Page 33

Donation gives birth to new hope

In May 2016 Cops for Kids reached a significant milestone with their 100th donation – $22 000 to the Flinders Medical Centre Foundation to purchase a Controlled Hypothermia Device for the Neonatal Unit at Flinders Medical Centre (FMC).

time. This led to concerning fluctuations in Noah’s body temperature during his first three days,” Sergeant Sporton said. “Thankfully we were one of the lucky families. We walked away from the hospital not just with our son being alive but also as a healthy ‘normal’ boy.”

During their stressful time in the hospital, the Sportons were shocked to hear that many medical items, such as the cooling device Noah required, were only able to be acquired as the result of fundraising. “After going through such an emotional situation, I gained a real appreciation for the various organisations that provide services and financial assistance,” Sergeant Sporton said. “This is why Cops for Kids is so important as they provide assistance to very vulnerable and innocent members of our community. “Their generous donation of a Controlled Hypothermia Device will not only be better for babies but also provide some peace of mind for parents who already feel helpless.” The Sportons are now enjoying life as parents of a healthy, happy and active toddler.

“Noah has been meeting all of his developmental milestones and continues to thrive. However, due to the cooling process he is required to have regular testing and assessment until he is five years old,” Sergeant Sporton said. Having experienced the anguish of their son’s health scare, Sergeant Sporton is encouraging colleagues to get involved in supporting the inspiring work of Cops for Kids. “After being in our situation, it’s quite humbling to think that a few dollars of pay deducted from a member’s salary each fortnight can contribute so positively to the lives of children and their families,” he said. To find out more about Cops for Kids, visit their website: www.copsforkids.org.au 

T

he Controlled Hypothermia Device is used to rapidly cool babies who have experienced perinatal asphyxia (reduced blood or oxygen to the brain around the time of birth), which is a major cause of death and brain damage. The device enables the baby’s temperature to be safely maintained. Sergeant Gary Sporton and his wife Amanda know all about the importance of this life-saving device, having seen their newborn son Noah cooled for 72 hours at the FMC’s Neonatal Intensive Care Unit to prevent potential brain damage after enduring a difficult delivery. “Our son had to be cooled predominantly by wet flannels and pedestal fans as this device was not available at the

BL UEPR IN T IS S U E 1 ~ 2 0 1 7

31

Blueprint magazine Issue 1 2017  

Blueprint is South Australia Police’s official magazine. In each issue you will find informative and engaging articles covering a broad rang...

Blueprint magazine Issue 1 2017  

Blueprint is South Australia Police’s official magazine. In each issue you will find informative and engaging articles covering a broad rang...