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AUGUST 9–15, 2012 | FREE | VOL. 32 NO. 6 | PITCH.COM


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LIVE PERFORMANCES BY MARK LOWREY & SOUL SERVERS, MAKING MOVIES, AND THE GRISLY HAND.

DJ ’ D BY JT Q U I CK


A U G U S T 9 –1 5 , 2 0 1 2 | V O L . 3 2 N O . 6 E D I T O R I A L

Editor Scott Wilson Managing Editor Justin Kendall Music Editor David Hudnall Staff Writers Charles Ferruzza, Ben Palosaari Editorial Operations Manager Deborah Hirsch Calendar Editor Berry Anderson Clubs Editor Abbie Stutzer Food Blogger, Web Editor Jonathan Bender Proofreader Brent Shepherd Contributing Writers Tracy Abeln, Theresa Bembnister, April Fleming, Dan Savage, Abbie Stutzer Intern Hayley Bartels

A R T

Art Director Ashford Stamper Contributing Photographers Angela C. Bond, Chris Mullins, Lauren Phillips, Sabrina Staires, Brooke Vandever

P R O D U C T I O N

Production Manager Christina Riddle Multimedia Designer Rafaella Chaves

A D V E R T I S I N G

Advertising Director Dawn Jordan Senior Classified Multimedia Specialist Steven Suarez Classified Multimedia Specialist Andrew Disper Multimedia Specialists Michelle Acevedo, Kirin Arnold, Erin Carey, Payton Hatfield Director of Marketing & Operations Jason Dockery Digital Marketing Manager Keli Sweetland

C I R C U L A T I O N

Circulation Director Mike Ryan

B U S I N E S S

Accounts Receivable Jodi Waldsmith Publisher Joel Hornbostel

MODEL RECALL Talent-agency heir Melissa Stevens refuses to be forgotten.

S O U T H C O M M

Chief Executive Officer Chris Ferrell Chief Operating Officer Rob Jiranek Director of Accounting Todd Patton Director of Operations Susan Torregrossa Creative Director Heather Pierce Director of Content/Online Development Patrick Rains Chief Technology Officer Matt Locke Director of Digital Products Andy Sperry Business Manager Eric Norwood

N A T I O N A L

A D V E R T I S I N G

Voice Media Group 888-278-9866, voicemediagroup.com Senior Vice President Sales Susan Belair Senior Vice President Sales Operations Joe Larkin National Sales Director Ronni Gaun

BY C H A R L E S F E R R U Z Z A

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TIME TABLES Murray’s Tables & Tap brings to mind an earlier dining age.

B A C K P A G E . C O M

BY C H A R L E S F E R R U Z Z A

Vice President Sales & Marketing Carl Ferrer Business Manager Jess Adams Accountant David Roberts

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D I S T R I B U T I O N

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ON T HE COVE R

SHO W AND TELL Piecing together the 2012 Pitch Music Showcase. BY DAV I D H U D N A L L , A P R I L F L E M I N G A N D B E R RY A N D E R S O N

22 6 7 8 13 16 19 20 22 28 36

PITCH QUESTIONNAIRE PLOG FEATURE F I LT E R FILM CAFÉ FAT CITY MUSIC NIGHTLIFE SAVAGE LOVE

MEANWHI LE AT PI TC H. C O M

ILLUSTRATION BY MEGAN DEJMAL

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husband and iPhone!

What career would you choose in an alternate reality? Pop star. Yep! That’s right. What was the last local restaurant you patronized? Cheesecake Factory Where do you drink? Don’t really drink but

Where do you like to take out-of-town guests? Country Club Plaza. I’m still relatively new to the area, so I need suggestions.

Finish this sentence: “Other than the Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts, Kansas City got it right AT E when …” All the shops N I NL

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were brought to the Country Club Plaza area.

“On my day off, I like to …” Shop, finish up chores and play with my little boy.

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AUGUST 9-15, 2012

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Celebrity you’d like to ride the Mamba with at Worlds of Fun: Eva Longoria

Person or thing you find really irritating at this moment: When someone has a beef with you

“People might be surprised to know that I …” Spent a year roughin’ it in Baghdad, Iraq.

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What movie do you watch at least once a year? The Notebook

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Favorite place to spend your paycheck: J.Crew,

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VH1’s Basketball Wives, both World News With Diane Sawyer and NBC Nightly News With Brian Williams, Entertainment Tonight

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What TV show do you make sure you watch?

“In fi ve years, I’ll be …” Hopefully a mom of two and loving my job as I do now.

Huffington Post and Survive TV News Jobs

and you have no clue what it’s about!

What subscription — print, digital, etc. — do you value most? The New York Times Last book you read: Audition, Barbara Walters’ memoir

Favorite day trip: Other than shopping, Great Wolf Lodge, meeting up with family What is your most embarrassing dating moment? On my very first date, the guy says at

the end, “We’re going Dutch, is that cool?” I had no idea what that meant. I said, “What?” He explained. (Embarrassing part) I then said, “Oh, no, we're not!”

Describe a recent triumph: Landing this job

at KMBC 9 News. I work with an amazing group of people who have already taught me so much. I’m blessed with a beautiful family and a job that I love. Follow Stephanie Ramos, @Stephanie_Ramos, on Twitter.


PLOG

THE HOOKUP

Live in an apartment and want Google Fiber? Here’s how to get it.

BY

JUS T IN K E NDA L L

FI B ER B Y TH E N U M B ER S KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI Top 10 neighborhoods above goal (percentage preregistered)

A

few weeks ago, Google fi nally revealed its plans for Google Fiber, making “fiberhood” a part of the Kansas City lexicon. Google put the onus on consumers to preregister for Fiber by September 9 by signing up at fiber.google. com. Pay $10 now or be left behind. That’s just a month away. With no time to waste, I checked the status of my fiberhood: Quality Hill, where I live in an apartment. We were on the high end of Google’s scale, needing the maximum 25 percent of our neighborhood to preregister to get Fiber. That’s 346 people. I tried to sign up … but I got this error message: “Sorry … we couldn’t find that address.” The maker of Google Maps couldn’t find my address? How am I supposed to “do it for Quality Hill” and rally my fiberhood if I can’t even register myself? This wasn’t just a Quality Hill problem. I’ve heard from other apartment dwellers who were having the same issue. I called up Google spokeswoman Jenna Wandres, who told me that the manager of my apartment complex would have to fill out a form for “multiple dwelling unit interest” to get into Fiber consideration. This form: http://goo.gl/GPbNu If you live in an apartment complex or condo, you’ll want to send that link to the property’s manager if you want Fiber. “We’re encouraging residents to talk to their landlords first and tell them that they’re interested in having Google Fiber for their apartment building,” Wandres said. “Then the landlord can get in touch with us online and ask us to build to the building.” So downtown apartment dwellers, if you want Fiber, talk to your landlords and send ’em that link.

I sent mine to my complex’s manager, but there’s been no change yet for Quality Hill, which is lagging behind with 274 preregistrations needed as of press time. Quality Hill isn’t alone; 86 neighborhoods have yet to qualify (42 have), but pretty much all of the downtown communities are below the goal, including Crown Center, the West Side, the Crossroads District, the Business District, and Ilus W. Davis. (Google makes up its own names for its fiberhoods.) Also on the outside looking in: Columbus Park, 18th and Vine, midtown, the Country Club Plaza, and Plaza Westport. The neighborhoods closest to downtown that are Fiber-eligible are the River Market, Union Hill, Pendleton Heights, and Scarritt Point North. The biggest pocket of Google Fiber neighborhoods is south of downtown Kansas City: Coleman Highlands and Valentine. Kansas City, Kansas, is even further behind. Only nine neighborhoods — Dubs Dread, Hanover Heights, Frank Rushton, North KU Med, Rosedale Arch, Pearson School, Strawberry Hill, Wyandotte High School, and Cambridge Circle — have met the goal. Sixty-five haven’t. KCMO and KCK aren’t the only cities getting Fiber. Part of northern Johnson County is likely getting Fiber. On Friday, Google Fiber’s blog announced tentative agreements with Westwood, Westwood Hills, and Mission Woods. JoCo will have to wait, though. Google Access General Manager Kevin Lo wrote that KCMO and KCK would be getting the gig before residents in JoCo. That is, if enough of them register.

E-mail justin.kendall@pitch.com

1. Greenway Fields: 32 percent 2. Wornall Homestead: 28 percent 3. Coleman Highlands: 26 percent 4. Countryside: 26 percent 5. Country Club District: 22 percent 6. Western 49-63 South: 21 percent 7. Armour Fields: 21 percent 8. Armour Hills: 20 percent 9. Romanelli West: 20 percent 10. Brookside: 19 percent

Neighborhoods above goal: 42 Neighborhoods below goal: 86 Neighborhoods with no preregistrations: 3 KANSAS CITY, KANSAS Nine neighborhoods above goal (percentage preregistered) 1. Dubs Dread: 25 percent 2. Hanover Heights: 25 percent 3. Frank Rushton: 12 percent 4. North KU Med: 11 percent 5. Rosedale Arch: 6 percent 6. Pearson School: 6 percent 7. Strawberry Hill: 6 percent 8. Wyandotte High School: 6 percent 9. Cambridge Circle: 5 percent

Neighborhoods above goal: 9 Neighborhoods below goal: 65 Neighborhoods with no preregistrations: 2

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Patricia Stevens Modeling School heir Melissa Stevens learned self-invention from her legendary mother. Now she must teach herself the art of reinvention. BY C HAR LES FE R RUZZ A P H OTO G R A P H Y BY SA B R I N A S TA I R E S

8 THE PITCH 2 THE PITCH

A U G U S T 9 - 1 5 , 2 0 1 2 pitch.com M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X pitch.com


R E CA L L

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he Governor’s Room of the Westin Crown Center Hotel is a fancy name for a small, charmless cell on the building’s fifth floor. It’s the kind of space typically rented out for corporate breakfasts or all-day training seminars. But on this hot July afternoon, it holds three suburban teenagers: 12-year-old Christine, 16-year-old Courtney and 14-year-old Da’jha. They’re awkwardly imitating an instructor’s hip-hop moves, trying to follow the fluidly agile young man through Wiz Khalifa’s “Work Hard, Play Hard” as the song punches out of an iPod. “They’re learning to limber up,” says Melissa Stevens, an impeccably coifed blonde in a shimmery-gold raw-silk pantsuit. “Modeling is all about movement.” Each girl has paid about $900 to take Stevens’ one-week course that includes a photo session, professional makeup application, and classes in retail merchandising and, the application promises, “social graces and etiquette.” “Modeling is more than just being pretty,” Stevens says. For one thing, it’s typically about height. It’s a profession dominated by tall women: Christy Turlington and Alessandra Ambrosio are 5 feet 10 inches, and Gisele Bündchen stands 5 feet 11. The three young women limbering up at the Westin are presumably still growing, but they aren’t yet 5 feet 5, and their middle-school prettiness suggests a future as a small-town prom queen more than it does a Paris runway model. Stevens waves away the high-fashion dream. “They’re perfect for trade shows, conventions and special events,” she says. These are the real, lower-rent destinations for most professional models. “They’re perfect petites,” she says, admiring her students. She is, at age 57, still a perfect petite herself — barely over 5 feet, with posture not much eroded by time. She spent most of her 20s on that grittier circuit, posing and greeting people at trade shows and special events. She began modeling for local fashion shows as soon as she could walk. “Mom was determined that her daughters would be stars,” Stevens says. “She thought pageants were a good way to develop talents.” Flo Stevens, known professionally as Patricia Stevens, was a force to be reckoned with: a teenage model in Chicago who hosted her own radio show at age 13. She later juggled motherhood duties while running a modeling agency full time. Eventually, Melissa Stevens would follow in Flo’s stiletto prints, training a generation of Kansas City debs to move and pose and move. Melissa Stevens never doubted that she would learn the modeling business inside out.

Her strong-willed mother had made it clear with Melissa’s birth announcement: “A new Patricia Stevens model has arrived.” Sixteen years later, Melissa was a finalist in the Miss Kansas City Teenage America Pageant. “I was Miss Blue Springs,” she says. Eight years after that, she was working in Los Angeles as a unit publicist for 20th Century Fox. Her stint in Hollywood completed in the early 1980s, she began her glory years as the very public face of the Patricia Stevens Modeling School. She appeared on TV, spoke on the radio, gave speeches, hosted fashion shows. But that was a long time ago. And no one knows just how long ago better than Melissa Stevens.

D

estiny, quite often, is a determined parent,” wrote the choreographer Twyla Tharp. The late Florence Czarnecki Stevens became “Patricia Stevens” only after her 1946 marriage to a young Chicago entrepreneur named Jim Stevens (“a ballsy, big-shouldered Irish guy,” Melissa recalls). Before he met Flo, he had already named his training school, a business designed to help women navigate the postwar work world. An early subscriber to Stevens’ vision: Howard Hughes. The millionaire industrialist and Trans World Airlines chairman was Jim Stevens’ first big client. Hughes hired the new company to train TWA stewardesses when the airline was still based in Kansas City.

The Patricia Stevens Career College & Model Agency came later. Jim’s sister, Bernadine, legally changed her name to Patricia, but Flo — the woman who everyone assumed was the real Patricia Stevens — never did. “She was a tough cookie,” Melissa says. “She told us that we had to be tough, too, or the world would wipe us up.” Flo Stevens was driven to succeed, and for most of the 20th century she did, becoming one of Kansas City’s best-known entrepreneurs and a businesswoman of national standing. The chain of modeling schools and talent agencies bearing her adopted name extended across the country. (My own mother attended the Indianapolis branch in the 1950s. “Girls with poise and style,” she was taught, “always find husbands.”) Flo’s three daughters — Patricia, Melissa and Sheila — were groomed to be stylish, poised and popular. (Melissa’s high school friends included members of a teen band called Manchester Trafficway — one of whom was future Kansas City Mayor Sly James.) They weren’t just the daughters of a familiar local brand; they were walking advertisements for the family business. The oldest daughter, Patricia, was voted Miss Teenage Kansas City in 1968. The youngest, Sheila, dressed up as the Easter Bunny every spring for the Easter parade, which her mother started on the Country Club Plaza in 1960 and kept going for three more decades. When Patricia left the company to work for TWA, Flo set her focus on Melissa. “I

Florence Stevens was known as the iconic Patricia Stevens for a half-century.

was the only one who liked the business,” she says. “Even though my mother would go on to fi re me three times.”

M

elissa Stevens sent the company archives — contracts, payroll slips, brochures, correspondence, hundreds of photographs and clippings — to the LaBudde Special Collections of the Miller Nichols Library last year. But she kept something. “Melissa didn’t want to turn over the Easter Bunny costume,” says Stuart Hinds, collections director for the library. She wants to bring back the Easter parade as a Patricia Stevens event. The costume also reminds her of Sheila, who died in her own home in 1984. (The cause was asphyxiation; Melissa Stevens insists that her younger sister was murdered but won’t elaborate on her theory.) “We were very close,” says Stevens, who hasn’t spoken to her older sister, Patricia, in two decades. “We were a close-knit family.” The bunny costume, along with most of Melissa Stevens’ possessions, was put in storage last January. That winter, she vacated the place she was renting downtown, the first and fourth floors of a brick office building at 21st Street and Grand. It was a frigid afternoon the day she collected the last objects left on the unheated upper floor that held her living quarters. Wearing blue jeans, a sweater and a fur-trimmed vest, Stevens sipped from a glass of white wine and chain-smoked cigarettes. One spacious room on the floor still had metal bars hanging from wires screwed into the ceiling; she’d used the room as a walk-in closet for her extensive collection of clothes. There was in the day an unwelcome déjà vu. The school used to give its students a printed handout titled “Laws for Women to Live By.” Rule No. 10: “Love is blind, but marriage is a real eye-opener.” “It was,” Stevens says. “It really was.” She wed her husband relatively late in her career. When she and photographer Frank Messer married, she was nearly 40, and her mother was dying. When the union ended in an acrimonious divorce, she says, there came a serious shift in her fortunes. (Messer wouldn’t speak to The Pitch about his ex-wife or their settlement. Each claims to have filed first.) The divorce ended what she thinks of now as the final act in the glamorous part of her life. From 1992 to 2002, Stevens was the sole owner of a 10-story building, the former Liquid Carbonic Co., at 20th Street and Baltimore in the heart of the Crossroads District. continued on page 10

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continued from page 9 “I paid cash for it,” she says. She lived on the top floor in a showy penthouse apartment with a Jacuzzi, crystal chandeliers, a closet packed with stylish clothes and hundreds of pairs of shoes, and the French Provincial furnishings inherited from her mother. By Stevens’ account, she hired and fired several attorneys to represent her in the divorce. It wasn’t a cheap split; the building on Baltimore had to be sold. Meanwhile, the family business languished. The last Patricia Stevens Modeling School, a fixture on the Country Club Plaza for more than three decades, moved out of its longtime office suite in 1995 and into far less upscale digs downtown. Today it’s pretty much a mobile affair. Stevens’ modeling camps this summer have squatted in hotel meeting rooms in midtown and at the Westin. “I’m still looking for a new studio,” she says. “You can’t believe all of the spaces I’ve looked at.” Despite her still graceful carriage and the lifelong habits of fashion-model poise — that classic “Patricia Stevens stance,” shoulders erect, arms to the side, left foot facing forward, right foot tucked behind it, heel to heel — she shows the last decade’s strains. “I’m a survivor,” she told me on that cold January afternoon, pouring another glass of wine and lighting another cigarette. “I’ll be back.”

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ike countless Americans, Melissa Stevens can sum up the means to her selfreinvention in two words: reality TV. She knows that television series, such as America’s Next Top Model, have sparked new interest in modeling as a profession. She knows that there are girls in KC who want in, who can learn from her. And it’s far from a fantasy that a young model from a Midwestern city might tunnel into the high-fashion world. Angela Lindvall of Lee’s Summit, for example, was discovered (along with her late sister, Audrey) here. Fol-

Stevens wants to reinvent her mother’s business. lowing a career arc from glossy-magazine ads to design collaboration to the occasional movie role, Lindvall is taking the next step: She’s set to host Lifetime’s Project Runway All Stars this fall. Another local talent agent and modelingschool maven, Kim Hoffman of Hoffman International Agency, credits herself with Lindvall’s launch. Could the Patricia Stevens brand generate a similar superstar-producing aura in the 21st century? “I never hear anyone talking about it — as a talent agency, anyway,” says Jennifer Mangan, president of the local Exposure Model and Talent (which bills itself as the city’s “premier model and talent agency”). “I was wondering if it was even still in business.” “I think with parents it probably has some cachet,” Hoffman adds. “It was a respected, recognizable brand name in Kansas City for a very long time. But things are changing so quickly. I sent a young model out on a photo shoot recently, and the talent coordinator looked at her and said, ‘You look like a young Christie Brinkley.’ And my model said, ‘Who is Christie Brinkley?’ That’s how quickly people forget. The Patricia Stevens School is like that.” In the 1960s, the Patricia Stevens Agency had its own big discovery: Debbie Bryant, who was studying at the University of Kansas in 1966 when she was crowned Miss America in Atlantic City. Bryant’s victory was a major publicrelations success for Flo Stevens, who had suffered some financial and personal hardships during that decade. The modeling-school empire had expanded quickly — and expensively — and the driving force behind that expansion, Jim Stevens, died in a Sioux City, Iowa, hotel fire in 1964. After that, his siblings in other cities took over the franchise schools; Flo inherited only the Kansas City operation. Meanwhile, other talent-training ventures — both local and franchise operations, such as John Casablancas and Barbizon — came along.


Most eventually vanished, but each did its part to erode the Patricia Stevens luster. By the late 1980s, the most prominent national mention of the business was a recurring Saturday Night Live sketch: Nora Dunn playing the clueless host of a low-rent talk show called “The Pat Stevens Show.” Dunn introduced her character to the audience by grandly announcing, “I used to be a model,” and striking that familiar stance: heels close together, arms at the side. (Stevens says she never saw any of the sketches. If that’s true, she was spared the knowledge that Dunn’s character had a sullen daughter named Missy.) Somewhere between that and America’s Next Top Model is the media exposure that Stevens wants now.

Melissa Stevens was a popular teen model in the 1960s. This is not the first time she has mentioned to me this cousin, this possibility. “But if I could ever afford to do it, what I’d really like to do is work with inner-city kids. Those are the young men and women who really need the tools to communicate with people and develop the confidence to maneuver successfully in any kind of social situation. I’m talking personal and corporate. Why shouldn’t those kids have those advantages, too?” This is how Melissa Stevens brings herself around, visibly rousing herself when talk has again turned to the difficulties of the past decade. Her mother was a determined woman,

“I was the only one who liked the business. Even though my mother would go on to fire me three times.” Getting there seems likely to take more than the lone laptop computer she has lately learned to fiddle with. The business’s failure to keep up with modern technology has contributed to her woes. “When I started in this business, in the 1980s,” Hoffman says, “there were no such things as websites that enabled clients to click a mouse and see my whole client list. If I wanted to send a head shot to a potential client, I had to use a fax machine or mail a packet or drive over to an office building. Technology has made it a really different ballgame now.” Stevens understands that she’s trying to play this game at an awkward personal time. “I have to reinvent the business,” she says, “and reinvent me. I have a cousin in Detroit who is interested in taking over the business, and I’ve considered bringing him in, teaching him everything I know, and then sit and knit while he runs the business. That’s one possibility.”

and Stevens can still draw on that family trait, that urge for one definitive scheme. Until she settles on that singular path to successful reinvention — for herself and for her 64-year-old family business — she spends her days planning the small stuff, the things that keep her going. She sets up the classes and seminars, making money a few days at a time in this or that drab rented space, coming and going from her cousin’s Overland Park house. The reinvention waits for relocation. Only the right place will do: a place to unpack the wardrobe and the mementos and to live alone, an office from which to book speaking engagements and start working the phone and meet new clients. A new studio to train the models of tomorrow. “All I really need,” she says, “is a runway, a makeup table, a mirror — and me.”

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T H U R S D AY | 8 . 9 | THE CHILD WHISPERER

Have you seen Jim Cosgrove (aka Mr. Stinky Feet) entertain a frenzied crowd of children? Even if you don’t have a child to take to one of his several appearances throughout the metro, you can’t help but appreciate the way songs like “Put Down the Binky,” “Scabs” or “Spaghetti & Goofballs” (off his latest release, Swimming in Noodles) get toddlers to bop along. Mr. Stinky Feet performs a free show tonight from 6:30 to 8:30 in Barkley Square in Leawood’s Park Place (11551 Ash). For more information, see destinationparkplace.com. We caught up with Cosgrove, who shared some of his secrets. The Pitch: Besides being a children’s entertainer, you do motivational speaking. What are some of the main points of that? Cosgrove: I have a program titled “Live

BACK TO FOOTBALL Chiefs fans don’t need any reminders about last season’s disaster, marked by injuries, strange front-office moves, and the firing of America’s hobo-iest football coach. But hope springs eternal for sports fans. Romeo Crennel leads the Chiefs into the team’s 50th season. The former defensive coordinator took over for Todd Haley, who was fired last Like a Child, Succeed Like a Child.” Working with kids for the past 15 years, I’ve learned many important lessons from them. They are intuitive and insightful, and they live in the moment. I realized that they have many of the communication skills and life skills for success that we adults have forgotten. Kids are successful because they are honest, passionate, focused on what they want and need. They know their audience inside and out, and they can sell almost any idea they want because of those skills. What do kids not like? continued on page 14

season with three games left. The Chiefs’ first preseason home game is against the Arizona Cardinals (8-8 last season) at 7 p.m. at Arrowhead (1 Arrowhead Drive). But it wouldn’t be the Chiefs without some drama. Dwayne Bowe, the team’s leading receiver last season, is unhappy with his contract and is holding out. Will he be on the field Friday? Tickets start at $35; call 816-920-9400 or see kcchiefs.com. — BEN PALOSAARI

F R I D AY | 8 . 10 |

CAMP ALAMO

H

ere’s our latest suggestion for parent-child summertime relief: Alamo Drafthouse’s Kids’ Camp. Children who are 3 and older are invited to 1400 Main for a free 11 a.m. showing of Short Circuit, the 1986 family-friendly scifi flick about a rogue robot who learns the meaning of life and death. Tickets for the advertisement-free screening are available on a first-come, first-served basis. Even if your young companions aren’t touched by the plights of Steve Guttenberg and Ally Sheedy, it’s an opportunity for them to learn — and practice — the “no talking” policy. The last day of Kids’ Camp is Sunday. See drafthouse.com for more information. pitch.com

AUGUST 9-15, 2012

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FRIDAY

8.10

v

e ic

mo t

nsas cit a K cycle se y r r o

opened at the Glenwood at Red Bridge (11118 Holmes, 816-942-1131). Demme’s film chronicles Young’s May 2011 solo stand at Toronto’s Massey Hall, alongside scenes from the 66-year-old’s detour (in a 1956 Ford Crown Vic) to his childhood home in Omemee, Ontario. See fineartsgroup.com for times. — SCOTT WILSON

free ’ in the Rockin ad a . n a C — world

S AT U R D AY | 8 . 11 | SHORT AND SWEET

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A Hip & Trendy Boutique Are you a lulu?

6017 Johnson Drive Mission, KS 913.362.CHIC (2442) luvlulus.com

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AUGUST 9-15, 2012

S AT U R D AY | 8 . 1 1 |

F R I D AY | 8 . 10 | OLD MAN

If you look away too long, Neil Young is apt to pile up on you. Boxed sets here, concert reissues there, and … is that one of his hats? Now there’s a third documentary for the “Jonathan Demme and Neil Young are BFFs” stack. Neil Young Journeys just

F R I D AY | 8 . 10 |

B O B C O M P T O N / S TA R L I G H T T H E AT R E

lulu (loo’loo) n 1. A remarkable person or thing. 2. stunner, mantrap, knockout, beauty, peach

NEW LOCATION IN NORTHLAND! 6058 NW 63rd Terr. Kansas City, MO 816.741.PINK (7465)

places that are dangerous, like near the edge of a stage or around a clump of wires near my sound equipment. Inevitably, there is a parent who is not paying attention or thinks it’s “cute” that their child is tugging on a cable that could topple a speaker. Once I invited some kids onstage, and a boy hit another kid on the head with a tambourine (it was his brother), so I had to stop the song and ask him to leave the stage. I explained that musical instruments are meant for peaceful purposes. There are always opportunities for teaching moments!

BRAD AUSTIN

lulu’s

continued from page 13 Kids are just like adults. They dislike the same things we do. They’re hungry for love, consistency and laughter. They can smell a fake instantly, so sincerity is essential. One of my pet peeves is when adults talk “down” to kids, or when they talk about kids in the third person when a child is standing right next to them. They understand a lot more than adults think they do. What are the advantages of having an audience of kids instead of older people? Kids tell it like is. If they don’t like a song, they’ll let you know, where an adult audience might feign interest and offer some sympathetic applause. I love that kids are so out there with their emotions. Have you ever had to stop a show or put a halt to the music because things in the audience got way too crazy? I’ve had to stop many shows — often right in the middle of a song — and it’s rarely the fault of a child. Kids sometimes roam into

The winner of Best Film in the 2011 48 Hour Film Project was Docile, an eight-minute thriller, directed by Alden Miller, about a pet psychologist who chains up and terrorizes the owners of the pets she works with. This year’s 48HFP started last weekend, when 18 teams each received a prop, line of dialogue and character sketch on which to base their films. Tonight, those films premiere at Screenland Crossroads (1656 Washington, 816-421-9700). “With this contest, it basically makes a micro-production with a very real deadline and decisions that have to be made with a degree of finality,” says Jason Turner, city producer. “It’s a rush, and many lasting, working relationships come out of these projects.” Films begin at 7 and 9 p.m. Tickets cost $10 in advance or $13 at the door. See 48hourfilm.com/en/ kansascity.

STAR BRIGHT

S

tarlight Theatre heads indoors for the Tony Award-winning Aida, playing at 8 p.m. nightly (also at 2 p.m. on weekends) through August 12 at the Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts (1601 Broadway). The Starlight-produced show includes a star-filled cast: Zakiya Young as Aida (above, fourth from left), from Stick Fly and Little Mermaid fame, and Paul Nolan (straight from a Broadway stint as Jesus in Jesus Christ Superstar) as Radames (not pictured). Tickets cost — D EBORAH H IRSCH $25–$95; see kcstarlight.com or call 816-363-7827.

pitch.com

FLYING HIGH AGAIN

W

e asked the people at Quixotic what was up with the globetrotting, TED-talking, bodymoving troupe’s 7 p.m. gig with Portland, Oregon, trip-hop producer Emancipator at Crossroads KC at Grinders (417 East 18th Street, 816-472-5454). The reply included words like “terrific” and “homecoming” and “excited,” and there was the suggestion that at least one surprise lies in store. All of which is obviously secret code for “Quixotic knows you by name, knows you haven’t seen them yet and highly encourages you to throw down the extra $50 to be part of their VIP entourage tonight.” We warned you: Miss this at your peril. Tickets start at $26.50; see crossroadskc.com.


M O N D AY | 8 . 1 3 |

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his is Kansas City according to artists Gavin Snider and Sabrina Staires (a frequent Pitch contributor). See the artboards above the Missouri Bank’s Crossroads branch at 125 Southwest Boulevard, where they will appear through the end of October. For more information on the Art Through Architecture project, see charlottestreet.org.

S U N D AY | 8 . 12 | I’MA BEE D-R-U-N-K

The winning word of the 2012 Scripps National Spelling Bee was “guetapens.” We’re pretty sure that word won’t be a selection in the Sunday-night Mumble Bee at Ernie Biggs (4115 Mill Street, 816-561-2444). Travis Fields, Biggs’ general manager, explained the rules: “Throughout the competition, if you misspell a word, you can either buy back into the Bee for $5 or you can chug a pint of PBR. After 9:30, your options increase. You can chug a pint or buy the next speller and yourself a shot. Past 10, the competition moves to single elimination, and you are no longer allowed to buy back in

if you misspell a word. The top speller takes the entire pot of cash home, along with a gift certificate to match it.” Sign up for the $3 competition at 8 p.m. or just drink $1 PBR pints and any whiskey or bourbon for $3 until close. Local bands play after the bee. For more information, see erniebiggs.com/ kansascity.

YOU’RE THE BEST AROUND

When we asked 2010 Pitch Music Award winner Samantha Fish what her victory in the Blues category meant to her, she said, “It means a lot to get recognition from your peers, especially in the town where you have grown E MOR up. You guys have seen me from the beginning, and have seen the T A E IN growth and evolution of ONL .COM PITCH the band. So to be recognized by people who have been there through it all, it does mean a lot.” See the winners, the losers, the ill-behaved and all the rest when The Pitch Music Awards ceremony starts at 8 p.m. at the Uptown Theater (3700 Broadway, 816-753-8665). Tickets cost $8 in advance or $10 the day of the show. (VIP tickets are $25 and $35, respectively.) See uptowntheater.com.

EVENTS

See Mick at his musical and cosmetic peak. this having been the last moment when these guys looked good in high definition. Tickets cost $8.50; reserve at tivolikc.com.

NEW W E D N E S D AY | 8 . 15 | REPTILES BEST-OF ARE SPOTLIGHT — THE PITCH 2011 BEST HERE!

N EWTIL ES R EP HER E! A RE Depend on us for pet supplies, toys, food, grooming and special orders! Next to Sunfresh 4029 Mill St. (816) 561-7387 | citypets.wordpress.com

HAPPY-HOUR FOOD: WEBSTER HOUSE

Happy hour at Webster House (1644 Wyandotte, 816-221-4713) is not the place for shots, Red Friday gear or a gab session about your co-workers. It’s a highbrow, on-your-bestbehavior experience, due in part to the luxurious nibbles served between 4:30 and 6 p.m. every Wednesday through Saturday. Silky mussels slide out of their shells and swirl in white-wine sauce. Fresh, house-ground beef crowned with Vidalia onions and a sesame bun sits thick and sturdy for a measly $9. And when we need a sweet to go with our Kir Royale: hot, fresh caramel corn. You can’t eat happy like this very often but, when you decide to, make a reservation.

T U E S D AY | 8 . 1 4 | TUMBLING DICE

Samantha Fish tries to be a repeat Pitch Music Award winner.

In his recent profile of Bruce Springsteen, New Yorker editor David Remnick makes a claim that the Rolling Stones “have not written a great song since the disco era.” True! Get a glimpse of the band at its zenith when The Rolling Stones: Some Girls, Live in Texas does the one-night-only thing at 7:30 p.m. at Tivoli Cinemas (4050 Pennsylvania, 816-561-5222). Filmed during the group’s 1978 U.S. tour, the 16 mm footage has been updated and remastered to take advantage of

E-mail submissions to Filter editor Berry Anderson at calendar@pitch.com. Search our complete listings guide online at pitch.com.

pitch.com

AUGUST 9-15, 2012

THE PITCH

15


FILM

RE-BOURNE

The Bourne Legacy puts Jeremy Renner in the

BY

driver’s seat of a moodier, more sober offshoot.

BIL GE EBIRI

B

y the previous standards of the Bourne franchise — which we all thought had concluded with 2007’s The Bourne Ultimatum — The Bourne Legacy is a decidedly B-team affair. Gone are star Matt Damon and director Paul Greengrass, replaced by new lead Jeremy Renner and director Tony Gilroy (who wrote the earlier fi lms and has since become a successful director himself, with the somewhat overrated Michael Clayton and the somewhat underrated Duplicity). But Legacy turns out to be less a franchise extension (let’s not use that dreaded word reboot) than an alternate take on a successful series. And in some aspects, it — like its hero — stands better alone. Gilroy’s movies make a fetish of complexity, so this new fi lm is positioned as a B storyline that unfolds simultaneously with Ultimatum’s third act. You might need a refresher: That’s when Jason Bourne, who here remains unseen, undoes the secret program that created him. With government honchos now worried that their under-the-radar intelligence operation is about to be uncovered, they move to terminate it — by offing, with ruthless efficiency, its affi liated scientists and agents around the world (some of whom are in the midst of providing valuable intelligence to the United States). Attempting to escape the carnage are Aaron Cross (Renner), a super-spy recently in from the wilderness, and Marta Shearing (Rachel Weisz), a scientist whom Cross befriends in an attempt to procure some mindaltering drugs. The government has been feeding Cross a blue pill to keep his senses sharp, and he has run out; without more (The Bourne Renewal?), he risks shutting down

and becoming … well, something, though it’s unclear what, exactly. So our hero is an uncharismatic addict about whom we know nothing, except that he is absolutely not Matt Damon. And yet it’s hard not to root for Renner. It’s a Bourne movie, so his ass-kicking abilities are never in doubt, but there’s a certain ordinary-guy intensity to his alt-Bourne. And he even has decent chemistry with Weisz. By asking to be placed in the context of the earlier Bourne films, though, Legacy does itself no favors. Tonally, it works a lot

better on its own. More sober and deliberate than its predecessors, it’s less about heroism and action and more about process, which appears to be Gilroy’s main obsession as a director. Much as he did with Michael Clayton, he focuses here on the way fear percolates through a system, and he handles the screenplay’s multiple story threads (Gilroy and Dan Gilroy are its co-writers) with genuine dexterity. The evil is more diff use — people may be getting killed, but the pencil pushers in government offices stay detached from what’s going on, even when they’re

watching a drone strike. Gilroy shows us a system self-destructing, with a hero just trying to get out of the way. That’s a hell of an idea to hang an action franchise on, and it’s hard to tell if The Bourne Legacy is this series’ death rattle or a successful reinvention. I’m hoping for the latter. In its methodical way, this unneeded, unwanted sequel is more riveting than it has any right to be. ■

The wife is Margot, a welter of selfconscious inertia and is-this-all-there-is confusion, conveyed flawlessly by Michelle Williams. The husband is Lou, who grins and honks and scowls like Seth Rogen because he is played — quietly and well — by

Seth Rogen. The interloper is Daniel, and Luke Kirby delivers his lines, which suggest one part brooding artist to one and a half parts phone-sex addict, with enough matter-of-factness to make the character’s occupation irrelevant (besides being one of several overdetermined metaphors here). It’s not easy, turning a Canadian rickshaw driver into the Dirty Harry of wife-stealing, but writer-director Sarah Polley almost pulls it off. The 33-year-old, Toronto-born actress follows her feature-directing debut, 2006’s wintry gut punch Away From Her, with a warmer palette and a younger cast trained on a similar question: When does a marriage expire? The previous fi lm took as its template an Alice Munro story. Polley has again written the screenplay here, but — other than lifting her title from the other Canadian bard, Leonard Cohen — she’s on her own, ideawise. The result feels like a Canadian Sofia Coppola movie, a lush feat of sometimes distracting art direction and formally astute montage (Polley has major allies in director

Not Matt Damon but not bad: Jeremy Renner in Legacy.

OUT THIS WEEK TAKE THIS WALTZ

S

o there’s this couple. She’s an anxious and unproductive writer (or something — her days are unencumbered by routine or responsibility). He works hard (he’s laboring on a chicken cookbook and therefore never far from a poultry-filled skillet or stockpot or oven) but does this at home, the better MORE to be near his wife. Their rambling home, with its dark wood and churchy T A INE lig ht a nd shelves of ONL .COM PITCH colored-glass bottles, looks to be on loan from some older, wiser marrieds. Their laughter together comes easily, though maybe from different places. For instance: His idea of a joke is tossing a pitcher of cold water onto his showering wife and letting her believe, day after day, that it’s a plumbing problem. Hers is humoring the seduction plea of a rickshaw driver, whom she meets on a solo trip to

FILM

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AUGUST 9-15, 2012

Luke Kirby takes Michelle Williams for a spin in Waltz. Nova Scotia, who turns out to live across the street from her. Neither is funny. One has consequences.

pitch.com

pitch.com

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MERRICK MORTON

of photography Luc Montpellier and editor Christopher Donaldson) held together with monochromatic dialogue. (Sarah Silverman, playing Lou’s alcoholic sister, nearly mends the script’s frays by herself with one latemovie scene.) Like Somewhere or Lost in Translation, Take This Waltz is absurd as drama but haunting as a dream — a dream of selfishness made somehow enriching.

— SCOTT WILSON

RUBY SPARKS

R

uby Sparks, a fi lm about writer’s block, feels distressingly constipated. Based on an original script by its female lead, Zoe Kazan, this second feature from Little Miss Sunshine directors Jonathan Dayton and Valerie Faris follows a depressed writer who falls in love with one of his characters. He develops an attraction so strong that he wills her literally to life. It’s a promising conceit, but the movie leaves its most tantalizing aspects undeveloped. Little Miss Sunshine veteran Paul Dano plays Calvin, a onetime literary prodigy now out of ideas. To comfort himself, he invents Ruby (Kazan), the timid, nebbishy author’s projection of an ideal companion. He can make the purple-tights-wearing free spirit speak French fluently or write her a happiness so pure that it makes her bounce up and down on his bed. She’s kittenish and sexy and, at fi rst, she’s a smart critique of the limited understanding and imagination that male writers often bring to female characters. But Kazan’s script doesn’t explore the hazards of idealization. Worse, Dayton and Faris rely on heavyhanded emotional cues instead of letting the script’s feeling and drama emerge naturally. The scenes in which Calvin realizes just how dangerous it is to make Ruby act only the way he wants come off as perfunctory and lacking in nuance. What starts as a smart deconstruction of cliché devolves into frustrating dumbness. — SIMON ABRAMS

HOPE SPRINGS

A

short profile of Hope Springs screenwriter Vanessa Taylor in this past Sunday’s New York Times posited that her and director David Frankel’s new film might join The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel among the

Zoe Kazan and Paul Dano sputter in Sparks. year’s major events for moviegoers of the osteoporosis set. Well, maybe. Helping its chances: Meryl Streep and Tommy Lee Jones and Steve Carell on the marquee. But the notion of the tragically underserved mature Hollywood audience (Get off my lawn, Batman!) is right up there with the music press’s “hey, there are women who rock” stories on the “no fucking shit” meter. The fact that Exotic has grossed $44 million in this country — making it The Matrix for retirees — owes something to that movie having been regarded as an object of curiosity by critics and writers complicit in some smart marketing. That frustrated, discerning nation of PBS-philes and multiplex-phobes might also be the last ticket buyers out there who make decisions based on what they read. To these people I ask: Are you ready to relate to Streep trying to go down on Jones in a movie theater, in a therapy-driven effort to save their characters’ marriage? (And is Meryl Streep having to blow somebody a metaphor for Hollywood’s tentpole state?) There’s more to Hope Springs than that, and Jones and Streep are effortlessly credible (and, in flashes, affecting). But they (and a warm but stranded Carell) deserve a movie with more faith in them. Each gives a visually nuanced performance, from wardrobe to gesture to their eyes, only to have their work smothered by a pop-song-dense soundtrack that’s more afraid of silence than the most counseling-desperate couple. There are a handful of witty lines, and there’s recognizable emotion here, but Frankel has directed this like a Seventh Heaven rerun. I’m just cranky, though, because I guess I’m one of them now, one of those where’smy-movie people. Last night I could have seen this or the Will Ferrell-Zach Galifianakis comedy, The Campaign — the lowest-commondenominator trailer for which promised that a baby would be punched. (Cost and geography factored not at all — these were free screenings, and each was equally inconvenient to work, home and dinner plans.) I chose Hope Springs, and maybe it was still the right call — even if it wasn’t the smart call.

Find movie times at

p

— SCOTT WILSON pitch.com

AUGUST 9-15, 2012

THE PITCH

17


NEW Tr y o u r gypt ittle E

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(selection from prix fix menu only)

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817 Westport Rd KCMO 816-931-1986 westportfleamarket.com 18

THE PITCH

AUGUST 9-15, 2012

pitch.com


CAFÉ

TIME TABLES

Murray’s Tables & Tap recalls an earlier dining age.

BY

CHARLES FERRUZZA

Murray’s Tables & Tap • 12921 State Line, 816-943-3333 • Hours: 11 a.m.–10 p.m. Sunday–Thursday, 11 a.m.–11 p.m. Friday and Saturday • Price: $$–$$$

P

at Murray, the owner of Murray’s Tables & Tap, says at least eight previous restaurant concepts have come and gone in the location where he opened his namesake restaurant and saloon two months ago. I can remember a couple of barbecue joints and a Mexican restaurant with delusions of grandeur in this spot on State Line Road, but everything else is a blur. South Kansas City — with the notable exception of Martin City — has never been known as a culinary Shangri-La. But Murray, who previously operated Pat’s Blue Rib’n BarBeQue in Manhattan, Kansas, and Lawrence, Kansas (as well as the old Lynn Dickey’s sports bar in Westport), thought the space was perfect for what he wanted to create: one part laid-back lounge and one part comfortable, somewhat sophisticated dining room. The demographic that he wants is already living in this neighborhood. Its residents belong to at least one country club, they like a E MOR nice cocktail before dinner, and they won’t skip a rich dessert afterward. T A E IN ONL .COM So the dining room here PITCH attracts a somewhat older crowd than you’ll see dining on the Plaza or in the Crossroads, but the KC versions of Red and Kitty Forman (the parents on That ’70s Show) need a place to eat sliders with Lyonnaise potatoes. Now they have it. To make things even more retro, many of the servers at Murray’s are old-school veterans. I’ve seen, for instance, Sharon and Roni, both sexy young waitresses two decades ago, both still attractive and total pros. They’ll not only suggest your best bets on the menu but they’ll also tell you to sit up straight, put your napkin in your lap and not talk with your mouth full. Murray’s is such a time warp that you can’t dislike the place even if you think you should. Of course, it would be nice if the prices were also out of some previous era. The featured crab-cake starter is a neat little puck of moist, delicately seasoned lump crabmeat, but at $12 a cake, it turns out to be, like, $4 a bite. The plump seared scallops, wrapped in a sheath of crispy, pecan-smoked bacon and served with a black-pepper-apricot chutney, are a better deal and a lot easier to share. Murray’s doesn’t have a dumbed-down menu, but it’s aggressively unpretentious. A plate of fresh mozzarella, sliced tomatoes and fresh basil isn’t called a Caprese salad here. It has some tissue-thin pink prosciutto tossed on the plate and is labeled simply “mozzarella and tomato plate.” It is what it is, but that name sounds like something you’d order off the menu from your room at St. Luke’s Hospital. Maybe that’s a selling point here, where, on one visit, I was among the youngest diners in the place. I considered asking for the children’s menu.

ANGELA C. BOND

CAFÉ

the choices, diner-style, but the list wasn’t skimpy: baked potatoes, mashed potatoes, steak fries, sweet-potato fries, potato salad, Before I could do that, my dining companLyonnaise potatoes (the fancy name for ions arrived and lowered the room’s median age by a couple of decades. They wanted the spuds fried with onion; the version here isn’t any grander than the hash browns at beer list, not the kids’ menu, and when they Town Topic). Oh, and macaroni and cheese, saw the prices, they almost left. “A Bud Light baked beans and beer-battered onion rings. draft for $4.50 … in Missouri? That’s outraThe starches are pretty much the only geous,” one of them said. For $20 more, they vegetarian-friendly options could have ordered a whole at Murray’s Tables & Tap slab of ribs. (During the Murray’s Tables & Tap (where the macaroni and happy hour at Murray’s, from Jumbo lump crab cake.......$12 cheese is prepared with3 to 6 p.m., a Bud Light costs a Bacon-wrapped out chicken broth). Among dollar less.) There are seven scallops ..............................$14 the vegetables are steamed other beers on draft, most of Smoked-meat platter.........$16 broccoli, grilled asparagus, which are worth the slightly Cayenne seafood pasta .....$18 and sautéed spinach with high-for-KC cost: three BouGrilled salmon .....................$18 mushrooms, all of which levard beers, Stella Artois, Lemon-goat’s-milk pudding ............................... $7 are serviceable. Guinness, Harp and Blue Meat eaters have much Moon. (At press time, Murmore to choose from, inray was playing with his draft cluding tender smoked ribs and a first-rate prices and had lowered Bud Light to $3.50.) smoked-meat platter that arrays excellent Besides, our booth was comfortable, in a brisket, pit ham, smoked turkey, succulent dining room painted a soothing sage green, pulled pork and house-brined corned beef. and our server (Sharon) was as friendly and The herbed pork loin is also delectable. accommodating as a long-lost relative. That good pork loin may change in the next After a couple of sips of beer, my younger few months, though. Pat Murray has hired forcompanions stopped fussing about the beer mer McCormick & Schmick’s chef Eric Johnson prices and were focused on the menu. We agreed that the sign of any good neighbor- to take over the kitchen, and he plans to tweak the menu for fall. Johnson’s first project should hood steakhouse — Murray’s offers five be to simplify this restaurant’s complicated cuts of beef — is a generous array of home(and labor-intensive) “Build Your Own Burger” style side dishes. Sharon didn’t rattle off

Haute-looking South Pacific grilled shrimp.

options. Like many of Murray’s patrons, I don’t want to have to make that many creative choices. Just bring me a good cheeseburger. Our server warned us that the cayenne seafood pasta, tossed in a goat’s-milk Alfredo seasoned with that pepper, was “very spicy.” By Applebee’s standards, maybe, but too discreet by mine. And even though I almost never order farm-raised salmon from a menu anymore (it’s often as tasteless as lard), chef Johnson does a good job with a grilled fillet here, marinating it in olive oil and garlic, expertly grilling the pale-pink slab and smothering it with a supple beurre blanc. I’d order it again. The dessert selection seems to vary erratically, but the crème brûlée is made in-house, as is a surprisingly robust lemongoat’s-milk pudding that’s comfortingly thick but refreshingly tart. Murray’s Tables & Tap is also one of the last places left in the metro where customers wanting to sample the pleasures of dining in the 1960s and ’70s can step outside to the covered patio after dinner, order a stinger or a grasshopper or even a daiquiri, and light up a Marlboro or Virginia Slims. Yes, it’s totally politically incorrect by today’s standards — even a little vulgar — but back then, we called it sophistication.

Have a suggestion for a restaurant The Pitch should review? E-mail charles.ferruzza@pitch.com

pitch.com MAOUNGTUHS TX X–X 9 - 1 5X, , 2200102X T THHE E P PI ITTCCHH 191 pitch.com


FAT C I T Y push into the KC cookie market.

BY

JON AT H A N BENDER

M AT T K L I N E M A N N P H O T O G R A P H Y

BUTTERCREAM DREAMS

The women of Swoon and Milk & Honey

I

t took 200 snowmen to convince Lauren Wendlandt that she might be in the wrong business. She walked into her architecture studio in the last few days of 2010 and saw drafting tables and counters covered with piles of Frosty-inspired sugar cookies. The iced treats represented the fi rst major order for Swoon, the customco ok ie compa ny she E MOR runs with partner Sofia Varanka Hudson. “There were cookies T A E IN ever y where,” WendONL .COM PITCH landt says. “And I thought about it: When people get cookies, they’re happy. There’s no arguing. It’s like getting flowers. It’s just nice.” The cookies were, at first, a way for Hudson to lure more people on First Fridays to Hudson Home, her kitchen-design shop. Hudson baked them with her mother-in-law, Paula Hahn, and they called their enterprise PS Sweets. When Hudson Home moved to 15th Street and Grand, Hahn (who still lends a hand on big orders) stopped readying cookies for the monthly art gathering in the Crossroads. But PS Sweets’ customers wouldn’t let her stop baking. Hudson attributes this to Hahn’s buttercream frosting. “The icing never completely hardens like royal icing,” Hudson explains. “But we’ll stick with handcrafting. We’d rather they look pretty and taste wonderful than be perfect and taste like a hockey puck.” In June 2010, Wendlandt approached Hudson about becoming partners. The two were acquaintances from a small-business networking group for UMB customers. Wendlandt was an experienced baker, a skill that had helped her pay for architecture school at Kansas State University. Later, she

FAT CITY

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AUGUST 9-15, 2012

sold her biscotti at farmers markets. By the could work 20 hours a week and make a ton time their snowmen order came, customers of money.” were requesting cookies featuring hula girls, “ B ut w e ’d s e t t l e fo r 4 0 h o u r s a tie-dye designs, and the leg lamp from A week and nice money,” Hudson adds. Christmas Story. The pair also started baking cookies to give to acts appearing at the Midland — recently, pudding pops for Bill blood-curdling scream filled the kitchen Cosby and album covers for the Fray. at the Independence Regional Ennova“This will never get boring because tion Center a few weeks ago. Karina Parreno we’re always doing something different,” and Casey Conner looked at each other. NeiHudson says. ther had made a peep. Earlier this year, the duo enlisted the “The kitchen is haunted,” Parreno says. Kansas City–based branding fi rm Meers to “I don’t believe in paranormal activity, but help develop a new name, the sound of shrieking was a logo and a Kickstarter coming out of the oven at campaign to remake PS. the stovetop the other “When people The cookie company, renight.” get cookies, christened Swoon (just“ We bot h hea rd it,” swoon.com), raised $15,910 Con ner says. “The old they’re happy. in June, enough to pay for a morg ue was below the There’s no arguing. brand-launching commerkitchen. Sometimes the cial kitchen. sinks w ill turn on and It’s like “ T h i s i s s ome t h i n g off. We leave little gifts of getting flowers. we think we could grow macarons. Then we take into a lifestyle brand, like them because we can’t It’s just nice.” Dwell,” Wendlandt says. leave a dirty kitchen. The Hints of Swoon’s future ghost has been on our side can be found in the Kickso far.” starter campaign — Swoon pint glasses and The voices on this side of the veil have aprons, evidence of Hudson’s furniture- also been supportive of the two bakers, who design degree from the noted design school in May launched Milk & Honey, a pastry Parsons. But accessories don’t comprise the company that specializes in French macaonly expansion in the works; Hudson is exrons. The chefs met while helping develop perimenting with fl avored sugar cookies, and perfect the menu — including Parreno’s including chai with cardamom icing and French macarons — for the 2010 launch of chocolate with chili-chocolate icing. the Bloom Baking Co. (Parreno trained at First, though, Wendlandt and Hudson the French Pastry School in Chicago, Conhave to build out Swoon’s kitchen. ner at Johnson County Community College.) “We don’t have an interest in being Both left Bloom later that year to work for Keebler elves,” Wendlandt says. “We’d just Nordstrom, Conner in retail and Parreno as like it to be viable. Sure, we’d take it if we the assistant restaurant manager. All along,

A

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At left, Milk & Honey’s macarons and, above, a Swoon cookie. they’d talked about starting their own business. In April, they set up their mixers at Ennovation. “We don’t have the job security that other generations are used to, and I think that makes us a little more fearless,” Conner says. What they do have is a solid baking pedigree. Conner worked at Three Women and an Oven, and Parreno was a production assistant at Christopher Elbow before moving to Bloom. For Milk & Honey, Parreno, 30, oversees the baking. Conner, 28, is in charge of decorating. “She’s Type A, and I’m Type Z,” Conner explains. Milk & Honey’s macarons are slightly larger than the traditional variety (that is, a little bigger than an Oreo) and packed with buttercream fi lling. The flavors now in the case at the Roasterie Café include vanillabean lavender, salted caramel, pistachio, and a hazelnut mocha made with the Roasterie’s Super Tuscan espresso beans. “Our macarons have a slightly crispy outer layer,” Parreno says. “You want that domed shell and ruffled edge.” “The shell isn’t overly sweet,” Conner adds. “It’s just about starting the conversation. The crunch is the most important part.” With a website slated to launch this month (milkandhoneykc.com) and online ordering on the horizon, the business partners are looking to open their own storefront next year. Until then, they’ll just have to make peace with that ghost.

E-mail jonathan.bender@pitch.com M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X

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MUSIC Pitch Music Showcase

B Y DAV ID HUDN A LL , A P RI L FLE MI NG A ND B E R R Y A ND E R S O N

H AY L E Y B A R T E L S

B R O O K E VA N D E V E R

SHOW AND TELL

Piecing together the 2012

Clockwise from top left: the Beaumont’s Back Yard, Reach, Sheppa, Radkey, Amy Farrand, and Making Movies.

ANGELA C. BOND

his year saw a handful of minor alterations — it was held on a Saturday rather than a Thursday; there were food trucks; the Union was added to the list of venues — but The Pitch Music Showcase of 2012 was essentially what it always is: a six-hour party celebrating the diversity of Kansas City’s local-music scene. Did you miss it? Were you there but you still want us to explain it to you? We would be happy to! Here are some highlights. • The teenagers of Best Emerging Act nominee Radkey blasting out a super-enthusiastic set of Danzig-style punk jams. The St. Joseph act also wins the award for best song intros: “This E R MO next song is called ‘Little Man.’ It’s about our grandpa on our mom’s T A INE side. He’s a dick.” Or: ONL .COM PITCH “This song is called ‘Is He Alright.’ It’s about asking someone if he’s all right.” • Some guy in an Affl iction-style T-shirt urinating on a telephone pole near the back entrance to Riot Room. As he zipped up, he staggered backward into one of those knobby, yellow, 4-foot-high parking poles and nearly fell over. Then he walked back into the Riot Room. The back of his shirt read, “REDEMPTION.” • Rapper Reach joining Diverse for its Riot Room set, transforming the jazz ensemble’s sound into something more like the smooth, positive hip-hop of A Tribe Called Quest or De La Soul. The bass lines cut sharp and low, and the vibraphone and trumpet cast a dreamy vibe over the room. At one point, Reach hopped off the stage and watched the band perform, as continued on page 24 THE PITCH

AUGUST 9-15, 2012

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H AY L E Y B A R T E L S

B R O O K E VA N D E V E R

M US I C

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B R O O K E VA N D E V E R ANGELA C. BOND

B R O O K E VA N D E V E R

continued from page 22 Clockwise from top: Hearts of Darkness, though he were an audience member. “I Soft Reeds, and Hidden Pictures. like the view from here. I kinda want to stay seemed like every single show of the night. out here,” he said. Gotta respect that dude’s enthusiasm. • Amy Farrand playing a solo set of gritty • The last line of Them Damned Young acoustic blues songs at McCoy’s and confronting everyone in the place with her amazing, Livers’ first song: Now she’s fuckin’ my cousin preposterously hardcore mohawk. McCoy’s Pete. Frontman Jody Hendrix continually asking the crowd for beers and then taking isn’t always an ideal venue — it’s kinda hard to rock when there’s an eight-top chowing down one drink and throwing it up toward the ceiling. on chicken fingers — but • During At the Left Farrand seemed unboth“Now that I’m Hand of God’s set, a dude ered. “Now that I’m playing running around the periphin a restaurant, it occurs to playing in a ery of the crowd doing high me that my songs aren’t all restaurant, it occurs kicks with one hand raised that family-friendly,” she in a devil-horn sign. “Don’t said, and then played a song to me that my take yer fuckin’ foot off the that contained the lyric Kill songs aren’t all that gas yet, guys!” frontman everybody and quit my fuckfamily-friendly.” Brett Carter yelled. “This ing job. last one is for all the zom• An absolutely dreadful bie-lovin’ motherfuckers barf smell wafting downout there!” At which point a man in a wheelstairs at the Union; fat chunks of half-digested food splattered on the floor next to a bar stool. chair, who presumably loves zombies, wheels himself out into the pit and barrels into two (The Union was quick to mop up, though.) unsuspecting metalheads. Then somebody • Making Movies, outfitted in ponchos and Zorro masks (and frontman Enrique Chi in a grabs hold of one of the wheelchair handles and starts spinning the dude in circles. Holy woman’s dress) working the Beaumont crowd shit. Good night. into a glorious fury. • Hearts of Darkness rapper Les Izmore up front and dancing his ass off during what E-mail david.hudnall@pitch.com 24 T H E P I T C H A U G U S T 9 - 1 5 , 2 0 1 2 2 T H E P I T C H M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X

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MUSIC

RADAR

M U S I C F O R E CAST

BY

Other shows worth seeing this week.

D AV ID HUDN A L L

T H U R S D AY, A U G U S T 9 Static-X, Prong, Davey Suicide, 9 Electric, Drek: The Beaumont Club, 4050 Pennsylvania, 816-561-2560.

F R I D AY, A U G U S T 10 Otep, Butcher Babies, One-Eyed Doll, Sky Seems Red: 6:30 p.m. The Beaumont Club, 4050 Pennsylvania, 816-561-2560. The Quivers, the Wild Ones, Bummer City: 9 p.m. The Brick, 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Train: Starlight Theatre, 4600 Starlight Rd., 816-363-7827.

S AT U R D AY, A U G U S T 11 Is It Is, the Ramblin’ Strangers, the Factory Workers: 10 p.m. Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club, 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. 10 p.m. Shooter Jennings: 9 p.m. Knuckleheads Saloon, 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456.

T U E S D AY, A U G U S T 1 4

Crosby, Stills & Nash (left) and the Toadies

The Toadies, with Helmet and UME

The Toadies were always wilder and more menacing than their 1990s alt-rock radio peers. (I’m pretty sure that the song “Tyler” from their debut LP, Rubberneck, is about raping a woman — a character sketch, one presumes.) Ultimately, though, the Fort Worth, Texas, act ended up following the same trajectory as so many other one-album wonders of that decade: commercial success, then battles with the label, a sophomore slump, band infighting, and a slow fade into obscurity. Since 2006, the band has been gradually reuniting, doing one-offs and odd festival dates, and it returned last month with a new album, Play.Rock.Music. It is unmistakably Toadian: creepy-sexy lyrics, guitars like chainsaws, crunchy hooks. No complaints here. Sunday, August 12, at the Beaumont Club (4050 Pennsylvania, 816-561-2560)

The Architects, with Hipshot Killer and Radkey

No frills at this Friday-night rock show — just varying ratios of guitars, drums, bass and attitude. Punk-rock is the unifier; Hipshot Killer is closer to the left side of that hyphen, the Architects the right. Radkey, a group of teenage brothers from St. Joseph, is still puzzling out the balance but is no less exciting for it. Friday, August 10, at RecordBar (1020 Westport Road, 816-753-5207)

week, Crosby Stills & Nash. Tack “Young” on the end of that, and we’d really be cookin’ with gas, but three-fourths of the supergroup ain’t nothing to sneeze at. CSN recently scrapped a Rick Rubin studio session but is still writing current-events-inspired protest songs, such as “Almost Gone,” about Bradley Manning, the U.S. soldier charged with leaking classified documents to WikiLeaks. They also still possess gorgeous voices, the synergistic beauty of which far outstrips the fatigue brought on by all those tales of 1960s tumult. Thursday, August 9, at Starlight Theatre (4600 Starlight Road, 816-363-7827)

Paul Oakenfold

Back when I was in college, when there was no Bassnectar or Skrillex, Paul Oakenfold shows were where you went to take Ecstasy and sweat in a crowd full of people. An elder statesman of electronic dance music, Oakenfold has angled more mainstream of late — doing scores for The Bourne Identity, taking a residency in Vegas, collaborating with such folks as Cee Lo Green and Red Hot Chili Peppers — or maybe it’s just the rest of the world fi nally catching up with him. Friday, August 10, at KC Live Stage at the Power & Light District (13th Street and Grand)

Catacombz Crosby, Stills & Nash

Starlight has done right by the baby boomers this summer: James Taylor, the Doobie Brothers, Chicago, Barry Manilow and, this

One of the darkest, weirdest sets I’ve seen in 2012 was Catacombz at Eastside Tavern in Columbia, Missouri, during the True/False Film Fest. The Milwaukee act knows how to set a mood: Stage lights were used sparingly,

F O R E C A S T

26

and the darkness that engulfed the venue nicely complemented Catacombz’s sound, which is a mishmash of krautrock grooves, droning synths and psychedelic tones. Also, that Z at the end of its name is hilarious. Tuesday, August 14, at the Replay Lounge (946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676)

Wanda Jackson

The queen of rockabilly, as they call her, Wanda Jackson had a late-career resurgence a few years back when Jack White collaborated with her on her The Party Ain’t Over. On Jackson’s upcoming album, Unfinished Business, she has enlisted another known quantity, Justin Townes Earle, to produce. She stopped by the Granada in Lawrence just over a year ago; this time through, KC gets a crack at her. Friday, August 10, at Knuckleheads Saloon (2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456)

The Pitch Music Awards

What better way to keep Sunday anxiety at bay than by drinking it off with the city’s fi nest musicians? VIP passes to The Pitch Music Awards get you an open bar; regular tickets get you zingers from host Eric “Mean” Melin and performances from Soul Servers, Making Movies, Mark Lowrey and the Grisly Hand. Sunday, August 12, at the Uptown Theater (3700 Broadway, 816-753-8665)

K E Y

..................................................Pick of the Week

..............................................Meat and Potatoes

.......................................................... CamelBaks

.........................................The Dream of the ’90s

..........................................................Old Hippies

.........................................................Plural Slang

.......................................................Kind of Scary

..................................................Voices of Angels

........................................................ Pompadours

.................................................. Locally Sourced

......................................................... Glow Sticks

..........................................................Tough Lady

THE PITCH

AUGUST 9-15, 2012

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Yanni: The Midland, 1228 Main, 816-283-9900.

W E D N E S D AY, A U G U S T 15 Strung Out, Handguns, the Darlings: The Bottleneck, 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483.

FUTURECAST AUGUST THURSDAY 16 Il Divo: Starlight Theatre XV, Chase Compton, That Kid Ty, Jet Moran: The Granada, Lawrence FRIDAY 17 B.B. King: Starlight Theatre THURSDAY 23 Goomba Rave Back to School edition with Riff Raff, Lil Debbie, Tyga Style, DJ G Train, Maal A Goomba: The Bottleneck FRIDAY 31 Journey, Pat Benatar, Loverboy: Livestrong Sporting Park

SEPTEMBER SATURDAY 8 Y’allapalooza: Livestrong Sporting Park SUNDAY 9 Twin Shadow: The Granada THURSDAY 13 Powerman 5000, Swill, Syn City Cowboys, Razorwire Halo: The Beaumont Club SUNDAY 16 Avicii: The Midland WEDNESDAY 19 Odd Future: The Granada WEDNESDAY 26 Masters of Illusion: The Midland FRIDAY 28 Ben Folds Five: Starlight Theatre

OCTOBER MONDAY 1 Florence + the Machine, the Maccabees: Starlight Theatre FRIDAY 5 Owl City: The Beaumont Club TUESDAY 9 Stars: The Bottleneck SATURDAY 13 Norah Jones: The Midland WEDNESDAY 17 Die Antwoord: Liberty Hall SATURDAY 27 Red Hot Chili Peppers: Sprint Center TUESDAY 30 Madonna: Sprint Center

M O N T H X X–X X , 2 0 0 X

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NIGHTLIFE Send submissions to Clubs Editor Abbie Stutzer by e-mail (abbie.stutzer@pitch.com), fax (816-756-0502) or phone (816-218-6926). Continuing items must be resubmitted monthly.

T H U R S D AY 9 ROCK/POP/INDIE

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL

JAZZ The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Paul Shinn and Dominique Sanders, 6 p.m. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Billy Ebeling. Take Five Coffee + Bar: 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park, 913948-5550. Parallax.

CLUB

The Hideout: 6948 N. Oak Tfwy., 816-468-0550. Lonesome Hank. The Levee: 16 W. 43rd St., 816-561-2821. The Good Foot. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Stone Cutters Union, 8 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Danny Cox and friends, 6 p.m. Trouser Mouse: 625 N.W. Mock Ave., Blue Springs, 816-2201222. Kris Lager Band.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS

The Levee: 16 W. 43rd St., 816-561-2821. Live Reggae with AZ-ONE.

Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Deadstring Brothers, 10 p.m. Frank James Saloon: 10919 N.W. Hwy. 45, Parkville, 816-5050800. Rivertown.

COMEDY

DJ

WORLD

Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. Bret Ernst, 7:30 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Steve Kramer, 8 p.m.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS Kanza Hall: 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park, 913-451-0444. The Scott Peery Band. KC Live Stage at the Power & Light District: 13th St. and Grand. Easton Corbin, 7 p.m.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Mardi Gras in August. Club Rain: 8015 Troost, 816-361-2900. Ciroc Star Thursdays, Ladies’ Night, $7 Ciroc drink specials, free Ciroc samples 9-10:30 p.m. Double Nickel Bar: 189 S. Rogers, Ste. 1614, Olathe, 913-3900363. Texas Hold ’em. Fuel: 7300 W. 119th St., Overland Park, 913-451-0444. Bike night. Hamburger Mary’s: 101 Southwest Blvd., 816-842-1919. Charity Bingo with Valerie Versace, 8 p.m., $1 per game. Mac’s Place: 580 S. Fourth St., Edwardsville. Karaoke. Sherlock’s Underground Coffeehouse & Pub: 858 State Route 291, Liberty, 816-429-5262. Karaoke, ladies’ night specials.

EASY LISTENING Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Interactive Acoustic with Jason Kayne, 9 p.m.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Double T’s Roadhouse: 1421 Merriam Ln., Kansas City, Kan., 913-432-5555. Blues Jam hosted by RocknRick’s Boogie Leggin’ Blues Band, 7 p.m. The Indie on Main: 1228 Main, 816-283-9900. Open mic, Low Dough Beer Night, 8 p.m. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 302 S.W. Main, Lee’s Summit, 816-525-1871. Jerry’s Jam Night, 9 p.m.

M E TA L / P U N K Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Sky Seems Red, Painted in Blood, Hellevate, 9 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. White Wizzard, Icarus Witch, Ancient Creation, Vanlade, 8 p.m.

pitch.com

ROCK/POP/INDIE

DJ The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Goomba Rave, with Team Bear Club.

AUGUST 9-15, 2012

F R I D AY 10

B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. John Paul’s Flying Circus. The Hideout: 6948 N. Oak Tfwy., 816-468-0550. J.D. Michael King. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Danny McGaw Acoustic Blues. Trouser Mouse: 625 N.W. Mock Ave., Blue Springs, 816-2201222. Jason Elmore.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL

THE PITCH

Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Shannon McNally, Carter Sampson, 8 p.m.

Bar West: 7174 Renner Rd., Shawnee, 913-248-9378. Travelers Guild. The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-5483. Universe Contest, the New Imperialism, the Long Shadows. Clarette Club: 5400 Martway, Mission, 913-384-0986. Dru & the Geezers. Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Modern Arsonists, Opium Symphony, Paradise E Affliction, Burning Symmetry, 5 MOR p.m., $5. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-832-1085. S G IN Many Moods of Dad, Sneaky Creeps, LIST E AT IN Theo’s Mystic Robot Orchestra. ONL M Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, PITCH.CO Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Shedding Watts, Artifact. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 302 S.W. Main, Lee’s Summit, 816-525-1871. Johnny Rampage.

The Eighth Street Taproom: 801 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-6918. Liquor Buddies. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. The AJays, Sobriquet, Johnnie Booth and the Head Wounds, 10 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Skinjob, Ponyboy, HMPH, 9 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Saything, the Magentlemen.

28

SINGER-SONGWRITER

Aura: 3832 Main. Tony Arzadon, JT Quick. The Quaff: 1010 Broadway, 816-471-1918. DJ E. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Mind Expansion and Bodily Reaction with Wake on the patio.

JAZZ Hotel Phillips: 106 W. 12th St., 816-221-7000. Candace Evans Duo. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Paul Shinn, 5 p.m.; the Stan Kessler Quartet, 7 p.m. Take Five Coffee + Bar: 5336 W. 151st St., Overland Park, 913948-5550. Gerald Spaits Quartet.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Making Movies Social Club. Hurricane Allie’s Bar and Grill: 5541 Merriam Dr., Shawnee, 913-217-7665. Karaoke, 8:30 p.m. J. Murphy’s Irish Pub and Grille: 22730 Midland Dr., Shawnee, 913-825-3880. Karaoke, 9 p.m. Mission Bowl: 5399 Martway, Mission, 913-432-7000. CountryN-Bowl, wear western clothing, win prizes, 10 p.m.-12:30 a.m.

S AT U R D AY 11 ROCK/POP/INDIE The Brooksider: 6330 Brookside Plz., 816-363-4070. Strike Back. Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. The Chaotic Goods, the New Imperialism, Little Rosco. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Normal Love, Grandi Flora, Oils. Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. The Crumpletons, 7 p.m.; Wrong Kata Trio, 10 p.m. Legends at Village West: 1843 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-788-3700. Rattle and Hum, 5 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-7497676. Muscle Worship, Names Divine, Student Film, 10 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. David Hasselhoff on Acid, Janet the Planet, Jorge Arana Trio, Restless Breed, 8 p.m.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Mama Ray Jam 26th Anniversary, 1:30 p.m.; Linda Shell and the Blues Thang, 9 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. The Brody Buster Band, 9 p.m.


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29


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AUGUST 9-15, 2012

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X, 200X

Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Greg Krutsinger, 5:30 p.m.; Katy Guillen & Go-Go Ray, 8 p.m.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS Danny’s Bar and Grill: 13350 College Blvd., Lenexa, 913-3459717. Matt Stillwell Band, Travis Marvin Band, Emily Grey. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. The Ben Miller Band, 9 p.m.

DJ The Eighth Street Taproom: 801 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-841-6918. DJ Candlepants. The Quaff: 1010 Broadway, 816-471-1918. DJ Chris. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. DJ Approach, the Warm Up! with Wolfgod on the patio. Z Strike: 1370 Grand, 816-471-2316. DJ Sophia Lin Birthday with DJ Dynamic.

JAZZ The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Shades of Jade, happyhour show. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Midtown Quartet.

WORLD RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Cachecanto, 6 p.m.

AMERICANA Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Sky Smeed (CD release), 8 p.m.

COMEDY Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. Bret Ernst, 7 & 9:45 p.m. Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. Dirty Dorothy on the main floor, 10 p.m. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Steve Kramer, 7:45 & 9:45 p.m.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS Avalon Ultra Lounge: 5505 N.E. Antioch, 816-452-CLUB. Upscale Saturdays with DJ Smiley, 9 p.m., $2 drink specials. KC Live Block at the Power & Light District: 14th St. and Grand. Back to School Free-4-All, 8 p.m. MoJo’s Bar & Grill: 1513 S.W. Hwy. 7, Blue Springs. Free pool, happy hour, 1-4 p.m.

R O C K A B I L LY The Granada: 1020 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-842-1390. The Rumblejetts, Brutally Frank, and more, 9 p.m.

VA R I E T Y Crossroads KC at Grinders: 417 E. 18th St., 816-472-5454. Quixotic, Emancipator, the Floozies. The Sandbar: 17 E. Eighth St., Lawrence, 785-842-0111. Fourth Annual Birthday Block Party with Mark Valentine and the Knights.

S U N D AY 12 ROCK/POP/INDIE Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. The Stolen Winnebagos.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Ed Yokley Tribute, 1 p.m.; Lee McBee and the Confessors, 6 p.m. The Brickyard Tavern: 1001 S. Weaver St., Olathe, 913-7800266. Crosseyd Cat open blues jam, 3-7 p.m. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Rich Berry.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS The Brooksider: 6330 Brookside Plz., 816-363-4070. The Scott Peery Band.

DJ The Gusto Lounge: 504 Westport Rd., 816-974-8786. REtox Sundays, 8 p.m. Replay Lounge: 946 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-7676. Sunday Funday with DJ G Train on the patio.

JAZZ La Bodega: 4311 West 119th Street, Leawood, 913-428-8272. Stan Kessler with Mistura Fina, 6 p.m. The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Rich Hill, 11 a.m.; Mark Lowrey Jazz Trio open jam session, 5 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. Second Sunday FUNdays: Gina and Chloe McFadden, 3 p.m.

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BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Smackdown Trivia and Karaoke. Bulldog: 1715 Main, 816-421-4799. Game night. Clarette Club: 5400 Martway, Mission, 913-384-0986. Texas Hold ’em, 7 & 10 p.m.

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Sunday Salvation with Booty Bass, 10 p.m., $3.

The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Hermon Mehari Trio, in the jazz club, 6 p.m.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. Coda Pursuit Team Trivia with Teague Hayes, 7 p.m. Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. Clash of the Comics, 7:30 p.m. MiniBar: 3810 Broadway. Sonic Spectrum Pop Culture Trivia, 7 p.m. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Schlafly AIPA Cask Tapping, 7 p.m.

VA R I E T Y

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS

RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Art Battle, 7 p.m. Uptown Theater: 3700 Broadway, 816-753-8665. The Pitch Music Awards.

Bleachers Bar & Grill: 210 S.W. Greenwich Dr., Lee’s Summit, 816-623-3410. Open Mic Acoustic Jam. DiCarlo’s Mustard Seed Mexican-Americana Restaurant & Bar: 15015 E. U.S. Hwy. 40, 816-373-4240. Blues, country and classic rock hosted by Rick Eidson and friends. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Open Mic Night.

M O N D AY 13 ROCK/POP/INDIE Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Appropriate Grammar, An Aesthetic Anaesthetic, Janet the Planet. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 302 S.W. Main, Lee’s Summit, 816-525-1871. Crashing Broadway. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Windhand, Hossferatu, 1950 D.A., 9 p.m.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS Barnyard Beer: 925 Iowa, Lawrence, 785-393-9696. Mudstomp Mondays.

R O C K A B I L LY RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Miss Major and Her Minor Mood Swings, 6 p.m.

VA R I E T Y Jerry’s Bait Shop: 302 S.W. Main, Lee’s Summit, 816-525-1871. Kilroy Presents.

W E D N E S D AY 15

DJ

ROCK/POP/INDIE

Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Liquid Lounge. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. DJ Feast.

Jerry’s Bait Shop: 302 S.W. Main, Lee’s Summit, 816-525-1871. Mad Anthony, Company Time. Quasimodo: 12056 W. 135th St., Overland Park, 913-239-9666. Rock Paper Scissors, 7 p.m. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Bob Walkenhorst, 7 p.m.; Guardian Alien, Starring, Gemini Revolution, 9 p.m.

COMEDY Missie B’s: 805 W. 39th St., 816-561-0625. MANic Monday on the main floor, 10 p.m., free.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS The AllStar Rock Bar: 7210 N.E. 43rd St., 816-452-2660. Monday Mancave: sports, drink and food specials. The Brick: 1727 McGee, 816-421-1634. Rural Grit Happy Hour, 6 p.m.; Karaoke with Kelly Bleachmaxx, 10:30 p.m., free. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Sonic Spectrum Music Trivia, 7 p.m., $5. Westport Flea Market: 817 Westport Rd., 816-931-1986. KC Mutual UFO Network, 6:30 p.m.; Texas Hold ’em, 8 p.m.

M E TA L / P U N K The Bottleneck: 737 New Hampshire, Lawrence, 785-8415483. Metal Monday with Terror Tractor, Ask an Adult.

T U E S D AY 1 4 ROCK/POP/INDIE Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Scott Duncan; Travelers Guild. Kelly’s Westport Inn: 500 Westport Rd., 816-561-5800. The Old No. 5s. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Makeshift Prodigy, the Rouge, Dsoedean (acoustic), 8 p.m.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Trampled Under Foot. Jazz: 1823 W. 39th St., 816-531-5556. Mark Montgomery.

ROOTS/COUNTRY/BLUEGRASS The Hideout: 6948 N. Oak Tfwy., 816-468-0550. Tele-Tuesday hosted by Outlaw Jim and the Whiskey Benders. RecordBar: 1020 Westport Rd., 816-753-5207. Attic Wolves, Jessie Torrisi & the Please, Please Me, Katy Guillen, 9 p.m.

DJ The Gusto Lounge: 504 Westport Rd., 816-974-8786. #Cake with DJ G Train.

HIP-HOP Czar: 1531 Grand, 816-421-0300. Dread Swilla, ABNORM, Pointdexter Pen II Life.

JAZZ Finnigan’s Hall: 503 E. 18th Ave., North Kansas City, 816-2213466. Abel Ramirez Big Band, 6 p.m.

BLUES/FUNK/SOUL B.B.’s Lawnside BBQ: 1205 E. 85th St., 816-822-7427. Shinetop Jr. Knuckleheads Saloon: 2715 Rochester, 816-483-1456. Gospel Lounge with Carl Butler, 7:30 p.m.; Randy McAllister, Buddy Whittington, 8 p.m. The Levee: 16 W. 43rd St., 816-561-2821. The Lonnie Ray Blues Band.

DJ Coda: 1744 Broadway, 816-569-1747. DJ Robert Moore, 10 p.m. The Gusto Lounge: 504 Westport Rd., 816-974-8786. Life 3-D, 10 p.m. The Union of Westport: 421 Westport Rd. Hump on the patio with Shaun Duval and guests, 10 p.m.

WHERE THE BEST MUSICIANS IN THE WORLD PLAY

KNUCKLEHEADS F re e S h u tt le in S u rr o u n d in g A reth e a

AUGUST

8: Miss Major 9: Shannon McNally 10: Wanda Jackson Levee Town

presents

11: Shooter Jennings 15: Randy McAllister & Buddy Whittington 16: Ramblin Jack Elliot Eric Sardinas 17: SKID ROW 18: Outlaw for Paws

w/ Nace Bros, Outlaw Jim & Green Goddammits

23: Tad Robinson

Kenny White 24: Marty Stuart 25: Hearts of Darkness & the Goodfoot SEP 1: Leon Russell

JAZZ The Majestic Restaurant: 931 Broadway, 816-221-1888. Rich Hill, 6 p.m. The Phoenix: 302 W. Eighth St., 816-221-5299. The Brian Ruskin Quartet.

AUG

COMEDY Improv Comedy Club and Dinner Theater: 7260 N.W. 87th St., 816-759-5233. The Kick Comedy. Stanford’s Comedy Club: 1867 Village West Pkwy., Kansas City, Kan., 913-400-7500. Kevin Brown, 8 p.m. The Uptown Arts Bar: 3611 Broadway. James Inman’s Microphone: Comedy (or Whatever) Open Mic.

BAR GAMES/DRUNKEN DISTRACTIONS Bulldog: 1715 Main, 816-421-4799. Liquid Lounge drink specials. Danny’s Bar and Grill: 13350 College Blvd., Lenexa, 913-3459717. Trivia and karaoke with DJ Smooth, 8 p.m. 403 Club: 403 N. Fifth St., 913-499-8392. Pinball tournament, Cash prize for winner, 8:30 p.m., $5 entry fee. Jackpot Music Hall: 943 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-8321085. Bingo. The Riot Room: 4048 Broadway, 816-442-8179. Stone Brewing Co. Summer Solstice Stone IPA’s Excellent Adventure, 5 p.m. The Roxy: 7230 W. 75th St., Overland Park, 913-236-6211. Karaoke.

11 AUG

17

TICKETS NOW ON SALE!

OPEN MIC/JAM SESSIONS Jazzhaus: 926-1/2 Massachusetts, Lawrence, 785-749-1387. Acoustic Open Mic with host Tyler Gregory, 10 p.m. Jerry’s Bait Shop: 13412 Santa Fe Trail Dr., Lenexa, 913-8949676. Jam Night, 9 p.m.

For more info & tickets: knuckleheadskc.com 2715 Rochester, KCMO

VA R I E T Y Davey’s Uptown Ramblers Club: 3402 Main, 816-753-1909. Amy Farrand’s Weirdo Wednesday Social Club, 7 p.m., no cover.

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816-483-1456

AUGUST 9-15, 2012

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31


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32

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AUGUST 9-15, 2012

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STREET TEAM

Each week, Pitch Street Team cruises around to the hottest clubs, bars and concerts. You name it, we will be there. While we are out, we hand out tons of cool stuff. So look for the Street Team... We will be looking for you!

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8.10 - Paul Oakenfold @ KC Live Block 8.11 - Unico Microbrew Festival @ Zona Rosa 8.11 - Shooter Jennings @ Knuckleheads 8.12 - Pitch Music Awards @ Uptown Theater

See more on the “promotions” link on the p 34

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BROOKSIDE BROOKSIDER SPORTS BAR & GRILL $2.50 Corona bottles No Cover CHARLIE HOOPER’S BAR & GRILLE Fridays- $1 off Budweiser $1 off Boulevard Wheat MICHAEL FORBES GRILLE Reverse Happy Hour 9:30pm-1am $1.50 Off Budweiser $1 OFF Boulevard Wheat

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M & S GRILL $6 Crown Royal Drinks with Wristband MCCORMICK & SCHMICK’S Happy Hour 9pm to 1030pm Great Drink and Food Specials! THE OAKROOM at the Intercontinental $5 Wells $5 House Wine $3 Domestics Small plates and Live Music 8-12 RAPHEAL HOTEL Happy Hour 5-Close Live Entertainment GRANFALLOON Smirfnoff Special O’DOWD’S LITTLE DUBLIN Free Cover & $5 Borulrish Vodka TOMFOOLERIES Friday & Saturday Happy Hour 9pm-close Dom Draw $2.50, Well $2.75 Call $4.00 Cuervo Marg $4.50

WESTPORT CALIFORNOS $5 OFF $12 purchase BEER KITCHEN Discounts with your Wristband! BUZZARD BEACH $1.25 Domestic Draws $2.50 Wells DARK HORSE $2 Wells $2 Domestic Draws DAVE’S STAGECOACH INN $3 Jameson Shots $1 Off Pinnacle Vodka (Gummy Bear, Cake, Whipcream, etc) ERNIE BIGG’S (PIANO BAR) 2 for 1 Cover $4 Sweet Tea Vodka

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S AVA G E L O V E

VI SU AL AIDS

Dan Dear Dan: I’m 16, and I like my friend’s mom,

who is 35. She’s married and has two kids. But I really like her. What should I do?

Help One Really Needy Youth Dear HORNY: Here’s what you shouldn’t do:

Dear Dan: I have a boyfriend of two years. At the beginning of our relationship, I caught him cheating on me. Not physically cheating, but he 36

THE PITCH

AUGUST 9-15, 2012

pitch.com

D A N S AVA G E

ing girl if/when her ex decides to issue an ultimatum. I’m head over heels for this girl, and I don’t want to come between her and her best friend. But it’s really hard to bite back observations about her roommate’s hypocrisy (her lovers practically move in). I don’t want to turn into a resentful jerk who makes my girlfriend stressed and unhappy, but the conflicts with her roommate (that I tend to bring on) are already causing her stress. Am I just being overly sensitive to the roommate’s behavior and should I chill the fuck out, or is it a red flag that this otherwise perfectly awesome relationship isn’t likely to have legs?

Dear Readers: I’m on vacation for the next two weeks. This week’s column features three recent Savage Love Letters of the Day (which go out to folks who have the Savage Love app for iPhone and Android). I hope everyone is having a great summer, and I’ll see you in two weeks.

You shouldn’t say anything — not to your friend, not to your friend’s mother — and you certainly shouldn’t try anything. Here’s what you should do: You should masturbate about your friend’s mom just as much as you like — and you should take the advice I gave another horny 16-year-old boy a couple of months back (this one happened to be gay, but the advice still applies): “Worry less about getting your 16-year-old self laid and more about getting your 20-yearold self laid. Get out of the house and do shit, get books and read shit, volunteer for a political organization and change shit. You’ll have more boys to choose from in a few years and you’ll be a more interesting, informed and attractive guy, thanks to all that doing, reading and volunteering. Beat off in the interim, of course, but remember to vary your masturbatory routine (left hand, right hand; fi rm grip, soft touch; with toys, without; lots of lube, just a drop; etc.) and try to cultivate your own erotic imagination. (Translation: Don’t jerk off to Internet porn exclusively; use your imagination once in a while.)” Lots of straight boys your age have crushes on their friends’ mothers, and lots of men had the same kind of crush at your age. It’s a great fantasy, one that fuels entire porn genres. But the potential benefits — a few orgasms for you and maybe one for your friend’s mom (if you’re any good at this sex stuff, and at 16, you most certainly are not any good at this sex stuff … yet, but you will be one day!) — aren’t worth the potential costs. A destroyed friendship, a broken family and, depending on age-of-consent laws where you live, a long prison term for your friend’s mom are high prices to pay for a few lousy orgasms. And that’s assuming your friend’s mom is even interested, which she almost certainly is not. So beat off about her to your part’s content. Then go do shit, go read shit, and go volunteer and change shit. You’ll meet girls, some closer to your own age, and you’ll be a more interesting, fuckable dude for all that doing, reading and changing.

BY

Frustrated Lady

was talking to girls, and they would send him pics. We worked everything out and now we trust each other. But a few weeks ago, I caught him watching porn. He doesn’t know. It doesn’t bother me that much, but I was wondering if it could lead to him cheating on me again?

Sent From the Savage Love App for iPhone Dear SFTSLAFiP: All men watch porn. Some lie and claim that they don’t, and some are so stealthy that they never get caught, but all men watch porn. If watching porn led to cheating, then all men would cheat. But not all men cheat. So we can safely say porn viewing doesn’t cause men to cheat. (OK, OK, a handful of men don’t watch porn. But their numbers are so small that the average girl’s chances of ever meeting a non-pornwatching guy — let alone dating one — are so small that we don’t need to factor them into our equation.) Dear Dan: My girlfriend and I are loyal listeners and readers. Our kinks fit together beautifully: She’s accepting of being monogamish, and we have an amazing time in bed and out. The only catch is her best friend and roommate, whom she used to date. Before they moved in together, the best friend demanded that every Sunday night be reserved for the two of them to hang out. OK, fine, everyone deserves a night without their S.O. But after they moved in together and saw each other every day, the practice continued. The ex complains when I spend the night with my girlfriend at her new digs. After the move, I was taking my girlfriend out on a date when she got a text from the ex asking where she was and why she wasn’t home yet. My girlfriend got so upset, we had to call off the date, and I took her home to the roommate. I’m trying to be patient with what looks like controlling behavior, but it’s incredibly frustrating to think that I could lose this amaz-

Dear FL: Your girlfriend is gonna have to decide who’s more important to her: her current girlfriend or her ex-girlfriend. And she’s gonna have to decide which feelings are more important to her: her current girlfriend’s feelings or her ex-girlfriend’s feelings. But those might not be decisions she has to make right now. You don’t say how long you two have been together, and that’s an important detail. You can’t expect to come fi rst if you’ve been dating this girl for only a few weeks or months. It’s generally a bad sign — a sign of emotional immaturity — when a person puts a brand-new girlfriend or boyfriend fi rst; it’s an even worse sign when a new/ newish girlfriend or boyfriend demands to be put fi rst. Dating is about discovery: You spend time with a person to determine if they’re the one you want to put fi rst “for the rest of your life” (in theory, anyway). During this trial period — the time that falls between a fi rst meeting and a joint decision to make a more serious commitment — your girlfriend’s close friends, family members and even her manipulative ex may have a stronger and more legitimate claim on her time and attention than you do. So if it’s been less than 12 weeks, then I would say your girlfriend’s willingness to prioritize her creepily controlling ex could be excused. But if you’ve been dating for longer than three months, if you two are very serious about each other, and your girlfriend still abandons you whenever her ex snaps her fi ngers … well, that’s a very bad sign. Your girlfriend may have a serious and seriously dysfunctional emotional entanglement with an ex. If that’s the case, I see confrontations, ultimatums, tears, broken leases, and other dramas coming your way over the next three to six months. Decide now if your current girlfriend is worth the grief. Find the Savage Lovecast (my weekly podcast) every Tuesday at thestranger.com/savage.

Have a question for Dan Savage? E-mail him at mail@savagelove.net pitch.com

MONTH


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AUGUST 9-15, 2012

THE PITCH

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The Pitch: August 9, 2012