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AUGUST 30–SEPTEMBER 5, 2012 | FREE | VOL. 32 NO. 9 | PITCH.COM


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A U G U S T 3 0–S E P T E M B E R 5 , 2 012 | V O L . 3 2 N O . 9 E D I T O R I A L

Editor Scott Wilson Managing Editor Justin Kendall Music Editor David Hudnall Staff Writers Charles Ferruzza, Ben Palosaari Editorial Operations Manager Deborah Hirsch Calendar Editor Berry Anderson Clubs Editor Abbie Stutzer Food Blogger, Web Editor Jonathan Bender Proofreader Brent Shepherd Contributing Writers Tracy Abeln, Theresa Bembnister, April Fleming, Matt Pearce, Nancy Hull Rigdon, Dan Savage, Abbie Stutzer Intern Hayley Bartels

THE PI TC H FALL GU I DE Football, concerts, authors, fashion, theater, festivals, Halloween and more, day by day.

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Art Director Ashford Stamper Contributing Photographers Angela C. Bond, Chris Mullins, Lauren Phillips, Sabrina Staires, Brooke Vandever

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Production Manager Christina Riddle Multimedia Designer Rafaella Chaves

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Advertising Director Dawn Jordan Senior Classified Multimedia Specialist Steven Suarez Classified Multimedia Specialist Andrew Disper Multimedia Specialists Michelle Acevedo, Kirin Arnold, Erin Carey, Payton Hatfield Director of Marketing & Operations Jason Dockery Digital Marketing Manager Keli Sweetland

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Circulation Director Mike Ryan

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Accounts Receivable Jodi Waldsmith Publisher Joel Hornbostel

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Chief Executive Officer Chris Ferrell Chief Operating Officer Rob Jiranek Director of Accounting Todd Patton Director of Operations Susan Torregrossa Creative Director Heather Pierce Director of Content/Online Development Patrick Rains Chief Technology Officer Matt Locke Director of Digital Products Andy Sperry Business Manager Eric Norwood

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Vice President Sales & Marketing Carl Ferrer Business Manager Jess Adams Accountant David Roberts

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The Pitch distributes 45,000 copies a week and is available free throughout Greater Kansas City, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased for $5 each, payable at The Pitch’s office in advance. The Pitch may be distributed only by The Pitch’s authorized independent contractors or authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of The Pitch, take more than one copy of each week’s issue. Mail subscriptions: $22.50 for six months or $45 per year, payable in advance. Application to mail at second-class postage rates is pending at Kansas City, MO 64108.

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The contents of The Pitch are Copyright 2012 by KC Communications, LLC. No portion may be reproduced in whole or in part by any means without the express written permission of the publisher. The Pitch address: 1701 Main, Kansas City, MO 64108 For The Pitch information, call: 816-561-6061 To report a story, call: 816-218-6915 Editorial fax: 816-756-0502 For classifieds, call: 816-218-6759 For retail advertising, call: 816-218-6702

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Chris Conatser won the PARIS OF THE PLAINS Bartending Competition. Swope Park’s OFF-LEASH DOG PARK is now open. BOBCAT GOLDTHWAIT on Juggalos, the Olympics and God Bless America .

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QUESTIONNAIRE

RYAN DAV I S

Creative manager, Alamo Drafthouse Mainstreet

Hometown: Kansas City

What movie do you watch at least once a year? There are too many to count. The Darjeeling Limited, Lost in Translation, House of the Devil, American Psycho, Jurassic Park and Akira are always in a constant rotation. I can see Drive, Killer Joe and Moonrise Kingdom finding their way onto that list soon.

Current neighborhood: Blue Springs Who or what is your sidekick? In life, it’s my wife, Angela, but if I were to turn into a masked vigilante, I would have to go with my dog, Tyler Durden. Mostly because I want to see him in a cape and mask.

Celebrity you’d like to ride the Mamba with at Worlds of Fun: Bill Murray. Doesn’t everyone

want to do everything with Bill Murray?

What career would you choose in an alternate reality? As a film fanatic, it doesn’t get much

better than working for the Alamo Drafthouse. It’s the kind of job that makes you feel like you’re already E R MO living in an alternate reality. One moment you’re discussing your favorite AT E N I ONL .COM film, and the next you’re PITCH ordering the pyrotechnics for the next Action Pack event. I can’t imagine a better job.

Favorite person or thing to follow on Twitter:

I’m a huge Mortal Kombat fan, so I’m constantly checking Ed Boon’s Twitter feed.

Q&As

Person or thing you find really irritating at this moment: People who talk or text in a movie

theater. I think I’m required to say that.

What subscription — print, digital, etc. — do you value most? I don’t want my subscriptions

to sell anything, to ask me to buy anything or to discuss any process. I don’t want to subscribe to anything sold or processed, or read anything sold, bought or processed. You know, with a subscription, I just don’t want that.

What was the last local restaurant you patronized? I have to admit, I’m a little obsessed

Where do you drink? I like to hop around. I love Jackpot Music Hall in Lawrence, MiniBar and Manifesto, but I mostly let the concert calendar pick the venue. There is nothing like the first beer after an eight-hour drive to see your favorite band.

What’s your favorite charity? Specifically, Wayside Waifs. Just show me a sad puppy, and I’m hooked for life. Damn you, Sarah McLachlan!

Favorite place to spend your paycheck: Most

of my paycheck goes to my movie collection. I’m a sucker for rerelease box sets and original movie posters.

What local phenomenon do you think is overrated? Mom-jean shorts. It’s a problem that plagues many cities.

A N G E L A DAV I S

with Port Fonda. I’m always up for suggestions, though, when it comes to the tortilla arts.

Where do you like to take out-of-town guests? Manifesto is always my first sugges-

tion. It’s the perfect place to catch up with old friends. The next day we’ll visit Westport Café & Bar to recover.

“Kansas City needs …” A more effective masstransit system.

Last book you read: Chris Gore’s Ultimate Film Festival Survival Guide. It’s a great book for filmmakers and film fans alike. “In five years, I’ll be …” Introducing a Kubrick marathon at Alamo Drafthouse Mainstreet.

What TV show do you make sure you watch?

missed her mouth and kissed her eye. It was awkward, but she decided to keep me around.

take(s) up a lot of space in my iTunes:

Describe a recent triumph: Not burning down the theater during our Action Pack presentation of The Running Man with in-house pyro.

Aren’t we all watching Breaking Bad? I just can’t wait for the return of Heisenberg! Anything and everything by Trent Reznor.

“People might be surprised to know that …”

Before the Drafthouse, I worked at a children’s mental-health center.

“On my day off, I like to …” Puddle-jump around

music venues in Westport or sit at home and watch movies with my wife.

What is your most embarrassing dating moment? The first time I ever kissed my wife, I

What local tradition do you take part in every year? I’m really looking forward to this year’s

Middle of the Map Fest. It’s one of the most exciting events to ever come to KC! I can’t wait to see where it will be in the next five years, as it grows into a local tradition.

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The Alamo Drafthouse’s Rolling Roadshow starts with Pee Wee’s Big Adventure September 14 and Spirited Away September 15 in the City Market Park and continues with Planes, Trains and Automobiles October 12 and Jurassic Park October 13 at the National WWI Museum at Liberty Memorial.

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THE DAILY BOOST T

o depart journalism for a more lucrative career in advertising, public relations or marketing has long been interpreted — by other journalists, at least — as a sign of compromised ideals (or else exhaustion). Flacks serve products, companies, corporations. Journalists serve truth. An advertising salary may buy you a big, comfortable bed, the thinking goes, but it’s easier to sleep at night knowing you’re in a line of work that helps prop up democracy. That sounds a bit lofty, doesn’t it? And these days it rings unrealistic and quaint, too — particularly in Kansas City, where there are numerous ad agencies but virtually no job opportunities in mainstream media. The Kansas City Star, like many daily newspapers in the United States, has spent the past decade bulldozing its editorial staff. At first, its corporate parent, the McClatchy Co., undertook layoffs to maximize short-term profits. Now the Star is struggling simply to stay afloat, stymied by the lack of a clear business model in the age of digital news consumption. Following furloughs and round after round of layoffs, it’s only natural that the shell-shocked survivors at the Star might cast about for cushier PR gigs. It’s less natural, and somewhat alarming, that a few of them seem to be auditioning for these jobs in the pages of the newspaper. Take Robert Trussell. Let’s set aside the fact that the Star’s theater critic — a very nice man — is habitually unwilling to, you know, criticize local theater. Instead, let’s examine his latest passion: beating the drum about Kansas City’s vigorous, staggering — heroic, even! — support for the arts, while repeating the not-so-novel observation about how great great great that is for the economy. The most recent example of Trussell’s relentless boosterism arrived Sunday, August 26, in a story on Deborah Sandler, the new general director of the Lyric Opera. In it, Trussell man-

Great news, Kansas City! ages to shoehorn breathless civic boasting into what, in any other newspaper, would have been a simple profile. “Something’s happening in Kansas City,” goes the dramatic lead. “The arts are on the move.” Kansas City is a “can-do city.” Is this a newspaper article or a pamphlet from the KC Visitors Bureau? And how does a fusillade of clichés help us get to know Sandler? Far more egregious, though, is the turd polishing that appeared on the front page of the Sunday A&E section a week before, on August 19. Here, Trussell attempts to digest a recent study published by Americans for the Arts. The purpose of the study was to measure the economic impact of the arts in American cities. It found that arts spending by audiences and organizations in Kansas City added up to $273 million in 2010. In St. Louis, that figure, over the same span, was $582 million. This despite a considerable handicap: Americans for the Arts had surveyed five counties in the Kansas City metropolitan area, whereas it had surveyed just one county (St. Louis County) in St. Louis. To an ordinary citizen, the takeaway here

The Star can make anything sound positive — except its own endangered bottom line.

is that St. Louis annually spends about $300 million more on the arts than Kansas City. If you were a writer or editor at a newspaper in Kansas City, this would seem to present an opportunity to galvanize support for increased arts spending in the city. It’s the stuff of a fine editorial: St. Louis is throttling us here. We can do better. Here’s how. But The Kansas City Star does not permit itself to draw such conclusions. And so, Trussell instead goes into damage-control mode, reassuring us that the study is flawed. He finds that a higher percentage of arts organizations in St. Louis responded to the study than did in Kansas City. The connecting headline on the section’s third page reads, rather incredibly, “Numbers: Limited response skews results.” (That one is on the editors, not Trussell.) Then, Trussell quotes Randy Cohen, vice president of research and policy at Americans for the Arts, saying a bunch of nice things about Kansas City’s commitment to the arts. Well, what the hell else is Cohen going to say? That we’re a bunch of losers? The story ends with a quote about how beautiful the Kauffman Center is. What? When The Pitch reached Cohen last week, he genially reeled off many of the same positive pro-arts talking points that he’d fed to Trussell, but he admitted confusion as to the point of the Star’s article. Of Trussell’s big scoop about the response rate, Cohen noted that all of KC’s major arts institutions were accounted for. (They were; we checked.) Cohen added: “Even if we had a completely full response rate from both sides, if you added them up, St. Louis would still far exceed Kansas City in spending. Which is not a good or bad thing. It doesn’t have to be about comparing who has the biggest bicep. It just is what it is.” But over at 1729 Grand, numbers need not be limited to what they are. The Star is dribbling this type of participation-medal hackery across

DREAM TEAM

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he cynical among us would say Chiefs fans are already playing fantasy football every year, even if they aren’t in a league, trying to poach $20 from friends based on the real-world performance of their virtual teams. But if you’re in for the long haul of a 16game season, you might as well benefit from your vigilance. Here’s a brief, critical guide to your 2012 Chiefs fantasy-football prospects. Peyton Hillis. The Avalanche cometh. For KC fans, the only thing prettier than Hillis running over somebody at the 1-yard line is Brady Quinn. (Seriously, Quinn is beautiful.) Round to pick ’em: seventh. Jamaal Charles. His yards-per-carry stat has increased every year he has been in the league. At this rate, he’s on track to run the average of a first down on each touch by 2014. His knee looks fine, and the defenses in the AFC West do not. His Twitter feed regularly

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JEFF MOFFETT/ICON SMI AAH/NEWSCOM

Our Chiefs fantasy-football prospectus

announces that he has just had a great workout, and Twitter never lies. Round to pick ’em: second. Tony Moeaki. The ACL Club is exclusive, one that gets you your own table in the trainer’s room and unlimited game tokens at Dave & Buster’s. Unfortunately, Moeaki’s membership

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(and let’s hope that this is the last year we hear this media-generated phrase) also means that he’s unlikely to equal the numbers of his breakout rookie season. Round to pick ’em: 13th. Kevin Boss. OK, so the team’s entire tightend corps ranked dead-last for fantasy purposes last year, with 34 total catches and one pitch.com

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all its sections. In early August, news arrived that the Kansas City Public Schools had again failed evaluations and would remain unaccredited for another year. The Star’s headline: “In Missouri’s school performance reports, KC gets a better score.” Uh, hurray? We won’t see the economic figures on the All-Star Game until October, but ask just about anybody who works in a restaurant, bar or retail shop in this city and you’ll hear confirmation that the game had a negligible impact on local business. Perhaps anticipating such an outcome, the Star on July 8 ran a front-page story with the headline “Biggest benefits of the All-Star Game for KC are intangible.” You were expecting tourists with cash? No, no — the real value of All-Star Week was the media exposure! Can’t put a dollar value on that, Kansas City! Yours truly, the Star. McClatchy recently announced that all of its papers — including the Star — are putting up online paywalls before the end of the year. In theory, this is good news. Good journalism costs money and is worth paying for. But inflight-magazine-style cheerleading doesn’t qualify as journalism. If you weren't already a print subscriber, would you pay to read a pro-tax-increment-financing Kevin Collison business column in which only the people who stand to make a mint on TIF deals are quoted (August 21)? Would you pay to read Jeneé Osterheldt’s ongoing defense of Nike (August 20 and 27)? And if you pay to take the paper now, how long are you willing to keep buying a Star that exhibits a pathological aversion to acknowledging room for improvement in your city? Massaging the facts is the opposite of what newspapers are supposed to do. You can put a dollar value on a daily paper worth reading. Maybe we’ll get one again someday.

E-mail david.hudnall@pitch.com touchdown. Boss looks ready to outscore that squad (though not many other teams’ tight ends), and you don’t get many fantasy opportunities to own a ginger. Round to pick ’em: 13th. Matt Cassel. He’s really nice, despite coming off a bad breakup — a good guy to spend Sundays with and quietly read the paper. Hey, we should try that new restaurant, he’ll say. Yes, you’ll answer. But stop leaving your dirty socks on the floor. Round to pick ’em: 11th. Dwayne Bowe. It’s a contract year, he spent his holdout hearing how Jon Baldwin may be better than he is, and Tyler Palko is no longer allowed to throw him the football. That’s three cherries, making Bowe a fantasy jackpot waiting to happen. Round to pick ’em: fourth. The Defense. For too long, this has been the Chiefs’ sole point-scoring unit. For the last three games, it has allowed just 33 points and forced six turnovers. You’re looking at a top-10 defense, if they ever find a kick returner who can score touchdowns. Round to pick ’em: 10th.

— JONATHAN BENDER M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X

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re they gone? The All-Star Game lookie loos, the drive-bys from the rest of the Plains states, the California in-laws and the East Coast pass-throughs from college — all home again. Now it’s just us, just the way we like it. And just in time for a fall that’s more than football and pumpkins. This season in KC is so full, we had to book Madonna and David Sedaris on the same day. We have Bieber and the Boss (not on the same day), Charlotte Street and NASCAR, spooks and opera, and plenty of football and pumpkins. Here, then — day by day — is The Pitch’s first Fall Guide. (Events and dates subject to change; keep up with local goings-on at pitch.com.)

7KH6QDS Fall’s can’t-miss college football games.

:

e don’t have to tell you that your fall Saturdays are booked from here to early December with the road trips, game-day gettogethers and tailgates that accompany college football. But we’re saying it anyway: Football is finally back in Manhattan, Columbia and Lawrence. And whether you pledge allegiance to royal purple, black and MU gold, or crimson and blue, one thing unites us all: Opening weekend is September 1. The University of Missouri, of course, has bolted the Big 12 for cash-greener pastures in the Southeastern Conference. To tune up for the SEC grind, the Tigers host Southeast Louisiana. Quarterback James Franklin needs to be healthy to best last season’s eight wins. Kansas State — led by college football’s most intriguing player, Collin Klein — opens against Missouri ... State. The Wildcats’ signal caller likely won’t need to summon his inner Tebow (he’s not a great passer, but he is a strong runner and an even stronger Christian) to pull out

a victory here. But he’d better be the second coming of football Jesus if the ’Cats are going to match last season’s 10 wins and trip to the Cotton Bowl. The University of Kansas, meanwhile, must improve everything in order to avoid another winless conference season. The Jayhawks have reset the program, firing Turner Gill and hiring former Chiefs offensive coordinator and Notre Dame coach Charlie Weis. The Weis era begins against South Dakota State. Weis will rely on a fellow former Irish, quarterback Dayne Crist, to break the Jayhawks out of the Big 12 cellar. Dates to watch the rest of the season: September 8 — Missouri’s first SEC home game pits the Tigers against the sixth-ranked Georgia Bulldogs. The Miami Hurricanes travel to Manhattan looking to avenge last season’s loss. KU tries to pluck a win from Rice. September 15 — Revenge for last season’s overtime loss to Arizona is on every Tiger’s mind when the Sun Devils come to Columbia. New Big 12 member TCU (No. 20) road-trips to Lawrence. K-State draws a familiar foe, former

Collin Klein: prepped and ready Iowa State coach Dan McCarney and his North Texas Mean Green.

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October 6 — No Border War, no problem. Manhattan has the Sunflower Showdown today. Can Klein take Crist? Missouri’s SEC home slate today brings Vanderbilt. Snore. October 13 — Wake up, MU, the national champions are coming. The Crimson Tide of Alabama rolls into Columbia as the centerpiece of the Tigers’ home schedule. You wanted the best? Here you go. Rock Chalkers hope today that an Oklahoma State minus Brandon Weeden and Justin Blackmon means no blowout. November 3 — Shootout 2? The Cowboys outgunned the Wildcats 52-45 last year. Can Klein get the drop this time? November 17 — If Weis keeps a calendar, he likely has the game against Iowa State circled as his best shot at a Big 12 win at home. The other Orange, Syracuse, heads to Columbia for a late-season showdown with Missouri. December 1 — The Texas Longhorns’ last stop before bowl selection is Manhattan. This one has end-of-season blockbuster potential. — JUSTIN K ENDALL

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Mission Arts and Eats Festival KC Roller Warriors All Stars Madama Butterfly, Lyric Opera Falldo Waldo Crawldo Pub Crawl, 75th and Wornall An Afternoon with John Lithgow, Kansas City Plaza Library

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UnPlaza Art Fair Comets Open Tryouts, KC Soccer Dome

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Stephen Marley at the Granada Paul Dorrell discusses Living the Artist's Life, Unity Temple Eleanor Clift, Forecasting the Presidential Election, Kansas City Plaza Library

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Expo Americas at Union Station Judith Grey art opening, Charlotte Street Foundation John Lithgow stars in Farkle & Friends, Kauffman Center Wylliams-Henry Contemporary Dance, White Recital Hall ConX: KC's First Sci-Fi, Horror, Pop-Culture Convention, Ramada Conference Center

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5 College football opening day Sporting KC vs. Toronto KC Irish Fest Kansas City Renaissance Festival opens Santa-Cali-Gon Days, Independence The Beast and Edge of Hell open

KC Irish Fest La Cage aux Folles closes, Starlight Santa-Cali-Gon Days, Independence

Labor Day KC Symphony Pops in the Park Santa-Cali-Gon Days, Independence Last call: Oceans of Fun, Schlitterbahn, Titanic exhibit at Union Station

The Real Inspector Hound, KC Actors Theatre

Missouri vs. Georgia (first SEC game) Missouri Mavericks Fan Fest, Independence Events Center Metro Pro Wrestling, Turner Rec Center Y’allapalooza, Cricket Wireless Amphitheater

Ad Astra Percussion, Spencer Museum (Lawrence) The Motherf**ker With the Hat, Unicorn Theatre

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American Royal opens Fashion Night Out KC

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Why at the Granada Crossroads Music Fest, Crossroads KC KC Ballet, First Friday “An Evening of Dance” KC Urban Film Festival Making God Laugh, American Heartland Theatre Jamie Lee Curtis discusses My Brave Year of Firsts, Village Presbyterian Church (Rainy Day) Buckwheat Zydeco, Lied Center (Lawrence)

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Football: Kansas vs. Rice, Kansas State vs. Miami.

Fiesta Hispana, Berkley Riverfront Park Lenexa’s Spinach Festival, Sar-Ko-Par Trails Park Symphony Ball, Sheraton at Crown Center Ben Vereen, Kauffman Center Divergent Dreams, NewEar Contemporary Chamber Ensemble, All Souls Unitarian Church Crossroads Music Fest, Crossroads KC

Chiefs’ first game of the regular season Twin Shadow at the Granada Fiesta Hispana, Berkley Riverfront Park Green Fest, Uptown Theater Last call: They Were All Stars and Baseball: America's Game, Negro Leagues Baseball Museum

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David Thomson, Milos Forman: “Finding a Nest,” Kansas City Plaza Library Ghostface Killah at Riot Room

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ArtSounds, The Goldberg Variations, Owen/Cox Dance Group

Circus at Sprint Center Metric at the Beaumont Marina Doc with David Ford, Spencer Museum (Lawrence) Dear America: Across the Wide and Lonesome Prairie, Coterie Theatre Joe Posnanski talks Paterno, Unity Temple

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Circus at Sprint Center Powerman 5000 at the Beaumont Three Tall Women, Metropolitan Ensemble Theatre Anthony de Mare, “Liaisons: Re-Imagining Sondheim From the Piano,” White Recital Hall Opening of Railroaded: The Transcontinentals and the Making of Modern America, Linda Hall Library

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Circus at Sprint Center Sporting KC vs. Houston “Map as Art” talk at Kemper Museum Blood Brothers, the Barn Players ConX: KC's First Sci-Fi, Horror, Pop Culture Convention, Ramada Conference Center Mission Arts and Eats Festival

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Football: Kansas vs. TCU, Kansas State vs. North Texas, Missouri vs. Arizona State ConX: KC's First Sci-Fi, Horror, Pop-Culture Convention, Ramada Conference Center

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Spring Awakening, the Coterie Theatre

Pippin, Kansas City Repertory Theatre

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Blitzen Trapper and Head and the Heart, Uptown Theater Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons, Kauffman Center Chuck Thompson, Better Off Without Em: A Northern Manifesto for Southern Secession, Kansas City Central Library

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Masters of Illusion at the Midland Alamo Drafthouse: horror remix of Hairy

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Jeffrey Toobin, The Oath: The Obama White House and the Supreme Court, Unity Temple (Rainy Day) Conservatory Connections: Martin Hackelman and Robert Weirich,

Odd Future at the Granada David Lindley at Knuckleheads Dollyrots at the Riot Room

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Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art

Rainy Day Books with Gretchen Rubin, Unity Temple Alamo Drafthouse: Action Pack: Boy Band Sing-Along

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Sporting KC vs. Chicago Ben Folds Five at Starlight Theatre Guided by Voices at the Granada Mark Morris Dance Group, Kauffman Center Ragamala Dance, Sacred Earth, Lied Center (Lawrence) Takács Quartet, the Friends of Chamber Music, Folly Theater Lee's Summit Oktoberfest

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Plaza Art Fair Ballroom with a Twist, Kauffman Center Jamal Joseph, Panther Baby, Kansas City Plaza Library On the Sunny Side of the Street: Music That Made the Depression Great, Quality Hill Playhouse

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Eric Church at Sprint Center William Kent Krueger signs Trickster’s Point, Rainy Day Books Comets Fan Fest, Independence Events Center American Royal Parade Fall Parade of Homes Showcase Lee's Summit Oktoberfest

Plaza Art Fair Robert Earl Keen at the Granada Pianist Emanuel Ax, Folly Theater UnPlaza Art Fair Comets Open Tryouts, KC Soccer Dome

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Plaza Art Fair Alamo Drafthouse: Princess Bride quote-along Alan Brinkley, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Kansas City Plaza Library

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Chiefs vs. Chargers “Pictures at an Exhibition,” KC Symphony, Kauffman Center

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Drinks!

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Okt-ing Out More Oktoberfests than one month can contain.

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rünauer Restaurant (101 West 22nd Street) presents an early Oktoberfest celebration Friday, September 28, and Saturday, September 29, sponsored by the beermaker Hofbrau, in two tents outside the historic freight house. Expect traditional German food and drink, 4 p.m.-midnight both days, and a variety of live entertainment (including polka dancing). Admission costs $10 and includes a Hofbrau draft. Another early Oktoberfest is held in downtown Lee’s Summit Friday, September 28 (5–11 p.m.), and Saturday, September 29 (9 a.m.–11 p.m.) featuring a biergarten, arts and crafts booths, and a carnival. Three stages feature live entertainment. Admission is free. Shawnee’s German-American Club presents its Oktoberfest Friday, October 5 (5:30–11 p.m.), at the Shawnee Civic Centre (13817 Johnson Drive) featuring

the Alpen Spielers German Polka Band and the Blautaler Schuhplatter Dancers. Food and beverages will be sold and admission is free. Parkville puts on its annual Parktoberfest Saturday, October 6 (noon–9 p.m.). Festivities in English Landing Park (the most scenic Oktoberfest site in the metro) include an early morning pet parade, food vendors, a beer garden, and live music. The Elders take the stage at 7 p.m. About three hours outside KC is 175-year-old Hermann, Missouri, the quaint river town where it’s all about the wine. The hamlet puts on Oktoberfest activities every Saturday and Sunday in October, with area vineyards offering wine tastings, and plenty of entertainment and food besides. The town’s Arts & Crafts Festival kicks the month off October 5 and 6 (at Hermann Middle School). “The Artists of Wine Country Walks and Talks” follow on October 13 and 14, and Deutsch Country Days at Luxenhaus Farm (near Marthasville) happen October 20 and 21. — CHARLES FERRUZZA

S A B R I N A S TA I R E S

Annette Pinter and co-sponsor Randall Schneck

City Girl Annette Pinter brings Fashion’s Night Out back to KC.

N

ew York City style is about to hit 13th Street and Main. But don’t expect a harsh East Coast vibe. This block party — with a designer meet-and-greet, silhouettes strutting behind screens, swag bags and plenty of bubbly — aims for the warmth of a community festival. The pairing of big-city ambition and Midwestern heart is the work of Annette Pinter, a Kansas City woman with a flair for Big Apple fashion. It’s Pinter who has crafted this scene for the Power & Light District’s Fashion’s Night

s on ks!

Club MONDAY @ 6 THE SONWRITERS SCENE HOSTED BY THE CLEMINTINES BRING YOUR ACOUSTIC & THROWDOWN!

Out event. She’s also the reason that Fashion’s Night Out exists here. Pinter attended New York City’s Fashion Institute of Technology and, after graduation, landed a stage-manager role with that city’s Fashion Week. “My dilemmas were, do we cast Naomi Campbell for this show? What about Gisele Bundchen?” Pinter recalls. “It was unreal.” The Kansas City-area native spent seven years in the thick of New York City’s fashion scene. With her 20s drawing to a close, though, she longed for the comforts of home. So she found work at the Garment District, a 10-boutiques-in-one collective launched by

9

0

the P&L two years ago as the district’s retail anchor, at 1350 Main. She manages it alongside Tommy Hilfiger transplant Randall Schneck. First on Pinter’s to-do list: Add Kansas City to the list of cities involved in Fashion’s Night Out. The annual global event began in New York City in 2009 as a Fashion Week kickoff at various shopping destinations. The intention was to create excitement for shopping, thus bolstering consumer confidence. Starting the event locally was no easy feat. It meant shopping centers collaborating rather than competing, not to mention finding sponsors — and tireless planning. After several meetings, three shopping centers — the P&L, the Country Club Plaza and Zona Rosa — committed, and the first Kansas City Fashion’s Night Out, last September, drew strong crowds. The three shopping districts are poised for round two, on September 6. Pinter has other aspirations for local fashion. People can be judgmental when it comes to fashion, she says, which can stifle innovation. On days when she misses the energy of New York City, she can be cheered by a surprise outside the shop’s vast Main Street windows. “I love it when I look out and see a girl who has thrown on something that’s very, Oh, she put on that with that!” she says. “You expect to see that in New York City. Those people are imitating a trend. But you don’t expect to see that in Kansas City. When you do see it, you’re seeing a trendsetter right here on the street. And that’s exciting to me.” — NANCY HULL RIGDON

Buy the Buy A few other noteworthy fall sales Hallmarket, September 29

Hallmark artists, photographers, sculptors and designers sell what they’ve made off the clock, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. today in front of the Hallmark Visitors Center (2450 Grand, 816-274-5745, crowncenter.com/events).

Wings of Hope, November 10–11

Shop an eclectic selection of artists’ work — from rings to rugs — while supporting breastcancer awareness and research during this open house. Head to Stuff (316 West 63rd Street, 816-361-8222, pursuegoodstuff.com).

Black Friday Wine Sale, November 23

Flee the battles at big-box stores for wine discounts in the country, from 11 a.m.– 5 p.m. today at Jowler Creek Vineyard & Winery (16905 Jowler Creed Road) in Platte City. See jowlercreek.com or call 816-858-5528.

West Bottoms Resale Shops December Sale, December 7–9

Repurposed home décor for gifts and decorations. Among the dozen-plus shops are Good Ju Ju (1420 West 13th Terrace, 816-421-1930, goodjujukc.com) and Restoration Emporium (1300 West 13th Street, 913-915-2124; search “Restoration Emporium” on Facebook).— NANCY HULL RIGDON continued on page 14

6

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FRIDAYS AND SATURDAYS KC’S BEST BANDS AND DJ’S FACEBOOK.COM/CLUB906 FOR DETAILS

NO COVER LIVE ENTERTAINMENT pitch.com

AUGUST 30 -SEPTEMBER 5, 2012

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EXCEL SIOR SPRINGS, GL ADS TONE, KANSAS CIT Y, KEARNEY, LIBERT Y, NORTH KANSAS CIT Y, SMITHVILLE

clay county MISSOURI

Come See. Come Do. Aug. 31 – Oct. 31 Sept. 6 Sept. 8 Sept. 8 Sept. 13-16 Sept. 15 Oct. 31 Sept. 22 Sept. 22

Sept. 28-30 Oct. 5-7

Oct. 12-13

Liberty Corn Maze Two miles south of Liberty Downtown Divas at Dusk Historic Downtown Liberty Jesse James 5K/10K Classic Run/Walk Jesse James Farm in Kearney Big Shoal Country Fair Atkins-Johnson Farm in Gladstone Jesse James Festival Jesse James Park in Kearney Carolyn’s Country Cousins Pumpkin Patch Two miles south of Liberty Midwest National Air Center Fly-In Excelsior Springs 12th Annual Music Fest & Back Porch Jam Watkins Woolen Mill State Historic Site Liberty Fall Festival Historic Downtown Liberty Gladfest Gladstone’s Central Park Octoberfest Downtown Smithville

For a complete listing of Clay County events visit

WWW.CL AYCOUNT YMO.GOV/VISIT 12

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AUGUST 30 -SEPTEMBER 5, 2012

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1 Florence + the Machine at Starlight Theatre Kansas City Royals last home stand, vs. Detroit Tigers

continued from page 11

2 Ayad Akhtar, American Dervish, Saint Paul’s Episcopal Church (Rainy Day) Kansas City Noir, KC crime fiction anthology, Kansas City Central Library Kansas City Royals last home stand, vs. Detroit Tigers

Wayne the Train Hancock at Knuckleheads Kansas City Royals vs. Detroit Tigers, final game of the season

4 Indians, Rockhurst Theatre Department Laura Moriarty, The Chaperone, Johnson County Central Resource Library

5 Royal Comedy Tour at Music Hall Bassnector at Lawrence Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros at Crossroads KC Voyeur: An Urban Rhapsody (with the People's Liberation Big Band of Greater KC), Fishtank Theater Radiate, Illuminate, Dance! at Kauffman Center BecauseHeCan, JCCC Theatre Department

6 NHL at Sprint Center Parktoberfest Lexington Apples, Arts & Antiques Festival in downtown Lexington, Mo. Football: Missouri vs. Vanderbilt, Kansas State vs. Kansas

7 Chiefs vs. Ravens Michael Stern conducts Brahms & Barber, Kauffman Center Lexington Apples, Arts & Antiques Festival in downtown Lexington, Mo.

8 Kansas City Renaissance Festival

9 Stars at Bottleneck Say Anything and Murder by Death at Beaumont Esparanza Spalding, Kauffman Center Lauren Oliver discusses The Spindlers at Unity Temple (Rainy Day) ArtSounds: Christina Vantzou and Verdana Valley Mini Chamber Orchestra, Epperson Auditorium Paola Gianturco, Grandmother Power: A Global Phenomenon, Kansas City Central Library The Musical Adventures of Flat Stanley, Theatre for Young America

10 Tanner Colby, Writers at Work: Some of My Best Friends Are Black, Kansas City Central Library Future of Energy and Creating a Sustainable Community, panel discussion, Kansas City Plaza Library Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson, Unicorn Theatre

11 Two Door Cinema at Beaumont Master Class, Spinning Tree Theatre

B R O O K E VA N D E V E R

3

Freaky Deaky It takes a village to build a haunted house.

F

or every freak drawn to Full Moon Productions’ annual haunted-house auditions, there’s at least one geek. At an August open call, one young man, his long hair tucked inside a do-rag, an even longer beard left uncontained, paces back and forth in front of Amber Arnett Bequeaith and her small staff. “Do you have a character that you like to perform?” someone asks him. “No, not really.” “Can you play dead?” He drops to the floor. A woman with two-toned hair and tight jeans steps to the front. “So what can you do?” asks James Dumas, who manages the Beast. “I can totally sing,” the woman says. She begins a fully committed version of Patsy Cline’s “Crazy.” Dumas interrupts her: “This isn’t American Idol.” There’s giggling. “Right, yeah,” the woman says. She’s not laughing. It turns out that her English accent needs work, too. The West Bottoms haunted-house operation, Bequeaith says, is a big undertaking. “We’re getting 250 people into makeup and costume every night in two hours or less,” she says. They also must hire employees and wrangle volunteers to handle the parking lots, the concession stands, the ticketing. “The theme is carried all the way

through,” she says — there are supposed to be jolts and chills at every stage of the customer’s experience. “If you aren’t going home without a voice or a sore throat, then you aren’t doing your job,” says Rachel SteenHatchet, a performer and makeup artist from Raymore. At 26, she’s in her fourth year performing here, working this season at Macabre Cinema for Full Moon Productions. She has always been into drive-in-style onscreen gore, so a haunted house designed to bring horror movies to life is a dream nightmare job. (It’s also a nonprofit, and all of the proceeds from admissions go to the Dream Factory.) To get here, Steen-Hatchet worked her way through the ranks at Full Moon, learning makeup and eventually specializing in latex, prosthetics and detailing. (She makes a mean bruise.) “Rachel is very physical,” Bequeaith says. “She leaps around, hangs in doorways, over doorjambs. People don’t even know where she is most of the time.” When she isn’t leaping about and vamping, the lithe, neon-greenmohawked performer has yet another skill: fire breathing. At regular intervals throughout her shift, she swigs from a 20-ounce bottle of lamp oil and mouth-sprays it into a lighted cloth at the end of a piece of wood. On this night, the lamp oil dribbles down Steen-Hatchet’s chin and onto her thin torso. “It’s easier than it looks.” — BERRY ANDERSON

YOU’VE BEEN ROCKED AT

photos by Paul Versluis 14 T H E P I T C H 2 THE PITCH

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12 Ice Breakers Tournament at Sprint Center Jayhawks at Crossroads KC Jerry Seinfeld at Midland Carmina Burana, Kansas City Ballet The National Circus of the People's Republic of China, Yardley Hall, JCCC Performing Arts Series Nnenna Freelon, “Lena, a Lovesome Thing,� Lied Center

13 Ice Breakers Tournament at Sprint Center Norah Jones at Midland Dinner of Note 2012, Heartland Men's Chorus, with Chely Wright, Marriott Hotel downtown Ballet Folklorico de Mexico, Kauffman Center Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center with Jeremy Denk, piano, Folly Theater Beginnings, Kansas City Civic Orchestra, Atonement Lutheran Church Rhythm and Ribs at the American Jazz Museum Crawl for Cancer in Westport Football: Kansas vs. Oklahoma State, Missouri vs. Alabama

14 A$AP Rocky at Beaumont Wolf Gang at RecordBar Last day: Fall Parade of Homes Showcase

15 Gennifer Albin talks Crewel, Unity Temple (Rainy Day)

16 Crystal Castles at Uptown Motion City Soundtrack at Granada National Symphony Orchestra of Cuba, Kauffman Center

17 Die Antwood at Liberty Hall

18 Gymnastics at Sprint Center Conservatory Orchestra, White Recital Hall SoÂŻ Percussion, Lied Center, Lawrence Junior League of KCMO Holiday Mart at Bartle Hall

19 Vincente Fernandez at Sprint Center NASCAR qualifiers The Mystery of Irma Vep, Kansas City Repertory Theatre The Lady From the Sea, UMKC Theatre The Capitol Steps, “On the Record,� Yardley Hall, JCCC Performing Arts Series

20 Northeast KC Historical Society Homes Tour Kansas Lottery 300 NASCAR Hammerween III at Beaumont Apollo's Fire: The Cleveland Baroque Orchestra, Friends of Chamber Music, Folly Theater

21 Hollywood Casino 400 NASCAR

Robert Belinic´, Lied Center (Lawrence) Threepenny Opera with the Free State Liberation Orchestra at the Lawrence Arts Center (Lawrence)

22 Matt Inman discusses How to Tell if Your Cat Is Plotting to Kill You, Unity Temple (Rainy Day)

23 Conservatory Wind Symphony, Californos Richard V. Barbuto, 1812: America on the Ropes, Kansas City Central Library

24 NBA: Miami Heat vs. Washington Wizards at Sprint Center Sporting KC’s last regular season game Kate Morton, The Secret Keeper, Unity Temple (Rainy Day) Frank White, One Man’s Dream: My Town, My Team, My Time, Kansas City Plaza Library

25 Grace Potter at Uptown Henry Wiencek, Thomas Jefferson, Kansas City Plaza Library Tracy K. Smith, Midwest Poets Series The Kentucky Cycle, Parts I and II, Metropolitan Ensemble Theatre

26 Justin Bieber at Sprint Center Theme and Variations, Owen/Cox Dance Group KC Symphony: Beethoven’s Eroica plus Eighth Blackbird, Kauffman Center Marilyn Maye, Quality Hill Playhouse Jasper Quartet, Friends of Chamber Music, White Recital Hall

27 Red Hot Chili Peppers at Sprint Center Rugged Maniac Run Waterfire Piano duo Christina and Michelle Naughton, Folly Theater Football: Kansas vs. Texas, Kansas State vs. Texas Tech, Missouri vs. Kentucky

28 Chiefs vs. Raiders KC Symphony: Beethoven’s Eroica plus Eighth Blackbird, Kauffman Center Here to Stay: the Gershwin Experience, Lied Center (Lawrence) Boo at the Zoo Last Call: Worlds of Fun

29 Thomas Frank, Pity the Billionaire, Kansas City Central Library

30 Madonna at Sprint Center Basketball: Kansas vs. Emporia State David Sedaris, Kauffman Center Basketball: Kansas State vs. Washburn

31 Halloween Conservatory Wind Ensemble, White Recital Hall

Bank on It The Kansas Speedway promises a newly repaved track with better, faster racing.

N

ASCAR drivers don’t like alterations to their tracks, explains Pat Warren, Kansas Speedway president, while cruising around the newly paved 1.5-mile track in a Toyota Sequoia. “They hate change,� Warren says, leaning the SUV into a banked turn as construction crews work on the infield under an overcast sky. “It doesn’t matter what you do.� When the NASCAR Sprint Cup and Nationwide Tour return to Kansas in October, drivers better be ready for a different track. Some of NASCAR’s biggest stars were skeptical when the repavement project was announced in April. Brad Keselowski, who took a checkered flag at Kansas Speedway in 2011, told ESPN that he was sorry to see the old pavement go. “I’ve got a really good feel for what I want out of my car at this track, and I’m ... really sad to see it go,� he told the network. Four-time NASCAR Sprint Cup champion Jeff Gordon echoed the sentiment. “This place is awesome,� he told USA Today. “I wish they wouldn’t touch it.� “I would not resurface this track ever,� Columbia, Missouri, native Carl Edwards told ESPN. The Kansas Speedway went ahead with the five-layer resurfacing (totaling 7 inches of asphalt). Now complete, the project includes what Warren calls the most important part of the repave: a steeper bank. The Speedway spent about eight months repaving and reconfiguring the tri-oval and increasing the bank to create more

competitive racing. The course’s bank now varies from 15 degrees in the “low groove� inside lane to 18.5 degrees in the middle and 20 degrees on the high end. Warren’s response to what this will do to races at the track is one word: “faster.� The increased bank will also allow drivers more opportunities to pass one another and race side by side. Cars on the higher banks will travel a slightly longer distance, but they’ll do so faster than the low lines. “I can race another car side by side and carry more speed through the corner at 18.5 and even more at 20 degrees, traveling a further distance but creating side-by-side racing,� Warren explains. The repaving was necessary due to weather fluctuations at the Speedway, which Warren says are more severe than any other NASCAR track. Warren pulls off the track and takes out his iPhone. He scrolls through photos until he finds a picture of a fist-sized chunk of track that popped out of the start-finish line during the last NASCAR race in April. “That’s a big piece of the track, and we never found the piece,� he says. “Had it been seen from race control, the race would have stopped, and we would have had to patch it.� Crews repairing the track found 11 years of problems throughout the course caused by racing. “Once you started peeling back the problem, you could never stop,� Warren says. While drivers might initially complain, the project will provide a faster and safer track, Warren says. “We now don’t have to worry this fall ‘what if?’ �

— BEN PALOSAARI continued on page 18

NOW LET’S ROLL

7E HAVE MORE PRICING OPTIONS THAN EVER BEFORE

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17


3 | S at u r day

Matt and Kim

continued from page 15

6 | T u e s day Election Day

Football: Kansas State vs. Oklahoma State Matt and Kim at Liberty Hall

1| T h u r s day

Rob Schneider at VooDoo Lounge

Snow Patrol

Pages & Chapters 5k

Snow Patrol and Noel Gallagher’s High Flying Birds, the Midland Soiree D'etude at Fishtank Theater, in collaboration with the UMKC Theatre Department Rick Marschall, Theodore Roosevelt, Kansas City Plaza Library

2 | F r i day

4 | S u n day

7| W e dn e s day

Cameron Carpenter, Kauffman Center

John Corigliano Concert, White Recital Hall (Conservatory of Music)

Pianist Conrad Tao, Folly Theater

Il Trovatore, Lyric Opera

Basketball: Kansas State vs. Emporia State

Crown Center Ice Terrace opens Dan Deacon at the Granada

5 | Mon day

The Cover of Life, UMKC Theatre, undergraduate production Next to Normal, She & Her Productions, River's Edge Theatre Jonathan Biss, Friends of Chamber Music, Folly Theater Curtains, the Barn Players

Miss Representation documentary screening, Glenwood Arts Theater

Basketball: Kansas vs. Washburn

Terry Beckenbaugh, Civil War Sesquicentennial: The Politics of War, Kansas City Central Library

Conservatory Chamber Orchestra, White Recital Hall

The Game's Afoot, with Marion Ross, New Theatre Restaurant

Ghost Tours of Kansas

U-Pick event, Labor Day Weekend

have been able to irrigate most of the fields

When: 8 p.m. September 22, October 13,

Drought? “We have about 900 apple trees,

throughout the summer. We still have our

When: Dusk–11 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays,

October 27

and many of our apples are sunburned or

fingers crossed the heat has not done too

September 29–October 27

Where: Starts at the Eldridge Hotel, 701

have cooked on the trees,” says co-owner

much damage.”

Where: 29755 West 191st Street, in Gardner

Massachusetts, in Lawrence, 785-851-0856

Joan M. Shearer. Good apples or no apples,

KC Pumpkin Patch and Corn Maze

Signature shock: Kansas Twister

Signature shock: You get two hours to

the orchard still offers hayrides to the or-

29755 West 191st Street, in Gardner

Ghost & Gangsters Tour at the Edge of Hell

slowly freak out over Lawrence’s reportedly

chard and the pumpkin patch, catch-and-

September 29–October 31 (hours and admis-

When: 6–9 p.m. Friday and Saturday

haunted spots. Tickets cost $17.

release fishing, picnicking, marshmallow

sion vary; check website)

roasts and duck feeding. For sale: apple

Drought? Maybe, but it’s not stopping this

cider, cider slushes, caramel apples, Dutch

pick-your-own patch from celebrating its

apple pies.

10th year with the T-Bones Corn Maze, the

Where: 1300 West 12th Street ers; this one’s a bus tour of KC landmarks

Pumpkin  Patches,   Orchards   and  Corn  Mazes

where paranormal activity and organized

Wagon Wheel Orchard

A corn maze runs September 14–October 31.

Fall harvest events begin Labor Day weekend

Powell Pumpkin Patch

Spook-Tacular Haunted Barn and more.

crime intersect. Tickets: $30–$60.

15380 Edgerton Road, Gardner

Drought? What drought? “It was a little scary

and run through the end of October on Satur-

25695 Spring Valley Road, in Louisburg

Carolyn’s Country Cousins Pumpkin Patch

The Graveyard Run 5k and Kids Run

Through November 1

there,” says co-owner Shelly Schierman.

days and Sundays, 9 a.m.–5 p.m.

September 29–October 31, 9 a.m.–6 p.m.,

17607 Northeast 52nd Street, in Liberty

When: 9 a.m. Saturday, October 27

This family-owned, you-pick-it orchard

“We’re like, ‘Oh, the corn is 12 inches tall,’

Drought? The Red Barn says its apple crops

with a corn maze ($2–$4), hayrides, a nature

Daily, September 15–October 31.

Where: Elmwood Cemetery, 4900 East

grows almost 1,000 varieties of apples,

and then we got that 2-inch rain. It seems like

have done fine but will likely be picked out by

trail and pumpkin picking.

Drought? Well, it’s been a crop-killing sea-

Truman Road

pears, peaches, cherries and more.

ages ago. It grew, like, 4 feet in four days. So

early September.

Corn-maze admission is $4 for people aged

son, so it might be appropriate to get here

Signature shock: It’s in a graveyard.

Louisburg Cider Mill & Country Store

it’s nice and tall.”

Cider Hill Family Orchard

12 and older, $2 for those aged 6–11, and free

for the patch’s Dia de los Muertos celebration

Register at active.com ($25 advance, $30

14730 K68 Highway, Louisburg

Weston Red Barn Farm

3341 North 139th Street, in Kansas City,

for children 5 and younger.

(October 27 and 28).

race day, $5 off for Northeast residents).

Ciderfest: September 29–30, October 6–7

16300 Wilkerson Road, Weston

Kansas

Drought? Powell’s Katie York says: “We

Read a longer version of this list at pitch.com.

Signature shocks: More like shock absorb-

2

KC Symphony: Love: It Takes Two, Kauffman Center

KC Fear Farm

Other  Haunts

18

8 | T h u r s day

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AUGUST 30 -SEPTEMBER 5, 2012

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— ABBIE STUTZER


9 | F r i day

Skyfall

The Mystery of Edwin Drood,

JCCC Theatre Department Basketball: Kansas State vs. North Dakota Quixotic, Lied Center (Lawrence) Eighth Blackbird, Friends of Chamber Music,

Mezzo-Soprano Joyce DiDonato, Folly Theater

16 | F r i day

17| S at u r day

Basketball: Kansas State NIT season tipoff ArtSounds: “The Machine the Sneetches Built,”

The Mystery of Edwin Drood,

Shirley MacLaine, Yardley Hall, JCCC Performing Arts Series

1 3 | T u e s day

Movie opening: Skyfall

American Royal ends

Epperson Auditorium

JCCC Theatre Department

Tap Dogs, Kauffman Center

KC Symphony: Carmina Burana,

Football: Kansas vs. Iowa State, Missouri vs. Syracuse North Face Endurance Challenge run

Kauffman Center

14 | W e dn e s day

White Recital Hall

Bruce Springsteen, Sprint Center

Supersuckers at the Riot Room

The Boss

Red Elvises at Knuckleheads

KC Symphony: Homes of Note Tour XXXVIII

10 | S at u r day

11| S u n day

1 5 | T h u r s day

Crooked Fingers and John Vanderslice at RecordBar

Kansas City Youth Ballet Fall Concert,

The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee,

Kansas City Youth Ballet Fall Concert, Bolender Center Hijinks, NewEar Contemporary Chamber Ensemble,

Il Trovatore, Lyric Opera Bolender Center

All Souls Unitarian Church Compagnie de Danse, Jean-René Delsoin (Haiti), Yardley Hall, JCCC Performing Arts Series Sofrito: David Gonzalez with the Latin Legends Band, Lied Center (Lawrence)

1 9 | Mon day

Basketball: CBE Hall of Fame Classic at Sprint Center

2 0 | T u e s day

Basketball: CBE Hall of Fame Classic at Sprint Center

Dropkick Murphys

Basketball: Kansas vs. Chattanooga

1 8 | S u n day

Rockhurst Theatre Department Dropkick Murphys at the Uptown Theater

Chiefs vs. Bengals

12 | Mon day

Set Your Seitz on Latin Rhythm, Kansas City Civic Orchestra, Folly Theater

Basketball: Kansas State NIT season tipoff

2 3 | F r i day

Christmas in Song, Quality Hill Playhouse

Basketball: Kansas State vs. North Florida

2 5 | S u n day

2 8 | W e dn e s day

Chiefs vs. Broncos

Inspecting Carol, Unicorn Theatre, co-production with KC Actors Theatre and UMKC Theatre

24 | S at u r day

2 9 | T h u r s day

KC Symphony: Beethoven’s Pastoral, Kauffman Center

Jonathan Steinberg, Bismarck: A Life,

2 1| W e dn e s day

Kansas City Central Library

3 0 | F r i day

Junie B. in Jingle Bells, Batman Smells, Theatre for Young America

Kansas vs. Oregon State, Sprint Center

2 2 | T h u r s day Thanksgiving

2 6 | Mon day

Basketball: Kansas vs. San Jose State

27| T u e s day

KC Symphony: Handel’s Messiah, Kauffman Center Cool Yule, Heartland Men's Chorus, with Marilyn Maye,

Robert W. Merry, Where They Stand:

Plaza lighting ceremony

The American Presidents in the Eyes

Schwag at Uptown

of Voters and Historians, Kansas City

Folly Theater

Plaza Library

continued on page 22

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M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X


SEPTEMBER

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AUGUST 30 -SEPTEMBER 5, 2012

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MAMA TIO’S Inside Town Pavillion on 11th St between Main & Walnut KC,MO 816-221-0589 mamatios.com MCCORMICK & SCHMICK’S 448 W 47th Street KC,MO 816-531-6800 mccormickandschmicks. com MICHAELANGELO’S ITALIAN GRILL 17104 E. 24 Hwy. Independence, MO 816-257-1122 POWER & LIGHT DISTRICT 13th and Main KC,MO 816-842-1045 RAOUL’S VELVET ROOM 7222 W. 119th St OP,KS 913-469-0466 raoulsvelvetroom. com R BAR & RESTAURANT 1617 Genessee Street KC,MO 816-471-1777 rbarkc.com RECORD BAR 1020 Westport Road KC,MO 816-753-5207 therecordbar.com RIOT ROOM 4048 Broadway KC,MO 816-442-8177 theriotroom.com 403 CLUB 403 N. 5th St. Kansas City, KS 913-499-8392 77 SOUTH 5041 W. 135th St. Leawood, KS 913-742-7727 77south.net pitch.com

AUGUST 30 -SEPTEMBER 5, 2012

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continued from page 19

S u n d ay

M o n d ay

T u es d ay

6

Wedne

18

Mecum Car Auction, KC Convention Center

Basketball: Kansas vs. Richmond

KC Symphony: The Holly and the Ivy, Kauffman Center

Basketball: Kansas State vs. Texas Southern

Lehár’s The Merry Widow, White Recital Hall

19

Nancy Gibbs, The Presidents Club: Inside the World’s Most Exclusive Fraternity, Kansas City

Basketball: UMKC vs. Iowa State

Plaza Library

20

7

A Spectacular Christmas, Musical Theater Heritage

Mecum Car Auction at KC Convention Center

21

KC Symphony: Jim Brickman: On a Winter’s Night, Kauffman Center

The Nutcracker, the Kansas City Ballet

Lehár’s The Merry Widow, White Recital Hall Baroque by Candlelight for the Holiday,

1

Old Mission United Methodist Church, Kansas City Chamber Orchestra Football: Kansas State vs. Texas Chris Isaak at the Uptown Here We Come A-Caroling!, Quality Hill Playhouse Cool Yule, Heartland Men's Chorus, with Marilyn Maye,

2

Chiefs vs. Panthers Basketball: Kansas State vs. USC Upstate

Metro Pro Wrestling, Turner Rec Center

4

David Nasaw, The Patriarch: The Remarkable Life and Turbulent Times of Joseph P. Kennedy, Kansas City Central Library

KC Symphony: Christmas Festival, Kauffman Center

14

KC Symphony: Tuba Christmas, Kauffman Center

Here We Come A-Caroling!, Quality Hill Playhouse

The Nightcap with Arty Vulgaris & Annie Cherry, Fishtank Theater

9

Sounds of the Season, Kansas City Civic Orchestra,

Six By Ten, the Barn Players

Atonement Lutheran Church

10

15

The Nutcracker and the Mouse King, Owen/Cox

Carrie Underwood, Sprint Center

Here We Come A-Caroling!, Quality Hill Playhouse

Basketball: Kansas vs. Belmont Sounds of the Season, Kansas City Civic Orchestra,

11

Immaculate Conception

16

Dance Group with the People’s Liberation Big Band, Folly Theater

23 Chiefs vs. Colts last regular season home game

Atonement Lutheran Church

New York Polyphony, Cathedral of the

22

Basketball: Florida vs. Kansas State, Sprint Center

KC Symphony: Christmas Festival, Kauffman Center

Punch Brothers at the Beaumont

Shrek the Musical, Coterie Theatre

Disney's Beauty and the Beast, Lied Center (Lawrence)

Lehár’s The Merry Widow, White Recital Hall

Lehár’s The Merry Widow, White Recital Hall

A Devil Inside, UMKC Theatre

5

Mecum Car Auction, KC Convention Center

Calvin Trillin discusses Dogfight (Rainy Day)

3

12 13

8

Basketball: Kansas vs. Colorado

Folly Theater

Paul Rudd alert: This Is 40 opens

24

House of Yes, by Wendy MacLeod, Fishtank Theater

A Christmas Carol, Kansas City Repertory Theatre

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Gift  guide

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es d ay

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S at u r d ay

Well Cast Actor Emily Peterson’s busy year is far from over. emember the time when you dreamed of being an actor? For Emily Peterson, 23, that childhood wish never went away. So it’s a good thing that she has become one of KC’s most visible — and accomplished — young performers. She was “around 12” and already drawn to the arts, she says, when her dad took her to see School House Rock: Live! at the Coterie Theatre, and she felt that pull toward acting. “I loved it so much,” she says, “he signed me up for classes right after.” She developed much of what she calls her “passion, understanding and drive” in five years studying at the Coterie. “They have an advanced curriculum that not only teaches technique, text analysis and ensemble work,” she says, “but they do it through development of imagination and confidence. Which is awesome for kids and, like me, teens who know that the arts is their path.” (She also studied with the Shakespeare Festival.) She kicked off her professional career, she says, at 13, when she played a weasel in the Coterie’s Wind in the Willows. Following graduation from Stephens College, Peterson performed in summer theater in Amana, Iowa, and Okoboji, Iowa, as well as the Black Hills Playhouse in Rapid City, South Dakota. It was “work hard, play hard,” she says of those out-of-town stints. “You do not rest. You eat, sleep and breathe the work.”

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She still does. In just the last six months, she has appeared on several local stages. In March and April, she portrayed Cecily in the American Heartland Theatre’s production of The Importance of Being Earnest. In May, she played English heroine Elizabeth Bennet in the Metropolitan Ensemble Theatre’s Pride and

Prejudice. She followed that with the Shakespeare Festival: Hermia in A Midsummer Night’s Dream and Iras in Antony & Cleopatra. August and September brought Kansas City Actors Theatre: Miss Casewell in The Mousetrap and Felicity Cunningham in The Real Inspector Hound. And she looks forward, after

that, to rehearsals for the Kansas City Rep’s A Christmas Carol. “I’ve been fortunate to play some pretty kickass ladies,” Peterson says. “Oscar Wilde is a blast to perform, and Elizabeth Bennet is my hero. That being said, while all of the women are strong and smart, they are all so different.” And it’s that range of roles that makes her work, she says, both challenging and gratifying. “One of the most enjoyable parts of working in theater is constantly meeting and working with new people,” she says. And her repeated work with other local actors breeds a helpful familiarity. “There’s a vocabulary, a style that we know in each other, so oftentimes we get to move a little quicker, are maybe more comfortable trying new things.” Relationships build and continue in other ways, too: knitting tips from Peggy Friesen, for example, and recipes from Charles Fugate. In what must be a very limited amount of leisure time, Peterson watches Netflix, goes to the City Market, eats out, cooks and grills, goes to theater, plays Skee-Ball at the Velvet Dog. She and her boyfriend, Kyle, plus two cats and a hound dog named French Fry, call the Southmoreland neighborhood home. “I’m so domestic, it hurts,” she says. She knits and sews, and she makes stationery. “I love most things crafty.” And so, there’s the craft of acting that she hones and perfects, both in KC and in Chicago, where she plans to start splitting her time after A Christmas Carol. She’s a student of the theater, she says, who keeps learning “with each challenge presented with each role.” — DEBORAH HIRSCH

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26

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AUGUST 30 -SEPTEMBER 5, 2012

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WEEK OF AUGUST 30-SEPTEMBER 5 | BY BERRY ANDERSON

33 PAG E

FILM Guy Pearce is so unlawful in Lawless.

36 PAG E

D THURS

AY

8 .30

to odbye Say go light. at Star r e m sum

FAT C I T Y This much bacon in one place might be unlawful, too.

42 PAG E

MUSIC FORECAST Does Umphree’s McGee look jammy to you?

T H U R S D AY | 8 . 3 0 | HEEL THE WORLD

The Heartland Women’s Leadership Council wants to empower the women of Kansas City. Campaign 20/20 began as a way for the original 20 board members to reach out to E R MO 20 other women in the community and assist them with basic needs AT E N I ONL .COM and resources. As both PITCH membership and need have grown, resources have been stretched. Help some sisters out at Martinis, Women and Shoes, a fundraiser whose $35 ticket buys you plenty of ’tinis, hors d’oeuvres and foot ogling. The doors open at 6 p.m. at the Gallery Event Space above the Bristol (61 East 14th Street). See heartlandwomen.org to Paypal yourself a ticket.

EVENTS

LA CAGE AUX FOLLIES Starlight Theatre (4600 Starlight Road, in Swope Park) closes out its summer season with the musical La Cage aux Folles, a hit that has never lost popularity. Based on a 1973 French play, it debuted on Broadway in 1983 (music and lyrics by Jerry Herman and book by Harvey Fierstein) and won six Tony Awards. La Cage was revived on Broadway and won a Tony in 2005 for Best Revival, then was revived on Broadway again in 2010 and received yet another Tony, this time

F R I D AY | 8 . 31 |

for Best Revival of a Musical. Now, George Hamilton (above left) and Christopher Sieber star in the national tour that’s based on the 2010 revival. Oh, you want plot? Georges (Hamilton) is owner of a glitzy nightclub in Saint-Tropez, and his partner, Albin (Sieber), is one of the star drag attractions. Mayhem ensues when Georges’ son brings his fiancée and her ultraconservative parents to meet them. See kcstarlight.com or call 816-363-7827. — DEBORAH HIRSCH

F R I D AY | 8 . 3 1 |

BIRD-WATCHING

Few local musicians have generated more goodwill than Megan Birdsall. The Detroitborn singer honed her craft in Kansas City, then decamped to Nashville in late 2009. At the time, she’d just finished Over the Bones, a haunting Americana album that subtly showed Birdsall’s jazz roots. Tonight she brings her band, MBird — co-songwriter Michael Smith and bass player Ben Leifer — to the Uptown Arts Bar (3611 Broadway, 816-960-4611) for her first KC show since her move. “This is also the same club we’ll be hosting our Artist Showcase at in September,” Birdsall tells The Pitch. The showcase, she says, is made up of “tons of local bands and performers, in stripped-down acoustic sets, and touring artists on their way through KC, as well as MCs, poets and essayists.” She adds: “Nashville continued on page 28

PARTY OF THE CENTURY

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e don’t know anyone who made it to Fatboy Slim’s fifth Big Beach Bootique this past June at Amex Community Stadium, in his hometown of Brighton, England. The electronic-music wizard, born Norman Cook, spun for 40,000 fans during the production, a performance shot to make Fatboy Slim Live: From the Big Beach Bootique. The movie screens tonight at Tivoli Cinemas (4050 Pennsylvania, 816-561-5222), a one-off for which the X and the glow sticks are best left at home. It starts at 9:15; tickets cost $8.50. See tivolikc.com. pitch.com

AUGUST 30 -SEPTEMBER 5, 2012

THE PITCH

27


MBird: back on our porch.

F R I D AY | 8 . 3 1 |

S U N D AY | 9 . 2 | GREEN IN THE FACE

As the 10th Kansas City Irish Festival gets under way, we’d like to remind you that the craic is for all ages and persuasions. Whiskey drinkers, fiddlers, dancers, homebrewers, comedy enthusiasts, Catholic Mass attendees, artists, Celtic-music lovers, people who like a good ghost story, potato freaks — whoever. It all happens at Crown Center (2450 Grand) this weekend (it began Friday at 5 p.m.). Tickets go for $15 at the gate but can be purchased ahead for $10 online or at metro area Hy-Vee stores. For a full schedule of events, a list of vendors and what’s new this year, see kcirishfest.com.

JIM AND JUICE

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continued from page 27 is famous for its songwriter nights, and we wanted to bring something like that home with us to showcase all the amazing talent KC has to offer.” Tonight’s homecoming begins at 9:30 p.m. The $10 cover also buys a disc with MBird songs recorded live in Nashville. Hear more at mbirdmusic.com.

READY PLAYER ONE

If you’ve forgotten that Labor Day weekend is when Santa-Cali-Gon goes down, then you aren’t very Kansas City. The Independence festival has been poppin’ off since 1973, with concerts, a huge crafts fair, a carnival, a midway, and some of the best people watching. But if fried gator on a stick, hordes of goth teens, and a watermelon-seed-spitting contest aren’t up your alley, may we suggest the Electric Theatre Vintage Arcade? Located in the party room at Square Pizza on Independence Square (208 West Maple Avenue, 816-388-9660), the golden-era video-game gallery lets you play all the Dig Dug, Tron, Punchout and Crystal Castles your thumbs can take (with tickets ranging from $5 to $20). Open today through Monday, it also offers an air-conditioned respite from the oldfashioned festival fun outside. See electrictheatrearcade .com for more information.

S AT U R D AY | 9 . 1 | BARRACUDA WARNING

More than 2,000 pre-1975 hot rods and custom cars roll into the Kansas Speedway (400 Speedway Boulevard, in Kansas City, 28

THE PITCH

hen you need art money, you throw an art party, and people write fat art checks. Except when they don’t. “I couldn’t have thrown a party at a worse time,” says Kevin McGraw, who set out to make a documentary about Jim Leedy in 2005 — just as the Bloch Building and the Kauffman Center were hoovering up donations. He put on some fancy parties. He got empty wine bottles and full-bellied partygoers, he says, but not much cash. So the 8:30 p.m. screening of Leedy: The Documentary, which McGraw made with director Matt Hawley, is both a long-awaited premiere and a retroactive fundraiser. At $10 a ticket, the event is a bargain; the movie, McGraw says, is “the complete story” of Leedy as artist, mentor and influence. After the movie, at Screenland Crossroads (1656 Washington), there’s a reception at Leedy-Voulkos Art Center (2012 Baltimore). Order tickets at — SCOTT WILSON leedy-voulkos.com/leedy or call 816-474-1919. Kansas, 913-328-3300) for the Goodguys 11th Mid-Western Nationals car show this weekend. That means one-stop oohing and aahing for vehicle enthusiasts: a swap meet, vendor exhibits, live music, and more of the expected four-wheeled attractions. Events run 8 a.m.–5 p.m. Friday and Saturday, 8 a.m.–4 p.m. Sunday. Tickets cost $18 for adults and $6 for kids aged 7–12 (and free for the 6-and-younger set, as is parking). For details, see midwesternnats.com.

hormone-free beef, free-range chicken, live chickens, free-range buffalo, buffalo summer sausage and jerky, longhorn beef and lamb. The bounty comes courtesy of the market’s ongoing Farm to Table Celebration Series, whose latest event is today’s For the Love of Meat, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. That means samples, people. Details at thecitymarket.org.

MEAT BEAT

You already know that the City Market (20 East Fifth Street) is a good place to pick up lemons and limes for your cocktails, berries for your yogurt, and free-range eggs for your breakfast. But today is also the day to find grass-fed beef, free-range and

S AT U R D AY | 9 . 1 |

DIRTY BOOK CLUB

S

ure, we could join the chorus of people mocking E.L. James’ Fifty Shades of Grey trilogy. The millions of sticky e-reader screens! The renewed interest in butt plugs! But no, we’ll take the high road and applaud. Look, people are still reading! Yea, books! Besides, now there’s a party. Locally, Eric Haynes and Stan Bryant of Luna (1520 Grand, 816581-6440) are putting on an event with a Fifty Shades of Grey theme. That means a “passion party” from 7 to 9 p.m., free champagne from 9 to 11, massage and novelty giveaways, special cocktails, and a chance to win new and unsullied copies of the erotic novels that have revved up book buyers all over. Men in suits and women in cocktail dresses pay no cover, Haynes and Bryant say, so dress to impress. For more information, search Luna KC on Facebook.

AUGUST 30 -SEPTEMBER 5, 2012

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M O N D AY | 9 . 3 |

OUTER LIMITS

According to Margie Kay, assistant state director of the Missouri Mutual UFO Network, Kansas City has had more than 75 UFO sightings in the past six weeks. “Why are they increasing?” she wants to know. Is she alone in her curiosity? Find out tonight, when MUFON’s guest speaker is Travis Walton. According to his famous book, Fire in the Sky (later made into a movie), Walton was abducted by aliens in 1975 while working as a logger in the mountains of northeastern Arizona. Kay says Walton’s story remains important because it encourages others who have made contact to come forward. “We need photos and video so we can get a better handle on who or what ‘they’ are,” she says. So gather your blurry Polaroids and old VHS tapes and head to the WynBrick Center (1701 WynBrick Drive, Liberty, 816-792-4325), where MUFON screens Fire in the Sky at 5:30 p.m., and Walton speaks and signs copies of his book afterward. Tickets cost $16 for members or $20 for nonmembers, and the event begins at 5 p.m. with a Mexican dinner. Reservations are required; see missourimufon.org.

W E D N E S D AY | 9 . 5 | THAT’LL BE THE DAY

Two days short of Buddy Holly’s 76th birthday, the men of the Rumblejetts (Chad Hasty, Jim Holopter and Jud Kite), Patrick Recob of


T U E S D AY | 9 . 4 |

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TOP OF THE CITY

W

e’ve said it before, and we’re saying it again: The observation deck at City Hall (414 East 12th Street, 816-513-3600) has the best high views of the city. It’s open from 8:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m. today, and admission is free.

Lee McBee & the Confessors, and Gregg Todt of the Federation of Horsepower light up Knuckleheads (2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456) with some of the best tuneage of the late 1950s. They’re joining forces to salute Holly, J.P. “the Big Bopper” Richardson and Ritchie Valens, who all went down together in a 1959 plane crash. The Pitch talked with the rockabilly heroes about the Buddy Holly Birthday Bash, which starts at 8 p.m. The Pitch: So it’s kind of a “The Day the Music Died” thing, right? Recob: It is a tribute to the three but isn’t a true, accurate knockoff [like] the Winter Dance Party Tribute Show. That one is done by John Mueller as Buddy, the Bopper’s son Jay E M OR Richardson, and Ray Anthony as Ritchie. With our presentation, the AT INE personalities of Buddy, ONL .COM PITCH Ritchie and the Bopper naturally come out as we perform the music with respect to the artists, by staying true to the music and realistically being ourselves. Is there a particular Buddy Holly song that touches the musician in you? Hasty: Musically, “Raining in My Heart” and “True Love Ways.” The producer and the string section were totally against these two works they were hired to do, but Buddy knew what he heard in his head, and his persistence produced a masterwork for all of time. Holopter: I’ve always liked “Not Fade Away.” Its meaning is so universal. It will never get old. There’s an aura of innocence that surrounds his music. Do you feel like that feeling is gone from today’s acts? Hasty: It’s not totally gone, but look at the difference in society and time from then to now. We play with acts that still have that new, fresh innocence not tarnished by bad deals, road fatigue or band breakups. Richard Johnston from Memphis comes to mind. He’s had global success by playing in the streets and doing it all on his own, independent. I’ve

EVENTS

recently learned a few things from this man. Look him up. Holopter: No, there are bands that still write great music that will hold up over time, like Social Distortion and the Replacements, to name two that take the time to write a great song. Kite: I am split on that. It’s a different type of innocence, maybe, but times have changed. I just don’t know if that “gleam” that he had in his songwriting can be recreated or captured again. That was truly of a golden era. Recob: No, absolutely NO! There is a strong current of this vibe that exists especially in the independent-music sector. It could exist more in the mainstream pop culture, but the younger generation just needs more exposure to it. As a traveling musician, I see young, fantastic, original musicians exude that innocence. It just seems stifled, but I think it could live and breathe again like it did once.

R E B M E SEPT |

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Children’s

ion Silent vAeuninctg) & (Friday e cake n a P y r a t o R t. 7-11 am a S t s a f k a e Br

65 BBQ teams competing for top honors! Sanctioned by the Kansas City Barbeque Society BBQ Prizes Awarded Sat. at 3:30 pm

F R E E  L IV E  E N T E R T A IN M E N T

Charlie & the Stingrays Frida y evening: 7-9 pm Midnight Station Saturday 12:30 -2:30 pm E-mail submissions to Filter editor Berry Anderson at calendar@pitch.com. Search our complete listings guide online at pitch.com.

Complete details at www.MissionCVB.org pitch.com

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AUGUST 30 -SEPTEMBER 5, 2012

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29


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ARTISTIC DIRECTOR WILLIAM WHITENER 30

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AUGUST 30 -SEPTEMBER 5, 2012

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Saturday Sept 1, 8pm-2am

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FILM

MOONSHINE KINGDOM

Lawless pours stout brew from a narrow bottle.

BY

SIMON A BR A MS

awless, director John Hillcoat’s follow-up to the Cormac McCarthy adaptation The Road, is little more than a testosterone-slicked period melodrama. But on its own limited terms, it’s brutally effective, an outlaw drama about reallife Prohibition-era bootleggers that traffics in heightened emotions, corn-pone humor and over-the-top violence. It’s the latest in a fruitful partnership between Hillcoat and songwriter-turnedscreenwriter Nick Cave, who last collaborated on the grim, bloody Western The Proposition. Here again, blood matters — a point that Tom Hardy’s beefy bootlegger, Forrest Bondurant, drives home to his little brother, Jack (played by Shia LaBeouf). When Charlie Rakes (Guy Pearce), a crooked cop from Chicago, tries to get protection money from the Bondurants, the interloper brings out the contrast in the brothers. Jack tries to adapt to the shifting power hierarchy, while Forrest stubbornly sits and waits for an opening. Forrest, who believes the legend of his own invincibility, gets many chances to strike back at Rakes. But times are changing for the Bondurants, and that means the relatively meek Jack may soon inherit the Earth. If Lawless is at heart a clash of masculine wills, its dearth of strong female characters is part of what keeps it from joining the ranks of classic gangster movies like Gun Crazy or

RICHARD FOREMAN

L

Bonnie and Clyde. Hillcoat and Cave sketch the men with vicious zest and tellingly sleazy detail — you get a good idea of who Rakes is when you see the black woman he’s sleeping with positioned on a newspaper on his hotel bed — but the women get short shrift. Most underwritten is one of the movie’s leads, the former stripper played by Jessica Chastain. As Maggie, Forrest’s love interest, she’s fleshed out with only a couple of interstitial scenes, remaining a forlorn decorative object. Had there been more to Maggie, there might

Shia under fi yah. have been more substance to Lawless’ revisionist interpretation of family as a modern tribalist group that now includes lovers and friends. What’s left, though, is a blunt, potent, often exciting crime drama. The movie’s warring badass alpha males are fighting to the death for dominance, unaware that their days as top dogs are coming to an end.



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OUT THIS WEEK ROBOT & FRANK

A

long with the dregs of Hollywood blockbuster season, August is when Wisconsin’s Beloit College puts out its annual Mindset List — that widely reported roundup of cultural touchstones deemed unlikely to mean anything to incoming university freshmen. This year’s includes things like cars that rely only on radio signals for sound (because children of the MP3 age never had to drive around with only commercial FM for the journey) and a U.S. Supreme Court without Justice Stephen Breyer. If that list does what its compilers intend and makes you feel old, Robot & Frank is your jam. For one thing, Liv Tyler and James Marsden — familiar to freshmen from their Lord of the Rings and X-Men roles (respectively) instead of for being in Aerosmith videos and Party of Five episodes — play the almost-middle-aged children of the main character. For another, that main character is an old man, and he’s played by Frank Langella, who is in fact pretty old. Frank is a retired burglar who spent more time in prison than he did with his kids, and now he forgets things. We meet him mid-heist — robbing the home he has forgotten is his own. Frank’s son insists that it’s time Dad get a robot helper. This being what the movie says is the near future, such a device is common. It’s one of the wittiest touches in this over-light debut feature by director Jake Schreier and writer Christopher D. Ford that the robot looks not

like an iPhone or a Prius but like a slightly more up-to-date version of something from Sleeper. (Wittier still, it’s voiced by Peter Sarsgaard.) In his latest lion-in-winter role, Langella doesn’t eclipse his defining turns in Frost/ Nixon and Starting Out in the Evening. But he’s reason enough to see Robot & Frank, an uneven film that’s too blunt in its satiric moments and too slack in its ideas about solitude and aging. Schreier and cinematographer Matthew J. Lloyd’s give Langella the lighting and framing to be lonelier than the screenplay allows, especially when Susan Sarandon shares the scene. The movie almost finds the power to haunt but settles for scattered (if pungent) laughs.

— SCOTT WILSON

2 DAYS IN NY 

A

t the root of the most bitter romantic disagreements is a desperate plea that takes many forms but boils down to Why are you like this? The only people who ever have good answers (No, why are you like that? doesn’t count) are in the movies. Onscreen, as in life, people rarely utter the question out loud. But the push-pull of defining identity without too much compromise is the tension that animates a parade of romantic comedies (Ha, it’s awesome that you’re like that after all), weepy dramas (Damn, you’re totally staying like that), and probably your Facebook page (Please like me being like this).

Julie Delpy’s 2 Days in NY — a sequel to the actress-turned-director’s patience-testing 2007 auteur project, 2 Days in Paris — has this tension. To this, it adds the tensions of poor parenting, mild xenophobia and gross moral negligence. There’s a clinically insane father, a dead mother, a sociopathic sister, a vile lover for the sister. There’s a history of divorce, the specter of career suicide, and a whole other movie’s worth of lying. Ah, but it’s a comedy — and, as Delpy’s character says at the film’s conclusion, a love story. An unremittingly condescending, visually dreary, unforgivably stupid comedy and a love story for narcissists. Why are you like this, Julie Delpy? And why have you dragged Chris Rock into your shit soup? (And look, if you think “shit soup” isn’t a very mature thing to call a movie, you haven’t had to hear Alexia Landeau, who wrote the script with Delpy and co-stars, keep rhyming the name Mingus — Rock’s character — with the word cunnilingus.) Rock gets a couple of short scenes to himself, delivering what feel like improvised monologues to a cardboard cutout of President Obama. In a movie studded with terrible ideas, this one is merely weak, and he sells it as cleanly as he might have on a stand-up stage. Now that Rock has proved capable of surviving 2 Days in New York without losing ground as an actor or a comic presence, someone needs to put him in a movie that deserves him.

— S.W. pitch.com

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THE PITCH

AUGUST 30 -SEPTEMBER 5, 2012

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CAFÉ

TRUCK STOP

Believe the hype: Port Fonda is even better than it was on four wheels.

BY

CHARLES FERRUZZA

Port Fonda • 4141 Pennsylvania, 816-216-6462. • Hours: 5 p.m.–1 a.m., Tuesday–Sunday. • Price: $$–$$$

t’s exhilarating to be in a new restaurant when it’s in the full flush of its opening hype. When a place opens with sizzle — great word of mouth, full stations from opening to close, people not just sitting or standing around the bar but crammed around it like Katy Perry fans waiting for an autograph — it gives off palpable electricity. When you’re on staff, it’s like being in the cast of a hit play. When you’re a customer, it’s like having front-row seats on opening night of that hit play. And when you’re behind the scenes, you feel the thrill but wonder how long that heightened, addictive energy can last. Port Fonda, the two-month-old Mexican restaurant created by chef Patrick Ryan, has momentum and talent, and it’s the first Kansas City restaurant in years to live up to its pre-opening E R O M hype — and the hype was considerable. I heard an awful lot about it before I T A INE ONL .COM stepped into the L-shaped H C PIT storefront dining room. The street reviews reported a noisy room, and that’s accurate. I’d heard that the room would be loaded with tattooed hipsters, but that mostly describes the people working there. The food isn’t conventional Tex-Mex, people said. That’s true. If you’re looking for a taco-and-enchilada combo plate, this is the last place to go. But is it really impossible to get a table? Kind of. Port Fonda does take reservations, but only before 6 p.m. and after 9 p.m. During peak dinner hours, you’re on your own. And this joint, which seats just 75 people, starts jumping early. Some friends of mine told me that they’d waited as long as an hour for a table. I heeded their advice to arrive early and was rewarded for it by being eligible, on two of my three visits, for one of the tables on the perimeter of the room — prime people-watching real estate. Given that Ryan is, by local standards, a largerthan-life culinary figure already, I figured I’d see acolytes and aspiring chefs dining here, and I wasn’t disappointed. Well, I’m at least sure that I saw a line cook from a far less trendy restaurant, but it counts because he looks like someone who would have no trouble being cast on The Young and the Restless. The tables at the center bear the decibel load of this room, a landscape of hard surfaces. The night I sat at one of them was also the night I dined with a slightly hearing-impaired friend. After some initial awkwardness, we figured out the right, forceful angle to lean into the table and have a more or less misunderstanding-free conversation. Mostly we discussed the food. That’s what you talk about at Port Fonda, where Ryan serves a collection of dishes designed to spark conversation. It’s not an elaborate list: soups, salads, tortas, tacos, cazuelitas (say caz-way-

CAFÉ

ANGELA C. BOND

I

of tempura-fried vegetables given slow-burn zing with a high-rent hot-sauce mayo. There are three kinds of tacos here, including two callbacks to Ryan’s days operating litas). Ryan recently replaced the half-dozen the only four-star food truck in the history fajitas on the debut menu because that dish of Kansas City. One holds pork-shoulder meat turned out to lack the core quality he seeks: and grilled pineapple, and it’s very good. The uniqueness. Instead, he has put together a other, though, is sensational: beef tongue, few puck-sized terra-cotta dishes, baked in brined for five days and braised until the meat a wood-fired oven, which can be spooned is indescribably tender. into a soft corn tortilla or just eaten straight. Assuming you don’t simply go haywire fill(Ryan uses different fruitwoods that impart ing up tortillas with various meat or seafood sweet, smoky notes to the bubbling dishes.) choices, there are also outstanding tortas to A meatless version, with roasted corn fungus, share. Assuming you’re willing to share. In wild mushrooms and goat cheese, steams out this case, I wasn’t — too damn bad. One of the black and mushy but tastes bright, with welldefined flavors. It’s an exceptional vegetarian tortas is the very best — and I mean hands down — fried pork tenderloin sandwich in the satisfaction and a rewarding adventure for a metro. The Milanesa de pumeat eater, especially with a erco is (deep breath) supple side of the esquite asado — a Port Fonda slices of Duroc pork dusted jumble of grilled sweet corn, Guacamole ............................$8 in masa, dipped in tempura, epazote, cotija cheese, chile Frito mixto ............................$8 fried until the exterior is exand lime juice. Mix a bit of Melon salad .......................... $7 quisitely crunchy, and served each on a warm tortilla and Milanesa de puerco .............$9 on an egg bun with achiote you taste heaven. Panza ....................................$10 mustard and spicy escabeche The panza, a hunk of Lengua tacos ........................$8 Camarones en pipian .........$14 mayonnaise. It only barely singularly tender pork belly tops Ryan’s version of a meatslathered in salsa negra ball sandwich (albondigas di( brow n suga r, v i nega r, vorciadas), which heaps small, flash-fried orbs molasses and dried chipotles blended into a mahogany condiment that tastes like the of pork, slow-simmered in either a tomatillabased sauce or a tomato-chipotle sauce, with world’s most elegant barbecue sauce), with ricotta and cotija cheese, then covers the lot of beans, pickled tomatillo and queso añejo, is a cazuelita that can be shared as a starter or it with salsa verde and queso fresco. Ryan uses his palette of spices and chiles combined with other small plates to make a with the confidence of Diego Rivera painting meal. I wasn’t as easily seduced by the camaa mural. In his deftly seasoned sauces and rones en pipian, a dish of fat prawns seeming across the spectrum of his meats, the comto lurch, almost threateningly, out of a blanbinations of sweet, sour, fiery and salty are ket of tasty but grainy-looking green peanut often intoxicating. Yet he never overwhelms mole. Of course, I had already sated myself with Ryan’s light and fresh guacamole and an a dish, an artful restraint most evident in a superb fresh melon salad that’s even better alarming majority of my table’s frito mixto. after dinner than before. Here Ryan mixes The latter is a little galvanized-metal bucket

There's fresh fruit in the pork tacos and the desserts.

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slightly bitter arugula with chunks of sweet and ripe heirloom melon, crispy radish straws, crunchy pumpkin seeds, salty cotija cheese, and bits of freshly chopped basil and mint and cilantro. The flavors unite within a delicately sweet melon vinaigrette, a combination so refreshing that I ordered it for dessert the second time I ate it — and I needed nothing more. On the subject of dessert, Ryan has recently brought back the ricotta doughnuts that he used to serve in his food truck — a smart move. But the roasted-peanut semifreddo that I sampled one night, draped in a silky sheep’s-milk caramel, was perfect with a cup of strong Oddly Correct coffee. And a Spanish-influenced variation on an Italian dessert that Ryan used to make in a different restaurant scores high as well: a sweet masa cake covered with a handful of fresh berries and then topped with a soothing, custardy sabayon made with tequila instead of marsala wine. The baked cake, topped this way, is briefly set under a hot broiler so the pudding puffs up like a little cloud. Ryan isn’t serving lunch at Port Fonda, but he introduced Sunday brunch last week, a neat little menu of dinner choices fashioned for an earlier hour. That fresh melon salad is there, as well as a steaming bowl of menudo. Exclusive to brunch is a vegetarian pozole, and huevos rancheros with Mexican sausage rendered for Ryan by the Local Pig’s Alex Pope. If the brunch business is anything like the dinner crowd, you’ll need to rise early. Or you can camp outside the building and wait until the sun comes up. After all, when a restaurant becomes the next big thing, you can’t let the parade — or the panza — pass you by.

Have a suggestion for a restaurant The Pitch should review? E-mail charles.ferruzza@pitch.com

Apitch.com UGUST 30 -S R 5X, , 22001 0 2 X T TH HE E P PI T MEOPNTTEHM B X EX–X I TC CH H 351


FAT C I T Y

PIGGING OUT

Bacon-Fest lives high on the hog for the Rehabilitation Institute.

BY

BERR Y A NDER S ON

HAELANGELOS MIC Italian Grill “Michaelangelos Grill is a neighbor worth having.”

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B R O O K E VA N D E V E R

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don’t get people’s ravenous appetite for Running the gamut from glorious mmm to all things bacon. Was it the advent of the dubious ew, often within a single moment. Atkins Nutritional Approach that started the I stuck a greasy finger in the top of a bacon bliss? Did y’all just say, “Fuck it” and beautifully decorated peanut-butter-bacon board the bacon bus with a shout of “peace cupcake to better taste the maple-butter out!” to your HDL cholesterol? The smell? I frosting. The cake was delicious (and would don’t get it but I don’t have to, because the take second place), but I’d soon regret that people at the Rehabilitation Institute of Kanmove. sas City do get it. “Hey, can you do that again?” a male phoThe Rehabilitation Institute threw Bacontographer asked. Fest last Saturday, with proceeds from ticket I cringed. Being in photos is as pleasursales going to the “nonprofit medical rehaable an experience for me as lemon juice in bilitation employment placement provider a cracked cuticle. And being photographed for children and adults with disabilities.” eating after I’ve had a few beers? That’s my Tickets went from $20 (thanks, Groupon!) worst nightmare. But this was for charity, to $100 (VIP style — early admission, private so I rolled my eyes and gave him the most beer stands, bathrooms, and access to an lascivious frosting-and-tongue performance air-conditioned indoor area). I could muster. Seventeen “Pork Partners” — restau“Like that?” I asked sarcastically. He rants, catering companies and drink slingdidn’t seem quite as enthusiastic anymore. ers from across the metro — converged on Other submissions included Rocket Dogs the northwest corner of 31st Street and (fat chunks of chicken Main and offered samples w rapped in bacon a nd of bacon and various pork dipped in a spicy tomatofoodstuffs. Gram & Dun The sun was in full based sauce), Bourbon prepa red countr y-fried effect, the beer lines M aple B acon Je rk y (a and battered bacon on the were clogged, and my sticky, caramelized strip spot and served the thick, of dark matter that stuck salty pork with a cheddarfingers and hands to my incisors), Coconut bacon biscuit and eggwere greased. Bacaroons (difficult to deyolk jam. Blanc Burgers + scribe but a decent idea Bottles offered a modest in theory), S’more Bacon pork slider — a pot roast, (homemade pink pig-shaped marshmallows perhaps — on white rolls. “High on the Hog” alongside a crumbly, marbly, nutty filling in a sponsor Farmland passed out strips of bacon graham-cracker boat), and Spicy Bacon Mac next to the main entrance. Oddly, these lines and Cheese (a visually unappealing twist were the shortest. on comfort food that scored high on taste). My mission was to judge eight original Around 3 p.m., the judges were let loose. recipes submitted by Bacon-Fest attendThe sun was in full effect, the beer lines were ees. Two other judges (a marketing manclogged, and my fingers and hands were ager from Farmland and a food blogger from greased. I was feeling well-salted. But I was western Kansas) and I sampled a range of determined to fully experience Bacon-Fest. dishes, including the eventual winner — the And a successful Bacon-Fest experience, I “Fat Is Good Bacon Cake” (a crumbly lemon now know, involves three things: eating, johnnycake dessert that listed bacon fat as drinking and taking breaks to sit in the dead an ingredient) — and a sauerkraut, bacon grass and listen to the cover band (heavy on and tomato salad (which I gave high marks the Pink Floyd). Then repeat. for taste and originality).

AUGUST 30 -SEPTEMBER 5, 2012

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I scanned the vendors on the edge of the event space. Next to a table of bacon merch — bacon wallets, bacon bandages and pig figurines — was Coloplast, a Minneapolisbased developer of health-care products. I stared, wide-eyed, at a female catheter and hoped that its 2-inch green tube would never be inserted into my person. “Are you a nurse?” asked a man behind the display of medical goods, which sharply contrasted the gastric debauchery going on. I shook my head. “I’m from The Pitch and I’m writing about the event today,” I said. I held up the catheter. “I’ve, um, just never seen one of these up close.” I stepped closer to him. “So, I’ve got to ask. How do you and these products fit into this BaconFest scene, man?” He handed me his business card. “These guys are my clients,” he said, thumbing toward the Rehabilitation Institute. I doubt that Coloplast gained as many new clients as Fogo de Chao, Grandma’s Catering, Local Pig or Trezo Mare. But he was smart to be there, because at BaconFest, you give till it hurts.

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WHERE THE BEST MUSICIANS IN THE WORLD PLAY

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Mudstomp Mondays cleans up with Barnyard Beer at the Pool Room.

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nce the dark, grubby site of an occasional hip-hop night or a small rock show, the Pool Room, at Ninth Street and Iowa in downtown Lawrence, hasn’t been much of a draw in recent years. But that appears to be changing. Over the past year, Barnyard Beer — a brewery owned by Andy Agnew and operated by Lawrence residents Mike Hummell and Heath Hoadley — has taken over the E R MO venue’s annex. Gone is the stained, smelly carpet, and the walls have T A INE ONL .COM been cleaned and painted PITCH barnyard red. Provided that an upcoming liquorlicense renewal goes smoothly, Hummell and Hoadley are about to slap up a Barnyard Beer sign outside and finish transforming the space into a full-on craft brewery — one that books live music. Hummell envisions the new space as a place where musicians can “play a show just like they were in their backyard,” he says. Already, Barnyard Beer has been putting on bluegrass open mics. It’s also HQ for the musicians collective called Mudstomp Mondays. Hank Osterhout organized Mudstomp Mondays on and off for several years at other Lawrence joints, including Dempsey’s, the Granada and the Bottleneck. He moved the party to Barnyard last Halloween, owing to what he describes as the inclusiveness and camaraderie of the space. “Plus,” says Osterhout, the bass player for local bluegrass stalwart Deadman Flats, “beer and bluegrass are two peas in a pod.” The emphasis at Mudstomp Mondays is on what you might call Kangrass, a roughedged, localized strain of the genre. “Colorado bluegrass is nice, but it’s like dancing in a field of wildflowers,” Osterhout says. “Kansas bluegrass is like breaking a whiskey

M US I C

AUGUST 30 -SEPTEMBER 5, 2012

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bottle. From there, it gets more traditional Hay there: Barnyarders Hoadley (left) and the farther east you go.” Kansas bands such Hummell. With reveler Lance Fahy (above). as Scroat Belly and Split Lip Rayfield have and their friends. On this particular night, one spent the past couple of decades pioneerof the performers is 14-year-old Rachel Taylor, ing this sound, with raucous, beer-soaked performances and beat-the-crap-out-of-your- a freshman at Shawnee Heights High School, near Topeka. She wears braces and looks instrument playing. even younger than her age, but she betrays The Walnut Valley Festival — everybody no schoolgirl shyness once she takes the stage. calls it Winfield, after the southern Kansas She runs through an impressive set of covers town that has been home to the fest for more than 40 years — is a mecca for Sunflower and originals as her proud father looks on. “We want to encourage people like her State bluegrass, and its influence is audible [Taylor] to come out and do this,” Hummell and visible in Mudstomp Mondays. At Winsays. “Who knows what field, there’s no electricity she’ll be doing in five years. and, thus, no amplificaShe may not be still intertion, which means the acts “Kansas bluegrass is ested in this, but she also must play their guts out to like breaking a whiskey might be amazing.” be heard. A byproduct of bottle. From there, it At midnight, the stomp this high-energy approach: in Mudstomp is in full efthe heightened mutual regets more traditional the fect as musicians perform spect between audience farther east you go.” in a musical-chairs fashion, and performer, a dynamic trading places and playing made plain at Mudstomp traditional songs. BrewMondays. Ditto the liberal master Hoadley appreciatively takes it in. notion of what constitutes a stage. At WinHe says he feels a kinship with the musicians: field, much of the music making happens “I’m a craftsman, too.” at campsites or in small empty corners. At Hoadley’s crafts tonight include a golden Mudstomp Mondays, small groups of musiale, a delicious Irish red, and a deep musky cians play together outside the venue’s doors, porter. (He prefers ales — wheats, he says, are in small empty corners, or just wandering too protein-heavy.) He says he plans eventuaround the bar.   On a recent flyby, local legend and former ally to bottle the beer, once renovations to the Pool Room are complete and a larger brewing Scroat Belly member Mike Helvy is onstage, tearing into a guitar in a solo performance. setup can be established in the main bar area. Meanwhile, Barnyard is set to expand the The musicians who trickle in between 8 and 9 p.m. all seem to know one another. They variety of its music offerings. Hummell and Hoadley remain bluegrass lovers at heart, but sign up to take the dozen or so open performance slots that night. Most play bluegrass they’ve already begun opening up the venue on other nights to different genres, including (Kansas style or otherwise), but the night is alt-country and indie rock. Beer and backstill an open-mic event, so it also yields rock, yards go with those, too. folk and even rap. By 11:30 p.m., the annex is comfortably full, with most of the room occupied by musicians E-mail feedback@pitch.com pitch.com

MONTH


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40

THE PITCH

ot long ago, during my daily, useless Internet travails, I happened upon a website about artisanal pencil sharpening. (There is even a book out now inspired by it, called How to Sharpen Pencils. John Hodgman is involved.) After a few minutes of research, I determined that the site was a parody of some kind. But that it was unclear to me whether it was a Portlandia-style spoof is a testament to the current absurdities of artisanal culture. Our local mixologists get points for at least being out ahead of the curve on the pretending-like-we’re-in-olden-times trend. The folks behind the bar at Manifesto were clubbing ice blocks with wooden mallets a good few years before pickling returned to our lives and $9 jars of Missouri elderberry jam became a thing. And most KC mixologists don’t even have handlebar mustaches, which allows me to excuse the vests. It also helps that the drinks they pour — or, if you must, craft — taste amazing. I have never regretted a single order at Manifesto, Westport Café, Grünauer, the Rieger, or any of the other specialty cocktail joints in town. The drinks are always impeccably executed and presented. This momentum peaked last week, at the debut of Paris of the Plains, a festival celebrating cocktail culture brought to us by Manifesto owner Ryan Maybee. Among the featured events were mezcal seminars, fancy dinners, parties and a bartending competition. One of these days, somebody is going to come over to my apartment, slap me around, dunk my head in a sink like Gene Hackman did to Dennis Hopper in Hoosiers, and make me sober up. But we are not there yet, not quite, and so I ventured out to see about all these booze-related events. Friday night marked the first time I have ever entered a Power & Light establishment after 9 p.m. on a weekend. Why? Because of the Kill Devil Club, a new jazz venue and cocktail lounge that has taken over the upstairs space formerly occupied by the Peachtree Restau-

AUGUST 30 -SEPTEMBER 5, 2012

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rant. Maybee consulted on the venue, which emphasizes fancy rum drinks, and Friday was the invite-only soft opening. Upon arrival, I was handed a laminated media pass attached to a lanyard to hang around my neck. I surveyed the packed room. Everybody looked very glamorous. The waitresses were wearing red flapper dresses. Mark Lowrey led a large ensemble, the New Jazz Order, through a set of big-band-style Count Basie tunes. Waiters circled with plates of tiny, obscure foods. “Do I have to wear this thing?” I asked the PR woman. “Yeah, just so people know you’re media,” she said. But what she really meant: I want to make it clear to the other people at this party that the only reason there is a poorly dressed bridge troll here is because he’s writing about it. Tanqueray sponsored the party, and so the menu consisted of five gin-based craft cocktails. The bartenders were slammed all night, and it makes you wonder whether artisanal drinks, which take at the least a couple of minutes to whip up, are feasible at a busy, swinging jazz club. “I’ll have whatever the easiest drink to make is,” I told the bartender, after watching her race around for 10 minutes. I don’t know what all was in it. Champagne, maybe? Some berries? It was beside the point. Opening-night parties aren’t a great yardstick for how well a new club is going to do — everybody wants in on that VIP, free-booze action — but I think the Kill Devil Club might work in spite of its P&L location. For one, Maybee’s name draws a lot of water; he’s one of the few bar-restaurant guys in town capable of transcending the cheesy funporium reputation of Cordish’s entertainment district. Inside, the space is ideal for jazz and dancing — the interior is sleek, the lighting nice and dim. Don’t even get me started on the bathrooms. The men’s room is large and wooden and cozy, and the live music is piped in through speakers. The stall doors are so heavy and secure that I wanted to camp out in there. It seemed too

Everybody wins at a bartending competition. glorious and private inside to simply urinate. “I am alone and in desperate need of company,” I texted a bartender friend from inside the stall. I stretched for a minute, then unnecessarily blew my nose. Out of ideas, I reluctantly exited the stall, and, soon after, the party. The Paris of the Plains Bartending Competition was held Sunday night at the Uptown Theater. Mixologists from local smart-cocktail establishments like the Farmhouse, Extra Virgin, Justus Drugstore and Port Fonda were on hand, but so, too, were folks from joints in Colorado, St. Louis, Chicago, Oklahoma, and Philadelphia. Each contestant prepares a signature drink, and pours it onstage before a panel of judges. Then the judges ask the contestant to pour a traditional drink with emphasis on various flavors. At the end, they tally up the scores they’ve given and crown a winner. Also, in the background onstage, there are Quixotic girls swinging around halfnaked on trapeze bars. In the Conspiracy Room — the events space near the entrance of the Uptown — you could sample each contestant’s signature drink, and as it happened, the only one I tried was the winner. It was made by Chris Conatser of Justus Drugstore, and it was basically a Manhattan with brandy instead of whiskey. Conatser also made the vermouth with local Boulevard beers. Spices and syrups were involved, and it was garnished with a cherryflavored almond. The big jerk who lives in my brain was jumping up and down and waving his arms, begging me to make a wisecrack about how unbelievably precious the drink was. (Almond pairing! Local vermouth! You can’t make this stuff up!) But then I sipped the concoction, and he quieted down. Damn, I thought, this thing is fucking tasty.

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MONTH


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BIG BAD VOODOO DADDY Thursday, December 6, 2012

UPCOMING SHOWS: 8/31 VooDoo Goinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Country featuring Travis Marvin 9/7 Kilroy Presents: Cover Wars Final 9/14 Flirt Friday 1-800-745-3000

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AUGUST 30 -SEPTEMBER 5, 2012

THE PITCH

41


MUSIC

RADAR

M U S I C F O R E CAST

BY

Other shows worth seeing this week.

D AV ID HUDN A L L

T H U R S D AY, A U G U S T 3 0 Merle Haggard, Dallas Wayne: 8:30 p.m., sold out. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Jackopierce: The Beaumont Club, 4050 Pennsylvania, 816-561-2560.

F R I D AY, A U G U S T 31 GRiZ, Dface: The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Journey, Pat Benatar, Loverboy: Livestrong Sporting Park, 1 Sporting Way, Kansas City, Kan., 913-912-7525.

S AT U R D AY, S E P T E M B E R 1 Son Venezuela, DJ Jalapeño: The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390.

S U N D AY, S E P T E M B E R 2 Tom Hall Benefit with Samantha Fish, Kelley Hunt, Trampled Under Foot: 1-6 p.m., $20 advance, $100 VIP. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456.

M O N D AY, S E P T E M B E R 3

Kansas City Reggae Jamboree

It’s Labor Day weekend — no work on Monday! That means Saturday and Sunday are wide-open for unlaborious activities like sitting around and getting faded and listening to reggae bands. If that’s your jam, the KC Reggae Jamboree at Californos has you covered. Saturday, it’s acoustic from Joel Castillo (77 Jefferson), plus sets from Firehouse Dub Crew and Blue Riddim. Then Arm the Poor, Born in Babylon, Jah Kings and a moombahton DJ make up Sunday’s bill. One-day passes cost $10; two-day passes can be had for $15. The festivities run from 6 p.m. to 1 a.m. both nights.

Saturday, September 1, and Sunday, September 2, at Californos (4142 Pennsylvania, 816-531-7878)

what seemed like a vague hiatus. This show celebrates the release of the pop-minded garage-punk band’s split 7-inch with Chicago’s Mannequin Men, via Replay Records. It’s also a tour kickoff. The Vigilantes are soon heading out across the eastern United States and could use some money for beer and gas. Hospital Ships, another top-of-the-heap Lawrence act with a split single on the way from Replay Records, opens. Thursday, August 30, at the Replay Lounge (946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676)

Leon Russell

Phish stopped in at Starlight last week. This week, Phish’s jam-band heir apparent, Umphrey’s McGee, comes to the Grinders stage. The Chicago six-piece — recently signed to Dave Matthews’ ATO label — shares with Phish a fanbase and a propensity for extended instrumental solos but is more interested in heavier prog-rock ideas, like a less formal Genesis. Thursday, August 30, at Crossroads KC at Grinders (417 East 18th Street, 816-472-5454)

Leon Russell's bio includes gold records for his solo work and a place in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, fair rewards for his smart stew of gospel, blues, rock and country. But his imprimatur on popular music over the past 50 years has at least as much to do with his behind-thescenes work. His enigmatic façade — long white hair, Gandalf beard, sunglasses — looks almost like a disguise, but there’s no mistaking Russell's session playing for Sinatra and the Stones and countless other greats. He also launched the careers of Tom Petty and J.J. Cale through his label, Shelter Records. Saturday, September 1, at Knuckleheads Saloon (2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456)

Rooftop Vigilantes

Grant Hart

Umphrey’s McGee

Hell, yeah, Lawrence’s Rooftop Vigilantes are active again — quite active, it appears — after

enthusiast, outspoken gay bear, The Daily Show theme-song writer (plus, of course, his pretty outstanding work in Sugar and as a solo performer) — his post-Hüsker Dü career has drawn more attention than that of his former bandmate, Grant Hart. But don’t sleep on Hart like I have! He’s less prolific, but the guy can write a nasty hook. I’ve been catching up on Hart, Spotifying the hell out of 1999’s Good News for Modern Man all week — and damn, that’s a fine pop-rock record. Hot Wax, from 2009? Also pretty fucking good! Saturday, September 1, at RecordBar (1020 Westport Road, 816-753-5207)

Del McCoury Band

Fans of modern bluegrass, newgrass, jamgrass — whatever you want to call it — ought to be over the moon for this late-summer outdoor bill. Having toured with such acts as Phish and the String Cheese Incident, Del McCoury is one of the primary gap bridgers between old-school bluegrass and the wilder, more free-form strains of the genre practiced by openers Mountain Sprout and the Emmitt-Nershi Band, a duo featuring a member of Leftover Salmon and a member of the String Cheese Incident. With Reverend Peyton’s Big Damn Band. Friday, August 31, at Crossroads KC at Grinders (417 East 18th Street, 816-472-5454)

Because of the dynamic media profi le that Bob Mould cuts — professional-wrestling

F O R E C A S T

42

From Left: Grant Hart and Leon Russell

K E Y

..................................................Pick of the Week

................................................ Punks Screaming

.........................................The Dream of the ’90s

.................................................Patchwork Pants

.................................................... Replay-centric

..........................................................Underrated

.....................................................Weed-Friendly

......................................................Living Legend

..........................................................Old Hippies

...................................................Noodle Dancing

.....................................................Kind of Creepy

................................................................. Plucky

THE PITCH

J U LY 2 6 - A U G U S T 1 , 2 0 1 2

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pitch.com

Korpiklaani, Moonsorrow, Tyr, Metsatoll, Stonehaven: The Granada, 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390.

W E D N E S D AY, S E P T E M B E R 5 The Fray and Kelly Clarkson, with Carolina Liar: Independence Events Center, 19100 E. Valley View Pkwy., Independence. Piano Benefit Concert with Sam Rotman: Calvary Bible College Conference Center/Chapel, 15820 Elmwood Ave., 816-322-0110.

FUTURECAST SEPTEMBER THURSDAY 6 Sister Sparrow and the Dirty Birds, Ben Miller Band: The Granada, Lawrence. FRIDAY 7 Why?, Serengeti and Jel DJ set: The Granada, Lawrence. SATURDAY 8 Y’allapalooza: 3 p.m. Livestrong Sporting Park, Kansas City, Kan. SUNDAY 9 Twin Shadow: The Granada, Lawrence. THURSDAY 13 Powerman 5000, Swill, Syn City Cowboys, Razorwire Halo: The Beaumont Club. SUNDAY 16 Avicii: The Midland. WEDNESDAY 19 Bryan Adams: Uptown Theater. Odd Future: The Granada, Lawrence. WEDNESDAY 26 Masters of Illusion: The Midland. FRIDAY 28 Ben Folds Five: Starlight Theatre.

OCTOBER MONDAY 1 Florence + the Machine, the Maccabees: Starlight Theatre. FRIDAY 5 Owl City: 7 p.m. The Beaumont Club. TUESDAY 9 Stars: The Bottleneck, Lawrence. FRIDAY 12 Ott., the All Seeing I, Clandestine: The Granada, Lawrence.

M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X

THE PITCH

1


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AUGUST 30 -SEPTEMBER 5, 2012

THE PITCH

43


NIGHTLIFE Send submissions to Clubs Editor Abbie Stutzer by e-mail (abbie.stutzer@pitch.com), fax (816-756-0502) or phone (816-218-6926). Continuing items must be resubmitted monthly.

LIVE MUSIC. NO COVER

~‚~‚ÚN<JKGFIKÚI;ÚÜڅ~ƒ£†€~£†~„ N<;څ¢† SCOTT MCCORMICK JR ACOUSTIC SHOWCASE K?Lڅ¢€‡ LONNIE RAY BLUES JAM =I@څ¢€~ TBA J8Kچ¢~ TBA KL<Jچ¢ CRITTERS TYE DYE TUESDAY N<;چ¢‚ TJ’S HINDU COWBOY GOSPEL PIANO J8Kچ¢… ALLIED SAINTS :,),12:$9$,/$%/(

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WED 8/29 FOLKICIDE FRI 8/31 OUTLAW JAKE MERCURY, BOOG & THE CHAIN GANG, LOADED GOAT SAT 9/1 OLASSA, KC BE AR WED 9/5 MIKE DILLON FIGHTER BA ND CD RELEASE & SNUFF JAZZ

SAT 9/8 CROSSROADS

MUSIC FEST, TUE 9/11 SC PALE HEARTSAMMERS, IDAHO JOE WINSLOW, THUR 9/13 EVERYDAY EVERY NIGHT, SPIRIT IS THE SP SIMPLE LINES IRIT, SEE THROUGH DRESSES, FRI 9/14 FEDERATION OF HORSEPOWER

T H U R S D AY 3 0 ROCK/POP/INDIE Aftershock Bar & Grill: 5240 Merriam Dr., Merriam, 913-3845646. The Zombie Apocalyose Tour. The Beaumont Club: 4050 Pennsylvania, 816-561-2560. Jackopierce. Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. Deerwolfanimalbear.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. John Paul’s Flying Circus. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Grand Marquis. Mike Kelly’s Westsider: 1515 Westport Rd., 816-931-9417. Lonnie Ray Blues Band. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. The Josh Vowell Band, 8 p.m.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS Kanza Hall: 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park, 913-451-0444. Flannigan’s Right Hook. KC Live! Stage at the Power & Light District: 13th St. and Grand. Montgomery Gentry. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Merle Haggard, Dallas Wayne, 8:30 p.m., sold out.

DJ The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Goomba Rave, with Team Bear Club. Dark Horse Tavern: 4112 Pennsylvania, 816-931-3663. DJ Beatbroker. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Louder Than Bombs with DJs BK, Dame Jeans, Lil’ Bombz, hosted by the Icon on the patio, 10 p.m. Saints Pub + Patio: 9720 Quivira, Lenexa, 913-492-3900. DJ Brad Sager.

HIP-HOP Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Chirpin’! RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Innate Sounds Showcase with Reggie B & the Solution, Deep Thinkers, Leonard Dstroy, 9 p.m.

ACOUSTIC Trouser Mouse: 625 N.W. Mock Ave., Blue Springs, 816-2201222. Bob Reeder.

JAZZ The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Bram Wijnands, Steve Lambert. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Rod Fleeman and Dan Bliss. Star Bar at Pachamama’s: 800 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785841-0990. Floyd the Barber with Tommy Johnson, 8:30 p.m. Sunset Grill: 14577 Metcalf, Overland Park, 913-681-1722. Tony Antonucci, 7:30 p.m.

WORLD The Levee: 16 W. 43rd St., 816-561-2821. Live Reggae with AZ-ONE.

AMERICANA The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. American Babies, O Giant Man.

COMEDY

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Mardi Gras in August. Bleachers Bar & Grill: 210 S.W. Greenwich Dr., Lee’s Summit, 816-623-3410. Ladies’ Night. Bulldog: 1715 Main, 816-421-4799. Brodioke, 9 p.m. Buzzard Beach: 4110 Pennsylvania, 816-753-4455. Trivia, Ladies’ Night, 7 p.m.

AO UN GT UH S TX 3X–X 0 - SXE, P2T0E0MXB E Rpitch.com 5, 2012 M

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CLUB

EASY LISTENING Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Interactive Acoustic with Jason Kayne, 9 p.m.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Double T’s Roadhouse: 1421 Merriam Ln., Kansas City, Kan., 913-432-5555. Blues Jam hosted by RocknRick’s Boogie Leggin’ Blues Band, 7 p.m. The Indie on Main: 1228 Main, 816-283-9900. Open mic, Low Dough Beer Night, 8 p.m. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 302 S.W. Main, Lee’s Summit, 816-525-1871. Jerry’s Jam Night, 9 p.m.

M E TA L / P U N K Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Wrath and Ruin, Beneath Oblivian. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Rooftop Vigilantes (record release, tour kick-off), Hospital Ships, 10 p.m.

PROG

Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. Arnez J, 8 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Tim Gaither, 8 p.m.

44 2 TTHHEE PPIITTCCHH

Club Rain: 8015 Troost, 816-361-2900. Ciroc Star Thursdays, Ladies’ Night, $7 Ciroc drink specials, free Ciroc samples 9-10:30 p.m., hosted by Big Rich and Her Majesty, 9 p.m. Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Hot Caution Thursdays, 10 p.m., free. Double Nickel Bar: 189 S. Rogers, Ste. 1614, Olathe, 913-3900363. Texas Hold ’em. Ernie Biggs Dueling Piano Bar: 4115 Mill, 816-561-2444. “You Sing It” Live Band Karaoke. Fuel: 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park, 913-451-0444. Bike night. The Granada: 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. The Pre-Game with DJ Savy, DJ Ray-Ban. Hamburger Mary’s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-842-1919. Charity Bingo with Valerie Versace, 8 p.m., $1 per game. M OR E Hotel: 1300 Grand, 816-226-3232. Back to the Hotel with DJ Mike Scott, champagne specials, 9 p.m., free. INGS LIST E AT Hurricane Allie’s Bar and Grill: IN ONL 5541 Merriam Dr., Shawnee, 913M PITCH.CO 217-7665. Karaoke, 8:30 p.m. Jake’s Place Bar and Grill: 12001 Johnson Dr., Shawnee, 913-962-5253. Trivia. Johnny’s Tavern: 13410 W. 62nd Terr., Shawnee, 913-962-5777. Live Trivia, 9 p.m. Johnny’s Tavern: 8262 Mission, Prairie Village, 913-901-0322. Boogie Bingo, 8 p.m. JR’s Place: 20238 W. 151st St., Olathe, 913-254-1307. Karaoke with Mad Mike, 9:30 p.m. Mac’s Place: 580 S. Fourth St., Edwardsville. Karaoke. Michael’s Lakewood Pub: N. 291 Hwy. and Lakewood Blvd., Lee’s Summit, 816-350-7300. DJ Pure, beer pong, pitcher specials, 9 p.m. Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. Karaoke on the main floor, 10 p.m. MoJo’s Bar & Grill: 1513 S.W. Hwy. 7, Blue Springs. Pool and dart leagues; free pool, happy hour, 4-6 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Trivia Clash, 7 p.m. The Red Balloon: 10325 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-9622330. Karaoke, 8 p.m., free. Saints Pub + Patio: 9720 Quivira, Lenexa, 913-492-3900. Ladies’ Night. Sherlock’s Underground Coffeehouse & Pub: 858 State Route 291, Liberty, 816-429-5262. Karaoke, ladies’ night specials. Smokehouse Bar-B-Que: 6304 N. Oak, Gladstone, 816-4544500. Happy hour, 4-6 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. Uptown Heat, 10:30 p.m. The Velvet Dog: 400 E. 31st St., 816-753-9990. Skeeball League Night. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. Trivia, 9 p.m.

pitch.com

Crossroads KC at Grinders: 417 E. 18th St., 816-472-5454. Umphrey’s McGee.

REGGAE Afrobeat: 9922 Holmes, 816-943-6333. Reggae Rockers, 10 p.m.

VA R I E T Y The All-Star Rock Bar: 7210 N.E. 43rd St., 816-452-2660. Family Night with Jason Dean the Magician, 9 p.m. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Grease-A-Rama Pre-Party with the Cave Girls, Bloodshot Bill, and vintage rods.

M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X

THE PITCH

2


F R I D AY 31 ROCK/POP/INDIE Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. Get Along, Whalen Reads the Manuel. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Nature Boys, Witch and Hare, Sneaky Creeps, Holy White Hounds, 8 p.m. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Believers, Spirit Is the Spirit, the Empty Spaces. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 302 S.W. Main, Lee’s Summit, 816-525-1871. On the Fly. KC Live! Stage at the Power & Light District: 13th St. and Grand. The Revivalists, 8 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Jeff Bergen’s Elvis Show, 7 p.m. Livestrong Sporting Park: 1 Sporting Way, Kansas City, Kan., 913-912-7525. Journey, Pat Benatar, Loverboy. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Grease-A-Rama Pre-Registration Party with Savage 7, the Conquerors, and hot-rod art auction, 6 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Sonic Douche Cuntry, Ask an Adult, 10 p.m.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL

COMEDY Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. Arnez J, Thu., 8 & 10:30 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Tim Gaither, 7:45 & 9:45 p.m.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Mardi Gras in August. Club Rain: 8015 Troost, 816-361-2900. Happy hour, 5 p.m. ComedyCity at Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-842-2744. Major League Improv, 7:30 p.m. Cronin’s Bar and Grill: 12227 W. 87th St. Pkwy., Lenexa, 913322-1000. Karaoke with Jim Bob, 9 p.m. Great Day Café: 7921 Santa Fe Dr., Overland Park, 913-642-9090. Happy Fridays, beer, wine, bloody marys, screwdriver sunsets, and sangria on tap for $3, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Hurricane Allie’s Bar and Grill: 5541 Merriam Dr., Shawnee, 913-217-7665. Karaoke, 8:30 p.m. J. Murphy’s Irish Pub and Grille: 22730 Midland Dr., Shawnee, 913-825-3880. Karaoke, 9 p.m.

JR’s Place: 20238 W. 151st St., Olathe, 913-254-1307. Debbioke, 9:30 p.m. Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. Ab Fab Fridays on the main floor, 10 p.m. Mission Bowl: 5399 Martway, Mission, 913-432-7000. Country-N-Bowl, wear western clothing, win prizes, 10 p.m.12:30 a.m. MoJo’s Bar & Grill: 1513 S.W. Hwy. 7, Blue Springs. Free pool, happy hour, 4-6 p.m. The Red Balloon: 10325 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-9622330. Karaoke, 8 p.m., free. Retro Downtown Drinks & Dance: 1518 McGee, 816-4214201. Trivia Riot, 7 p.m. Sharks: 10320 Shawnee Mission Pkwy., Merriam, 913-2684006. Dart tournament, 8 p.m. Smokehouse Bar-B-Que: 6304 N. Oak, Gladstone, 816-4544500. Happy hour, 23-oz. Bud $3, 23-oz. Bud Light $3, and specialty 23-oz. $4, 4-6 p.m. Wilde’s Chateau 24: 2412 Iowa, Lawrence, 785-856-1514. Dance Party.

ELECTRO The Granada: 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. GRiZ, Dface.

REGGAE Californos: 4124 Pennsylvania, 816-531-7878. Jah Lion.

R O C K A B I L LY RJ’s Bob-Be-Que Shack: 5835 Lamar, Mission, 913-2627300. Jason Vivone and the Billybats.

VA R I E T Y Aftershock Bar & Grill: 5240 Merriam Dr., Merriam, 913-3845646. Battle for Freaker’s Ball.

S AT U R D AY 1 ROCK/POP/INDIE The Brooksider: 6330 Brookside Plz., 816-363-4070. KC/DC. Jake’s Place Bar and Grill: 12001 Johnson Dr., Shawnee, 913962-5253. Live music. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. The Crumpletons, 7 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Grant Hart, Rank Strangers, and more, 9 p.m.

B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. John McNally Band. Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. The Devil’s Marmalade, the Electric Lungs, Jonathan Theobald, 6 p.m.; Kan Eyed, Driving Wheel, the Dirt Kings, Infinite Catfish, 8 p.m. Grumpy’s Tavern: 133 S. Parker, Olathe, 913-780-0240. Michael Charles. The Hideout: 6948 N. Oak Tfwy., 816-468-0550. The Groove Pilots. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Samantha Fish, 9 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Stone Cutters Union. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Derek Jones, 5:30 p.m.; KC Rain Dogs, 8 p.m. Trouser Mouse: 625 N.W. Mock Ave., Blue Springs, 816-2201222. JP Soars. Uncle Bo’s: 420 E. Sixth St., Topeka, 785-234-5400. The Josh Vowell Band.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS Barnyard Beer: 925 Iowa, Lawrence, 785-393-9696. MidXMidwest with the Old No. 5s, Outlaw Jake and the Chain Gang, Randy Burk, the Rhythm Busters, Stacy Stringer & the Dead Ringers, the Clementines, and more. The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Outlaw Jake and the Chain Gang, Loaded Goat. Crossroads KC at Grinders: 417 E. 18th St., 816-472-5454. The Del McCoury Band, Emmitt-Nershi Band, Mountain Sprout, 6 p.m. VooDoo Lounge: Harrah’s Casino, 1 Riverboat Dr., North Kansas City, 816-472-7777. Travis Marvin, Hazzard Country.

DJ Club Monaco: 334 E. 31st St., 816-753-5990. DJ Soap. Hotel: 1300 Grand, 816-226-3232. Rockwell Fridays with Salvatore Palazzolo featuring the Jukebox Heroes (DJ Mike Scott and Spinstyles). Mosaic Lounge: 1331 Walnut, 816-679-0076. Mosaic Friday hosted by Luke Rich, with DJ Allen Michael. The Quaff: 1010 Broadway, 816-471-1918. DJ E. Saints Pub + Patio: 9720 Quivira, Lenexa, 913-492-3900. DJ Naylor. Strikerz Entertainment Center: 18900 E. Valley View Pkwy., Independence, 816-313-5166. DJ night. Z Strike: 1370 Grand, 816-471-2316. Fabowlous Fridays with DJ Nuveau, 9 p.m.

JAZZ EBT Restaurant: 1310 Carondelet (I-435 and State Line), 816942-8870. Candace Evans Trio. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Max Groove. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Paul Shinn, 5 p.m.; Bram Wijnands, Barry Springer, Tommy Ruskin, 7 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Lonnie McFadden, 4:30 p.m. Take Five Coffee + Bar: 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park, 913948-5550. Dan Bliss and Brian Ruskin. Thai Place: 9359 W. 87th St., Overland Park, 913-649-5420. Jerry Hahn.

WORLD Blvd. Nights: 2805 Southwest Blvd., 816-931-6900. Good Fridays: International Party Experience, 10 p.m. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Cloud Dog.

AMERICANA The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483. Carrie Nation and the Speakeasy, the Sunflower Colonels.

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Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Cowboy Indian Bear, Netherfriends, 10 p.m. Take Five Coffee + Bar: 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park, 913948-5550. Hard@Play.

Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. Dirty Dorothy on the main floor, 10 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Tim Gaither, 7:45 & 9:45 p.m.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS

B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Mama Ray Jazz Meets Blues Jam, 2 p.m.; Chris Ruest Band. The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Mad Kings, Robocopter. Dynamite Saloon: 721 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8562739. Dan Bliss, 7-10 p.m., free. Fat Fish Blue: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-3474. Michael Charles. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Dirty Dillons, 10 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Leon Russell and the Rick Bacus Trio play Clapton, 9 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Cadillac Flambe, 9 p.m. RJ’s Bob-Be-Que Shack: 5835 Lamar, Mission, 913-2627300. Mike Roberts Band. Trouser Mouse: 625 N.W. Mock Ave., Blue Springs, 816-2201222. The Nace Brothers. Uncle Bo’s: 420 E. Sixth St., Topeka, 785-234-5400. JP Soars and the Red Hots.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS Barnyard Beer: 925 Iowa, Lawrence, 785-393-9696. MidXMidwest with Famous Seamus and the Travelbongs, the Magnificent Bang Bangs, the Rotgut Ramblers, the Bus Company, the Walltalkers, Open Jam, Rachel Black. The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Olassa, the Kansas City Bear Fighters. Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. The Crybaby Ranch.

DJ Beer Kitchen: 435 Westport Rd., 816-389-4180. Furious Palace. The Eighth Street Taproom: 801 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-6918. Saturday Soulclap with Josh Powers. MiniBar: 3810 Broadway. DJ Jochen (Hog-In). Nara: 1617 Main, 816-221-6272. Samurai Saturdays. The Quaff: 1010 Broadway, 816-471-1918. DJ Chris. Saints Pub + Patio: 9720 Quivira, Lenexa, 913-492-3900. DJ Brad Sager.

Avalon Ultra Lounge: 5505 N.E. Antioch, 816-452-CLUB. Upscale Saturdays with DJ Smiley, no cover for ladies until 10:30 p.m., $2 drink specials, 9 p.m., $10. B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Mardi Gras in August. ComedyCity at Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-842-2744. Major League Improv, 7:30 p.m. 403 Club: 403 N. Fifth St., 913-499-8392. Pinball tournament, cash prize for winner, 4:30 p.m., $5 entry fee. Hamburger Mary’s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-842-1919. Charity Bingo, 5 p.m.; Mary-oke with Chad Slater, 9 p.m. Hurricane Allie’s Bar and Grill: 5541 Merriam Dr., Shawnee, 913-217-7665. Karaoke, Saturdays, 8:30 p.m. The Indie on Main: 1228 Main, 816-283-9900. Karaoke with KJ David, 9:30 p.m. Johnny’s Tavern: 6765 W. 119th St., Leawood, 913-451-4542. Trivia Bingo, 9 p.m. MoJo’s Bar & Grill: 1513 S.W. Hwy. 7, Blue Springs. Free pool, happy hour, 1-4 p.m. The Red Balloon: 10325 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-9622330. Karaoke, 8 p.m., free. Smokehouse Bar-B-Que: 6304 N. Oak, Gladstone, 816-4544500. Happy hour, 23-oz. Bud $3, 23-oz. Bud Light $3, and specialty 23-oz. $4, 4-6 p.m. Westport Coffee House: 4010 Pennsylvania, 816-756-3222. The Kick Comedy Theatre: the Kick-Off Improv Comedy Show, 8-9:30 p.m.

M E TA L / P U N K The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Abigail Williams, Night Creation, In the Shadow, Ancient Creation, Koktopus, Caucasian Debris, Meatshank, Gornography, Marasmus, At the Left Hand of God.

REGGAE Californos: 4124 Pennsylvania, 816-531-7878. Kansas City Reggae Jamboree, 6 p.m., $10 one-day pass, $15 two-day pass.

JAZZ The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. A La Mode, 4:30 p.m.

WORLD The Granada: 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Son Venezuela, DJ Jalapeño. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Maria the Mexican, Living Room session, 8 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Black Crack Review, 6 p.m.

AMERICANA Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Alexis Barclay Band.

VA R I E T Y The Beaumont Club: 4050 Pennsylvania, 816-561-2560. Kansas City Music Festival. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Kansas City Music Festival, 6 p.m., $10, $12

S U N D AY 2 ROCK/POP/INDIE Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. My Brother, the Vulture, Conflicts, the Matador, the Evil That Men Do. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Bear and Company, the Rocketboys, Bearcat, Bear Face.

COMEDY Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. Arnez J, 7 & 10 p.m.

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BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Lee McBee and the Confessors.

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The Brickyard Tavern: 1001 S. Weaver, Olathe, 913-780-0266. Crosseyed Cat open blues jam, 3-7 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Tom Hall Benefit with Samantha Fish, Kelley Hunt, Trampled Under Foot, 1-6 p.m., $20 advance, $100 VIP.

DJ The Gusto Lounge: 504 Westport Rd., 816-974-8786. Retox Sundays, 8 p.m. Hamburger Mary’s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-842-1919. Bad Music Sundays with Brett Dietrich, 3:30 p.m.

Saints Pub + Patio: 9720 Quivira, Lenexa, 913-492-3900. Free pool. Shark Bar: 1340 Grand, 816-442-8140. Labor Day: Drink Grand St. Dry. Smokehouse Bar-B-Que: 6304 N. Oak, Gladstone, 816-4544500. Happy hour, 23-oz. Bud $3, 23-oz. Bud Light $3, and specialty 23-oz. $4, 4-6 p.m. Wallaby’s Grill and Pub: 9562 Lackman, Lenexa, 913-5419255. Texas Hold ’em, 6 & 9 p.m. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. Texas Hold ’em, 3 & 6 p.m. Z Strike: 1370 Grand, 816-471-2316. Labor Day Weekend Bash.

ACOUSTIC

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS

Tomfooleries: 612 W. 47th St., 816-753-0555. Phil and Gary, 9 p.m.

Bleachers Bar & Grill: 210 S.W. Greenwich Dr., Lee’s Summit, 816623-3410. Open Blues and Funk Jam with Syncopation, 6 p.m. The Hideout: 6948 N. Oak Tfwy., 816-468-0550. Open blues jam, 7 p.m. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Sunday Salvation with Booty Bass, 10 p.m., $3. R.G.’s Lounge: 9100 E. 35th St., Independence, 816-358-5777. Jam Night hosted by Dennis Nickell, Scotty Yates, Rick Eidson, and Jan Lamb, 5 p.m.

JAZZ Ironwoods Park: 14701 Mission, Leawood. Free Jazz Concert Series, 6 p.m. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Dan Bliss. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Mark Lowrey Jazz Trio open jam session, 5 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. The People’s Liberation Big Band.

COMEDY Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. Arnez J, 7 p.m. Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. Dirty Dorothy on the main floor, 10 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Tim Gaither, 7 p.m.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Smackdown Trivia and Karaoke. Bulldog: 1715 Main, 816-421-4799. Game night, beer pong, TV trivia, shot dice. Clarette Club: 5400 Martway, Mission, 913-384-0986. Texas Hold ’em, 7 & 10 p.m. The Fox and Hound: 10428 Metcalf, Overland Park, 913-6491700. Poker, 7 & 10 p.m. Frank James Saloon: 10919 N.W. Hwy. 45, Parkville, 816-5050800. Karaoke, 6-10 p.m. Fuel: 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park, 913-451-0444. SIN. Hotel: 1300 Grand, 816-226-3232. Hotel California Service Industry Night with DJ Ashton Martin, 9 p.m. Howl at the Moon: 1334 Grand, 816-471-4695. Labor Day Luau. Hurricane Allie’s Bar and Grill: 5541 Merriam Dr., Shawnee, 913217-7665. Double Deuce Poker League, 4 p.m.; karaoke, 8:30 p.m. Jake’s Place Bar and Grill: 12001 Johnson Dr., Shawnee, 913962-5253. Free pool, 3 p.m. The Jones Pool: 10 E. 13th St. Labor Day Trip Giveaway party with DJ Na Palm, DJ Highnoone, noon. JR’s Place: 20238 W. 151st St., Olathe, 913-254-1307. Karaoke with Mad Mike, 9:30 p.m. McFadden’s Sports Saloon: 1330 Grand, 816-471-1330. Labor Day: Drink Grand St. Dry. Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. Show Stopper Karaoke, 12:30 a.m. The Red Balloon: 10325 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-9622330. Karaoke, 8 p.m., free. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Sunday Solace with Paul Dipadova, 3 p.m., free.

REGGAE Californos: 4124 Pennsylvania, 816-531-7878. Kansas City Reggae Jamboree, 6 p.m., $10 one-day pass.

VA R I E T Y The Beaumont Club: 4050 Pennsylvania, 816-561-2560. Kansas City Music Festival. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Kansas City Music Festival, 6 p.m., $10, $12. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Club Wars, 8 p.m. VooDoo Lounge: Harrah’s Casino, 1 Riverboat Dr., North Kansas City, 816-472-7777. White Linen Party with Mint Condition, and more.

M O N D AY 3 ROCK/POP/INDIE The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Deadringers, the Scurvies, the Skies Revolt.

DJ Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. DJ Big Brother, Dark Drag, 9 p.m.

HIP-HOP RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Jakprogresso, Puppet the Grimey, Vertigon, Sephiroth, Ben Grimm, Leonard Dstroy, 9 p.m.

COMEDY Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. MANic Monday on the main floor, 10 p.m., free.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Slaughter Movie House: Mold; Cinemaphonic, 10 p.m.


M E TA L / P U N K The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Metal Monday. The Granada: 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. Korpiklaani, Moonsorrow, Tyr, Metsatoll, Stonehaven.

T U E S D AY 4 ROCK/POP/INDIE Tomfooleries: 612 W. 47th St., 816-753-0555. The Transients, 9 p.m.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Trampled Under Foot.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Elkheart’s Downtown Outlaw Fiasco, 6 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Rex Hobart’s Honky Tonk Supper Club, 7 p.m.

DJ Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. DJ Whatshisname, service industry night, 9 p.m. The Gusto Lounge: 504 Westport Rd., 816-974-8786. The Dropout Boogie, 10 p.m., free. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Tasteless Tuesdays, rock, punk and more, Nintendo games, Missouri beer specials, and midnight riot, 9 p.m., free.

JAZZ Finnigan’s Hall: 503 E. 18th Ave., North Kansas City, 816-2213466. Abel Ramirez Big Band, 6 p.m. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Rick Bacus and Monique Danielle. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Open Jam with Everette DeVan, 7 p.m.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Gak Attack. The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Scrabble Club, 7 p.m. Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. Coda Pursuit Team Trivia with Teague Hayes, 7 p.m. The Drop: 409 E. 31st St., 816-756-3767. Brodioke, 9:30 p.m. Flying Saucer: 101 E. 13th St., 816-221-1900. Trivia Bowl, 7:30 & 10 p.m., free. Hamburger Mary’s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-842-1919. MJ Knight’s “Dinner is a Drag” show, 8 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. Clash of the Comics, 7:30 p.m. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. It’s Karaoke Time! Johnny’s Tavern: 13410 W. 62nd Terr., Shawnee, 913-962-5777. Bingo Boogie Nights, 9 p.m. Johnny’s Tavern: 11316 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-8515165. Texas Hold ’em. JR’s Place: 20238 W. 151st St., Olathe, 913-254-1307. Buttwiser’s Bash with DJ Double D, 10 p.m., free.

Mike Kelly’s Westsider: 1515 Westport Rd., 816-931-9417. Critter’s Tye Dye Tuesday. MiniBar: 3810 Broadway. Sonic Spectrum Trivia: the Bizarre, Pop Culture, and Travel, 7 p.m. Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. Gayme Night upstairs, in-house tournament, Wii and NTN Trivia, 7:30-10 p.m.; karaoke on the main floor, 10 p.m. MoJo’s Bar & Grill: 1513 S.W. Hwy. 7, Blue Springs. Pool and dart leagues; free pool, happy hour, 4-6 p.m. The Red Balloon: 10325 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-9622330. Karaoke, 8 p.m., free. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-7497676. Replay Horror Picture Show on the patio. The Roxy: 7230 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-236-6211. Karaoke. Saints Pub + Patio: 9720 Quivira, Lenexa, 913-492-3900. Karaoke, 9 p.m. Sherlock’s Underground Coffeehouse & Pub: 858 State Route 291, Liberty, 816-429-5262. Round Robin Card Tournaments. Smokehouse Bar-B-Que: 6304 N. Oak, Gladstone, 816-4544500. Happy hour, 23-oz. Bud $3, 23-oz. Bud Light $3, and specialty 23-oz. $4, 4-6 p.m. Tower Tavern: 401 E. 31st St., 816E R 931-9300. Trivia, 8 p.m. MO The Velvet Dog: 400 E. 31st St., 816-753-9990. Beer Pong, team registration starts at 9:30 p.m., GS IN T tournament starts at 10 p.m. LIS AT E N I Westport Flea Market: 817 ONL M Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. Chess PITCH.CO Club, 7 p.m.

CLUB

M E TA L / P U N K The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Tides of War, Enemies Laid to Rest, Collapse the Masses, Mercia.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Bleachers Bar & Grill: 210 S.W. Greenwich Dr., Lee’s Summit, 816-623-3410. Open Mic Acoustic Jam. DiCarlo’s Mustard Seed Mexican-Americana Restaurant & Bar: 15015 E. U.S. Hwy. 40, 816-373-4240. Blues, country and classic rock hosted by Rick Eidson and friends. The Hideout: 6948 N. Oak Tfwy., 816-468-0550. Taco Tuesday Troubadour Songwriter Open Mic, 6 p.m. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Dave Hays Band Open Jam. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Open Mic Night.

SINGER-SONGWRITER The All-Star Rock Bar: 7210 N.E. 43rd St., 816-452-2660. Scott Ford Songwriter Showcase, 7 p.m.

VA R I E T Y RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. In Back of a Black Car, the Cave Girls, Found a Job (Talking Heads tribute), 9 p.m.

W E D N E S D AY 5 ROCK/POP/INDIE Independence Events Center: 19100 E. Valley View Pkwy., Independence. The Fray and Kelly Clarkson, with Carolina Liar.

Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Buddy Holly Birthday Bash with Pat Recob, the Rumblejetts, 8 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Bob Walkenhorst, 7 p.m.; Antique Scream, Chaotic Good, and more, 9 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. The Last Vegas, Radkey, Daffy’s Elixer.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Billy Ebeling. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Gospel Lounge with Carl Butler, 7:30 p.m. Trouser Mouse: 625 N.W. Mock Ave., Blue Springs, 816-2201222. The Dirty Bourbon Band.

DJ Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. Sonic Spectrum with DJ Robert Moore, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., 10 p.m. Saints Pub + Patio: 9720 Quivira, Lenexa, 913-492-3900. DJ Pure. The Union of Westport: 421 Westport Rd. Hump on the patio with Shaun Duval and guests, 10 p.m.

ACOUSTIC Dark Horse Tavern: 4112 Pennsylvania, 816-931-3663. Live acoustic.

JAZZ B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. New Vintage Big Band. The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. The Mike Dillon Band, Snuff Jazz. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. The Brian Ruskin Quartet.

AMERICANA Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. She’s a Keeper, the Flea Marketeers, Mike Borgia & the Problems, 6:30 p.m. Mike Kelly’s Westsider: 1515 Westport Rd., 816-931-9417. TJ’s Hindu Cowboy Gospel Piano.

CLASSICAL Calvary Bible College Conference Center/Chapel: 15820 Elmwood Ave., 816-322-0110. Piano Benefit Concert with Sam Rotman.

COMEDY Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Nikki Glaser, 8 p.m.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS The All-Star Rock Bar: 7210 N.E. 43rd St., 816-452-2660. Ladies’ Night and Dance Party with Debby Z. Beer Kitchen: 435 Westport Rd., 816-389-4180. Brodioke. Bulldog: 1715 Main, 816-421-4799. Liquid Lounge drink specials. Danny’s Bar and Grill: 13350 College Blvd., Lenexa, 913-3459717. Trivia and karaoke with DJ Smooth, 8 p.m. 403 Club: 403 N. Fifth St., 913-499-8392. Pinball tournament, cash prize for winner, 8:30 p.m., $5 entry fee.

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Hamburger Mary’s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-842-1919. Charity Bingo with Valerie Versace, 8 p.m., $1 per game. Hurricane Allie’s Bar and Grill: 5541 Merriam Dr., Shawnee, 913-217-7665. Karaoke, 8:30 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. Devin Henderson’s Mind Madness. The Indie on Main: 1228 Main, 816-283-9900. Karaoke, 9:30 p.m. J. Murphy’s Irish Pub and Grille: 22730 Midland Dr., Shawnee, 913-825-3880. Karaoke, 9 p.m. Jake’s Place Bar and Grill: 12001 Johnson Dr., Shawnee, 913962-5253. Karaoke. Johnny’s Tavern: 6765 W. 119th St., Leawood, 913-451-4542. Texas Hold ’em. JR’s Place: 20238 W. 151st St., Olathe, 913-254-1307. Karaoke with the Queen, 9:30 p.m.-1 a.m. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Bikers For Babies Pre-Registration Party, 6-9 p.m. Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. The Dirty Game Show, 10 p.m. MoJo’s Bar & Grill: 1513 S.W. Hwy. 7, Blue Springs. Pool and dart leagues; free pool, happy hour, 4-6 p.m. Nara: 1617 Main, 816-221-6272. Ladies’ Night. Outabounds Sports Bar & Grill: 3601 Broadway, 816-2148732. Karaoke with DJ Chad, 9 p.m. The Red Balloon: 10325 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-9622330. Karaoke, 8 p.m., free. The Roxy: 7230 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-236-6211. Karaoke. Sherlock’s Underground Coffeehouse & Pub: 858 State Route 291, Liberty, 816-429-5262. Open jam blues, bike night specials. Smokehouse Bar-B-Que: 6304 N. Oak, Gladstone, 816-4544500. Happy hour, 23-oz. Bud $3, 23-oz. Bud Light $3, and specialty 23-oz. $4, 4-6 p.m. Strikerz Entertainment Center: 18900 E. Valley View Pkwy., Independence, 816-313-5166. Ladies’ Night, ladies bowl for free in the Spare Room Party Room, DJ, 9 p.m. The Union of Westport: 421 Westport Rd. Pop Culture Trivia. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. Trivia, 8 p.m. Wilde’s Chateau 24: 2412 Iowa, Lawrence, 785-856-1514. Pride Night, 8 p.m.

ELECTRO The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. The Malah.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Bleachers Bar & Grill: 210 S.W. Greenwich Dr., Lee’s Summit, 816-623-3410. Open Blues and Funk Jam with Syncopation, 7 p.m. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Acoustic Open Mic with host Tyler Gregory, 10 p.m. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Jam Night, 9 p.m. Take Five Coffee + Bar: 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park, 913948-5550. Open Mic with Philip Wakefield. Tonahill’s 3 of a Kind: 11703 E. 23rd St., Independence, 816833-5021. Blues, country and classic rock hosted by Rick Eidson and friends.

VA R I E T Y Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Amy Farrand’s Weirdo Wednesday Social Club, 7 p.m., no cover.

Apitch.com U G U S T 3 0 - SMEOPNT TE H M BXEX–X R 5X, ,22001 2 E EP IP TI T CC H H 475 0X T H TH


S AVA G E L O V E

DREAMSTALKING Dear Dan: Not sure that even you can help with this one, but I’ll give it a shot … My husband and I enjoy a solid, trusting BDSM relationship, and we’re both quite happy with not only our sex lives but also our lives together in general. There is one issue that concerns me. Roughly twice a month, in the middle of the night, my husband will “attack” me sexually in his sleep. I use the term “attack” lightly because the moment lasts for about 30 seconds, and generally I’m able to ignore it and go back to sleep. However, there are times when I become frightened by these incidents and can’t seem to “get over it” by morning. Generally, the attacks amount to my husband groping my breast painfully and aggressively, violently digitally penetrating me, attempting to penetrate me with his penis (vaginally or orally), and/or shoving me. He doesn’t ejaculate or anything — it is a very short incident. He’s completely unaware of what he’s doing when he does it, and I have been able to wake him up (when I have been lucid enough) as it is happening (if it lasts that long). He does masturbate in his sleep every so often (never to ejaculation), and so I’m figuring this is connected somehow. We have an active sex life, and he has assured me that he’s not sexually dissatisfied, and I do believe him. I have spoken to him about these incidents, and even though I try to laugh them off to hide my fear, he feels terrible about what he has done. He’s fully asleep when these incidents occur, so it’s not as if he can do anything about them. I have stopped telling him when the incidents happen because I don’t want him to feel so bad about something he can’t control. I have tried seeking advice from other places, but I’m usually told to “just ignore it” or “just enjoy it.” I don’t enjoy it. I can’t ignore it. It hurts and it scares me. Should I just ignore it and enjoy it? Is this a common problem? Is there even an answer? Am I being too sensitive?

Scared of Stiffy Dear SOS: Jesse Bering, a psychological sci-

entist and a regular contributor to Scientific American and Slate, says, “SOS’s husband has semiregular sexsomnia, a subtype of sleepwalking, and SOS is not being too sensitive.” Bering devotes a chapter of his terrific new book, Why Is the Penis Shaped Like That? … And Other Reflections on Being Human, to the phenomenon of sexsomnia. “Involuntary sexual ‘automatisms’ occur within two hours of sleep onset, during nonREM sleep,” Bering says. “In most cases, these are harmless enough — gyrating against a pillow, vacuous masturbation. But there are also more violent and worrisome automatisms, such as those making SOS so understandably uncomfortable. In fact, there have been several high-profile rape and child-abuse cases involving sexsomnia.” Luckily, there is an answer, something your husband can do about his problem. “The good news is that sexsomnia responds 48

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AUGUST 30 -SEPTEMBER 5, 2012

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well to pharmaceuticals, so SOS’s husband should find a knowledgeable doctor who is willing to prescribe a low dose of one of the benzodiazepines (such as clonazepam) to take before bedtime,” Bering says. But your husband is unlikely to get the help he needs if you continue to minimize the problem for fear of making him feel bad. Stop laughing these violent episodes off and start telling him about every one. Explain to your husband that all this violent sleep fucking has left you feeling traumatized and that he has to see a doctor as soon as possible. Hearing that might make your husband feel terrible, but these episodes are making you feel terrible. Why shouldn’t he feel terrible about them, too?

Dear Dan: I accidentally raped my boyfriend. What happened was, I awoke to find my boyfriend rubbing up against me. After a little while, he pulled my hand, motioning for me to get on top of him to have sex, as he has done many times before. I obliged, and all was well, until he apparently woke up and pushed me off him. I did not have any indication that he was asleep because he was an active participant the entire time and was NOT lying there like a dead fish. In the morning, he expressed his displeasure about being woken up with sex. He said he felt really violated. I apologized and explained my understanding of the situation. Now he says he feels really weird about what happened, and he can’t stomach me touching him. What should I do?

Reeling After Problematic Intimate Sex Transgression Dear RAPIST: You did not rape your boyfriend.

You didn’t ask me to weigh in on whether you raped your boyfriend, but I felt obligated to toss that out there. Your boyfriend may or may not be a sexsomniac — this is just one incident — but he initiated routine (for you guys) sexual activity in his sleep, and you recipro-

BY

D A N S AVA G E

cated. Once he woke up, and you both realized what was going on, you immediately stopped. Mistakes were made, but no one was raped. As for what you should do, well, I think you should dump the guilt-tripping, blame-shifting motherfucker. But if you want to keep seeing this guy, you need a simple way to determine whether he’s fully awake when he seems to be initiating sex in the middle of the night. Two or three hard slaps across the face might do the trick. Jesse Bering has a kinder, gentler suggestion. “In light of this experience, RAPIST may find herself feeling a bit gun-shy about any middle-of-the-night sex initiated by her boyfriend or any future boyfriends,” Bering says. “After all, how can she know if he’s fully awake and innocently in the mood or just having another episode? Here’s how: She should have an agreement with her boyfriend that, from now on, he will ‘flick’ his penis a few times for her by clenching his PC (pubococcygeus) muscle on initiating nocturnal sex.” And how will that help? “Penile flicking is an intentional action,” Bering explains, and one that cannot be performed by a sleep-fucking sexsomniac at his partner’s request. “It’s a subtle, conscious signal to assure you that you’re not dealing with a lascivious zombie.” For more of Jesse Bering, see jessebering .com or follow @JesseBering on Twitter.

Dear Dan: You will no doubt get some flak for

your response to the snowboarder who needs a finger up his ass in order to come. He stated that he is so ashamed of this practice that when he’s fucking a girl and wants to come, he pushes the woman’s face in a pillow to hide it. How could you let that little bit of mini sadism pass without comment? I hope you will throw a comment in next week’s column to acknowledge it. You are normally so thorough in your replies, Dan!

Pillow Fight Dear PF: You’re right. I dropped the ball in that

response. BUMMED wrote that he goes “to great lengths to hide” his need for prostate stimulation, adding that he will “push [a girl’s] head in a pillow” when he fingers himself. And he was worried that the last girl he slept with must have seen him fingering himself — seen it and concluded he was gay — because she wasn’t responding to his texts. A little addendum for BUMMED: That girl might not be returning your texts because she didn’t appreciate having her face smashed into a pillow. You can do what you like with your asshole, bro, without being an asshole. Find the Savage Lovecast (my weekly podcast) every Tuesday at thestranger.com/savage.

Have a question for Dan Savage? E-mail him at mail@savagelove.net pitch.com

MONTH


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1816 Jeferson $229,000

1-Bdrms starting at $395 central air, secure entry, on site laundry, on bus line, close to shopping, nice apts, Sections 8 welcome $100 Deposit (816) 231-2874 M-F 8-5 office hours

Wallstreet Tower Penthouse (1101 Walnut) #2004 $599,000

NORTHLAND VILLAGE

723 W. 16th $439,000

$100 DEPOSIT ON 1&2 BEDROOMS

$525 / up Large 1, 2 & 3 Bedroom Apts and Townhomes Fireplace, Washer/Dryer Hook-ups, Storage Space, Pool.

523 Grand (multiple units) $149,000-$325,000

I-35 & Antiocht(816) 454-5830

the Stylish Apartments in Historic Midtown Building STUDIOS, 1&2 BEDROOMS • All utilities included • Off Street Parking • Laundry Facilities 816-531-3111 • Huge Windows 1111 W. 39th St. • High Ceilings KCMO

426 W. 5th $675,000 5 Delaware #203 $429,950 Liberty Lofts 360 W. Pershing #310 $344,900 Union Carbide 912 Baltimore #502 $189,900 1600 Locust $595,000

For more information go to: www.Move-DowntownKC.com or call 816.333.4040

WALDO PL AZA DE $99 Quiet, Comfortable 1 & 2 bedrooms in SUPER neighborhood!

POSIT

$570 - $650 No Application Fee!

816-363-8018 Are you out of housing options?

Have Credit Problems? Previous Evictions? Criminal History?

We rent to the rent challenged

Holiday Apartments Studios BRING THIS Downtown Area

$110/WEEK $150/DEPOSIT*

* Restrictions apply

Month to Month Lease! On Site Loundry Facility Cable TV On Metro Bus Line Route 201

All Utilities Paid

AD IN FOR $20 OFF YOUR FIRST 2 WEEKS

Holiday Apartments (816) 221-1721 pitch.com

AUGUST 30 -SEPTEMBER 5, 2012

THE PITCH

55


APTS/JOBS/STUFF

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Š Psychic Readings Š Palm Readings Š Tarot Readings Š Crystal Readings 



WATER HEATER SPECIALIST COMMERCIAL - RESIDENTIAL - INDUSTRIAL INSTALLATION - REPAIR - SERVICE WE SERVICE ALL MAKES AND MODELS

913-742-1477 | 866-570-9475 24 H O U R EMERGENCY SERVICE

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Law Offices of David M. Lurie

DWI, SOLICITATION, TRAFFIC DEFENSE, INTERNET-BASED CRIMES816-221-5900



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SPECIALIZING IN REUNITING LOVERS

Advice on LOVE, STRESS, DEPRESSION, FINANCIAL SUCCESS, HEALTH 100% GUARANTEED RESULTS. NO FALSE PROMISES.

Independence, MO & Grandview, MO

816.965.7125

http://www.the-law.com

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Simple, Uncontested + Filing Fee. Don Davis. 816-­531-­1330

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The road to DEBT RELIEF and a fresh start. Accurso and Lett Law Firm Experienced and Affordable MISSOURI:

816-587-4LAW (4529) KANSAS: 913-402-6069

www.AccursoAndLett.com

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The Pitch: August 30, 2012