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As the Recruiting Manager, Inspector Peter Clifton has facilitated many of the changes. “We have doubled the number of recruiting seminars per month with the introduction of women and youth pre-application seminars, both in the metropolitan and regional areas including Murray Bridge, Berri and Mount Gambier and have attended the Lucindale field day,” he said. “We have had a visible presence at high profile events, such as the Tour Down Under and the Adelaide Thunderbirds’ family day for the first time, and highlighted SAPOL career opportunities directly to students and parents through high schools and universities.” SAPOL’s current recruitment campaign “Achieve More/See Yourself in Uniform” has been revamped for the Recruit 313 initiative and has been very successful in generating a surge in applications. It has been

communicated via a suite of advertising and promotional activities, including traditional TV, radio, press and gym advertisements, together with emerging video/audio on-demand platforms such as TenPlay, Yahoo7 and Spotify. The advertising campaign has also appeared on Snapchat and Facebook, with a Facebook testimonial video featuring Probationary Constable Kathryn Khor recently passing 300 000 views. “All this focused activity has seen seminars fill-up well in advance. Applications have skyrocketed and female applications have increased to between 35 and 40 per cent,” Inspector Clifton said. “We currently have around 1000 open applications, so interest and competition for positions is at a very high level.” The campaign has appealed to younger people, with 19 per cent of cadets in the first 11 courses of Recruit 313 aged 21 or under and a further 62 per cent in the 22-30 age group. This is the result of not only the targeted marketing campaign but a more efficient recruiting process focusing on the fast-tracking of applications for high-achieving school leavers and university graduates.

The usual three-to-fourmonth vetting and testing regime has been streamlined to ensure applicants are processed in around three weeks in some instances. South Australians holding an Australian Tertiary Admission Rank (ATAR) of 70 or above, or a Bachelor’s degree from a recognised institution, are no longer required to complete the pre-application numeracy and literacy test to be accepted as a recruit. “This more efficient recruitment process is aimed at attracting the state’s best and brightest to consider a long-term career in policing. Most importantly we are ensuring those we recruit share our values as we move forward,” Inspector Clifton said. In other moves, SAPOL has adjusted the physical

fitness requirements to better match what is necessary for a patrol officer and introduced a junior cadet training wage for recruits aged under 21 years during their 12 months’ training at the Academy. SAPOL has also made a significant investment in resourcing the Academy to accommodate the influx of cadets and additional trainers. “To successfully implement Recruit 313 we have purchased additional equipment and resources including tablet computers, training firearms and new vehicles for driver training,” Inspector Clifton said. “This ensures recruits have everything they need to prepare for a rewarding longterm career with a modern and diverse police service.”

TOP: Probationary Constable Kathryn Khor and Cadet Heather Lee. OPPOSITE PAGE (TOP): The SAPOL recruitment stand at last year’s Royal Adelaide Show. Photos: SAPOL Photographic Section.

UEPR INT ISSUE IS S U E 1 ~ 2 0 1 7 BL UE PRIN

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Blueprint magazine Issue 1 2017  

Blueprint is South Australia Police’s official magazine. In each issue you will find informative and engaging articles covering a broad rang...

Blueprint magazine Issue 1 2017  

Blueprint is South Australia Police’s official magazine. In each issue you will find informative and engaging articles covering a broad rang...