. Awesome, best, boom. But let’s be clear about punctuation: That’s awesome, period; best, period; boom, full stop. If you like your superlatives shot through with exclamation points, Skyfall isn’t the Bond for you. (Exception: Adele! Born to E R MO sing a Bond song!) Over his 50 years onscreen, T t h is lea st u rgent of A E IN ONL .COM screen heroes — as conPITCH cerned with shooting his cuffs as he is with shooting thugs — has never been a shouter. And on director Sam Mendes’ watch, Craig’s Bond muscles past elegant sang-froid to reach an icy, near-meditative state. James Bond, mutely contemplative? What could he possible be thinking about? The past, say screenwriters Neal Purvis, Robert Wade and John Logan. Country, identity, mortality. Octopussy, not so much. So, right, plot: After a couple of bullets and a fall from an impossible height fail to extinguish him, Bond hides out in Turkey. He drinks. He gets laid. He stays improbably beefy. And he apparently spends some of his presumed-dead time Netflixing the Bourne movies and Christopher Nolan’s Batman trilogy because he returns to duty feeling kind of origin story. (Like Bruce Wayne in this year’s The Dark Knight Rises, he also manages to get a haircut and a smart outfit on his moneyless

FILM

way back to the grid.) Meanwhile, his nemesis is Bardem’s Silva, a mustard-haired psycho obsessed with his own MI6 history, one that includes a betrayal to avenge. That’s basically it. No stolen warheads, no deadly lasers, no sexy gadgets. What multinational threat there is amounts to a tincture of the cyber-attack dread now familiar to anyone who has watched a network-TV thriller since 24 hit the airwaves 11 years ago. There’s just one tricked-out car, and saying more about it would dampen one of the few laughs in this stern little event. Most of the other mirth on display comes courtesy of Bardem, who makes Silva a more talkative version of his Anton Chigurh, from No Country for Old Men. His one long scene opposite Craig is a love song, delivered with just enough threat to generate suspense later and with the awareness that he’s still getting valuable mileage from having played the indestructible Chigurh. And there are, for the first time in a while in this series (maybe ever), a couple of suspenseful moments, thanks to that echo of menace. If that’s a cheat, well, this is a Bond movie. The most self-aware (all right, the car is Goldfinger’s Aston Martin), nostalgic (see last parenthetical), English (ibid) Bond movie ever conceived, but still. It’s also the most stylized and art-house, thanks to Mendes’ favorite cinematographer, the great Roger Deakins. (Also the Coen brothers’ go-to camera guy, Deakins shot Bardem in No Country.) Rebuking the shaky action of Paul Greengrass’ Bourne movies while outwitting genre convention, Deakins uses light, color and fi ltration to make some of Skyfall’s action sequences memorably balletic and painterly. But it’s a plain, quiet scene, co-starring

Bond will not go quietly. a real painting, that Mendes wants us to think about. As Bond awaits a new Q (Ben Whishaw) at the National Gallery, he stares at J.M.W. Turner’s “The Fighting Téméraire Tugged to Her Last Berth to Be Broken Up,” an 1838 depiction of a steamship towing a vessel of the Napoleonic Wars to the scrap yard. By this point, several people have wished Bond good luck, all with an implied “you’re going to need it, old chap.” Craig doesn’t play Bond discernibly older than his own 44 years, but he finds some weary new notes in the character. He needs those notes to sell a climax that cranks the back-story pathos to Harry Potter levels (drowned out when Silva shows up blaring the Animals’ 1964 single “Boom Boom” from a helicopter full of the usual faceless henchmeat). The idea of Bond and M (Judi Dench, as Judi Dench) billeting at the Bond family estate in Glencoe (the Scottish place that Fleming said his creation was from after he saw Connery in the part) is more of that looking back, more of that Nolan urge for exposition. But don’t think about it too much or else you’ll start missing the old world-domination plots, and that would be worse. Besides, Skyfall’s sometimes cloyingly self-aware nostalgia is a witty nod to the amnesiac Bourne and a firm assertion of British identity. This is, after all, the kind of movie that gives one of Charles Noke’s Royal Doulton ceramic bulldogs more screen time than the fi rst of Bond’s exotic conquests. For now, anyway, it feels oddly right to see a 007 with a license to Churchill.

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CAFÉ

N A A N S O FA I R

Saffron could be a winner if the spice is right.

BY

CHARLES FERRUZZA

Saffron Authentic Indian Restaurant • 8140 Northwest Prairie View Road, 816-505-5576 • Hours: Lunch buffet 11 a.m.–2:30 p.m. Monday–Sunday; dinner 5–10 p.m. Monday–Sunday • Price: $$–$$$

f there were such a thing as a do-it-yourself Indian-restaurant kit, you might think that Sarbjit Singh and his wife, Navneet Kaur, owners of the two-month-old Saff ron Authentic Indian Restaurant, had used one to put together their tidy, no-frills dining room in the Northland. It’s not a particularly warm or welcoming space, and it’s painted a cringe-inducing shade of yellow that might have come with instructions on making your restaurant as eat it-andbeat-it as possible. The only art on the walls are a few unattractive framed pieces hung about 3 inches from the ceiling. The steam tables for the lunch buffet are pushed back along one wall, and the plate-glass windows offer a panoramic view — of an asphalt parking lot. Saffron is tucked into an utterly forgettable brown-concrete shopping strip south of the Zona Rosa complex. So forgettable, in fact, that it remains not so easy to find even once you’ve E MOR been there. And the landmarks to help orient you are a little sad: a Motel T A E IN ONL .COM 6 and the raucous blueH C IT P collar saloon called Dirks. Look for those businesses, though, and you’ll know where to turn on Prairie View Road. The first time I ventured out to find the restaurant, I got lost twice and when I finally parked in front of the place, I thought, “Where the hell am I?” Despite its assault on my eyes and my odometer, Saff ron allayed some of my concerns the moment I stepped though its front door. I was instantly enveloped in the comforting fragrances of cumin, garlic, ginger and cayenne. A restaurant that smells delicious is always a good sign, even if it’s in the Twilight Zone. Singh and Kaur, natives of the Punjab region of India, moved to Kansas City last year from Las Vegas because they wanted to open their own restaurant. Singh had been working as a cook in the notorious city of high rollers and cheap buffets, helping make Northern Indian cuisine in one such low-stakes culinary outpost. He knew Sin City would be prohibitively expensive if he wanted to run his own business, so his ears perked up when family members in Kansas City suggested that the couple look around this city’s Northland. “My husband came and liked this location,” Kaur says. “And we moved here.” Saff ron is still a work in progress. Singh has applied for a liquor license (right now the most intoxicating beverage on the menu is a cold mango lassi) and hopes to offer Kalyani Black Label beer (a good complement to his curry dishes) before the end of the year. The buffet offered during lunch hours is well-stocked, but the regular menu items aren’t available then; Saffron is menuonly after 5 p.m., with no buffet.

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garlic and onion. It’s a little greasier than traditional tandoori-baked concoctions, and the better for it. In contrast, the poori — big, No one is going to confuse Saffron with the more glamorous and sophisticated Swagat res- golden balloons of deep-fried whole-wheat taurant a few blocks away, in the Zona Rosa dough — is the least oily version of this bread I’ve tasted in the metro. It’s absolutely delishopping complex, though the newer venue’s name has an ambitiously luxe quality. (Saffron cious with a spoonful of Singh’s sag paneer, a silky blend of creamed spinach and houseis the world’s most expensive spice.) The young made cheese, and a dollop of Saffron’s neonowners didn’t choose it, though. “One of our green, slightly sweet mint chutney. investors liked the name,” Kaur tells me. “Our And a dollop might be all you get — Saffron English is not very good yet.” But they’re trying to learn. Singh steps out is a little stingy with its condiments. I had to practically beg for a bit of onion chutney, of the kitchen frequently during the evening and all the house chutneys to greet customers. He’s a and the shiny tamarind bit reserved, not nearly as Saffron Authentic sauce are served in Lillipuchatty and gregarious as Indian Restaurant tian cups not much more his wife, but he’s friendly Vegetable samosas .......$3.99 voluminous than a jigger. and eager to get feedback Tandoori combination For some reason, though, about his dishes, most of dinner .......................... $19.99 the cup of yogurt raita that I which are from traditional Vegetarian combination received one evening could Northern Indian recipes. dinner ........................... $17.99 have fed a family of 10. And Singh and Kaur have Chicken tikka masala...$12.99 Rogan josh .....................$13.99 So Singh and Kaur are a communication asset in Poori .................................$2.99 on a learning curve with the brassy local waitress Kulfi ...................................$1.99 Saff ron. But you can’t help they’ve hired, Christina, but want them to succeed. a physical-education stuI hope that they stop frying dent at Park University who the vegetable pakoras past the point of petriis one part Bette Midler, one part Naomi Judd and two parts Ethel Merman. She’s fication, which seems easy enough. But they articulate about every dish on the menu and need not tinker with the vegetable samosas, not shy about making recommendations. which are glorious, the delicate pastry crust “Why order the plain naan bread,” she told almost bursting with a smooth stuffi ng of seasoned potatoes and peas. me one night, “when you can get the kabuli “Almost bursting” sums up the dinners at naan baked with nuts, cherries, raisins and coconut? And what you don’t eat with your Saffron. Here, the greatest hits of the Northern Indian culinary repertoire are attractively dinner, you can take home and heat up for presented and reasonably priced and generbreakfast in the morning. It’s the best breakously portioned. The six combination dinners fast bread ever.” Sold. include bread, raita and a mildly spiced dal, The breads at Saff ron are indeed tasty. My favorite might be the “special” version, the thick lentil stew that’s delicious spooned over rice or a puffy wedge of naan. fi lled with fi nely chopped paneer cheese,

Aloo gobi and garlic naan warm the palate.

The vegetable platter — served thali-style, as a palette of little dishes (in this case the creamy sag paneer, the tender cauliflower aloo gobi, and spiced garbanzo beans), with dal, bread and saffron-spiced basmati rice — is an appealing way to sample several meatless choices at once. As with another of the combination dinners (a sizzling, white-hot metal platter heaped with fiery, red tandoori-baked chicken and minced lamb sausages, chopped onions and peppers), it’s a big meal with more than enough here for two patrons to share. All of Saffron’s dishes can be ordered with three degrees of spiciness: regular, medium and very. A better translation might be not spicy, kind of on the edge of spicy, and ow. If you’d like the lamb vindaloo to make your eyes water, then pick option three. Even the mildly spiced choices are flavorful, with the chicken tikka masala gorgeously buttery. The rogan josh, succulent lamb in a fragrant cinnamon and cardamom sauce, is outstanding. (There’s a saffron-flavored ice cream, kulfi, for dessert, and it needs a little more saffron. Better is the much more intensely flavored mango version.) The music I heard in the dining room on my visits ran from bouncy Bombay disco to Calcutta rap, a spectrum more adventurous than the cuisine. Among Singh and Kaur’s challenges will be learning to narrow the gap between what’s easy on the tongue and what’s bland, and finding a spice level between “a little” and “too much.” But when a place is named Saffron, and when it’s run by people with good instincts, there’s every reason to believe they’ll conquer that learning curve and spice up the Northland.

Have a suggestion for a restaurant The Pitch should review? E-mail charles.ferruzza@pitch.com

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THE PITCH

816-471-0450

NOVEMBER 8 -14, 2012

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I

s there life for the Hereford House brand after Rod Anderson? For more than two decades, Anderson, the tall and congenial accountant who turned an aging downtown steakhouse into the flagship of a successful restaurant group, was the public face of the Hereford House restaurants. But on October 31, after a high-profile trial, the 59-year-old restaurateur was found guilty of arson, mail fraud, conspiracy, and using fire to commit a federal crime. Anderson had been charged in connection with the October 20, 2008, fire that destroyed the original Hereford House restaurant, at 2 East 20th Street, which opened in 1957. (Anderson’s two co-defendants, Vincent Pisciotta and Mark Sorrentino, were found guilty of arson, conspiracy, and using fire to commit a federal crime.) At the time of the fire, the Anderson Restaurant Group operated the four remaining Hereford House restaurants as well as the 13-year-old Pierpont’s at Union Station restaurant. Anderson’s name and image were crucial to each restaurant’s publicity and marketing. Jim Stanislav, chief financial officer for the Anderson Restaurant Group for the past 12 years, doesn’t sound worried. “I don’t believe the negative publicity from the trial will hurt the Hereford House in the long run,” he tells me. “At least I’m praying that it won’t. I haven’t seen any backlash yet and I don’t think that we will.” Anderson faces a prison sentence of 15–35 years. And even if he successfully appealed his convictions, he would unlikely ever play a role in his company. That leaves room for Stanislav to become the company’s face, but he says he hasn’t thought that far ahead. “It’s too soon to tell,” Stanislav says. He adds that no decision has been made about renaming Anderson Restaurant Group. “We’re still sorting out all the details here,” he says. “We’re in the process of deciding who is going to do what in the company. The one thing that won’t change will be the day-to-day operation of the restaurants.” For Stanislav, the core of those operations — and the reason behind the Hereford House brand’s long run — is the company’s staff. “We have employees that have been with us for

A last shot of the old Hereford House. over 10, 15 and 20 years, the servers, managers, bartenders who have been part of our business for 50 years,” he says. “Those are the people that our customers expect to see at the restaurants when they come in to dine.” When the original Hereford House burned, many of the longtime employees at that location stayed with the company, moving to one of the four satellite operations — in Leawood, Zona Rosa, Shawnee and Independence. A bigger challenge for the Hereford House restaurants than the recent trial publicity, Stanislav says, is keeping a half-century-old brand relevant in the modern, steakhouseheavy restaurant community. One way to keep customer loyalty has been to continue offering full-plate steak dinners, unlike the upscale beef palaces that offer primarily a la carte menus. “Our customers do not pay extra for a salad, breads and a side dish,” Stanislav reminds me. “We’ve had discussions about that in the past, but we know what our customers want, and we’ll continue to provide that level of assurance.” During the trial of Anderson, Pisciotta and Sorrentino, two former Hereford House employees testified that Anderson had shown them, before the 2008 fire, an architectural rendering of a new building that Anderson wanted to construct on the property at 2 East 20th Street. Assistant U.S. Attorney Jess Michaelsen told the jury on the first day of the trial that Anderson was in debt and “out of options” prior to the destruction of the restaurant, yet had wanted to build a new Hereford House to compete with the Power & Light District’s upscale new venues. “Rod Anderson had a dream, a vision of what he wanted a new downtown Hereford House restaurant to look like,” Michaelsen said. The Anderson Restaurant Group does not own the property where the original Hereford House once stood — now a narrow, grassy plot. But Stanislav does not rule out building a new Hereford House on the site. “It’s a possibility,” he says. “Who knows?”

E-mail charles.ferruzza@pitch.com

PRESENTED BY

NOVEMBER 24TH, 2012 TROLLEY CRAWL

PIRATES VS. NINJAS Who would win in a fight? Come dressed as your choice!

HOW TO VOTE:

• Take a picture as your choice in front of OR on the trolley • Tag The Kansas City Strip Facebook page • Most tags answers this long asked question!!! • Prizes for best dressed at participating bars:

* Indie On Main * Dark Horse Tavern * Luna Nightclub

Angels Rock Bar No Cover on Friday Drunken Fish Late Night Happy Hour-10pm to Close Fran's Restaurant

The Only Cigar Shop on the Strip. 10% Off Purchase of Cigars

Appetizer get Second of Equal or Lesser Value at 1/2 Price Firefly Brookside $5.99 Premium Breakfast on Fridays, $4 $4 Wells, No Cover All Night with Hickok's $5 Mojito $6 Black Margaritas Brooksider Sports Bar & Grill Bacardi & 360 Vodka Bombs after 10pm, Wristband Open 24 Hours Green Room Burgers and Beer $3 Draws and Free Queso with 2 Food $3 Corona Bottles Howl At The Moon Free Fry with Purchase of an Entrée Purchases, $3 House Margaritas Minsky's Pizza Charlie Hooper's Bar & Grille 2 for 1 cover Gusto $1 off Apps $2.50 Domestic Draws $3 Fridays- $1 Off Boulevard, $2 Yard Beers and $5 Grape Bombs Indie On Main Wells $12 Bucket of Beers and 50 Cents Saturdays $1 off Domestic Bottles $3 Domestics with wristband! Harpo's Restaurant Bar off Martinis Maker’s Mark Bourbon $2 Selected Shots The Blue Line Michael Forbes Grille House & Lounge Reverse Happy 930pm-1am. $2 Blue Line Beers $2 Blue Line Jersey Dog, Hot Dog Cart $5 Maker's Mark Cocktails 2 for 1 Wells $3 Margaritas 2 Jumbo Dogs for $5 and $1 Off Shots $3 Wells McFadden's Sport's Saloon Winslow's BBQ Any Sandwich $4 UV Flavors Cocktails Martini Corner $5 off Lunch or Dinner for Two Jerusalem Cafe Mosaic Lounge Haus $5 off Hooka No Cover Before 11pm Waldo $3 Radaberger Pilsner & Joe's Pizza Buy the Slice PBR Big Sky Bar 75th Street Brewery Agris-Pinot Gris 2 Slices for $5 $5 Jack Daniel’s Drinks $2.50 Wells, Bombs, and Pints! Sol Cantina Kelly's Westport Inn Bobby Baker's Lounge Pizza Bar $4 Trolley Margaritas & $2 Domestic Bottles & $3 Rock Lobster Shots $1 off Cover $3 Boulevard Wheat Pints $2.75 Pacifico Bottle Lew's Grill & Bar McCoy's Public House Shark Bar The Drop $2.50 Bud Light Draws $4.00 McCoy's Pints $4 Malibu Cocktails Quinton's $6 Specialty Martinis & Cocktails Tengo Sed Cantina Missie B's $3 Domestic Draws $3 Wells and a Free Cover Tower Tavern $3 El Jimador Margarita Complimentary Shot with wristband! The Dubliner Riot Room $3.50 Wells and Remedy Food + Drink $3.50 Boulevard Wheat on Fridays and $5 Jameson $3 Wells after Midnight 15% off with Wristband $10 Pizza 7pm-12am Free cover with Wrist Band Tanner's Bar and Grill Tea Drops Velvet DOG Z-Strike Bowling $2.50 Budlight 16 oz. Draws $1.00 Off a Cupcake or Regular Tea $1 off all Skyy Drinks 2 for 1 games, No cover on Fridays The Foundry The Well Bar-Grill and Rooftop Monaco $4.00 McCoy's Pints No Cover Free Spinach Dip w/any Purchase

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DOWNTOWN

POWER & LIGHT DISTRICT 18th & VINE

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W 31 St

E 18 St

E 19 St

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MARTINI CORNER Rd ort stp We

The Paseo

Luna special Free Champagne for all Bachelorette Parties, No Cover for Ladies!

P&L

RIVER MARKET

Main St

16th & Grand

Fri - Sat 9pm-Close $2.50 Domestic Draws $2.75 Wells $4.50 Cuervo Margaritas

5 St

WESTPORT

Brush Creek Blvd

E 63 ST

PLAZA de Blvd

Uptown Arts Bar Buy One Get One Free Wine or Mixed Drinks (Except Premiums)

TROLLEY STOPS

Br oo ks

OutaBounds Fridays-$2 Wells All Night, Saturdays-$5 Bomb Shots after 9pm

Figlio $5 off Any Purchase 7-10pm O'Dowds Free Cover & $5 Boru Irish Vodka Tomfooleries

Westport

Wyandotte

36th & Broadway

Blanc Burgers + Bottles Reverse Happy Tacos,Calimari, and Great Drink Specials!

Westport

Torre's Pizzeria Beer Kitchen Any Specialty Pizza for $10 & 2 Late Night Happy Hour Friday & Slices for $4 Saturday 11pm-1am Westport Cafe and Bar Buzzard Beach $1.25 Domestic Drafts $2.50 Wells Shot and a Beer for $5 Westport Coffee House Californos 15% Off Any Coffee Drink $5 off $12 purchase Downtown Dark Horse $2 Wells $2 domestic draws $12 Anthony's Power Hours 8pm-10pm Fri & Sat 2 for 1 Any Item from Late Night Menu with Purchase of Two Beverages Dave's Stagecoach Inn John's Big Deck (Upper) $3 Jameson Shots and $2 16oz $3 Wells $4 Bombs and No Cover Cans of PBR Ernie Biggs Dueling Piano Bar River Market 2 for 1 cover Café Al Dente Fidel’s Cigar Shop $3 Mascot Shots, Buy One

Wornall Rd

18th & Vine Danny's Big Easy Get Your Wristbands here!

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BROOKSIDER WALDO E 75TH

Where do I catch the trolley?

• River Market - The Blue Line • Downtown - John’s Big Deck • Power & Light - Dubliner • 18th & Vine - Danny’s Big Easy • 36th & Broadway-Uptown Arts Bar • Martini Corner - Velvet Dog • Westport - Dark Horse • 16th & Grand - Luna • Plaza - O’Dowds • Brookside - Brooksider • Waldo - Quinton’s

NOVEMBER 8 -14, 2012

THE PITCH

25

MUSIC

THAW, YEAH

Olassa asks: I Love You, Come Back to Me. We say: OK.

BY

A PR IL F L EMING

A

couple of years ago, Allison Olassa returned from a trip to the grocery store and told Cain Robberson, “I met a tuba player while shopping for frozen fruit.” This turned out to be fortunate news. Olassa and Robberson, late of the Lawrence group Tiny Tuxedo, had found a new bandmate. “At the time,” Tyler Bachert says, “the tuba was the last thing I wanted to play.” He had focused on the big brass instrument in college but more recently had become interested in the upright bass. (He also knows a thing or two about the drums.) Olassa made a convincing case in the frozen aisle, though. The result is the three-person outfit that shares her name — Olassa — and is about to release its debut EP. Bachert is telling me about his role in the Americana trio’s origin at Frank’s North Star Tavern in Lawrence. It’s karaoke night here, E MOR and a loud Pink Floyd rendition threatens to drown him out. Over T A INE drinks and the someONL .COM PITCH times deafening sounds of people trying to sing the catalogs of Lady Gaga and Kanye West, he and Robberson and Olassa tell me how they came to make I Love You, Come Back to Me. The group pulls from two distinct energies: Allison’s and Robberson’s. Her style is highly focused but mellow, and his is frenetic. He’s a jump-on-the-amps-and-playit-hard musician. Bridged by Bachert, who says his way falls somewhere in the middle, they’re making some very appealing music. And they’ve become a captivating live act, thanks in part to the way that Allison’s and Robberson’s voices work together. ���Allison’s big on people singing with their own voice,” Robberson says as the karaoke buzzes around us. Someone is boldly and somewhat effectively belting Radiohead’s “Creep.” Robberson fi nishes his thought: “And this is her voice.” It is her voice that you notice first when you hear the band. Her vibrato is distinct, just a little waver that she might deploy once or twice per phrase. “I call it a quiver,” Bachert says. “It would just come out when I sang softly,” Allison says. “And then I learned to use it when I was singing louder.” It accentuates Olassa’s rootsy sensibility, blending easily with a sound that fi nds room for guitars, accordion, tuba, bass and drums. Allison arrived in KC from Wichita about five years ago and started making a name for herself playing solo shows and in the Old Country Death Band. She had met Robberson at the Walnut Valley bluegrass festival in Winfield by then, and their time in Tiny Tuxedo taught them to love each other’s styles. So when that band split up because of another member’s move, Robberson and Olassa kept at it. As Robberson tells it, their

M US I C

26

THE PITCH

NOVEMBER 8 -14, 2012

pitch.com

sound began to “come down to a more beautiful, controlled place” from Tiny Tuxedo’s less restrained approach. Together, the three band members share 30 years of collective Winfield experience, and that easy association means that the group ends up on bluegrass bills. “We can definitely connect with that bluegrass crowd, but I feel like musically we belong more with the folk or indie crowd,” Robberson says. And while it’s true that the band has appeared here and there with a banjo player or with someone at the washboard at this or that bluegrass festival, the band’s music lacks most of the usual bluegrass elements.

“There’s just never enough time, never enough money to record in a studio.” The members of Olassa hope that I Love You, Come Back to Me, recorded earlier this year at Robberson and Olassa’s house, clears up any confusion and cements the group’s identity. All three musicians shared production duties, with Bachert engineering. (He produced albums for his other band, Lawrence’s Ample Branches.) “We cut our teeth making this record,” Robberson says. “We learned how to record. Before [in Robberson

“Hello, tuba repair?” Olassa comes calling. and Allison’s previous bands], the sound wasn’t ready yet.” “There’s just never enough time, never enough money to record in a studio,” Allison says. They’re proud of this first, appropriately homespun effort — and the feeling is warranted. I’ve spent some time with the EP since the getting-to-know-you night at karaoke, and it’s a strong showing. With six songs totaling 22 minutes, it accurately reflects the band’s personality. Allison takes three of the songwriting credits here, and Robberson the other three, a split that effectively echoes the duality of the band’s live performances. Yet it’s also a cohesive blend of these two personalities and styles, with Bachert’s inventive, playful percussion and instrumentation holding it all together. It’s a lovely album, with enough metaphor-heavy lyrics — encompassing death, friendship, lost connections and relationships — to keep lyric parsers busy, and just enough accordion, too. The band plans to release it before the end of the year, and they hope to herald its arrival with a release show in Lawrence (as well as future Ka nsas City appearances). It has been a slow thaw for a band born in a frozen-foods section, but I Love You, Come Back to Me deserves a warm welcome.

E-mail feedback@pitch.com pitch.com

MONTH

pitch.com

NOVEMBER 8 -14, 2012

THE PITCH

27

MUSIC

RADAR

M U S I C F O R E CAST

BY

Other shows worth seeing this week.

D AV ID HUDN A L L

T H U R S D AY, N O V E M B E R 8 Milo Greene, Bahamas: Early show. The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483.

F R I D AY, N O V E M B E R 9 Paul Thorn Marathon, with Samantha Fish: 8 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456.

S AT U R D AY, N O V E M B E R 10 Hijinks, concert by newEar: 8 p.m. All Souls Unitarian Universalist Church, 4501 Walnut, 816-531-2131. Opiate, Sir Knucklehead, Razorwire Halo: The Beaumont Club, 4050 Pennsylvania, 816-561-2560. Skeletonwitch, Havok, Mutilation Rites, Troglodyte: The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Paul Thorn Marathon, with the Nace Brothers: 9 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456.

S U N D AY, N O V E M B E R 11 BrokeNCYDE, Nathan Ryan, the Bunny the Bear: The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Paul Thorn at Old Time Southern Gospel Brunch: 11 a.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456.

T U E S D AY, N O V E M B E R 13

Clockwise from left: Crooked Fingers, Aerosmith and Neil Hamburger

Neil Hamburger, with Bacon Shoe

Sitting through a set by “America’s Funnyman,” as Neil Hamburger hilariously refers to himself, requires Olympian levels of good faith and stamina. Hamburger is a sort of anti-comedian, and the concept of his act is that he’s a washed-up hack, bitter at the showbiz establishment. His show is one giant nose dive. His appearance is especially grotesque: He dons an old tuxedo, huge glasses and a greasy comb-over. As he delivers his horrible one-liners about dated celebrities (Madonna, Britney Spears, Smash Mouth), he coughs hideously and deposits phlegm into the drink glasses that he tucks in the crook of his arm. “Has anyone here ever changed dirty diapers? You get shit all over your fuckin’ hands!” goes my favorite Hamburger joke. It’s not for everyone. With Bacon Shoe, a hip-hop parody act that I’m assuming still fries bacon on a griddle as part of its stage show. Saturday, November 10, at Czar (1531 Grand, 816-421-0300)

David Ramirez

Hate him or love him (mostly hate him), Ryan Adams has written a boatload of great songs and, in the process, inspired a generation of alt-country singer-songwriters. Three of them

appear on this bill. Austinite David Ramirez is on record as an Adams acolyte. We can only assume as much, given the gentle, disarming folk rock of openers Noah Gundersen (from Seattle) and David Burchfield and the Great Stop (Kansas City). Tuesday, November 13, at RecordBar (1020 Westport Road, 816-753-5207)

Crooked Fingers, with John Vanderslice

I wasn’t looped in enough in the 1990s to know about Archers of Loaf, a group of North Carolina slacker-rock heroes in league with other not-quite-mainstream acts like Superchunk and Pavement. I learned of the group only after discovering Crooked Fingers, the band that frontman Eric Bachmann started after the Archers split up. Crooked Fingers is a more melodic and pop-oriented outfit than the Archers, and I much prefer CF. That’s a deeply uncool opinion, but check out Dignity and Shame, Forfeit/Fortune or the band’s most recent, Breaks in the Armor, and tell me that those aren’t super-solid pop-rock records. With smart folk from John Vanderslice. Saturday, November 10, at RecordBar (1020 Westport Road, 816-753-5207)

F O R E C A S T

28

Aerosmith, with Cheap Trick

Aerosmith has a new album out this month, Music From Another Dimension. The lead single, “Legendary Child,” has been floating around the Web since sometime this summer, and it confi rms that Steven Tyler and company are completely out of ideas. The song is remarkable, really — they’ve just taken a bunch of their classic hooks and fills and made a new, terrible Frankenstein Aerosmith song out of them. It’s like the music equivalent of Scary Movie, but with no shred of irony or self-awareness. The worst part is, I kind of like it. Wednesday, November 14, at Sprint Center (1407 Grand, 816-949-7000)

MV & EE

Matt Valentine and Erika Elder are a couple of Vermont hippies who play spaced-out psych-folk songs, with traces of Neil Young and Dinosaur Jr. audible in equal measure. Opener Sons of Great Dane also combines a backwoods sound with ’90s rock, but its version is much more accessible and uptempo. Wednesday, November 14, at RecordBar (1020 Westport Road, 816-753-5207)

K E Y

..................................................Pick of the Week

............................................ Singer-Songwriters

............................................................Cash Grab

................................................................ Phlegm

..................................................... Sensitive Men

....................................................Leathery Faces

................................................ Excessive Grease

.............................................. Indie-Rock Legend

.....................................................Weed-Friendly

........................................................Cured Meats

..........................................................Mom Jeans

......................... Are You Ready for the Country?

THE PITCH

NOVEMBER 8 -14, 2012

pitch.com

pitch.com

Hinder (acoustic tour), Aranda: 8 p.m. The Riot Room, 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. The Infamous Stringdusters: The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483.

W E D N E S D AY, N O V E M B E R 1 4 Mayday Parade, the Maine, the Postelles: The Beaumont Club, 4050 Pennsylvania, 816-561-2560. The Red Elvises, the Rumblejetts: 8 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456.

FUTURECAST THURSDAY 15 Dropkick Murphys: Uptown Theater The Twilight Sad: RecordBar The Wallflowers: The Midland SATURDAY 17 Metalocalypse: Dethklok: The Midland Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band: Sprint Center SUNDAY 18 Matisyahu: Uptown Theater MONDAY 26 Paul Banks, Conner: The Granada, Lawrence THURSDAY 29 Tyler Ward: The Granada, Lawrence

DECEMBER SATURDAY 1 Killswitch Engage, Shadows Fall, Acaro: The Beaumont Club SATURDAY 8 KPR Big Band Christmas: Liberty Hall, Lawrence Lamb of God, In Flames, Hellyeah, Sylosis: Uptown Theater SUNDAY 9 Trans-Siberian Orchestra: the Lost Christmas Eve: Sprint Center SATURDAY 15 Carrie Underwood: Sprint Center

JANUARY MONDAY 4 Lady Gaga: Sprint Center SUNDAY 10 Emilie Autumn: The Granada, Lawrence THURSDAY 21 Toro Y Moi, Sinkane: The Granada, Lawrence

M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X

THE PITCH

1

THREADZ BY HEADZ FOR THE HEADS CLOTHING - JEWELRY ACCESSORIES - ART

OFFICIAL CROSSROADS TICKET OUTLET

1607 Westport Rd. KCMO 816-442-8400

Mon - Thurs 12-9pm • Fri - Sat 12-10pm • Sun 12-6pm

SATURDAY NIGHT  VIBRATIONS  HOSTED BY 95.7  THE VIBE

Mon - Thurs 12-9pm • Fri - Sat 12-10pm • Sun 12-6pm

Saturday, November 17, 2012

TECH N9NE INDEPENDENCE

@ EVENTCENTER

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THUNDER FROM DOWN UNDER

DECEMBER

Saturday, November 24, 2012

HEAR THEM BEFORE YOU SEE THEM

//FREE MUSIC PLAYER ON THE MUSIC HOME PAGE OF PITCH.COM

presents

BIG BAD VOODOO DADDY Thursday, December 6, 2012

Wed Nov 14

Advance tickets $15

ZAPPA PLAYS ZAPPA Thursday, December 13, 2012

UPCOMING SHOWS: 11/9 11/10

Flirt Friday Pure Empire

TICKETS

in advance at knuckleheadskc.com

1-800-745-3000

11/16

Kilroy Presents: Best of Cover Wars

11/21

Kilroy Presents: Club Wars Expo

  •  VooDooKC.com

WHERE THE BEST MUSICIANS IN THE WORLD PLAY

KNUCKLEHEADS 2715 Rochester • KCMO • 816-483-1456

Know When To Stop Before You Start.® Gambling Problem? Call 1-888-BETSOFF. Subject to change or cancellation. Phone and online orders are subject to service fees. Must be 21 years or older to gamble, obtain a Total Rewards ® card or enter VooDoo ®. ©2012, Caesars License Company, LLC.

pitch.com

NOVEMBER 8 -14, 2012

THE PITCH

29

WHERE THE BEST MUSICIANS IN THE WORLD PLAY

KNUCKLEHEADS F re e S h u tt le in S u rr o u n d in g A reth e a

NOVEMBER

7: Jon Wayne & The Pain w/ 77 Jeffersons 8: Sonny Moorman Blues Band

NOV 9,10,11: PAUL THORN

NIGHTLIFE Send submissions to Clubs Editor Abbie Stutzer by e-mail (abbie.stutzer@pitch.com), fax (816-756-0502) or phone (816-218-6926). Continuing items must be resubmitted monthly.

T H U R S D AY 8 ROCK/POP/INDIE Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Redneck Remedy, DVWR, Brimstone Crow, From the West, Story May Vary, 8 p.m. The Eighth Street Taproom: 801 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-6918. Ebony Tusks, Netherfriends. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Father Figures, DJ eKleCtic. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Gentleman Savage, Dawns, Squirt, 9 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Radar Defender, the World Record, Many Moods of Dad, 10 p.m.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL

9: Paul w/ special guest Samantha Fish 10: Paul w/ special guest The Nace Brothers 11: Paul (Gospel Brunch) w/ special guest Hal Wakes & presents Carl Butler 11: Blue Star Connections w/ Jimmy Hall, Kate Moss, Samantha Fish, Danielle & Kris Schnebelen & Reese Wynans

presents

14: The Red Elvises 17: Sonny Landreth

(one of the best TICKE TS NOW Guitar players OSlide N SALE ! on the planet)

NOV 17: RADNEY FOSTER Unplugged & Lonesome

A Living Room Session only 60 tickets will be sold

20: Rick Estrin & The Nightcats 21: Trampled Under Foot

For more info & tickets: knuckleheadskc.com 2715 Rochester, KCMO

816-483-1456

30

THE PITCH

NOVEMBER 8 -14, 2012

B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. John Paul’s Flying Circus. Gran-Daddy’s Barbeque: 1447 W. 23rd St., Lawrence, 785830-8665. Bed Against the Wall. The Hideout: 6948 N. Oak Tfwy., 816-468-0550. J.D. Michael King. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Funk & Soul Kitchen. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. The Sonny Moorman Group, 8 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Danny McGaw.

DJ Mosaic Lounge: 1331 Walnut, 816-679-0076. Mosaic Thursdays.

JAZZ The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. Matt Otto, Steve Lambert, Seth Lee, Crosscurrent, Sam Wisman. Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Joe Cartwright Duo. EBT Restaurant: 1310 Carondelet (I-435 and State Line), 816942-8870. Candace Evans.

AMERICANA Mike Kelly’s Westsider: 1515 Westport Rd., 816-931-9417. Scotty McCormick. Trouser Mouse: 625 N.W. Mock Ave., Blue Springs, 816-2201222. Sky Smeed.

COMEDY Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Marc Price.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS Bleachers Bar & Grill: 210 S.W. Greenwich Dr., Lee’s Summit, 816-623-3410. Extreme Bingo. Fatso’s Public House and Stage: 1016 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-865-4055. Electro Therapy Thursdays, 10 p.m. Johnny’s Tavern: 8262 Mission, Prairie Village, 913-901-0322. Bingo, 8 p.m. Kanza Hall: 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park, 913-451-0444. Freedom Fest Pre-Party. Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. Karaoke on the main floor, 10 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Trivia Clash, 7 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. MBird’s Artist Showcase, 7:30 p.m.; Uptown Heat, 10:30 p.m.

EASY LISTENING Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Interactive Acoustic with Jason Kayne, 9 p.m.

Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. John Keck’s Devils and Angels. Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Grind and Shine 2012, 6 p.m.

F R I D AY 9 ROCK/POP/INDIE Bar West: 7174 Renner Rd., Shawnee, 913-248-9378. Travelers Guild. Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. Velvet Freeze. Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Molehill, Little Rosco, the Future Kings, Gentlemen Savage, 7 p.m. Garrett’s Bar: 6505 Nieman, Merriam, 913-912-1191. 13th Hour. The Midland: 1228 Main, 816-283-9900. Katy Guillen, the Heavy Figs, Brandon Phillips. Mike Kelly’s Westsider: 1515 Westport Rd., 816-931-9417. The Wolfmanz Brother. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Spirit is the Spirit, Wooden Sky, Tiny Horse, 9 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Up the Academy, the Sluts, the Original 185, 10 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Six Percent (EP release), Lionize, Large, 8 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Kerrington Cooper, 10:30 p.m.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. John McNally. Clarette Club: 5400 Martway, Mission, 913-384-0986. JC the New King of Funk. Gran-Daddy’s Barbeque: 1447 W. 23rd St., Lawrence, 785830-8665. Dave Bostwick. The Hideout: 6948 N. Oak Tfwy., 816-468-0550. Back Porch Blues Band. Trouser Mouse: 625 N.W. Mock Ave., Blue Springs, 816-2201222. Kris Lager.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Ashes to Immortality. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Forrest Whitlow (CD release), Rick Gray, Harry Hewlett, 5 p.m.

DJ Club Monaco: 334 E. 31st St., 816-753-5990. DJ Shaun Flo. The Eighth Street Taproom: 801 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-6918. DJ G Train. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Wax Museum. The Quaff: 1010 Broadway, 816-471-1918. DJ E. VooDoo Lounge: Harrah’s Casino, 1 Riverboat Dr., North Kansas City, 816-472-7777. Flirt Friday.

JAZZ The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. Bob Bowman, Megan Birdsall. Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Joe Cartwright Trio. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Bram Wijnands, 7 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Lonnie McFadden, 4:30 p.m. Take Five Coffee + Bar: 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park, 913948-5550. Sons of Brasil. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Shades of Jade, 7 p.m.

AMERICANA Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Billy Ebeling & the Late for Dinner Band.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS

Double T’s Roadhouse: 1421 Merriam Ln., Kansas City, Kan., 913-432-5555. Blues Jam hosted by RocknRick’s Boogie Leggin’ Blues Band, 7 p.m. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 302 S.W. Main, Lee’s Summit, 816-525-1871. Jerry’s Jam Night, 9 p.m.

Bleachers Bar & Grill: 210 S.W. Greenwich Dr., Lee’s Summit, 816-623-3410. Open Juke Box. The Blue Line: 529 Walnut, 816-472-7825. Red Friday. The Brooksider: 6330 Brookside Plz., 816-363-4070. Team trivia. Hamburger Mary’s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-842-1919. Maryoke with Monique. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. Sandman the Hypnotist, 7:30 & 9:45 p.m.

PUNK

REGGAE

The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Plug Uglies, the Atlantic, I am Nation.

The Granada: 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Bad Fish, High Rise Robots, Arm the Poor.

VA R I E T Y

VA R I E T Y

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS

The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Songwriter Forum, 7 p.m., free.

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Aftershock Bar & Grill: 5240 Merriam Dr., Merriam, 913-3845646. Club Wars.

S AT U R D AY 10 ROCK/POP/INDIE The Brooksider: 6330 Brookside Plz., 816-363-4070. The Rock Show. Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. Cape Lions, the Lucky Graves, the Vedas. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-832-1085. The E Monarchs, Root and Stem, Sobriquet. MOR Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Making Movies. S G IN The Midland: 1228 Main, 816-283LIST E AT IN 9900. Dolls on Fire, the Quivers, the ONL M Hillary Watts Riot. PITCH.CO Sherlock’s Underground Coffeehouse & Pub: 858 State Route 291, Liberty, 816-429-5262. The Earl Baker Band. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Attic Lights, 10:30 p.m.

CLUB

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL The Hideout: 6948 N. Oak Tfwy., 816-468-0550. Samantha Fish. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. The Garrett Nordstrom Situation. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. The Brody Buster Band, 9 p.m.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. MAW, the Wheatbenders, 6 p.m.; Casey James Prestwood and the Burning Angels, Berwanger, 10 p.m.

DJ The Eighth Street Taproom: 801 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-6918. DJ Candlepants. MiniBar: 3810 Broadway. The Dropout Boogie. The Quaff: 1010 Broadway, 816-471-1918. DJ Chris. Saints Pub + Patio: 9720 Quivira, Lenexa, 913-492-3900. DJ Brad Sager.

HIP-HOP The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. The Winner’s Circle Showcase.

JAZZ The Blue Room: 1616 E. 18th St., 816-474-8463. James Ward, Angela Ward. Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. The Hatchlings. Take Five Coffee + Bar: 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park, 913948-5550. Project H.

COMEDY Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. Dirty Dorothy on the main floor, 10 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Marc Price, 7:45 & 9:45 p.m.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS ComedyCity at Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-842-2744. Major League Improv, 7:30 p.m. Hamburger Mary’s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-842-1919. Charity Bingo, 5 p.m.; Maryoke, 9 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. Sandman the Hypnotist, 7 & 9:45 p.m.

R O C K A B I L LY Trouser Mouse: 625 N.W. Mock Ave., Blue Springs, 816-2201222. The Rumblejetts.

SINGER-SONGWRITER

Gran-Daddy’s Barbeque: 1447 W. 23rd St., Lawrence, 785830-8665. Byron James.

VA R I E T Y Mike Kelly’s Westsider: 1515 Westport Rd., 816-931-9417. Cerebral Palsy Benefit with the Invisible World, and more. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. 1001 Arabian Nights Bellydance with A’ishah and friends, 8 p.m.

S U N D AY 11 ROCK/POP/INDIE Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-7497676. Little Big Bangs, Dry Bonnet, 10 p.m.

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31

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Blue Star with Jimmy Hall, Kate Moss, Samantha Fish, and Reese Wynans, 8 p.m.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS

Bleachers Bar & Grill: 210 S.W. Greenwich Dr., Lee’s Summit, 816-623-3410. Texas Hold ’em Poker Night, 7 & 9:15 p.m. The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Scrabble Club, 7 p.m. Bulldog: 1715 Main, 816-421-4799. Double feature movie night. Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. Coda Pursuit Team Trivia with Teague Hayes, 7 p.m. Hamburger Mary’s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-842-1919. Boob Tube Tuesdays, 7 p.m. The Hideout: 6948 N. Oak Tfwy., 816-468-0550. Tele-Tuesday hosted by Outlaw Jim and the Whiskey Benders. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. It’s Karaoke Time! The Roxy: 7230 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-236-6211. Karaoke. Saints Pub + Patio: 9720 Quivira, Lenexa, 913-492-3900. Karaoke, 9 p.m. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. Chess Club, 7 p.m.

Clarette Club: 5400 Martway, Mission, 913-384-0986. Texas Hold ’em, 7 & 10 p.m. Frank James Saloon: 10919 N.W. Hwy. 45, Parkville, 816-5050800. Karaoke, 6-10 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Art Battle. The Red Balloon: 10325 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-9622330. Karaoke, 8 p.m., free. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. Texas Hold ’em, 3 & 6 p.m.

DiCarlo’s Mustard Seed Mexican-Americana Restaurant & Bar: 15015 E. U.S. Hwy. 40, 816-373-4240. Blues, country and classic rock hosted by Rick Eidson and friends. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Dave Hays Band Open Jam. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Open Mic Night.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS

REGGAE

R.G.’s Lounge: 9100 E. 35th St., Independence, 816-358-5777. Jam Night hosted by Dennis Nickell, Scotty Yates, Rick Eidson, and Jan Lamb, 5 p.m.

The Granada: 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Radical Something.

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BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS

Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Dan Bliss. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Mark Lowrey Jazz Trio open jam session, 5 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Second Sunday FUNdays: Gina and Chloe McFadden, 3 p.m.

CLASSICAL Chaz on the Plaza: 325 Ward Pkwy., 816-802-2152. Les Mengel Duo, 5-9 p.m.

M E TA L / P U N K Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Fretless, Hellevate, Bleed the Victim, Meatshank.

M O N D AY 12 ROCK/POP/INDIE Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. The Atom Age.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL Jerry’s Bait Shop: 302 S.W. Main, Lee’s Summit, 816-525-1871. Leogun.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. The Goddamn Gallows, Jayke Orvis and the Broken Band, Whiskey Breath, 8 p.m.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Rural Grit Happy Hour, 6 p.m.; Karaoke with Kelly Bleachmaxx, 10:30 p.m., free; The Hideout: 6948 N. Oak Tfwy., 816-468-0550. Monday Night Football. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Karaoke Idol with Tanya McNaughty. Nara: 1617 Main, 816-221-6272. Brodioke, 9 p.m. Sherlock’s Underground Coffeehouse & Pub: 858 State Route 291, Liberty, 816-429-5262. Tell a Joke Mondays.

M E TA L / P U N K RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Fretless, the Devil, 9 p.m.

T U E S D AY 13 ROCK/POP/INDIE Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Appropriate Grammar, Fossils, Knifecrime, the Fluorescent, 8 p.m. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. The News Can Wait, Tiger Lily, 2 Twenty 2, Perfect Pursuit.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Trampled Under Foot. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Mark Montgomery. Slow Ride Roadhouse: 1350 N. Third St., Lawrence, 785-7492727. Lonnie Ray Blues Band.

JAZZ Finnigan’s Hall: 503 E. 18th Ave., North Kansas City, 816-2213466. Abel Ramirez Big Band, 6 p.m. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Hermon Mehari Trio. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Open Jam with Everette DeVan, 7 p.m.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS

SINGER-SONGWRITER Californos: 4124 Pennsylvania, 816-531-7878. Nicolette Paige, 8:30 p.m.

W E D N E S D AY 1 4 ROCK/POP/INDIE Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Schwervon, Paleface, Folkicide, 9 p.m. The Granada: 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Papadosio, Octopus Nebula. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Eyes Lips Eyes, Fossils. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 302 S.W. Main, Lee’s Summit, 816-525-1871. Rob Foster and Dudes. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Two Cow Garage, the Copyrights, Hotdog Skeletons, 8 p.m.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Shinetop Jr. Trouser Mouse: 625 N.W. Mock Ave., Blue Springs, 816-2201222. Marbin.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS Kanza Hall: 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park, 913-451-0444. Parmalee, with Travis Marvin.

DJ The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Booty Jamz, 10 p.m.

JAZZ The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. A La Mode.

COMEDY Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. The Kick Comedy. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Greg Warren.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS The Blue Line: 529 Walnut, 816-472-7825. Karaoke. Danny’s Bar and Grill: 13350 College Blvd., Lenexa, 913-3459717. Trivia and karaoke with DJ Smooth, 8 p.m. 403 Club: 403 N. Fifth St., 913-499-8392. Pinball tournament, Cash prize for winner, 8:30 p.m., $5 entry fee. The Hideout: 6948 N. Oak Tfwy., 816-468-0550. Ladies’ night, DJ dance party. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Estrogen Rush: a showcase of women poets. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. Trivia, 8 p.m.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Tyler Gregory hosts Acoustic Jam Session.

CA

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33

S AVA G E L O V E

BEARS REPEATING DEAR READERS: I was fighting a cold for two weeks, and the cold won. It morphed into an insanely painful sinus infection — you know it’s bad when your doctor urges you to err on the side of too much Vicodin, not too little. So a warning to everyone whose letter appears in this week’s column: My sucky advice is probably going to be suckier than usual.

Dear Dan: I’m a bearish 44-year-old who can’t

get a hot Latin 18-year-old guy to stop sucking my dick. He comes by for weekly sessions of mutual head and leaves immediately afterward. His round trip on the subway lasts longer than his stays at my place. He’s a sweet kid but deeply closeted; what little I know of his Dominican family and friends, he’s years from coming out. I’m under no illusion that I’m what he’s looking for. The trouble is, he won’t kiss or do anything social with me, and the novelty of getting naked with an 18-year-old has worn off. I could stop seeing him, but I’m mindful of your rule about treating younger partners like campsites: Leave them in better shape than you found them. I’m doing that by treating him respectfully and showing him that it’s possible to be openly gay and have support from family and friends, but I don’t know where to go next.

Not Wild About the Boy Dear NWATB: Tell him that he’s hot, that he’s a good little cocksucker, but that’s not enough for you to sustain interest. You’re not asking to meet his friends or family — you’re not asking him to risk exposure — but if he wants to keep blowing you, there’s going to be some getting to know you. He’ll have to risk a conversation now and then, maybe watching a movie together sometime at your apartment. Tell him you can’t be friends with benefits with someone who isn’t a friend. A lot of desperate-to-stay-closeted cases convince themselves that they won’t have to come out if they can get their sexual needs met in one place and their emotional needs in another. By showing him that a healthy gay person successfully integrates his sexual and emotional needs (whether he keeps coming over or not), you’ll be honoring the campsite rule. Dear Dan: I’m a man who just got out of a twoyear relationship with a great girl. She was always a little controlling, and I felt like I had to tiptoe around her all the time, so I was glad to be out of the relationship. But I was still providing her with a lot of emotional support. She started bothering me for advice on what to do about her rebound relationship, which seemed beyond the call of duty. I suggested that we needed to re-evaluate our boundaries. She flipped out and threatened to force all our mutual friends to pick her over me. I’m also worried that she will tell everyone we know about my pegg ing kink.

Kink-outing Is Not Kind 34

THE PITCH

NOVEMBER 8 -14, 2012

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BY

D A N S AVA G E

Dear KINK: If there’s documentary evidence, prepare yourself to own your kink and laugh it off. Assholes and vengeful exes can use the details of your turn-ons against you only if you’re ashamed of them. Shrug off the reveal, laugh along with any good-natured ribbing, and look on the bright side: You could have mutual female friends who are interested in pegging and, after they hear the news, interested in you. Dear Dan: I know you were raised Catholic but are now an atheist. I’m curious if you might still believe in God if you took the time to expose yourself to other faith traditions that are more accepting of gay people. Have you looked at Buddhism or Hinduism? There is evidence for reincarnation, and what better way to say “it gets better” than by doing it again until you get it right?

Born Again and Again Dear BAAA: The Catholic Church’s stance

on homosexuality gave me a big sad when I was an adolescent, but I didn’t come to the conclusion that there is no God based solely on that big sad. My sexuality prompted me to question all faiths. I don’t know how any reasonable person can conclude that one tribe or prophet or science-fiction writer got it right. But if I was gonna pick a faith based on gayness alone, I would go with Antinous, the gay lover of the gay second-century Roman emperor Hadrian. Hadrian, a bearish guy in his 40s, was in love with Antinous, a Bithynian teenager. Like the NWATB’s Dominican, Antinous must have given amazing head because after he died (he drowned while swimming in the Nile), Hadrian had him declared a god. Take it away, Wikipedia: “The grief of the emperor knew no bounds, causing the most extravagant veneration to be paid to Antinous’ memory. Cities were founded in his name, medals struck with his likeness, and cities throughout the east commissioned godlike images of the dead youth for their shrines and sanctuaries.… As a result, Antinous is one of the best-preserved faces from the ancient world.” My husband, Terry, looks like Antinous — it’s true — so, yeah, I’d hit and/or worship that. As for reincarnation, well, have you seen Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants? I wouldn’t mind coming back as that magical pair of pants — only, I’d like to be passed among Broadway stars Cheyenne, Andrew, Nick and Kyle. And instead of blue jeans, I’d like to be a magical dance belt. If there’s a religion that could make that happen for me, sign my ass up. Find the Savage Lovecast (my weekly podcast) every Tuesday at thestranger.com/savage.

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Lawrence, KS 2331 Alabama Street Suite #103

Naismith

785-856-4994 23rd Street

CC Massage & Spa 707 Main Street Eudora, KS

(10 min east of Lawrence on Hwy 10)

LIC # 12-004

(785) 542-2364

36

THE PITCH

NOVEMBER 8 -14, 2012

pitch.com

* * NEW LOCATION * *

140 N. 130th

Bonner Springs, KS (913) 721-1111

JOIN OUR TEAM!

Research Subjects Do you have ASTHMA?

LEARN A NEW SKILL! EARN EXTRA MONEY!

Liberty Tax Service’s Basic Income Tax classes teach you the ins and outs of individual income tax preparation. No prior tax experience is necessary to enroll and take the class. Enroll and you’ll be on your way to the pursuit of a new career!

Physicians at the Asthma Clinical Research Center at Truman Medical Center Hospital Hill are currently recruiting for studies for Astma Patients.

• Classes meet for 3 hour sessions, 2 days a week • Class options available in morning and evening • The course lasts 6 weeks • Convenient locations in Kansas and Missouri • Friendly, knowledgeable instructors

• You must be at least 18 years old. • On asthma medications and your asthma is controlled. • All study related care is provided at no cost for those who take part. • Financial compensation for participation is available.

Call our toll-free hotline

1-888-319-5858

or send an email to LibTaxKC@gmail.com to register or for more info. Tell your friends and family about Liberty Tax School, and you could qualify for our referral bonus!

This Asthma Center is one of 18 prestigious Centers of Excellence funded by the American Lung Association. Please call 816-404-5503 for screening and to learn more about this research study.

If you are goIng to go out, you mIght as well get paId

YOU MUST: * BE RELIABLE * BE AVAILABLE NIGHTS & WEEKENDS * OWN TRANSPORTATION

To find out more, check out or send your resumé to streetteam@pitch.com pitch.com

NOVEMBER 8 -14, 2012

THE PITCH

37

HEAD HOUSE HAIR PARLOUR extensions. straight razor shaves. pin-ups. dreds.

We are looking for EXPERIENCED BARBER who can straight razor shave. We are also looking for EXPERIENCED STYLIST who works with weave and all curly hair types.

PLEASE CALL 816.518.8193 FOR MORE INFO

MAC PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

MACAPARTMENTS.COM FEATURED PROPERTY :

PARK CENTRAL APARTMENTS STUDIOS STARTING AT

NOW HIRING FOR

CONCERTS CONVENTIONS SPORTING EVENTS

$599

EVENT STAFF, USHERS, TICKET TAKERS

APPLY IN PERSON 4050 Pennsylvania Ste. 111 KCMO 64111 OR ONLINE www. crowdsystems.com EOE

p NOW HIRING FOR THE FOLLOWING TEMPORARY POSITIONS… • 2ND PARTY VENDER AUTO INDUSTRY PORTERS /TAPERS/INSTALLERS CASINO AREA • PACKERS/ASSEMBLY/ PRODUCTION HWY AREA • MEAT PACKERS PRODUCTION EXPERIENCE HELPFUL

Valid Driver’s License Randolph/NKC/Ameristar

Pet friendly, Gated Parking, Dishwasher, Central Air,

N. Independence 291/24 Martin City, MO

Granite Countertops

APPLYMUST IN PERSON MONDAY THRU THURSDAY BETWEEN 9 AM TO 11AM PASS BACKGROUND AND DRUG TEST. NO PHONE CALLS, INQUIRE IN PERSON DURING APPLICATION ACCEPTANCE HOURS.

1531 Swift Ave, K.C, MO 64116 PLEASE REFERENCE THIS PUBLICATION!

38

THE PITCH

NOVEMBER 8 -14, 2012

pitch.com

877-453-1039 350 E. Armour, KCMO

Are you out of housing options? Have Credit Problems? Previous Evictions?

We rent to the rent challenged

Holiday Apartments $110/WEEK $150/DEPOSIT* Studios BRING THIS Downtown Area

* Restrictions apply

Month to All Month Lease! Utilities On Site Loundry Facility Cable TV

Paid

AD IN FOR $20 OFF YOUR FIRST 2 WEEKS

Holiday Apartments (816) 221-1721

NORTHLAND VILLAGE $100 DEPOSIT ON 1&2 BEDROOMS

$525 / up Large 1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apts and Townhomes Fireplace, Washer/Dryer Hook-ups, Storage Space, Pool.

I-35 & Antioch • (816) 454-5830

WILLOWIND APARTMENTS

1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apartments Starting @ $425

3927 Willow Ave • KCMO 64113 816.358.6764

Stonewall Court Apts 1-Bdrms starting at $395 central air, secure entry, on site laundry, on bus line, close to shopping, nice apts, Sections 8 welcome $100 Deposit (816) 231-2874 M-F 8-5 office hours pitch.com

NOVEMBER 8 -14, 2012

THE PITCH

39

APTS/JOBS/STUFF

816.218.6759 CLUBEROTICAKCXXX.NET #1 Lifestyle House Party In KC

Parties Every Fri. & Sat.

NOW join us for Suite Parties Limo Available 913-238-4339 www.lifestylesofkc.com

AFFORDABLE ATTORNEY

SPEEDING, DWI, POSSESSION, ASSAULT FREE CONSULTATION Call: The Law Office of J.P. Tongson (816) 265-1513

CASH FOR CARS

Wrecked, Damaged or Broken. Running or Not !

Cash Paid ! www.abcautorecycling.com 913-271-9406

DUI/DWI, KS, MO

P.I.--Work Comp.--Bankruptcy Reasonable rates! Susan Bratcher 816-453-2240 www.bratcherlaw.biz

SPEEDING DWI CRIMINAL SOLICITATION Call Tim Tompkins Today KCTrafficlawyer.com 913-707-4357 816-729-2606 DOWNTOWN AREA STUDIO APT $110/WEEK Min.

$150 Deposit, All Utilities Paid, Laundry Facilities. Holiday Apts, 115 W. Harlem Rd, KCMO 816-221-1721

Personal Injury & Employment Law

Brady & Associates Law Office. 913-696-0925 Licensed In Missouri, Kansas and Colorado. WWW.MBRADYLAW.COM

Attorney since 1976: 913-345-4100, KS/MO. Injuries, workers comp, criminal, divorce, DUI, traffic, and more. Low fees, Call Greg Bangs.

http://www.the-law.com

BED BUGS? 1-800-GOT-BUGS

Law Offices of David M. Lurie

Total Pest Control

DWI, SOLICITATION, TRAFFIC DEFENSE, INTERNET-BASED CRIMES816-221-5900

Locally Owned Since 1939

http://www.the-law.com

GET PAID TO DRINK and TEXT!

Uptown Expansion

Practice emphasizing DWI defense. Experienced, knowledgeable attorney will take the time to listen and inform. Free initial phone consultation.

THE LAW OFFICE OF DENISE KIRBY 816-221-3691

Uptown Expansion

Now hiring: event staff, sales staff, wait staff, event planners, marketing personnel, security personnel & supervisors. Email info to: lsells@uptowntheater.com

DWI, SOLICITATION, TRAFFIC DEFENSE, INTERNET-BASED CRIMES816-221-5900

GET PAID TO DRINK and TEXT!

* DWI * * CRIMINAL * * TRAFFIC *

Tarot Readings Crystal Readings

Law Offices of David M. Lurie

Brand Ambassadors Wanted! Immediate earnings potential. Company car program, team bonuses, and more! Positions available now. Start part time or full time. Training provided. Work at home, in person, or both. Receive FREE energy drinks and pay for referrals. Call or TXT 816-520-5456 or email applynow@centurylink.net

Now hiring: event staff, sales staff, wait staff, event planners, marketing personnel, security personnel & supervisors. Email info to: lsells@uptowntheater.com

Psychic Readings Palm Readings

99.7% Toxin Free w/n an hour We can help you pass Coopers 3617 Broadway, KCMO 816.931.7222 ERICA'S PSYCHIC STUDIO

$10

Reunites Love- Depression-Finances Success 100% Guaranteed Results !

816-965-7125

Readings

DOWNTOWN AREA STUDIO APT $110/WEEK Min.

$150 Deposit, All Utilities Paid, Laundry Facilities. Holiday Apts, 115 W. Harlem Rd, KCMO 816-221-1721

U-PICK IT SELF SERVICE AUTO PARTS

$$ Paying Top Dollar $$ For Junk Cars & Trucks Missouri: 816-241-7548 Kansas: 913-321-1000

CASH FOR CARS

Wrecked, Damaged or Broken. Running or Not !

Cash Paid ! www.abcautorecycling.com 913-271-9406

$99 DIVORCE $99

Brand Ambassadors Wanted! Immediate earnings potential. Company car program, team bonuses, and more! Positions available now. Start part time or full time. Training provided. Work at home, in person, or both. Receive FREE energy drinks and pay for referrals. Call or TXT 816-520-5456 or email applynow@centurylink.net

INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL BARTENDING

AFFORDABLE TUITION Two week program-Job placement assistance FT, PT, Parties, Weddings, Always in demand! Call 816-753-3900 TODAY !!!

Simple, Uncontested + Filing Fee. Don Davis. 816-531-1330

The road to DEBT RELIEF and a fresh start. Accurso and Lett Law Firm Experienced and Affordable MISSOURI:

816-587-4LAW (4529) KANSAS: 913-402-6069

www.AccursoAndLett.com

HOTEL ROOMS A-1 Motel 816-765-6300 Capital Inn 816-765-4331 6101 E. 87th St./Hillcrest Rd. HBO,Phone,Banq. Hall

$37.06 Day/ $149 Week/ $499 Month + Tax


The Pitch: November 8, 2012