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A RESOURCE GUIDE FOR SMALL BUSINESSES Written by Lovey Sidhu, M.Ed., B.A., P.I.D. Carla Weaver, M.A., M.Sc.


“To succeed, you will soon learn, as I did, the importance of a solid foundation in the basics of education — literacy, both verbal and numerical, and communication skills.” Alan Greenspan

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Written by Lovey Sidhu, M.Ed., B.A., P.I.D. Carla Weaver, M.A., M.Sc.

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COPYRIGHT

Communities for Literacy: WORKPLACE ESSENTIAL SKILLS TRAINING PROJECT - WEST

Presented by:

In partnership with:

Cloverdale District Chamber of Commerce Kwantlen Polytechnic University South Surrey & White Rock Chamber of Commerce

This project is funded by the Government of Canada’s Communities for Literacy: Workplace Solutions for Enhancing Literacy and Essential Skills

Project Participants: The WEST project would like to acknowledge the dedication and hard work of the business participants who supported the project and participated in the training experience. We would sincerely like to thank the dedication and efforts of the following small businesses:

Express Computers U-Lock Mini Storage Woman’s Place Concierge

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Acknowledgements The work of this key individual is gratefully acknowledged. His leadership, guidance and insight served as an invaluable support over the course of the WEST project. We would sincerely like to thank Dan Scott for this support and wisdom. Without his vision, the WEST project would not exist.

Dan Scott Dan has over 23 years of service with Sources, including positions as Manager of Life Skills programs, Manager of Employment Resource Centres, Coordinator of the WEST Project, and most recently as Director of Community and Employment Services at Sources. Prior to his employment with Sources, his background includes work as a public school teacher and as an aid worker in the alternate school system. In addition to growing Sources’ existing community and employment programs to meet the needs and expectations of clients, Dan oversees the Workplace Essential Skills Training (WEST) program, which was established in the Fall of 2009 to improve employee retention and enhance skill sets in our community. Dan has a wealth of experience in both the employment and community living sector.

ABOUT SOURCES Sources Community Resource Centres is a community-based non-profit agency dedicated to supporting the needs of children, youth and families, persons with disabilities, and seniors who reside throughout the communities of White Rock, Surrey, Langley and Delta. Sources is proud to have played a role in the efforts of this community to promote a better quality life for all, and to build a sense of community which encourages each of us to lend support to neighbours in need. To learn more about Sources visit www.sourcesbc.ca

SPECIAL MENTION The project team would also like to acknowledge the following individuals and organizations for their continued support and guidance throughout the project. Kyle Downie CEO, Skillplan Lesleigh Smith Program Analyst, Office of Literacy and Essential Skills SmarterU Online Learning Management System www.smarteru.com Lynda Fownes Past CEO, Skillplan Pam Tetarenko Community and Contract Services Programmer, Douglas College Michael Donovan iMentor-Pro

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AUTHORS

About the Authors LOVEY SIDHU, M.ED., B.A., P.I.D. Over the past 10 years, Lovey has worked in several capacities in the education sector. She began her career working in the public school system and then branched off into post-secondary education. She has provided leadership and guidance in matters of education design and delivery to various post-secondary institutions. Coupled with her practical experience in education and administration, Lovey received her Master’s degree in Education from Simon Fraser University. This program of study has served as an invaluable tool in enhancing her role as an educator and an administrator. Lovey has experience working with a number of highly respected post-secondary institutions, training organizations, Aboriginal organizations, non-profit, and government agencies to design, develop, evaluate and/or implement programs. “It’s exciting to be involved in providing excellence within the community“, says Lovey. “I believe this project showcased Sources as a forward-thinker in the area of company training and people development,” says Lovey.

CARLA WEAVER, M.A., M.Sc. Carla’s unique combination of education across disciplines and her interest in creativity bring a fresh cross-disciplinary approach to her training development and delivery. She always keeps the interests of the learners in the forefront, and her goal is to help them to develop their creativity in the subject area of the training. Her formal education includes undergraduate degrees in Business and Fine Art, and her graduate studies are in Fine Art, Business and Psychology with a focus on Creativity. Carla has several years of experience in training in both corporate and academic environments, including experience in the IT, construction, education, transportation, wholesale and government sectors. She has developed and delivered training in these industries for many years. “I love developing quality training to meet specific needs, and I have thoroughly enjoyed this opportunity to apply my skills and experience to meet WEST’s clients’ needs, and to help in developing this resource guide to make the resources available to other small businesses,” says Carla.

Lovey and Carla continue to consult and collaborate with organizations to provide effective training and creative approaches to train, develop and empower. For more information visit: www.loveysidhu.com or www.carlaweaver.com

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TA B L E O F CO NT E NTS

Contents Acknowledgements About Sources...........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................5 Special Mention ......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................5

About the Authors Lovey Sidhu, M.Ed., B.A., P.I.D............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................7 Carla Weaver, M.A., M.Sc.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................7

Preface Workplace Essential Skills Training – WEST .........................................................................................................................................................................................................................11 How to use this Resource Guide .................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................14

Chapter 1 Train > Develop > Empower ............................................................................................................................................................................................15 Employee Training and Development and the Small Business ..................................................................................................................................................................................17 The Training Model.............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................18

Chapter 2 Assess .................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................21 Conducting a Needs Analysis .......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................23

Chapter 3 Train ....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................27 Create and Deliver Effective Training .......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................29 Best Practices .........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................34 Workplace Training Sustainability – Keep Training Going! ..........................................................................................................................................................................................34

Chapter 4 Evaluate .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................37 Identify, Measure and Evaluate.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................39 Stages of Evaluation ...........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................39

Chapter 5 Develop and Empower .............................................................................................................................................................................................................41 Promote a Culture of Employee Development .................................................................................................................................................................................................................43

Toolkit Lesson plans & Surveys .............................................................................................................................................................................................................45 Resource CD............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................47 Lesson Plan ..............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................48 Sample Pre-Assessment Survey ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................50 Sample Employee Survey.................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................51 Sample Management Survey ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................52 Sample Post-Assessment Survey .................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................55

Bibliography Resources and Suggested Readings ...........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................57 TR A I N

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“The ability to learn faster than your competitor may be the only sustainable competitive advantage.” Peter Senge

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PREFACE

Preface WORKPLACE ESSENTIAL SKILLS TRAINING – WEST The Communities for Literacy project was established to address the need for sustainable, employment-based support for literacy and essential skills from a community perspective. Our approach addressed workforce shortages and skill deficiencies by supporting employers to incorporate skill development into the workplace. In this way, individuals may obtain, maintain, and augment employment while simultaneously upgrading their literacy and essential skills (LES). The Workplace Essential Skills Training project (WEST) evolved as an innovative HR practice that is designed to provide focus-based training to employees. The WEST initiative bases its practice on a results-orientated approach and supports employees by designing training that enhances workplace skills. The WEST mission is to create new models for local businesses to embed Workplace Essential Skills into their training and development plans, models that not only train and develop employees but also empower them. The WEST project provided services to three employers and over 55 employees participated in individual skill development activities. The following Literacy and Essential Skills Resource Guide and Toolkit were designed to support employers, trainers, and practitioners in implementing Essential Skills Training into their workplaces.

Learn more about WEST www.westproject.ca

ESSENTIAL SKILLS The Relevance and Importance of Essential Skills in the Workplace Literacy refers to “a complex mix of skills that an individual can use at work, at home or in the community, skills that generally require maintenance and upgrading over the course of a career – and a lifetime” (Canadian Manufacturers and Exporters Ontario and Human Resources and Skills Development Canada., Business Results Through Essential Skills and Literacy Guidebook). The terms “literacy” and “essential skills” are used to describe a specific set of skills that are generally agreed to be necessary in order to effectively hold and perform a job. Focusing training on Essential Skills provides benefits to both employees and employers. Employers can use Essential Skills to: • develop a more competent and qualified work force • create a safe and productive workplace • help employees to adapt to workplace change • develop HR tools such as job descriptions and training plans • create a learning culture. In order to be competitive in the global marketplace, businesses need to develop their competitive advantages, and productive employees are a critical factor in this process. Many businesses today empower their employees to be more independent in decision making and problem solving, so it’s important that employees have the skills to respond. To be effective, employees need to be able to write and understand written documentation, perform basic math functions, apply logic to make effective decisions, operate computers and other equipment, and be able to work well with others on teams and in customer situations. Employees can use Essential Skills to: • assess and enhance their skills • develop career goals • increase self-confidence and self-esteem • understand the training and skills required for specific jobs • increase their earning potential.

Learn more about Essential Skills: Human Resources and Skills Development Canada Literacy and Essential Skills www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/workplaceskills/LES/index.shtml

The WEST initiative based its practice on delivering and designing training that enhances workplace skills and supports employees.

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PREFACE Through extensive research, the Government of Canada, along with other national and international agencies, identified and validated key literacy and Essential Skills that are used in nearly every job and throughout daily life in different ways and at varying levels of complexity and can be considered the building blocks that Canadians need to participate in their daily activities and occupations. The essential skills: • are fundamental to working, learning and living, and • help workers adapt to changes in their workplaces.

The Essential Skills More than 3000 Canadians in workplaces in all sectors and in all types and sizes of organizations were surveyed to find out what skills are needed in order for workers to be most effective and productive. The result was the identification of the following nine workplace Essential Skills: • Reading • Writing • Numeracy

• Document use • Computer use • Oral communication

• Working with others • Continuous learning • Thinking skills

These nine Essential Skills are used in different combinations and to different degrees for different occupations. Following is a description of each essential skill: 1. Reading The reading skill includes reading material in the form of sentences or paragraphs, and generally involves reading notes, letters, memos, manuals, specifications, regulations, books, reports or journals. It also includes: • forms and labels if they contain at least one paragraph • print and non-print media (for example, text on computer screens and microfiche) • paragraph-length text in charts, tables and graphs. An example of training for this skill includes Basic Business Skills. 2. Writing Writing includes: • writing text and writing in documents (for example, filling in forms) • non-paper-based writing (for example, typing on a computer). Some examples of training for this skill include Business Writing and Email and Work-Life Balance. 3. Numeracy Numeracy refers to workers’ use of numbers and thinking in quantitative terms. Some examples of training that improves numeracy are: Basic Business Skills, Basic Excel, and Priority Management, Problem Solving and Decision Making. 4. Document Use Document Use refers to tasks that require using words, numbers, icons and other visual characteristics (e.g. line, colour, shape) in spatial arrangements. For example, graphs, lists, tables, blueprints, schematics, drawings, signs and labels are documents used at work. Document Use includes: • print and non-print media (for example, computer screen or microfiche documents, equipment gauges, clocks and flags) • reading, interpreting, writing, completing, producing documents - these applications often occur simultaneously as part of the same task, such as, completing a form, checking off items on a list, plotting information on a graph, and entering information on an activity schedule. Some examples of training to enhance document skills are: Planning and Leading Effective Meetings and Priority Management, Problem Solving and Decision Making.

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PREFACE 5. Computer Use Computer Use involves a variety of computer applications of varying complexity. Some examples of training developed to enhance computer use are: Business Writing and Email and Basic Excel. 6. Oral Communication Oral Communication involves using speech to exchange ideas and information. Some examples of oral communication include: Basic Business Skills, Dealing with Difficult Customers, Fantastic Customer Service, and Mentor Development. 7. Working with Others Working with Others involves employees working with others to accomplish their work responsibilities. Some workers must work co-operatively with others as a part of a team, while others must have self-discipline to meet goals while working alone. Workers may work on their own most of the time, but work with team members in some situations. For example, receptionists in a large office and production line workers with responsibility for a very specific part of the process are in physical environments that include other workers. However, they work essentially on their own. Some examples of training that enhances skills for working with others are: Mentor Development Workshop, Working in Teams and Team Planning, Working with Difficult People, Dealing with Difficult Customers and Fantastic Customer Service. 8. Continuous Learning Continuous Learning is the practice of acquiring new skills and knowledge. More and more jobs require continuous upgrading, and workers must continue learning in order to keep their jobs or to grow with them. Continuous learning involves knowing how to learn, understanding your learning style and knowing how to access resources. Some examples of continuous learning include health and safety training, updating credentials and learning new equipment, applications, procedures, products or services. All training addresses this skill, as new training helps learners to improve their qualifications and apply new skills. 9. Thinking Thinking differentiates between six different types of interconnected cognitive functions: • problem solving • decision making • critical thinking • job task planning and organizing • significant use of memory and • finding information. Some examples of training that helps to develop this skill are: Priority Management Problem Solving and Decision Making Workshop, Train Develop Empower Workshop, Work / Life Balance, Working in Teams and Team Planning Workshop, Working with Difficult People Workshop and Ultimate Customer Service Workshop.

Workplace Skills

Find Training

are

Resources in the

Essential Skills

Resource CD.

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PREFACE HOW TO USE THIS RESOURCE GUIDE Who is this Guide for? This resource guide will be useful to you if you are: • A small business owner or manager • A decision maker at your organization • Involved in strategic planning for your firm • Working in human resources (including recruiting, retention, training & development, and other employee-related programs) • A manager or supervisor of employees in any size of business, but more specifically in a small to medium-sized business. This Resource Guide can help you with practical information as you tackle human resources issues, such as hiring, developing, training, evaluating and retaining qualified and skilled workers for your organization. More specifically, this Resource Guide was designed to: • Describe “literacy” and “essential skills”; • Bring focus to the fact that employees ‘ essential skills issues can affect your business’s productivity, effectiveness, adaptability, creativity and success either positively or negatively; • Help decision-makers in your organization identify the business benefits and understand why addressing and improving employee essential skills can lead to improvements in daily operations and increased profitability; • Support managers of small businesses in assessing, developing and delivering appropriate training to enhance the skills and effectiveness of their workers. The Guide will: • Offer you tools to assess where your business is now; • Provide some specific assessment, training plans and deliverable training programs that can be used by small and medium-sized businesses to develop and train their workers; • Provide resources to help your organization conduct internal assessments to identify current essential skill levels and needed improvements; • Assist your organization in developing plans to help and encourage employees to improve their essential skill levels to positively impact your business results. The Resource CD will: • Provide “ready-to-use” lesson plans and power point presentations focusing on workplace skills; • Provide resources and examples of assessment and evaluation tools.

References at a Glance

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Remarks

Reference Links

Case Study

Definitions

Toolkit Resources

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Chapter 1 TRAIN DEVELOP EMPOWER TR A I N

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CHAPTER 1: TRAIN>DEVELOP>EMPOWER EMPLOYEE TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT AND THE SMALL BUSINESS One of the most valuable assets of a small business is its workforce, yet small businesses often have limited resources to invest in Human Resources programs, including training, and they may even consider training an optional expense. Research shows that companies with fewer than 500 employees dedicate less time per employee to training than do larger organizations, but they spend more per employee because it’s more difficult for small companies to take advantage of available training that’s been developed for larger organizations (Bacal & Associates, 2012). Without a well-trained and qualified workforce, a business faces the risk of not achieving its goals, so small businesses have, perhaps, a greater need for training than larger organizations. Larger organizations may be better able to attract the most qualified workers because they can offer more robust benefits programs and opportunities for advancement. Yet, all organizations need to train and develop their workforces in order to meet their specific company goals. Additionally, due to the recent recession, new demographics in the work force, and rapidly changing technology, skills and creativity are extremely important to help companies grow and succeed. That means that workers need well developed skills that are specific to their organization’s needs and goals in order to do their jobs well. Developing a well-trained workforce is critical to the success of the small business, so it must be achieved by carefully assessing the needs and skills of each employee for the tasks specific to that employee’s work tasks. Often, businesses decide that employees need training, so they put together a training plan without carefully assessing the needs of the specific employees for the specific jobs to be accomplished.

Developing a well-trained workforce is critical to the success of a small business

In order to perform in their jobs, workers need to have the nine essential skills: reading, writing, numeracy, oral communication, document use, computer skills, working with others, thinking and continuous learning. These are broad subject areas, and it can be insulting to suggest to an employee that he or she isn’t able to read or do math, but the requirements can be reframed into areas of the skill that are specific and applicable to your business and the tasks that each employee must perform. For example, if workers must do math to prepare sales orders, then training can include numeracy in targeted task training, such as Writing Sales Orders. If workers deal with customers, then “working with others” can take the form of customer service training.

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CHAPTER 1: TRAIN>DEVELOP>EMPOWER Employee training programs could be expensive for a small business, but training should not be looked at as a cost; it is a long-term investment toward the success and growth of the company. It will facilitate the development of a well trained workforce capable of quality and professional work output. Investing in training will develop employees’ essential skills required for their specific job tasks, and in turn, they will become more innovative and productive. As an owner or manager of a small business, it’s important to support and encourage skills development by fostering an environment that supports career growth. In return, these more productive employees become a valuable asset to the business leading to greater success of the business. There are several types of training, and selecting the right kind of training depends on the resources of the business and the type of training required. If training is needed to meet a general need for a group of employees, then traditional instructor-led classroom training may be the solution. However, if training is specific to a unique task undertaken by only one or a few workers, then mentoring or one-on-one on-the-job training may be more effective. This resource guide will outline the various types of training and best practices for use in each different type of situation.

THE TRAINING MODEL

EVALUATE

TRAIN

DEVELOP

EMPOWER

ASSESS

How does a business create training that is valuable? Effective workplace training and development programs must focus on the needs of the employee. What additional skills do employees need to be more effective at their job? What specific skills am I expecting the employees to gain throughout the years? What is the best way my employees learn? As each employee brings with them a different skill set, a varying degree of experience, and specific learning needs, it is not effective to design training that is too broad.

Find Training Resources in the Resource CD.

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CHAPTER 1: TRAIN>DEVELOP>EMPOWER How does a business create a training program with real results? The subsequent chapters will cover each of the sections below in greater detail, but here is a snapshot of some considerations when creating training that is cost-effective, efficient and well received: 1. Conduct on-going ASSESSMENT What core workplace skills require attention? What is the purpose of providing training? Why is it important? How does this training work towards achieving company and department goals? How many employees will need this training? And how will they implement it into their daily workplace tasks? Can I do an assessment or test to determine employees’ current skills levels? 2. Create TRAINING that is job-related, focused and specific in its outcome Based on the assessment, what core workplace skills require training? By the end of the training what specific changes will be achieved? How will the learner demonstrate such change? Is the training specific to the job-tasks? If so, how? 3. Design training that DEVELOPS the employees beyond their job tasks Will the skills employees learn apply to other tasks within the organization? How will the skills be utilized? And how quickly? Will the training increase independence? Increase decision-making skills and autonomy? 4. EVALUATE training programs How will I measure effectiveness? Did training produce the results I was looking for? What are the employees saying about training? 5. Develop a workplace culture of EMPOWERMENT Are employees actively participating in training? Do employees work effectively with one another – do they mentor and support coworkers? Are employees open to change? New policies? New technology? Has staff turnover decreased? Are we able to retain our employees?

How are training and development connected? Effective training can be a powerful tool in ensuring employee commitment and loyalty for the organization. Successful training programs incorporate skills enhancement where employees feel the skills assist them in accomplishing job-related tasks, ultimately culminating in a culture where employees use their knowledge to benefit the organization. Training is designed to develop and enhance employees. Through strategic, well-planned training programs employers create a culture of development and life-long learning. A culture of people development ensures that the acquired knowledge and skills are put to use in the most productive way, which enables companies to achieve their targeted business goals.

Through strategic, well-planned training programs employers create a culture of development and life-long learning.

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“An empowered organization is one in which individuals have the knowledge …” Stephen Covey

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Chapter 2 ASSESS TR A I N

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CHAPTER 2: ASSESS

CASE STUDY Employee Needs vs. Training Goals Your organization is implementing new data entry software. The software converts simplified Excel spreadsheets into the more sophisticated software program that will be accessed by the Senior Management team. They will use this data to make strategic decisions related to budgets and company goals. As all employees will be required to interface with the new software, you hired a consultant who specializes in Excel to deliver a 2 hour training session to your entire team. It has been a month after the training workshop and employees are still struggling with the software. Many employees are unable to accurately fill in the Excel spreadsheets. The Senior Managers are frustrated as they are unable to access the information they need. The employees do not feel the software is necessary and that the training was a waste of time.

CONDUCTING A NEEDS ANALYSIS One of the most common challenges faced by organizations is accurately pinpointing training needs. Many organizations are understaffed and often do not have HR departments that can conduct on-going employee assessments. Training is implemented on a “needs basis” or “on-the-fly” and often, although with the best of intentions, does not meet the needs of the employee or the company goals. Without conducting a thorough assessment before training plans are developed and implemented, it is inevitable that training will fail and organizations will continue to struggle with strategic initiatives, similar to the one described in the case study. As a manager have you ... • ever provided a training seminar that resulted in little or no change in employee behaviour? • had employees complain about training being “useless” or a “waste of time”? • felt lost about “where to start?” when it comes to training?

Needs Analysis A Needs Analysis is an assessment method to determine the need for training. It assists in identifying the main reasons and purposes of training, and pinpoints specific training goals. Although a comprehensive needs analysis requires time, energy and human-power to gather the data, the information collected is invaluable. Investing the time before training begins will assist in ensuring focus-based training programs meet the goals of the training program and company. Data collected from the needs analysis further provides organizations with information that can be used to • create policies and procedures • take the “pulse” of the organization (employee satisfaction) • identify gaps within the organization (in communication, information sharing, etc.) • create or amend job descriptions and • evaluate training program success.

Essential Skills Needs Assessment Tools www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/workplaceskills/LES/tools_resources/tools.shtml#tabs2_2

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CHAPTER 2: ASSESS Stages of a Needs Analysis Stage 1 - Identify Key Stakeholders Collecting data for the needs analysis involves a comprehensive approach that involves all levels of the organization. Speak with front-line staff, managers, directors, customers - essentially any person involved with the issue. It is best practice to identify 2-3 members from each stakeholder group to get the most comprehensive data. Take a look at the case study again – can you identify the stakeholders in the scenario?

What is a Stakeholder? A stakeholder is a “person, group, or organization that has a direct or indirect stake in an organization because it can affect or be affected by the organization’s actions, objectives, and policies.” BusinessDirectory.com, 2012 This is an essential first step to ensure that training goals and objectives are aligned at all levels. Training programs that are developed on the basis of one stakeholder often miss key needs of the other parties resulting in poor training results. Stage 2 - Develop Key Questions You will ask each of the stakeholders a series of questions that will assist in identifying and pinpointing training needs. If you have an identified problem you will likely ask questions related to the identified issues. If the problem is unclear, you can start by asking broad questions and then narrow in on more specific questions. Below is a list of questions to get you started: • What are the goals of the company/department? • What does a well organized department look like? • Describe challenges, issues and barriers surrounding the attainment of company/department goals? • Describe specific job related tasks for the various positions within the organization (Job Task Analysis). What are your responsibilities? What is your manager responsible for? Your coworkers and members in other departments? • Describe specific areas of improvements needed with staff within each department • What are the core workplace Essential Skills required to meet the goals? Stage 3 - Engage Stakeholders Finding the time to engage with stakeholders to obtain the information you need, can be a challenge. But keep in mind that the information you gather will prove to be more useful than guessing what the training needs are. Strategies to access stakeholders include: • Create small working groups where you can speak to a few people at a time • Create paper surveys stakeholders can complete on their own time • Email or engage stakeholders via telephone • Be considerate of time (what is the best time to engage with an employee? A manager? A customer?) • Offer incentives for participating • Keep sessions short and specific to the task at hand. Stage 4 - Determine Themes Once you have met with the identified stakeholders and gathered your information, you will begin to identify themes that emerge. Your role is to review the data and determine patterns, identify commonalities, and look for things that surprised you or information you didn’t know about. The goal here is to find 2-3 key areas on which to focus. These areas should be identified by most if not all of the stakeholders. Stage 5 - Creating Training Goals and Objectives Determining training goals is a crucial step in the development process. Communicating these goals to all parties within the organization is essential. Being specific about the goals and developing objectives that are measurable is critical. Training goals, objectives and learning outcomes are all important elements of the training design process. This information becomes even more valuable when you conduct the evaluation of the training program.

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CHAPTER 2: ASSESS A Glimpse: Needs Analysis in Action Let’s take a look at the case scenario at the beginning of the chapter. We will work through each of the steps of the Needs Analysis.

STAGE 1

Identify Key Stakeholders

STAGE 2

Develop Key Questions

STAGE 3

Engage Stakeholders

STAGE 4

Determine Themes

STAGE 5

Create Goals and Objectives

Managers, employees who will use software, IT department, software supplier.

What is the goal for software implementation? What improvements will be made? What challenges will act as barriers to achieving these goals? How will your department use the software? What training needs do you have? What are the core workplace Essential Skills needed to meet the goals?

Create a working session with each department (IT, front-line, Management, sales/marketing). Determine the best time and best communication method (telephone/email/face-to-face).

All levels identified poor communication of goals of software implementation. All levels identified a need for Excel training: • Sales department identified Excel training goals to be related to formulas; • Clerical staff identified training goals related to basic Excel fundamentals (limited experience with Excel); • Accounting department does not require Excel training.

Company Goal: • improve efficiency when creating budgets, accurately establish sales goals and set targets All department objectives: • workshop explaining software goals/purpose and strategic initiative Accounting department objective: • no Excel training required Sales department objective: • requires Excel training, use of formulas Clerical staff objective: • requires Excel core skills (entry level) and training for data entry in Excel. TR A I N

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Learning is more than absorbing facts, it is acquiring understanding.� William Arthur Ward

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Chapter 3 TRAIN TR A I N

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CHAPTER 3: TRAIN CREATE AND DELIVER EFFECTIVE TRAINING Training is designed to develop and enhance employees. Through strategic, well-planned training programs, the WEST approach is to create a culture of development and life-long learning. A culture of people development ensures that the acquired knowledge and skills are put to use in the most productive way, which enables companies to achieve their business goals. The following diagram illustrates the cornerstones of WEST’s effective training approach. First, is the Needs Analysis, which has been discussed in detail in Chapter 2. Next, objectives and learning outcomes are designed. Once the objectives and learning outcomes have been defined, then they are used to create a delivery plan, which includes preparing the final lesson plan, which then serves as the design document for developing the training and selecting the delivery method. All of these elements are connected to the company’s organizational goals, which are pivotal to creating training that aligns with your company’s plan.

WORKSHOP DEVELOPMENT Develop Objectives

Assessment

Need Analysis

COMPANY / ORGANIZATIONAL GOALS

Create the Lesson Plan and Develop the Lesson

Develop Learning Outcomes

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CHAPTER 3: TRAIN Connecting to the Needs Analysis As was previously stated, every good lesson or workshop design begins with a needs assessment to understand what learners need, and what objectives and outcomes will be. Effective workplace training and development programs must focus on the needs of the employees. A strategic effort has been made to assess before training; so the next step is to create programs that are job-related, focused, and specific in outcome leading to a transformative change within both the organization and its people. Having completed a thorough assessment process makes developing training easier than if you did not assess the needs first. Since you’ve completed the assessment process and interviewed every potential trainee about what they believe they need to know to be more effective in their work, you can look for common threads amongst the workers to develop training for groups of workers, and you can look for specific needs of each individual and determine how to address those specific individual needs through more targeted one-on-one or on-the-job training.

Workplace Challenge To accurately assess workplace skills, employees must understand the required skills, knowledge and expectations of the job. Does your workplace have accurate job descriptions? How are they updated? Communicated to staff?

Developing Objectives An objective is a statement of the intended general goal of a unit or program, and the objective statement describes a more global learning outcome. Learning outcomes: • Specify what learners’ new behaviours will be after a learning experience; • State the knowledge, skills and attitudes that the learners will gain through the workshop; and • Begin with an action verb and describe something observable or measurable. The learning objectives should describe the aims of the training, the main goals and topics of the learning, the main content and put it into the context of the “Big Picture.” Here are some examples for the case scenario presented in Chapter 2: • Provide employees with the necessary information related to company goals and initiatives. • Present employees with the necessary skills and knowledge to effectively work with the software program.

Resource Guide Objectives • Present training providers with the necessary skills and knowledge to effectively develop training programs. • Provide adult educators with web-based tools and strategies to incorporate into their class activities.

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CHAPTER 3: TRAIN Developing Learning Outcomes Learning outcomes specify what learners’ new behaviours will be after a learning experience by stating the knowledge, skills and attitudes that the learners will gain through the workshop. They begin with an action verb and describe something observable or measurable. When specifying learning outcomes, think about what you want learners to be able to do on the job as a result of their learning. These things fall into three possible categories (domains): • Thinking, knowledge (cognitive domain), • Doing, skills (psychomotor domain), • Feeling, attitudes (affective domain).

Creating the Lesson Plan

A Great Resource for Writing Learning Outcomes https://helpdesk.bcit.ca/fsr/teach/courseprep/htoutcomes.pdf

The Toolkit includes a sample lesson plan BCIT HelpDesk, 2010 template. You’ll also find several lesson plans on the CD. It’s important to start with a lesson plan to ensure that the training that is developed meets the needs of your learners and fulfils the required objectives for your organization. Following are the key components of a lesson plan: • Title of the lesson • Time required to complete the lesson • List of required materials • List of objectives • List of outcomes The lesson plan starts with some basic information about the topic of the training and who it’s for (learner profile). Next, it includes the essential skills that will be addressed in the training and the specific objectives of the lesson. A note is made in the lesson plan of any resources that will be required by both instructor and learners. The lesson plan also provides focus for learners, such as showing pictures or models, asking leading questions, or providing reviews of previous lessons that are relevant to continuing on the topic. It also includes a detailed outline of the planned content and the time allotted for each section, as well as practice activities that allow learners to extend their skills. A summary wraps up the discussion and answers questions. Any additional material, such as course evaluation forms or materials for exercises, is also noted in the lesson plan. Lastly, the lesson plan contains a bibliography or references list of the sources that are used to develop the lesson. While the lesson plan serves as a guide for the lesson developer, it is also a road-map for the instructor who will deliver the training. The lesson plan should be kept with the training materials, so that any instructor who will deliver the training in the future will be able to look at it and know the audience for whom the training was created, its objectives, and what resources are required. In conclusion, the lesson plan is a key document, as it serves as a guide for the developer of the training, who may not be the same person who creates the lesson plan, and as a guide for the instructor who delivers the training. It is the guide for management, training developer and instructor.

Toolkit Resource Lesson Plan

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CHAPTER 3: TRAIN Choosing the Right Delivery Method: Training can be delivered by selecting one of the following delivery methods, and each has its strengths and weaknesses. Delivery Method

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Description

Strengths

Weaknesses

Classroom/ Instructor-led Training

• An instructor teaches training in a classroom to a group of learners.

• The instructor is present to answer questions and offer alternative explanations when learners don’t understand the material. • It is interactive – learners and instructors can have interactive discussions that take place in group or individual activities to enhance learning. • The instructor may be an expert on the content of the material, and therefore provide greater opportunities for learning.

• Hiring an instructor and a training facility can be costly. • Taking a group of workers away from their jobs all at the same time may negatively impact business. • Not all learners learn at the same pace, so modulating the pace of the training can be challenging to engage those who learn quickly while not leaving behind those who take longer to assimilate the content.

Mentoring/ On-the-job Training

• An experienced co-worker or supervisor coaches and provides on-the-job hands on training to learners.

• This is generally conducted in a one-onone situation or in small groups, so it can take place at a pace that is suited for the learner. • It is specific and on-the-job, so the training is targeted at the specific tasks that must be performed by workers. • The mentor is experienced in the work tasks covered, so he/she can explain how the tasks should be completed, and then supervise the learners as they complete them and offer immediate feedback.

• Mentoring is more time-consuming and if there are many learners, it can take a long time to complete the training.

E-learning – Facilitated

• An instructor oversees a classroom of learners as they work through a computer-based learning program.

• Learners can ask questions of the instructor or each other, while completing hands-on training on the computer. • Less costly and resource intensive than pure instructor-led learning because there may be less development time on the part of the instructor if the e-learning is purchased from an outside vendor.

• If the e-learning is not specifically developed for the learners’ needs and work tasks, then it may not be as effective as customized training that targets the specific needs of the learners. • May be more challenging for learners who are not computer-literate.

E-learning – Selfpaced

• Learners independently work through a self-paced computer-based training session without supervision. There may be an online help facility to assist learners.

• Learners can complete training on their own schedule at their own pace.

• May be more challenging for workers who are less experienced with the computer or who do not learn well on their own.

Blended Learning

• A combination of instructor-led training in a classroom and selfpaced e-learning, or one-on-one instructor instruction combined with e-learning.

• Combines the advantages of instructor-led training, facilitated e-learning and self-paced e-learning.

Self-Paced Independent Learning

• Learners have a self-paced training program, such as a workbook or self-study guide, and they complete it on their own without instruction. It is not computer-based.

• Learners can complete training on their own schedule at their own pace.

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• May be more challenging for learners who do not learn well on their own. • It may be more difficult to monitor if and when learners have completed the training, and/or they may procrastinate and not complete it in a timely manner.


CHAPTER 3: TRAIN While the table on the previous page indicates advantages and disadvantages for each mode of training delivery, each mode has its strengths and is best-suited for certain types of content and learner requirements, so it cannot be concluded that one mode is superior to others, as it depends on the situation. Choosing the right training delivery method to meet the needs of your organization and your workers is critical. Review the needs and objectives and determine the best method of training to fulfill them.

Organization Needs, Expectations and Constraints You need to consider your business needs and expectations about how training will be delivered. For example, if you have a small budget for training or limited people resources within your organization, then you may need to consider specific delivery methods that will fit within these constraints. If your orientation is that training should be interactive or hands-on, for example, then you may feel predisposed to selecting these methods because you are familiar with them, although it is a good idea to explore alternative methods that may meet your needs and your workers’ needs. If you have employees within your organization who will deliver the training, then they may have preferences for different training methods. Forcing a trainer to use a method with which he/she is uncomfortable can interfere with the effectiveness of the training. Additionally, all trainers have their strengths and weaknesses, and you should consider these when you decide on your training delivery method (Bacal & Associates, 2012). For example, if you have a trainer who has great teaching skills in a classroom, but is not very adept at facilitating a hands-on or on-the-job session, then you may want to go with his or her strengths to ensure that you are delivering the most professional training. Time can also be a constraint. You may not have the time to develop and deliver your own training, so you may be using off the shelf training that’s been developed by someone else or hiring outside trainers to come in and complete the training. While this may seem to save time, it’s important to take the time to ensure that whatever training you are going to deliver will meet the needs discovered in your needs assessment. So, while off the shelf training packages or outsourced trainers can be a very effective solution, take the time to review the content and alter it to meet your employees’ specific training needs. You will find a number of training resources (lesson plans and Power Point presentations) in this resource guide, and we encourage you to make use of all of these resources, but change them to address the specific needs of your employees. Training delivery methods vary in their requirement for time commitments from both management and trainers’ perspectives and also the time investment needed from your employees. For example, one can deliver a large volume of content in a relatively short period of time via a webcast or classroom lecture. However, it may not be practical to bring the workers into a classroom setting all at once for the lecture, or having them tune into a webcast may not be the most effective means of delivering the type of content to be delivered. Consideration needs to be given to the content and how it can best be assimilated by your employees. So, while offering a classroom lecture may be the fastest in both terms of development and delivery, it may not be the most effective. Developing hands-on or computer assisted training takes considerably more time upfront to prepare, but it may work better in the end because workers complete it in situations that are similar to their work

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CHAPTER 3: TRAIN environments and at their own pace. It may also be more effective if your business has several locations, so that the workers can complete the training in their home offices without having to travel away from their workplaces to take advantage of the training. By considering time available for both development and delivery, you can select the most appropriate training delivery method to meet your company objectives and your workers’ needs, thus improving the chances for success of your training program.

Learner Needs and Expectations Your workers may have certain expectations about methods of training, desired activities and topics, so you will want to consider these before finalizing a training plan. If you do not meet your employees’ expectations, then the training may not meet your objectives (Bacal & Associates, 2012). For example, if you have an older work force, or workers who do not usually use a computer, then you may need to consider instructor-led training, as opposed to computer-based training. Conversely, if your business is technology-based and your workers are highly computer-literate, then an online delivery method or other self-paced computer-based training may be the most effective training. Depending on the objectives of the training or the topic, different delivery methods vary in their effectiveness. For example, skills such as typing or using software programs are more effectively learned through hands-on-training than via a lecture. However, if the objective of the learning is simply to convey some information about a topic, such as the process for completing an order, then a lecture will suffice.

Developing the Lesson The completed lesson plan provides the guide for developing the lesson, as it defines the audience, the training objectives and resources, an outline, the time allotted, the delivery method to be used, activities, practice sessions and a summary. With these guidelines in mind, the lesson needs to be developed to meet the target audience and the objectives. (See Toolkit for a sample of a completed lesson plan.) The delivery method to be used will dictate the development. If the lesson will be instructor-led, then a lecture or Power Point presentation may be developed. If the lesson will be delivered online or via computer-assisted learning, then development will require using the appropriate technology. If the lesson is to be delivered via a self-paced program, then a lesson guide will be written. Whatever the delivery method, the lesson should contain some variety and interactivity to keep learners engaged.

Toolkit Resource Lesson Plan

BEST PRACTICES It is critical that all training match an organization’s strategic goals by aligning the content, learning objectives, learning outcomes and business objectives (Brown, 2008). When training is specifically linked to work tasks, learners are more engaged and therefore, the training is more effective and yields better results to both the organization and the employees. Additionally, when workers are able to learn by performing the specific tasks that they need to perform on the job, they are more empowered. The material or skills learned in training programs must be easily transferred back to the real world. This is facilitated by ensuring that the training is delivered when it’s needed, so that learners don’t forget the new ideas or skills before they have to use them (Brown, 2008).

WORKPLACE TRAINING SUSTAINABILITY – KEEP TRAINING GOING! Learning should be ongoing. A continuous learning plan ensures that learning outcomes are reinforced and new skills and concepts are introduced when appropriate, either for the same workers, for new workers, or for workers in other areas of the business (Brown, 2008). There are cost effective ways to implement and sustain training initiatives within your organization. Let’s explore two of these.

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CHAPTER 3: TRAIN Mentorship Mentorship is a helping and supportive learning relationship between an experienced person and a learner. A mentor is someone who is adept at the work skills that must be transferred to the learner, and takes on the responsibility of coaching the learner as he or she learns the new skills. The mentor instructs, provides feedback, coaches and encourages the learner, as he or she learns the new skill on the job by incorporating the “how” and “why” of the task (Canadian Construction Sector Council, 2009). A good mentor listens to learners by asking questions and encouraging learners to take risks. A good mentor also helps learners to improve by letting them know how to improve their work. Mentors are also trustworthy and consistent in their feedback. They are credible and have experience. Good mentors are also patient with learners (Canadian Construction Sector Council, 2009). WEST adopted the Six Steps to Mentorship, as outlined by the Canadian Construction Sector Council (2009). 1) Identify the Point of the Lesson – the mentor sets the tone for the training and describes the context in which the skill or task is completed. 2) Link the lesson – the mentor demonstrates how the skill or behaviour is connected to the overall process in which it takes place. 3) Demonstrate the skill – the mentor demonstrates the skill or task so that the learner observes how it is done correctly. 4) Provide opportunity for practice – the mentor gives the learner an opportunity to practice the skill. 5) Give feedback – the mentor offers feedback to the learner after he or she practices the skill, so that the learner knows how to improve. The feedback offers encouragement and makes suggestions to correct errors or improve performances. 6) Assess progress – the mentor monitors the learner’s progress and decides when the learner is prepared to move on to the next task (Canadian Construction Sector Council, 2009). The mentorship approach to training offers several benefits: • A supportive and trusting relationship develops between mentor and learner, so that interactive training can take place. • The mentor-learner relationship helps both mentor and learner develop confidence, self-esteem, enthusiasm and commitment for the work and organization. • In production, manufacturing and trades environments, the mentoring approach improves health and safety performance. • Mentoring improves teamwork and cooperation (Canadian Construction Sector Council, 2009). Workers develop new skills and insights by working with an experienced mentor to learn new skills.

Train the Trainer

“Tell me and I forget, teach me and I may remember,

By offering training to those who involve me and I learn” will train others in the organiz-Benjamin Franklin ation, a company ensures consistency and quality in training, which ultimately benefits both workers and the organization. The training will be consistent and effective and linked to the strategy of the organization, ultimately leading to improved performance, a happier more qualified workforce, and improved productivity. Transferring training skills to team leaders and more experienced workers ultimately reduces training costs, as workers within your organization develop their skills to train others with less experience, thus eliminating the necessity of investing in external training. The CD provided in this resource guide includes training materials that include information about mentorship, developing objectives, learner outcomes, lesson plans and lessons with practice exercises.

Essential Skills Learning & Training Tools www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/workplaceskills/LES/tools_resources/tools.shtml#tabs2_3

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“Learning Organizations are those where people are continually learning to see the whole together.” Peter Senge

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Chapter 4 EVALUATE TR A I N

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CH A P T E R 4 : E VA L UAT E IDENTIFY, MEASURE AND EVALUATE

Create Goals and Objectives

Needs Analysis

Develop Learning Outcomes Evaluate

Program

Establish Training Plan

Success Depends on Establish Trainer

Evaluation

Evaluation occurs at several levels and at various stages of the training process. Data collected for the evaluation comes in many forms and is collected both formally and informally. You may talk to employees directly about their experience one-on-one, or run focus groups and speak to several employees. You could send out surveys with a series of specific questions about the training via email or conduct telephone interviews. The goal of program evaluation is to accurately assess success, measure it and identify areas that require further development. Training program evaluation begins at the needs analysis stage. During the needs analysis, organizations identify training goals and objectives; these goals and objectives are then measured during the evaluation stage. To ensure on-going program success, evaluation of the training plays a vital role.

STAGES OF EVALUATION The one basic question you should ask yourself, regardless of the stage of development you are in, is:

“Did we accomplish what we set out to do?” There are fundamentally two parts to evaluation; the first is accurately identifying what specific factor(s) is to be measured; and second, determine the method you will use to measure the factor. Initiate the evaluation process at the training stage. It is during this stage you will gather the most specific information.

Evaluate the Training Experience Collecting data from participants about their training experience is a great way to begin the evaluation process. You will learn about what worked, what didn’t work, how participants felt about the training session and whether (or not) they found value in the training session. The information gathered here is about the experience during the training session. You might ask participants: • What did you enjoy/not enjoy about the training session? • Did you obtain the information that you needed? • Are you able to implement the skills learned in your workplace? • Was the venue appropriate? • Was the length of the training session appropriate for information presented? • Would you participate in additional training sessions in the future?

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CH A P T E R 4 : E VA L UAT E Evaluate the Trainer Another key piece to an effective training session is selecting the right trainer. The trainer is tasked to not only deliver the company’s message, but also to meet the needs of the participants. The trainer needs to be skilled at delivery and identifying the key outcomes of the session. You might ask participants: • How well did the trainer know the subject matter? • In what ways did the trainer’s presentation keep your interest? • Did the trainer connect the learning to your workplace needs?

Evaluate Learning Outcomes To effectively evaluate learning outcomes, you must first identify the specific outcome to be measured. In Chapter 3 you learned how to create learning outcomes for the training session. Learning outcomes specify what learners’ new behaviours will be after a learning experience by stating the knowledge, skills and attitudes that the learners will gain through the workshop. They begin with an action verb and describe something observable or measurable. Here are some examples of learning outcomes. By the end of the training session, participants will be able to: • Describe the stages in a needs analysis • Describe the stages in workshop development • Enter data into the ABC software program • Retrieve client account information from the ABC software program • Demonstrate an ability to provide feedback At times, a pre-assessment survey can also be implemented. A pre-assessment is a survey that participants complete before they begin the training. It invites learners to assess the skills, abilities and knowledge about the subject matter before engaging in training. Once training is complete, participants can identify if they have actually increased knowledge in the topic.

Toolkit Resource Sample Pre-Assessment Survey

Once the training is completed, as part of your evaluation, you might ask participants: • Are you able to describe the stages in workshop development? • Can you enter data into the ABC software program? • Has the workshop improved your ability to provide effective feedback?

Toolkit Resource Sample Employee Survey

You might further evaluate the effectiveness of learning outcomes by asking managers/supervisors of the impact of training. Ask specific questions to determine training effectiveness such as: • Has there been an increase in use with the data software program? • Are employees entering and retrieving information from the software program? • Has teamwork and collaboration among departments increased? Can you provide examples?

Toolkit Resource Sample Management Survey

Evaluate Goals and Objectives The learning objectives should describe the aims of the training, the main goals and topics of the learning, the main content and put it into the context of the “Big Picture.” After reviewing the feedback collected from the evaluations conducted at the training and outcomes level you can validate the effectiveness of training goals and objectives. Statements related to goals and objectives are often broad and address the “big picture” targets. Examples might include: • There has been an increase in customer service satisfaction Toolkit Resource • Employee demonstrate an increase in initiative Sample Post Assessment Survey • There is an increase in organizational efficiencies – information is readily available

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Chapter 5 DEVELOP AND EMPOWER TR A I N

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CHAPTER 5: DEVELOP AND EMPOWER PROMOTE A CULTURE OF EMPLOYEE DEVELOPMENT Employee development is a joint, on-going effort of both the employer and the employee. Successful employee development programs consider both the needs of the employee and the organization’s goals. Consider the following factors when creating compelling need for development among people: • Provide opportunities to put learning acquired during training into use in the actual work context. • Support employees to use the skills acquired in training; give employees a chance to demonstrate new skills. • Encourage active employee participation in decision making about training and organizational goals as a whole. • Create reward programs that encourage employee development and involvement in training. How does this benefit my organization? Creating a culture of life-long learning and people development will result in a workforce that is eager to learn, easily adapts when presented with change and increases business flexibility. If a business wants to be able to attract and retain skilled, dedicated and effective workers, it must adopt a culture of learning as a life-long commitment. How does a business empower its staff? Employee empowerment is a strategy that fosters an environment in which people are dynamic, happy, and produce real results. A culture of empowerment reinforces accomplishments, employee contribution, and places value on the people who work within an organization. Leaders share organizational goals, company direction, and encourage staff to contribute to the company’s vision. Staff empowerment creates an environment of trust; one in which the employees intentions are trusted and where employers trust that staff will make the right decision. Think of empowerment as a process that enables employees to think, take action, take control and make decisions in an autonomous way. Your role as an employer is to remove barriers that limit staff to act in empowered ways. Does an empowered workforce benefit the company? An organization has the responsibility to create a work environment which helps foster the ability of employees to act in empowered ways. But what benefits does this bring to the organization? Here are a few: • Staff that is more responsive and adaptive to change • Staff that engages and supports the company mission • Increased employee retention • A more confident staff that is interested in moving within the organization • Intrinsically motivated employees who contribute to team effectiveness • A workforce that is innovative, with strong decision-making skills What can employers do to empower their staff? Believe in the process; that’s the first step. Employers must truly recognize the power and benefits of employee empowerment. It’s essential that employers take the time to learn about employee empowerment, and the principles and the practices that encourage empowerment. The next piece is to trust in your staff; believe that staff will make the right decision and provide opportunities for staff to be involved in decision-making, especially regarding their jobs. As an employer, provide the information and tools to ensure employees are well equipped to make informed decisions. Provide feedback, before, during and after training. Communication is essential and employers need to listen, learn and provide leadership when employees need it. Finally, ensure that employees are rewarded and recognized for engaging in empowered behaviours. Remember, empowering employees will have dramatic results.

Toolkit Resource Lesson Plans & Surveys

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“Let us think of education as the means of developing our greatest abilities …” John F. Kennedy

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Toolkit LESSON PLANS & SURVEYS TR A I N

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RESOURCE CD Contents Training Resources

Assessment Resources

Basic Business Skills

• Lesson Plan • Power Point presentation

Pre-Training Surveys

• Train-the-Trainer Pre-Assessment

Basic Excel

• Lesson Plan • Power Point presentation • Exercise

Post-Training Surveys

Business Writing and Email

• Lesson Plan • Power Point presentation

Dealing with Difficult Customers

• Lesson Plan • Power Point presentation

• Post-Training Employee Survey: Sample A & B                                                      • Post-Training Management Survey: Sample A & B • Train-the-Trainer Post Assessment

Program Assessment Tools Fantastic Customer Service Workshop

• Lesson Plan • Power Point presentation

• Program Assessment Chart: Sample A & B

Priority Management, Problem Solving & Decision Making

• Lesson Plan • Power Point presentation

Mentor Development Workshop

• Lesson Plan • Power Point presentation

Planning and Leading Effective Meetings

• Lesson Plan • Power Point presentation

Priority Management, Problem Solving & Decision Making

• Lesson Plan • Power Point presentation

Train the Trainer: Part 1 and Part 2

• Power Point presentation

Train-Develop-Empower

• Lesson Plan • Power Point presentation

Ultimate Customer Service Workshop

• Lesson Plan • Power Point presentation

Work Life Balance

• Lesson Plan • Power Point presentation

Toolkit Resource

Working Effectively with the Elderly

• Power Point presentation

Working in Teams and Team Planning

• Lesson Plan • Power Point presentation

Working with Difficult People

• Lesson Plan • Power Point presentation

_________________ Please refer to the Resource CD enclosed for an electronic copy of these Training & Assessment Resources _______________

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TOOLKIT

LESSON PLAN Sample Lesson  Plan   LESSON  PLAN   Lesson  Title:     Basic  Business  Skills     Sector:   Occupation(s):    Social  Enterprise   Cleaning  Service     Lesson  Theme:    An  introduction  to  basic   Occupational  Task(s):   business  concepts  to  familiarize  non-­‐business   House  Cleaning  and  Seniors  Support   trained  employees  about  business  in  general     and  how  to  talk  about  the  company  to  others     Learner  Profile:    Company-­‐wide  training  for  cleaning  and  concierge  staff.  This  workshop  discusses   the  basic  concepts  of  business  management.     Essential  Skills  developed  during  the  learning  activities:   • Oral  Communication   • Working  with  Others   • Thinking  Skills   • Continuous  Learning   • Document  Use   • Numeracy     Learning  Outcomes:     After  completing  this  session,  participants  will  be  able  to   • Develop  an  understanding  of  an  organization’s  goals  and  operations   • Define  basic  business  terms  and  financial  concepts   • Establish  a  plan  for  continued  development  of  business  knowledge  skills.         Instructor  Resources:     • Facilitator/Mentor  –  Basic  Business  Skills  Power  Point  Presentation   • Blank  flip  chart     Learner  Resources:     • n/a                         48

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TOOLKIT

LESSON PLAN

Learning Activities  

Timeframe   1. Mentor  /Facilitator  –  Basic  Business  Skills  Power  Point  Presentation  

Welcome,  Introduction,  Agenda,  Learning  Objectives,   Essential  Skills:  (slides  1-­‐6)     Company  Overview  (slides  7-­‐13)   • Mission  statement,  goals,  organization  chart,  branding     Basic  Business  Knowledge  (slides  14-­‐15)   • Basic  business  terms   Business  Financials  (slides  16-­‐19)   • Terms,  Income  statement,  Balance  sheet  

Business Operations  (slides  20-­‐22)   • Keys  to  success  and  introduction  Activity  

Putting it  All  Together  (slides  23-­‐27)   • Summary,  essential  skills  covered,  action  plan,  references  

10 minutes   10  minutes   5  minutes       15  minutes       15  minutes       10  minutes      

Evaluation (if  applicable):   • Course  Evaluation  Forms     References:   • Atwood,  Christee  Gabour,  (2009).  Ultimate  Basic  Business  Skills,  ASTD  Press,  Alexandria,   VA.   • Quickbooks  2004  Software  –  Sample  Reports        

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BIBLIOGRAPHY

Bibliography RESOURCES AND SUGGESTED READINGS Amanda. (August 2, 2010). “Employee Training: A Wise Investment,” CEO Leadership Entrepreneurs, retrieved from http://www.smbceo.com/2010/08/02/employee-training , October 17, 2012. Appleman, Jack. (2008). 10 Steps to Successful Business Writing, ASTD Press, Alexandria, VA. Atwood, Christee Gabour,. (2009). Ultimate Basic Business Skills, ASTD Press, Alexandria, VA. Bacal & Associates, The Training and Development World, http://thetrainingworld.com , retrieved November 7, 2012. Boller, S. (2005). Teamwork Training, ASTD Press, Alexandria, VA. Brown, Tris. (April 2, 2008). Top 10 Training Best Practices for Effective Learning and Development Programs, http://www.articlesbase.com/management-articles/top-10-training-best-practices-for-effective-learning-and-development-programs-376420.html , retrieved November 10, 2012. Byrne, Rhonda, (2006). The Secret, Atria Books, New York, NY. Canadian Construction Sector Council, Mentorship Program, Ottawa, ON. 2009. Canadian Manufacturers and Exporters Ontario and Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, Business Results Through Essential Skills and Literacy Guidebook and related workshop materials, Mississauga, ON. Chen, C. (2003). Coaching Training, ASTD Press, Alexandria, VA. Creighton, James L, and Adams, James W.R. (1998). CyberMeetings, AMACOM, INC. Daft, Richard L. (2005). Management, (7th Ed.), Thomson South-Western, Mason, OH. Donovan, M. Concepts in Mentoring Series, ARG Australia. Douglas College, retrieved from http://www.douglas.bc.ca/training-community-education/essentialskills.html , October 15, 2012. Effective Meetings.com, www.effectivemeetings.com , retrieved on June 15, 2011. Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, retrieved from http://www.hrsdc.gc.ca/eng/workplaceskills/LES/definitions/definitions.shtml , October 15, 2012. “If You Only Understood Your Customer’s Personality Style,“ AH Digital FH Studios, Inc., http://www.ahfx.net/ weblog/37 , retrieved on June 30, 2011. Kamin, M. (2010). Customer Service Training, ASTD Press, Alexandria, VA. Kamin, M. (2010). 10 Steps to Successful Customer Service, ASTD Press, Alexandria, VA. Kibbee, Kate and Gerzon, Jeannette. (2008). MIT Training Delivery Guide, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, http://web.mit.edu/training/trainers/guide/deliver/train-guide-matrix.pdf , retrieved November 8, 2012. Kirstein, K., Hinrichs, J., Olswang, S. (2011). Authentic Instruction and Online Delivery: Proven Practices in Higher Education, City University of Seattle, Seattle, WA. Matson, Eric. (April 30, 1996). “The Seven Sins of Deadly Meetings,” Fast Company. Matson, Eric. (April 30, 1995). “Have I Died and Gone to Meeting Heaven?” Fast Company. McNamara, Carter. “Guidelines to Conducting Effective Meetings,” http://www.managementhelp.or/misc/mtgmgmnt.htm , retrieved on June 15, 2011.

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RESOURCES / SUGGESTED READINGS McNamara, Carter, “Critical Ingredients for Building and Maintaining Trust,” retrieved from http://managementhelp.org/interpersonal/building-trust.htm , October 21, 2011. Microsoft Websites online Excel Demo, retrieved from http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/excel-help/meetthe-spreadsheet-RZ101773335.aspx?section=2 and http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/templates/my-college-budget-TC102347374.aspx , January 16, 2012. Mind Tools: Essential Skills for an Excellent Career, “Running Effective Meetings,” http://www.mindtools.com/CommSkll/RunningMeetings.htm , retrieved on June 15, 2011. Moran, Gwen. (2011). “How to Make Employee Training a Winning Investment,” retrieved from http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/45187680/ns/business-small_business/t/how-make-employee-training-winning-investment , October 17, 2017. Nelson, Robert B. and Economy, Peter. (1995). Better Business Meetings, Richard d. Irwin, Inc. Oberstein, S. (2009). 10 Steps to Successful Coaching, ASTD Press, Alexandria, VA. Rabemananjara, Rova and Parsley, Chris. (October 2006). “Employee Training Decisions, Business Strategies and Human Resource Management Practices: A Study by Size of Business,” Small Business Branch, Industry Canada, retrieved from http://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/061.nsf/eng/h_rd02058.html , October 17, 2012. Sidhu, Lovey. (2011). “Take your training to a new level of Success ... Go W.E.S.T. Part I: Train, Develop and Empower,” retrieved from http://www.westproject.ca , July 28, 2011. Sidhu, Lovey. (2011). “How is Workplace Training and Business Success Connected? Part II: Training & Development”, retrieved from http://www.westproject.ca , July 28, 2011. Sidhu, Lovey. (2011). “How does a Company Empower their Staff? Part III: Don’t just Train ... Empower,” retrieved from http://www.westproject.ca , July 28, 2011. Skillplan (2010). Six Steps to Mentoring, Burnaby, BC. Stolovitch, H. and Keeps, E. (2002). Telling Ain’t Training, ASTD Press, Alexandria, VA. The 9 Essential Skills, Workplace Education, Manitoba, retrieved from http://www.wem.mb.ca/the_9_essential_skills.aspx , October 15, 2012. The Construction Sector Council. (2009). Mentorship Program, Ottawa, ON. Weaver, Carla B. (2007). “Express Your Creative Spirit” Workshop, Vancouver, BC. YouTube, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QzZyUaQvpdc&feature=related.

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“Success in business requires training, discipline and hard work ...” David Rockefeller

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