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CONCERT DIARY 2017


WELCOME TO SOUTHBANK SINFONIA 2017 Music takes us on all kinds of adventures. In 2002, when we created Southbank Sinfonia to help musicians across the rough waters after college, could we have imagined all that would ensue? It has been consistently thrilling to see exceptional young artists come together, find new strengths within themselves, and commit remarkable style and energy to countless performances. In fifteen years, the orchestra has grown and transformed in extraordinary ways, but the fundamental principles remain; celebrating the individual in a supportive environment and empowering young musicians to achieve their highest potential. This year’s Concert Diary presents a feast of experiences for the orchestra and audience alike. The 33 new players joining us for our annual fellowship are set to delve into a diverse range of repertoire and collaborations. On 17 May, they unite with past players for a spectacular 15th Birthday celebration on the Royal Festival Hall stage: we hope you can join us there. We are tremendously grateful to all our friends and supporters, without whom none of this would be possible. Here’s to many more exciting adventures ahead!

SIMON OVER MUSIC DIRECTOR AND PRINCIPAL CONDUCTOR 2


RECOMMENDED MUSIC

JEMMA FREESTONE FLUTE WALTON Belshazzar’s Feast Wednesday 17 May

MIKE GRITTANI CELLO COPLAND Appalachian Spring Thursday 5 October

“A truly epic piece of work in every sense of the word - you name it, Belshazzar’s Feast has got it. I can’t wait to perform it on the stage of the Royal Festival Hall.”

“Look out for Rush Hour #14: my passion for music reached a new high the first time I performed Appalachian Spring, and I experience the same thrill every time I revisit it.”

JONATHAN FAREY HORN TELEMANN Concerto for two horns Thursday 30 March

BERNADETTE MORRISON CELLO BEETHOVEN Symphony No.7 Thursday 12 October

“Baroque music has such soloistic writing for the horns - parts with real spark, and so different to the Romantic style more commonly heard in the concert hall.”

“I love the huge range of emotions, the eccentricity and passion which all seem to pour out from Beethoven’s very soul to connect with your own.”

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AN ORCHESTRA LIKE NO OTHER: SOUTHBANK SINFONIA FELLOWSHIP Each year, Southbank Sinfonia welcomes 33 of the world’s most promising graduate musicians to form an orchestra. They are exceptional young artists, eager to delve into great music and make their mark.

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Maxime Tortelier conducts a Free Rush Hour Concert, broadcast on BBC Radio 3, 2016

Southbank Sinfonia’s annual fellowship provides unparalleled opportunities to gain crucial orchestral experience and the skills that 21st century musicians need to thrive. More than just an orchestra, it is a community where promising young talents can find their own voice and creative strengths, fulfil personal goals, make lasting contacts, and take their musicianship to new frontiers. By their very nature, no two fellowships are the same. Each new cohort casts its own distinct personality on the music, and each new year brings fresh opportunities and collaborations. What is guaranteed is the chance to explore music spanning centuries, learn from exceptional experts, and stride forward in stamina, outlook and versatility. Enabling players to devote themselves fully to the experience, every place is free and every player receives a bursary. Making this possible is a family of supporters – trusts, organisations and individuals like you – who recognise the players’ potential and relish following their remarkable progress and the spirit they exude in all performances across the year. Find out more on page 34.

“Southbank Sinfonia offered me opportunities for musical and professional growth that I simply would not be able to find elsewhere. The space between music college and professional life is daunting, but Southbank Sinfonia has instilled in me a confidence that I will carry forward.” OLIVER PASHLEY 2015 CLARINET


MUSICALITY

INNOVATION

LEADERSHIP

COMMUNICATION

From symphonies to string quartets, from opera to electronica to Baroque, our players blaze through every possible genre, switching seats in each section to experience a variety of roles, preparing for the profession ahead. An intensive residency at the start of the programme helps them bond artistically and set shared goals, while coaching through the year courtesy of the Royal Opera House, Academy of St Martin in the Fields, the Allegri Quartet - our new Associate Artists - and other leading professionals propels their potential. A major new recording with celebrated pianist Alessio Bax will test them further, demanding immaculate artistry with nowhere to hide.

This generation of players will lead orchestral music into the future. True to the spirit of young pioneers like Mozart and Mendelssohn, we want them to celebrate and challenge tradition in equal measure. Our new initiative #ConcertLab gives them scope to flex their artistry in exciting new ways, as does their headline appearance performing Anna Meredith’s Concerto for Beatboxer in the New Music Biennial, set for broadcast on BBC Radio 3, and our return to Gabriel Prokofiev’s Nonclassical club night. Digital projections are changing the face of the Family Concerts they present, and in both our appearances at Southbank Centre, they are set to champion thrilling new compositional voices from the United States.

To survive, classical music urgently needs inspiring young role-models. By virtue of their youth and vitality, Southbank Sinfonia players are the perfect fit. Across the year, they connect with a huge range of young people, giving them a palpable sense of the rewards that come from working hard and following your dreams. The players themselves learn the ropes from the most inventive practitioners, instantly putting their skills to work in a range of settings, including our thriving partnership with the disadvantaged wards of In Harmony Lambeth. Every player is supported to achieve their own leadership objectives, whilst collectively addressing measures to ensure they are all healthy and fit for the formidable pace of today’s profession.

Musicians have brilliant things to say about their art, but are not always granted the opportunity and often lack the confidence to share what they feel with the audience. We want all Southbank Sinfonia players to be fluent, eloquent advocates for the power and relevance of orchestral music. Our 2017 players are poised to work with experts from the music and theatre worlds, including actress Patricia Hodge, pianist and presenter James Rhodes, and LSO violinist and social media star Maxine KwokAdams. You will see them introduce our Rush Hour concerts, create captivating videos and blogs online, and take the lead, presenting our Family Concerts and educational projects entirely themselves.

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COLLABORATIONS ACADEMY OF ST MARTIN IN THE FIELDS

Orchestras are chameleons, changing guise from one context to the next. Performing for opera and dance requires strikingly different skills from concerts, so who better to learn from than the Orchestra of the Royal Opera House? In workshops backstage at Covent Garden, they play alongside Southbank Sinfonia and provide invaluable coaching and mock auditions. Our players regularly share the limelight with their sensational Jette Parker Young Artists and the Royal Ballet’s rising stars, and also power digital projects on the Royal Opera website, like Verdi vs. Wagner with Sir John Tomlinson.

There’s nothing like playing without a conductor to keep an orchestra on its toes, recognising their full responsibility for shaping and driving the music forward. Our annual collaboration with the Academy of St Martin in the Fields – world leaders in this art – puts the power into our players’ hands, setting them up with a trove of ensemble skills to drive them through the year. This long-standing partnership has led a handful of Southbank Sinfonia players to join the Academy itself, including their principal clarinettist James Burke who returns this year to coach his successors. Rush Hour #4 (9 March)

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IN HARMONY LAMBETH

Chamber music has always been integral to Southbank Sinfonia, giving the players the chance to take charge of the creative process together and forge connections they can transplant to the orchestral ensemble. We are thrilled to welcome the celebrated Allegri Quartet as our new Associate Artists, having drawn upon their astonishing energy and insights in a number of collaborative projects over the last two years. In 2017, they coach our players on exhilarating contemporary chamber music, join us once again at the Anghiari Festival, and disperse among the orchestra for a powerful chamber Rush Hour.

At Southbank Sinfonia, we have always cherished the cascade that comes from our players passing on to younger counterparts all they have learned themselves from the professionals. Central to a range of encounters with schools and community organisations is our thriving new association with In Harmony Lambeth. Based on the celebrated Venezuelan model, it aims to raise the aspirations of young people through daily participation in music. Regular coaching from Southbank Sinfonia not only boosts our own players’ confidence as leaders, it offers the participants young, streetwise role-models to whom they can directly relate.

Anghiari Festival (22 - 28 July) Rush Hour #14 (5 October)

Coaching with the Allegri Quartet

Side-by-side with Academy principals

Side-by-side with the Orchestra of the Royal Opera House, 2015

Rush Hour #9 (1 June) Meet the Young Artists (November)

ALLEGRI QUARTET

Waterloo Festival (23 June)

Side-by-side with In Harmony Lambeth, 2016

ROYAL OPERA HOUSE


“Musicians are thrust centre stage to epic effect”

Credit: Marc Brenner

“Why has no one used a live orchestra in Amadeus before?” asks The Sunday Times in its five-star review. While there have been concert renditions and occasional players in productions past, there was no blueprint for unleashing a whole orchestra onstage in Peter Shaffer’s classic play about Mozart. Nonetheless, a cohort of Southbank Sinfonia has embraced the challenge, following in the footsteps of those who have trodden the boards in our prior NT productions of Tom Stoppard/ André Previn’s Every Good Boy Deserves Favour, Bach’s St Matthew Passion and Alan Bennett/George Fenton’s Hymn. The sensational result concludes its sold-out run in March, including a live broadcast to cinemas worldwide, and is now poised to return by popular demand next year. Meanwhile, the spirit of colliding live music and theatre in striking new ways is all set to resound in our new initiative #ConcertLab.

Amadeus

ACCLAIM FOR AMADEUS:

The Guardian

“Southbank Sinfonia are integrated into the world of the play to stunning effect” The Independent

“We hear Mozart’s masterpieces in gorgeous splendour” The Telegraph

“The musicians are the backbone of the production, scattering and re-forming throughout, like some sort of murmuration of musically gifted starlings” The Times

Credit: Marc Brenner

Salieri (Lucian Msamati) and Southbank Sinfonia, Amadeus

NATIONAL THEATRE

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MEET THE 2017 PLAYERS JESSICA COLEMAN Violin

GEORGIA HANNANT Violin

JOHN HAN Violin

FRANCINA MOLL SALORD Violin JEMMA FREESTONE Flute

DANIEL GRIFFIN Bass

WENDY HELLMANN Bass 8

ANDREA MONTALBANO Violin

MARK TAYLOR Flute

CLAUDIA SANSON Violin

MARIA OGUREN Violin

COLM Ó BRAOIN Violin EMMA GIBBONS Oboe

JOANNA PARK Violin ANTHONY FRIEND Clarinet

LAVINIA REDMAN Oboe

ROSS MONTGOMERY Clarinet


JULIA DOUKAKIS Viola

CLAIRE SLEDD Violin

MIKE GRITTANI Cello

KESARI PUNDARIKA Viola

ELIN PARRY Viola

REBECCA ELDRIDGE Bassoon

MICHAEL ARNOLD Horn

ANASTASIA SOFINA Viola

REBECKA LAGMAN Cello

CAROLA KREBS Cello

DOMINIC HAMMETT Trumpet

BERNADETTE MORRISON Cello

LOUISE GOODWIN Percussion SIMON OVER Music Director and Principal Conductor REBECCA MILLER Associate Conductor EUGENE LEE Associate Leader ALLEGRI QUARTET Associate Artists DAVID CORKHILL Assistant Conductor

ANDRES YAURI Bassoon

JONATHAN FAREY Horn

GWYN OWEN Trumpet

Find out more about our musicians at southbanksinfonia.co.uk 9


FREE RUSH HOUR CONCERTS Tania Passendji (2016)

Boundless excitement. Heart-wrenching tragedy. Whisky-fuelled parties... All this and more awaits in our free, bite-sized concerts at our base St John’s Waterloo this year. From epic symphonies to propulsive chamber music, the sheer versatility of what an orchestra can sound and look like is put on show. In 2017 we push this to new extremes in our #ConcertLab performances, alongside collaborations with an array of internationally acclaimed guest artists. Mark Wigglesworth, celebrated conductor in concert halls and opera houses worldwide, makes his Southbank Sinfonia debut in June, as does thrilling saxophonist Jess Gillam in March. We also walk the tightrope of an unconducted performance beside the Academy of St Martin in the Fields and explore great operatic works with the rising stars of the Royal Opera House. If you’re new to classical music, this is the perfect way to dip a toe in the water. If you’re a seasoned concert-goer, we guarantee you’ll find something new alongside the players themselves. FINDING ST JOHN’S WATERLOO

Divert your commute home, enjoy a glass of wine and immerse yourself in an hour of thrilling music.

6.00pm on Thursdays throughout the year. IMAX R TE WA

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Waterloo station

St John’s Waterloo

“I have seen the future... the youthful Southbank Sinfonia in great form” The Times

#1: THE WORLD UPSIDE DOWN Salieri / Mozart / Schubert | 9 February #2: CINEMATIC Haydn / Korngold | 23 February #3: GENERATIONS Brahms | 2 March #4: UNCONDUCTED Beethoven | 9 March #5: CHAMBERS Roth / Shaw / Bruce | 16 March #6: RE-DRESS Heath / Jalbert / Nyman | 23 March #7: TAPESTRY Bach / Campra / Handel / Telemann | 30 March #8: HIGHLANDS Maxwell Davies / Mendelssohn | 4 May #9: STRIPPED Mozart / Tchaikovsky / Verdi | 1 June #10: MOTION Sibelius / Takemitsu / Rautavaara | 8 June #11: HEROES Beethoven | 29 June #12: SPOTLIGHT Weber / Hough / Saint-Saëns | 20 July #13: TWILIGHT Pärt / Grieg / Richter / Vasks | 28 September #14: ALLEGRI Stanford / Britten / Copland | 5 October #15: DANCE Widmann / Beethoven | 12 October


When does a concert experience begin? How might the musicians themselves set the scene for all the drama ahead? How might classical concerts adapt the performance space to draw audiences closer to the emotion of the music? 33 musicians, 33 styles. Attire plays a huge role in dance or theatre what role could concertwear have in concerts? Could opera stripped of its usual ornate costume better reveal the music’s enduring modernity? Why stand still? Could movement help convey more of the boundless spirit in orchestral music? How might the audience/orchestra relationship change to make a more immersive experience for both? Waterloo Festival, 22 June Concert lights tend to have two settings: on and off. But how might atmospheric lighting enhance the power of a performance? How far is it possible to push the physicality of orchestral performance, humanising music meant for dancing?

#ConcertLab Classical music is boundless, yet concert presentation has hardly changed in 200 years. What if we’re missing out on something? Throughout 2017, our concerts at St John’s Waterloo are set to become a laboratory where orchestra and audience can explore new approaches together. Fresh from the National Theatre’s vibrant new staging of Amadeus, we will ask how experimenting with layout, lighting, movement and concertwear can refresh the power of orchestral performance. Supported by Jerwood Charitable Foundation, our eight #ConcertLab performances will probe areas of musical presentation ripe for re-imagination, and charge a new generation of musicians with the confidence and skills to push their own boundaries. Working alongside movement directors, choreographers and lighting designers, while never sacrificing the quality of music, we invite you to join us for a journey into the unknown. Of course, no orchestra is complete without its audience and we want to hear your thoughts throughout the year too. From concert feedback to any ideas of your own, join the discussion online using the hashtag #ConcertLab, or talk to the musicians at our concerts.

#ConcertLab supported by:

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Georgia Hannant

FREE

RUSH HOUR #1: THE WORLD UPSIDE DOWN

FREE

THURSDAY 9 FEBRUARY | 6.00pm ST JOHN’S WATERLOO

THURSDAY 23 FEBRUARY | 6.00pm ST JOHN’S WATERLOO

SALIERI Overture from ‘Il mondo alla rovescia’ MOZART Symphony No.31 ‘Paris’ SCHUBERT Symphony No.2 Simon Over conductor

HAYDN Symphony No.104 ‘London’ KORNGOLD Violin Concerto Rebecca Miller conductor Georgia Hannant violin

‘The World Upside Down’ - has Salieri’s opera title ever been more relevant? His explosive overture shows a composer of searing imagination and potency. Mozart’s Symphony No.31, written a year earlier, was the work of a 22 year-old looking to make a big impression in Paris. His father Leopold had noted that ‘the French must like noisy symphonies’, and so Mozart unleashed his biggest orchestra yet.

London: a bustling metropolis whose brilliant, diverse population provide an endless stream of creativity. Sound familiar? Haydn travelled from Vienna to London ready to embrace a city teeming with modernity. Here, as our musicians converge for their own musical adventure, the orchestra provides Haydn’s final, pioneering symphony with a theatrical new context. Korngold journeyed from Vienna to Hollywood to embrace the emerging artform of film. He helped define the sound still heard in cinemas today sophisticated symphonic music bursting with romantic energy. In his Violin Concerto, filmic power meets mighty virtuosity from the soloist.

Credit: Richard Haughton

#ConcertLab The Derek Butler Concerto Series

Rebecca Miller

Simon Over

Schubert was even younger when he wrote his Second Symphony, a Viennese teenager who took the legacy of Salieri and Mozart into a new generation. Taught by Salieri, he was inspired to compose music in which captivating rhythmic energy surges through an underlying classical elegance.

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RUSH HOUR #2: CINEMATIC


RUSH HOUR #3: GENERATIONS

FREE

THURSDAY 2 MARCH | 6.00pm ST JOHN’S WATERLOO

THURSDAY 9 MARCH | 6.00pm ST JOHN’S WATERLOO

BRAHMS Symphony No.4 David Corkhill conductor Cardinal Vaughan Memorial School

BEETHOVEN Overture from ‘The Creatures of Prometheus’ BEETHOVEN Symphony No.5 with the Academy of St Martin in the Fields

For five years, ideas were brewing in Brahms’ mind as to how he might ally the contemporary and the archaic. In his final symphony, he injects a dose of supercharged romantic passion into composition styles from two centuries before, creating a work of epic tragedy and lyricism. On the surface sit the kind of melodies that etch themselves into your memory, while underneath, intoxicating musical ideas churn and change as Brahms delivers a work of devastating expression.

Good versus evil, light versus dark, hope versus despair: here an extra element of drama is added to Beethoven’s invigorating symphony. With no conductor, the musicians must read a myriad of tiny signals and gestures within the ensemble to navigate their way through. Leading the way are the principals of the world-renowned Academy of St Martin in the Fields, performing side-by-side with Southbank Sinfonia as they pass on the skills needed for such a feat.

Harvey de Souza, Academy of St Martin in the Fields

Joining us to create an orchestra of symphonic proportions are the remarkable students of Cardinal Vaughan Memorial School, the next generation annually mentored by their Southbank Sinfonia counterparts.

David Corkhill

RUSH HOUR #4: UNCONDUCTED

Anthony Friend

FREE

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Daniel Griffin

FREE

RUSH HOUR #5: CHAMBERS

THURSDAY 16 MARCH | 6.00pm ST JOHN’S WATERLOO

ALEC ROTH String Quartet No.2 CAROLINE SHAW Entr’acte DAVID BRUCE Steampunk As the creativity of composers melds with new trends, technologies and techniques, contemporary chamber works probe musical boundaries. In turn, this poses a question: how might the concert hall adapt to stage these works more powerfully? As St John’s Waterloo reconfigures to suit the mood and scale of the music, David Bruce takes the intricate plumbing of the French horn and the elaborate, mechanical keys of the bassoon, clarinet and oboe to create a steampunk octet. Kanye West collaborator Caroline Shaw’s Entr’acte is fuelled by subtle shifts in rhythmic atmosphere, while from Alec Roth comes a quartet that bounces between pulsing and unwinding dance melodies. #ConcertLab

“The orchestra flood the stage with dynamism and versatility” Auditorium 14

FREE

FRIDAY TONIC @SOUTHBANK CENTRE FRIDAY 17 MARCH | 5.00pm CENTRAL BAR, ROYAL FESTIVAL HALL

JOBY TALBOT String Quartet No.1 MASON BATES Rough Math JUDD GREENSTEIN Clearing, Dawn, Dance CAROLINE SHAW Entr’acte MICHAEL DAUGHERTY Flamingo Begin your weekend with an hour of daring music that stops you in your tracks. Continuing from the previous day’s #ConcertLab Rush Hour, we perform a selection of propulsive chamber music by some of the most inventive composers of the moment. Mason Bates mixes string quartet with jagged electronic beats in Rough Math, while Michael Daugherty’s Flamingo presents a flamenco/ pop-culture mashup that zips from Iowa to Florida. Staring at a crisp spring sky inspired Joby Talbot’s string quartet, and musicians are given the chance to flaunt their individual personalities in Judd Greenstein’s Clearing, Dawn, Dance.


RUSH HOUR #6: RE-DRESS

FREE

THURSDAY 23 MARCH | 6.00pm ST JOHN’S WATERLOO

THURSDAY 30 MARCH | 6.00pm ST JOHN’S WATERLOO

DAVE HEATH Out of the Cool PIERRE JALBERT Into the Tempest (UK premiere) MICHAEL NYMAN Where the Bee Dances Tim Murray conductor Jess Gillam saxophone

JS BACH Sinfonia in D major CAMPRA Suite from ‘L’Europe Galante’ HANDEL Water Music TELEMANN Concerto for two horns Adrian Butterfield director Julian Perkins harpsichord Jonathan Farey and Mike Arnold horn

Jess Gillam made history in 2016 as the first ever saxophonist finalist of BBC Young Musician of the Year. Her inimitable style here meets an orchestra newly asking how their clothing might represent their own collective identity - and that of the music. Out of the Cool welcomes Jess to stamp her personality on its sparsity of markings inspired by Miles Davis and John Coltrane. Stepping Into the Tempest, the orchestra stirs up a storm of sound. For his energetic saxophone concerto, Nyman re-imagines Shakespeare’s ‘Where the bee sucks’ from The Tempest and the dance-like flight of bees around nectar.

Tim Murray

#ConcertLab

RUSH HOUR #7: TAPESTRY

300 years ago, European composers developed their own national styles - but music knows no boundaries. Each influenced another, resulting in a rich tapestry of Baroque music across the continent. Performed on authentic gut strings and period bows, the orchestra sounds edgier and rich in overtones, just as audiences of the day would have heard. The Derek Butler Concerto Series

£15

LONDON HANDEL FESTIVAL

FRIDAY 31 MARCH | 7.00pm ST GEORGE’S, HANOVER SQUARE

Repertoire as 30 March, plus: LOTTI Missa a tre Cori Adrian Butterfield director Julian Perkins harpsichord Vox Musica | Michael Berman director Bethany Seymour soprano Tom Verney countertenor BOOKING london-handel-festival.com | 01460 54660

“Jess gave a great show with her hot licks, lustrous tone and winning passion” The Times Jess Gillam

FREE

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GLOBAL VOICES

FREE

MONDAY 17 APRIL | 7.30pm ROYAL FESTIVAL HALL

THURSDAY 4 MAY | 6.00pm ST JOHN’S WATERLOO

JONATHAN DOVE There Was a Child Ben Gernon conductor National Youth Choirs of Great Britain and leading international youth choirs

MAXWELL DAVIES An Orkney Wedding, with Sunrise MENDELSSOHN Symphony No.3 ‘Scottish’ Karin Hendrickson conductor

Eight of the world’s foremost youth choirs join together for a major performance of Jonathan Dove’s cantata that chronicles a young life, from birth through childhood to maturity. Through the words of Wordsworth, Keats, Whitman and more, the wonder, playfulness, mischief and adventure of childhood are celebrated.

“Next August I am going to Scotland, with a rake for folk songs, an ear for the lovely, fragrant countryside, and a heart for the bare legs of the natives”, exclaimed the 20 yearold Mendelssohn. His trip north made a big impression, the misty scenery and bloody history inspiring some of the composer’s most expressive and profound music. Both moodily beguiling and joyfully uplifting, his Third Symphony is a sonic OS map at its most potent.

Singers from South Africa, Latvia, Israel, USA, Indonesia, Norway, Hong Kong and Great Britain sing as one, accompanied by the equally diverse musicians of Southbank Sinfonia.

Written 150 years later, as the whisky diminishes the celebrations become ever more riotous in Maxwell Davies’ highland party. As guests make their way home, the sun rises with startling beauty over the rugged cliffs.

Karin Hendrickson

Ben Gernon

Credit: Hannah Taylor

BOOKING southbankcentre.co.uk | 020 7960 4200

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RUSH HOUR #8: HIGHLANDS

Elin Parry / Carola Krebs

£17.50 - £35


£6.50 -£10

FAMILY CONCERT: DO YOU SPEAK MUSIC? SATURDAY 6 MAY | 11.30am CADOGAN HALL, SLOANE SQUARE

MENDELSSOHN Symphony No.3 ‘Scottish’ Karin Hendrickson conductor How many languages do you know? It’s more than you think… Music is a language that everyone understands, heard and loved around the world. But every country has a slightly different musical accent, and for every person – yes, even you! – the music has a slightly different meaning. In this Family Concert, 33 musicians from 12 countries will be your guides through a symphony written in Italy by a German all about Scotland. Join Southbank Sinfonia for a thrilling global adventure, hearing straight from the performers as we uncover the ingredients of classical music like never before.

£10£22

B MINOR MASS

SUNDAY 7 MAY | 3.00pm ASSEMBLY HALL THEATRE, TUNBRIDGE WELLS

JS BACH Mass in B minor Rebecca Miller conductor Royal Tunbridge Wells Choral Society The first publisher of Bach’s epic Mass called it ‘the greatest work of art of all times and nations’. In the 270 years that have passed, it might be expected that such a glowing review would fade, eclipsed by centuries of musical innovation and evolution. And yet the Mass in B minor remains a landmark in Western music, a cathedral of sound, whatever your faith. It is a consecration of a whole life, a biography of every remarkable emotional, stylistic and technical contribution Bach made to music. BOOKING assemblyhalltheatre.co.uk | 01892 530613

Big-screen projections and lighting immerse you within the music during the concert, and then afterwards you can meet the musicians and try out their instruments. Ideal for children aged 5 - 11 BOOKING cadoganhall.com | 020 7730 4500

“@SouthbankSinf Family Concert was amazing! We had a lovely morning” @gkbnsez

“Rebecca Miller, a miracle of perpetual motion” The Times

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Presenter:

NING FENG

15 YEARS YOUNG The youthful vitality Southbank Sinfonia brings to the stage results in performances that, audiences and critics concur, give hope for the future of classical music. The fearless spirit of our players has fuelled a succession of innovative projects, earning the orchestra a place at the forefront of music-making, not just following in the footsteps of professional counterparts. At home on the Southbank, we have filled Tate Modern, the BFI and Waterloo Vaults with music, collaborated with Yoko Ono, Guy Garvey and others at Southbank Centre, and taken the stage amid the actors in four National Theatre shows. We have created a musical promenade through the Imperial War Museum, performed amid the locomotives at the National Railway Museum, streamed worldwide from the Roundhouse and Royal Opera House, and presented the first ever performance of Mozart’s Requiem in Notre-Dame de Paris. We have collaborated with Sir Antonio Pappano, Marin Alsop, Vladimir Ashkenazy, Edward Gardner, Nicola Benedetti, Alison Balsom, Sir Thomas Allen, Sir John Tomlinson, Cliff Richard, Dionne Warwick, Damon Albarn and DJ Mr Switch, among many others. 18

AND SOUTHBANK SINFONIA ACCLAIMED BRITISH ORCHESTRA IN ITS HONG KONG DEBUT

寧峰與倫敦南岸交響樂團

a dashing ensemble who “ play with exhilarating fizz, exactness and stamina ” The Times (London)

Programme includes:

節目:

Mendelssohn Violin Concerto in E minor Beethoven Romance No.1 and No.2 Beethoven Symphony No.7

孟德爾遜 E小調小提琴協奏曲 貝多芬 第一及第二小提琴浪漫曲 貝多芬 第七交響曲

Ning Feng violin

Simon Over conductor

Southbank Sinfonia

寧峰 (小提琴)

西門奧法 (指揮)

倫敦南岸交響樂團

21 Sep 2015 Monday 星期一 (8pm) Hong Kong City Hall 香港大會堂音樂廳 $320/$220/$120

2015 ANTONIO PAPPANO CONDUCTS

2015 HONG KONG DEBUT WITH NING FENG

2016 NOTHING, GLYNDEBOURNE

2016 AMADEUS, NATIONAL THEATRE

2013 VERDI VS WAGNER ROYAL OPERA HOUSE

2013 THE REST IS NOISE, SOUTHBANK CENTRE

2014 NOTRE-DAME DEBUT

2014 iTUNES FESTIVAL WITH BALSOM / BENEDETTI

2009 PETER HULSEN ORCHESTRAL SONG AWARD FOUNDED

2009/10 EVERY GOOD BOY DESERVES FAVOUR, NATIONAL THEATRE

2010 MARIN ALSOP CONDUCTS

2012 ALESSIO BAX MOZART ALBUM

2002 LAUNCH CONCERT, ST JOHN’S SMITH SQUARE

2003 CORONATION JUBILEE, WESTMINSTER ABBEY

2004 PATRON VLADIMIR ASHKENAZY CONDUCTS

2007 DEBUT CD WITH RAPHAEL WALLFISCH

Tickets available NOW at URBTIX. 音樂會門票現於城市售票網公開發售

Internet Booking 網上購票 www.urbtix.hk

Ticketing Enquiries 票務查詢 3761 6661

Credit Card Telephone Booking 信用卡電話購票 2111 5999

Programme Enquiries 節目內容查詢 9545 6851 / info@pphk.org


Benjamin Grosvenor

RHAPSODY IN BLUE: SOUTHBANK SINFONIA 15TH BIRTHDAY CONCERT

Credit: Sophie Wright/Decca

£12£36

WEDNESDAY 17 MAY | 7.30pm ROYAL FESTIVAL HALL

MASON BATES Mothership GERSHWIN Rhapsody in Blue WALTON Belshazzar’s Feast Simon Over conductor Benjamin Grosvenor piano Benedict Nelson baritone Parliament Choir Bar Choral Society Music packed with innovation, that melds genres and defies borders, provides everything needed for an unforgettable birthday party. To celebrate 15 years of Southbank Sinfonia, we take to the iconic stage of the Royal Festival Hall with a super-sized orchestra - the biggest in our history - bringing together current and former players for a concert of boundarybreaking music. Britain’s star pianist Benjamin Grosvenor takes to the keys for Gershwin’s Jazz Age Rhapsody in Blue, a piece that shot American orchestral music in a vibrant new direction. In a single work comes jazzy syncopation and verve, backed up by symphonic power that always keeps a feeling of off-the-cuff improvisation. The world was stunned, the Rhapsody liberating composers to use anything around them - both modern and traditional - to make music.

After meeting Gershwin, Walton also caught the jazz bug. Belshazzar’s Feast is an exhilarating fusion of extrovert symphonic tradition and swing-infused, punchy rhythms. From its colossal orchestra and chorus come breathtaking sonic combinations, painstakingly chosen by a composer expanding his horizons. Mothership evolves this tradition for the 21st century, celebrating the limitless potential of the Internet to bring musicians and styles together. This thrilling electro-orchestral spaceship welcomes improvising soloists to ‘dock’ with it, allowing the individual their moment to shine - something that Southbank Sinfonia has always celebrated. BOOKING southbankcentre.co.uk | 020 7960 4200

Ben Grosvenor photo

“Who said they don’t make pianists like they used to? Benjamin Grosvenor is a virtuoso of a rare kind” Financial Times

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ST MARTIN’S: ASCENSION DAY

THURSDAY 25 MAY | 8.00pm ST MARTIN-IN-THE-FIELDS

Andrew Earis conductor St Martin’s Voices The orchestra returns to one of London’s most iconic venues, St Martin-in-theFields in Trafalgar Square, for a miniature residency. Built in 1724 and lavishly renovated in 2008, generations of our players have relished performing regularly in the church’s immaculate acoustics. For the first time since 2011, we are delighted to be part of the church’s celebrated Ascension Day Service, broadcast live on BBC Radio 4. BOOKING smitf.org | 020 7766 1100

£9 £29

ST MARTIN’S: VOICES

SATURDAY 27 MAY | 7.30pm ST MARTIN-IN-THE-FIELDS MENDELSSOHN Gloria MOZART Oboe Concerto BEETHOVEN Mass in C Andrew Earis conductor St Martin’s Voices Lavinia Redman oboe Imagine rummaging in a cupboard and finding in your hand a long-lost work by Mendelssohn or Mozart. Both the heartfelt Gloria and hugely expressive oboe concerto were for many years thought lost, only for their brilliance to be rediscovered decades later. Mendelssohn’s is the music of a prodigy breaking free from childhood study and finding his own voice; Mozart’s contains premonitions of later operas and a finale of unbounded joy.

Credit: Edward Webb

St Martin-in-the-Fields

The shadow of Haydn’s already revered Masses loomed over Beethoven in 1807. His Mass in C resonates with his forebear’s influence, but the maverick composer inevitably created something thrillingly of his own, here sung by our young counterparts, St Martin’s Voices.

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BOOKING smitf.org | 020 7766 1100

Jessica Coleman / Lavinia Redman

FREE


RUSH HOUR #9: STRIPPED

FREE

THURSDAY 1 JUNE | 6.00pm ST JOHN’S WATERLOO

RUSH HOUR #10: MOTION THURSDAY 8 JUNE | 6.00pm ST JOHN’S WATERLOO

SIBELIUS Scene with Cranes TAKEMITSU Tree Line RAUTAVAARA Cantus Arcticus Maxime Tortelier conductor Imogen Knight movement director

Featuring music from: MOZART Le nozze di Figaro and Così fan tutte GOUNOD Faust TCHAIKOVSKY Eugene Onegin VERDI La traviata and Rigoletto DONIZETTI La fille du régiment BIZET Carmen Royal Opera House Jette Parker Young Artists James Hendry conductor Matthew Scott Rogers conductor Anush Hovhannisyan soprano Emily Edmonds mezzo soprano David Junghoon Kim tenor David Shipley bass

Nature never stands still: trees grow, birds migrate, species evolve. In music inspired by something so inherently kinetic, could musicians be equally liberated from their usual concert hall positions? Devised with Imogen Knight from Amadeus, subtle motions and gestures will infiltrate the performance. Rautavaara’s concerto mixes recordings of larks and swans, nature’s Arctic musicians, with a mystical, organic accompaniment. Sibelius takes the beauty of cranes in flight and captures it in musical form, while Tree Line builds a world in which wisps of melodies germinate from ever-changing perspectives.

If you think of a night at the opera, extravagant costumes and gilded splendour might come to mind. Yet the works that the musical greats have written for opera houses worldwide maintain an enduring modernity, their stories, issues and dilemmas as relevant today as ever. Who hasn’t ever dreamt of unlimited knowledge, felt unrequited love or placed trust in others?

#ConcertLab

#ConcertLab

Credit: Chris Morehouse

With exceptional talents from Covent Garden, this is opera stripped back, the performers deliberately dressing down so nothing cloaks their raw talent. Maxime Tortelier

FREE

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Claire Sledd

WATERLOO FESTIVAL: IMMERSION

FREE

THURSDAY 22 JUNE | 7.30pm ST JOHN’S WATERLOO

FRIDAY 23 JUNE | 7.00pm ST JOHN’S WATERLOO

BRUCKNER Symphony No.4 ‘Romantic’ Jonathan Berman conductor

At the start of every musician’s story, a fuse is lit and simply no other calling can compare. You can witness this for yourselves as the intrepid young people of In Harmony Lambeth perform side-by-side with Southbank Sinfonia.

Experience a symphony as never before. Join us as we smash the ‘fourth wall’, permitting the audience to sit alongside and close to the orchestra: feel the vibrations, gain a new perspective and be at one with the music.

In an action-packed hour-long showcase, our players lead their young counterparts into the dance-filled exuberance of Beethoven’s Seventh Symphony: 200 year-old music that defies its age.

All Bruckner’s symphonies are epic voyages. The mighty Fourth casts you into a vast musical forest, inviting you to marvel at art’s extraordinary power to evoke the beauty of nature. #ConcertLab BOOKING Public booking opens in May stjohnswaterloo.org | 020 7633 9819

Side-by-side with In Harmony Lambeth

Credit: George Garnier

Jonathan Berman

A limited number of Proms-style tickets will be available, welcoming you to bring cushions or a blanket to sit amid the ensemble.

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WATERLOO FESTIVAL: IN HARMONY


RUSH HOUR #11: HEROES

THURSDAY 29 JUNE | 6.00pm ST JOHN’S WATERLOO

BEETHOVEN Symphony No.3 ‘Eroica’ Mark Wigglesworth conductor At a time when the air of Europe was thick with revolution, Beethoven took a huge creative breath. The result was a symphony that didn’t just break the rules: it liberated music, empowering everyone - performer and listener - to imagine their own place within it.

Credit: Sim Canetty-Clarke

Mark Wigglesworth

Having conducted the world’s greatest orchestras and opera companies, including the Berlin Philharmonic and Metropolitan Opera, New York, Mark Wigglesworth is guaranteed to bring his own thrilling take on Beethoven’s musical revolution. But the true meaning of ‘Eroica’ is really up to you.

FREE

NEW MUSIC BIENNIAL: BEATBOXER

FRIDAY 30 JUNE | 5.30pm ALBERMARLE MUSIC CENTRE, HULL FRIDAY 7 JULY | 5.30pm CLORE BALLROOM, SOUTHBANK CENTRE

Andres Yauri

FREE

ANNA MEREDITH Concerto for Beatboxer and Orchestra Gerry Cornelius conductor Is the human voice the most incredible instrument of all? Anna Meredith and Shlomo’s hybrid concerto, bringing together six beatboxers and orchestra, sheds any preconceptions of genres to create a blueprint for a future style of music. Premiered in 2010, a brand new notation for beatboxing was invented that enabled an arsenal of intricate sounds and rhythms to weave within those of the orchestra. As part of PRS for Music’s New Music Biennial celebrating works written in the last 15 years, orchestra and beatboxers first meet in Hull, UK City of Culture 2017, before returning to Southbank Centre for a further performance to be broadcast on BBC Radio 3.

“Head buzzing after amazing @SouthbankSinf Rush Hour concert” @janeslowey 23


LONDON CONCERT CHOIR: OPERA CHORUSES

FREE

THURSDAY 13 JULY | 7.30pm CADOGAN HALL, SLOANE SQUARE

THURSDAY 20 JULY | 6.00pm ST JOHN’S WATERLOO

Including choruses from: MOZART Die Zauberflöte WAGNER Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg STRAVINSKY The Rake’s Progress VERDI La traviata Mark Forkgen director London Concert Choir Erica Eloff soprano Jeanette Ager mezzo soprano Alexander James Edwards tenor Peter Willcock baritone

WEBER Clarinet Concertino STEPHEN HOUGH Bridgewater (world premiere) SAINT-SAËNS Cello Concerto No.1 Simon Over conductor Ross Montgomery clarinet Andres Yauri Andoquia bassoon Carola Krebs cello Southbank Sinfonia’s musicians are not only exceptional orchestral players, but charismatic soloists too. Here, three get their chance in the spotlight.

Following Vaughan Williams’ rousing Sea Symphony at the Barbican last year, we collaborate once again with the ardent forces of London Concert Choir.

From dulcet to dazzling, Weber’s excitable Concertino changes in mood and colour with each new variation. A soloist himself, Stephen Hough also composes: here we present his newest jewel for bassoon and strings. Meanwhile the firebrand Saint-Saëns created a showcase for cello that vividly tests the very limits of the instrument’s capabilities.

In Rush Hour #9 (1 June) we explore some of the great opera arias - here we tuck into a feast of opera choruses alongside one of the country’s leading amateur choirs. BOOKING cadoganhall.com | 020 7730 4500

Credit: Sim Canetty-Clarke

Planet Hugill

The Derek Butler Concerto Series

Stephen Hough

“The players showed an impressive combination of technique and energy, bringing great personality to the music” 24

RUSH HOUR #12: SPOTLIGHT

Piazza del Popolo, Anghiari

£12 £30


ANGHIARI FESTIVAL

SATURDAY 22 - FRIDAY 28 JULY ANGHIARI, TUSCANY

Simon Over conductor David Corkhill conductor Allegri Quartet Soraya Mafi soprano Vox Musica Anghiari Festival Chorus Perched high above the Tiber valley, each year the historic hill-town of Anghiari plays host to one of Europe’s most exciting classical music festivals. Amidst stunning scenery and charming piazzas, Southbank Sinfonia brings a selection of symphonic, chamber and choral music to be enjoyed under the Tuscan sky and in beautifully ornate churches. In 2017, the festival once again welcomes an array of guest artists. Soraya Mafi, winner of the 2015 Peter Hulsen Orchestral Song Award and now a star on the English National Opera stage, will sing arias with the orchestra, while Vox Musica brings stunning chamber and

Baroque choral music. Festival favourites the Allegri Quartet also return, while the Anghiari Festival Chorus sings Mozart’s enduring Requiem. From Southbank Sinfonia, a number of our 2017 fellowship will perform concertos, including Claire Sledd with Tchaikovsky’s evergreen Violin Concerto. Besides an incredible variety of music, enjoy divine food and an informal charm away from the tourist trail in one of Italy’s most picturesque towns. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION Visit our website or contact Ellie Greenhalgh on 020 7921 0370 or ellie@southbanksinfonia.co.uk

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Jemma Freestone

£6.50 -£10

FAMILY CONCERT: ORCHESTRAL TOOLKIT

FREE

SATURDAY 23 SEPTEMBER | 11.30am CADOGAN HALL, SLOANE SQUARE

THURSDAY 28 SEPTEMBER | 9.00pm ST JOHN’S WATERLOO

POULENC Sinfonietta

ARVO PÄRT Fratres GRIEG Death of Åse and Solveig’s Song (Peer Gynt) ARVO PÄRT Cantus in Memoriam Benjamin Britten MAX RICHTER On the Nature of Daylight PĒTERIS VASKS Viatore Eugene Lee leader

If you were creating a piece of music for an orchestra, where might you start? Perhaps a lightning bolt of sound to grab everyone’s attention... or an upbeat dance that gets your toes tapping, or a beautiful tune that gets stuck in the listener’s head? The options are endless, but with Poulenc’s action-packed Sinfonietta, Southbank Sinfonia’s musicians will help you explore some of the tools used to make brilliant music.

Northern European string music, pure in sound but so rich in emotion, conjures an atmosphere of intense serenity. In this late night Rush Hour, atmospheric lighting creates an aura of stillness in which the spirit of the music can soar. In Fratres, the timbre of the music evolves slowly, morphing in meaning and resonance as it travels through the orchestra. Three lonely chimes of a bell cast a mesmerising spell over Pärt’s tribute to Britten and, in turn, Vasks pays homage to Pärt in his story of a wanderer whose life unfolds against the unchanging backdrop of eternity.

In the concert, specially-made videos provide an up-close insight to the music being played. Afterwards, you can ask the musicians all your questions and try out an array of instruments. Ideal for children aged 5 - 11 BOOKING cadoganhall.com | 020 7730 4500

@MummyDelia 26

#ConcertLab Please note the later time of this Rush Hour

Eugene Lee

“@SouthbankSinf Family Concert at Cadogan Hall - great music and I think I learnt more than the boys! #FamilyFunday”

RUSH HOUR #13: TWILIGHT


RUSH HOUR #14: ALLEGRI

£10 £20

TITANS

THURSDAY 5 OCTOBER | 6.00pm ST JOHN’S WATERLOO

SUNDAY 8 OCTOBER | 7.30pm MARLBOROUGH COLLEGE, WILTSHIRE

STANFORD Horn Fantasy BRITTEN Phantasy Quartet COPLAND Appalachian Spring Allegri Quartet Associate Artists

GRIEG String Quartet in G minor MAHLER (arr. Iain Farrington) Symphony No.1

Performing side-by-side with the worldrenowned Allegri Quartet, the sound, personality and musicianship of every player is on show in this Rush Hour of verdant chamber music. Copland’s chamber ballet, here in its original version for 13 instruments, captures the vast, green open spaces of Pennsylvania and a bracing pioneer spirit. Across the Atlantic, Britten’s Phantasy is evocative of a hazy summer morning, rich with English pastoral charm. Stanford’s Fantasy adds to this sumptuous soundworld as horn and string quartet hold a beautiful, compelling conversation. Supported by our Obbligato Friends

Colm Ó Braoin

FREE

In the winter of 1888, Grieg was rather excited about his new string quartet. “It is not planned to be meat for small minds! It aims at breadth, vigour, flight of imagination, and, above all, fullness of tone,” he wrote to a friend. The outcome was a fireball of sound, hints of Norwegian folk and an extraordinary amount of double–stopping creating the musical equivalent of a can of Red Bull. Of all the symphonists, Mahler thought big. His works are thrilling in their scale, calling upon huge orchestral forces to bring their epic statements to life, and yet still seem to speak personally to each listener. Here, that intimacy is amplified in an arrangement of the full ‘Titan’ Symphony for 15 musicians, where every player is treated like a soloist and hidden aspects of the score are revealed as never before.

Allegri Quartet

Credit: Sarah Emma Smith

BOOKING marlboroughconcertseries.org | 01672 892566

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ST MARTIN’S: LUNCHTIME

FREE

MONDAY 9 OCTOBER | 1.00pm ST MARTIN-IN-THE-FIELDS

RUSH HOUR #15: DANCE

THURSDAY 12 OCTOBER | 6.00pm ST JOHN’S WATERLOO

GRIEG String Quartet in G minor SAINT-SAËNS Septet

JÖRG WIDMANN Con brio BEETHOVEN Symphony No.7 Holly Mathieson conductor David Ogle choreographer

What’s the greatest Christmas present you’ve ever received? For Émile Lemoine, it’d be pretty hard to better a work specially written by Saint-Saëns for the unusual group of players in his chamber music society. Looking back in time, the piece takes the form of a Baroque dance suite brimming with catchy melodies, but one refreshingly stripped back to reveal harmonies and textures in high definition.

In the 1988 film Running on Empty, it’s said that “you can’t dance to Beethoven”. But why not? His Seventh Symphony is a piece with dancing in its very DNA. Wagner famously called it ‘the apotheosis of the dance’, and the passing of time does nothing to dilute music’s invitation to move. In our #ConcertLab finale, the musicians will explore the limits of physicality in performance, bringing dance into music that pulsates with rhythmic energy.

Paired with Grieg’s blazing string quartet, swap lunchtime sandwiches for free chamber music in the elegant setting of St Martin-in-the-Fields.

Con brio was composed as a partner to Beethoven’s whirling symphony, unleashing musical fury by taking fragments of the original and remixing them for a modern take on the 19th century orchestra.

Credit: Cathy Pyle

Holly Mathieson

#ConcertLab

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Kesari Pundarika / Jonathan Farey

FREE


“Sickeningly beautiful performance by @SouthbankSinf, captivating beyond imagination” @JamilKowcan

“Such an amazing night tonight at #rushhour concert. First time going and can’t wait to see another” @Beckycollier92

“Outstanding programming tonight from @SouthbankSinf. Best concert I’ve been to for a long time” @j_barnett2

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NONCLASSICAL OCTOBER

Each autumn, Southbank Sinfonia ‘transfers’ to the West End, as our players take residency at the Peacock Theatre. Here they join forces with their operatic counterparts in British Youth Opera. Acclaimed new accounts of Jonathan Dove’s Flight in 2008 and Judith Weir’s Night at the Chinese Opera in 2012 have gone handin-hand with classics by Mozart, Puccini and Rossini, and most recently in 2016, the first fullorchestral production of Britten’s Owen Wingrave in London for almost 30 years. Watch this space for news of what 2017’s production will entail.

Since the orchestra was launched, it’s been our great pleasure to welcome conductor Edward Gardner to workshop great symphonies with the players. Back in 2002 he was – like them – on the brink of stardom; now he brings a wealth of experience from the world’s great stages. One of the orchestra’s Patrons, Edward returns this October to give the 2017 fellowship a workout they won’t forget.

Last year, we collaborated with pioneering composer and producer Gabriel Prokofiev on his popular Nonclassical club night, where classical music and DJs thrillingly collide. Broadcast on BBC Radio 3 and acclaimed in The Times, the occasion sparked a fuse that will lead to an even more ambitious collaboration this autumn. Plans are currently being forged: brace yourself for a performance that breaks the rules and defies all genres.

Credit: B Ealovega

PETER HULSEN ORCHESTRAL SONG AWARD OCTOBER Everyone loves a song contest, from the Kathleen Ferrier Award to Cardiff Singer of the World. While they respectively entail recital and operatic repertoire, young singers find few opportunities to delve into the glories of the orchestral songbook. This is rectified by the biennial Peter Hulsen Orchestral Song Award, named after a treasured friend of Southbank Sinfonia who died in 2015. Conducted by Simon Over, a celebratory concert will reveal this year’s winners, presenting the opportunity to perform some of the great orchestral songs with Southbank Sinfonia.

Soraya Mafi, 2015 winner

EDWARD GARDNER OCTOBER

Percussionists at Nonclassical, 2016

BRITISH YOUTH OPERA SEPTEMBER

Edward Gardner

Credit: Clive Barda

The Cunning Little Vixen, 2015

FURTHER AUTUMN HIGHLIGHTS


Nonclassical: Rise of the Machines, 2015

ROYAL OPERA HOUSE: MEET THE YOUNG ARTISTS NOVEMBER

GUY BARKER NOVEMBER Preparing our musicians to thrive in all genres, the last two years have featured some roof-raising performances with jazz icon Guy Barker. Trumpeter, composer, showman and all-round jazz aficionado, few artists are better skilled to immerse our players in the idiom. We look forward to sharing news of our biggest collaboration yet, set to conclude our 15th Birthday year in high style.

The culmination of each year’s partnership with the Royal Opera House sees our players and the enchanting Jette Parker Young Artists collaborate on a lavishly-staged new production. Together we made our debut at the East End’s stylish, intimate Wilton’s Music Hall last autumn, and return there this year for a strikingly imaginative interpretation of a true classic. Stay tuned for further details.

Credit: Charlie Chan

Guy Barker

Oreste, 2016

Credit: Clive Barda

DISCOVER MORE Be the first to hear about the latest details of projects like those on this page by visiting southbanksinfonia.co.uk. There you can also join our monthly eNewsletter list, bringing the latest news straight to your inbox. @SouthbankSinf

Southbank Sinfonia 31


THE IMPACT Southbank Sinfonia exists to give young musicians a much-needed springboard into the profession. The impact is incalculable: this year’s orchestra joins a group of almost 500 musicians who have completed the fellowship. Worldwide, former members now occupy prominent seats in leading orchestras. Many more pursue exciting musical ventures of their own, as chamber and freelance musicians, educators and musical entrepreneurs, each proudly acknowledging the impact Southbank Sinfonia has had on their progress.

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GEMMA WAREHAM 2008 CELLO, THE BERKELEY ENSEMBLE AND FREELANCE

JAMES BURKE 2010 PRINCIPAL CLARINET, BBC SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA AND ACADEMY OF ST MARTIN IN THE FIELDS

“Since forming during our fellowship year, the Berkeley Ensemble has been on a thrilling chamber music adventure. We have performed live on BBC Radio 3, recorded four commercial discs, and toured the UK and China. This is all thanks to the infectious spirit of determination and creativity that Southbank Sinfonia exudes.”

“As a member of Southbank Sinfonia, you live the life of a working orchestral musician for a year. I found this invaluable, as when the call comes in to play with a professional orchestra, you don’t feel thrown in at the deep end. You are already doing the job, and you know exactly what to expect.”

MICHAEL WILSON 2004 PRINCIPAL OBOE, HONG KONG PHILHARMONIC

EUGENE LEE 2009 FIRST VIOLIN, PHILHARMONIA AND ASSOCIATE LEADER, SOUTHBANK SINFONIA

JULIA LOUCKS 2013 FIRST VIOLIN, WELSH NATIONAL OPERA

“I am deeply grateful to have been part of Southbank Sinfonia. Not only did it bring about opportunities to play at wonderful venues and interact with leading professional players, it gave an insight into the very real life of becoming an orchestral musician.”

“Being able to call yourself a Southbank Sinfonia player exemplifies belonging, talent, credibility and the future. The fellowship is a once in a lifetime opportunity to discover and push your boundaries. I wouldn’t be the same without this programme.”

“I wouldn’t have my job without Southbank Sinfonia. I gained so much confidence through all the fantastic performance and audition opportunities.”


STEPHEN CRAIGEN 2015 HORN, ROYAL DANISH ORCHESTRA “I learnt a great deal about myself and the music profession through the fellowship. The performance experience I gained in London and on tours to Italy and Hong Kong is not something easily acquired as a young musician.”

IMOGEN HANCOCK 2016 TRUMPET, FREELANCE “The opportunities Southbank Sinfonia offers recent graduates are unrivalled. I loved performing as a chamber and symphony orchestra, alongside choirs, in operas and as a soloist, tackling an amazing variety of music.”

After the fellowship, players continue to play a valued role in the life of Southbank Sinfonia - and the orchestra continues to support musicians in developing their careers. Many return as deputies and extras, sharing insights with their successors and enabling us to perform invigorating large-scale repertoire. Former members now in leading orchestras also provide expert coaching, or join our audition panels providing insight and feedback to the hundreds of musicians that apply to join the fellowship each year.

Jennifer MacCallum (2014)

BEYOND THE FELLOWSHIP

Increasingly, musicians from the Southbank Sinfonia family embark on projects beyond the fellowship, from acclaimed theatrical exploits at the National Theatre to nationwide tours with pop artists. We are proud to have now generated over £5 million that has gone directly into young musicians’ pockets, transforming their livelihood through the bursaries granted to all those on our initial fellowship and full fees provided in this growing range of paid work thereafter. Few other institutions worldwide give young artists such a footing. In the current economic climate, this makes Southbank Sinfonia a great British success story of which the nation may feel justly proud.

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Maria Oguren

BE ADVENTUROUS The unique experience of Southbank Sinfonia is not just limited to its players. Helping young people at this vital moment in their lives, our supporters play an essential role in the life of the orchestra, not just watching from the sidelines, but getting to know each individual musician as they progress. Every year brings a fresh cohort of musicians in need of our help. Our supporters embark on an adventure with them, as they discover together what it takes to become outstanding professional artists. For each player the journey is different, but all of them rely on the enthusiasm and support of people like you to propel them forward.

“We have got so much from our involvement with Southbank Sinfonia. It is a privilege to discover such high quality music played with such enthusiasm and to see the joy on the faces of the young musicians. You get to know them as the year progresses and feel real pride for them as they develop through the programme. It is a worthy organisation to support – but it’s also such good fun to be involved!” Steve and Lynne Soden, Ripieno Friends

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JOIN OUR FAMILY

INVEST IN BOLD NEW VENTURES

MAKE A LASTING DIFFERENCE

Become a Friend with a monthly donation of £10 (Continuo), £20 (Ripieno) or £35 (Obbligato) and enjoy a range of opportunities to get closer to the music. Experience a unique rapport with the orchestra, from attending a private rehearsal to taking a seat inside the orchestra, whilst having a presence and impact the players really value. Become a Maestro Supporter and enjoy an even closer association, including personal updates on our progress and plans from our Music Director Simon Over.

With such boundless young players, Southbank Sinfonia has the scope to achieve so much. We are especially grateful to a central circle of supporters – an ensemble as vital as the musicians you see onstage – whose conviction and generosity enable us to fulfil ambitious plans: taking the orchestra to new destinations, staging major works previously beyond our reach, and much more. If you would like to see the orchestra rise to new heights, please talk to us.

In everyone’s life there comes a moment when they need the help and encouragement of others to take a vital step forward. For 15 years, young musicians from around the world have found that support through Southbank Sinfonia. With your help, we can ensure the orchestra is here for decades to come, continuing to transform young people’s prospects. When you come to write or revisit your Will, you might consider if there is a place for Southbank Sinfonia among your plans. Any gesture, no matter what size, will have a lasting effect, and enable you to make a difference to our players that will continue to resonate long into their futures.

ADOPT A PLAYER

INVOLVE YOUR ORGANISATION

By ‘adopting’ a player, you don’t have to take them home but can make a real difference to their prospects, directly funding their place on the programme. A gesture like this enables you to get to know an individual player and forever know you have played a vital part in their journey to the international stage. Over the course of the year, you will see how much this means to them as your player keeps you personally updated on their progress.

If you are part of a company that - like us - believes in unlocking potential, we can create a rewarding partnership bringing Southbank Sinfonia’s team spirit and imagination to your workplace and community. If you are involved in a trust or foundation that believes in the limitless potential of young people, you could make an invaluable contribution to any aspect of our work, helping us to innovate and inspire.

Whether you’re experiencing the orchestra for the first time or a long-standing cherished friend, we invite you to join us in exploring further what it takes to be a musician today, guided by our brilliant young ambassadors. To talk about any of these possibilities, please contact Charlotte Castle, Development Director on 020 7921 0377 or charlotte@southbanksinfonia.co.uk Alternatively, talk to any of our staff or the players themselves at any of our concerts.

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“Southbank Sinfonia, a hugely talented young ensemble whose performances are always theatrical� The Independent

southbanksinfonia.co.uk Southbank Sinfonia @SouthbankSinf Southbank Sinfonia is a registered charity No.1092461 Front Maria Oguren / Dominic Hammett / Jemma Freestone Back Daniel Griffin / Rebecca Eldridge

Information in this Concert Diary was correct at the time of going to press, but we reserve the right to vary programmes or artists if necessary. Booking fees apply for venue box offices. Design, text and feature photography Matt Belcher | Printed by Cantate Communications

Profile for Southbank Sinfonia

Southbank Sinfonia | Concert Diary 2017  

Southbank Sinfonia | Concert Diary 2017  

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