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The Lazy Brats BY SOULAIMA GOURANI ON OCTOBER 26, 2012

I just spoke with a young guy who has been called “unrealistic” and “spoiled” by a potential future employer. Hmmm… These years, many fresh and promising young people are entering the job market, but the integration of these new graduates into the workforce is not going all that well! You may have heard the terms “generation Y,” “generation Z,” and “generation alpha.” But very few people know the meaning of the terms and what really makes these youngsters tick. Every week, I speak for at least a few companies who ask me if I believe that it is possible for them to attract, retain, and motivate the next generations. This is a question that preoccupies many companies. Will your company survive or die within the next five years? The companies that will survive this exciting “post crisis time” think, act, and see our differences as an opportunity—not as a challenge. The successful company trains managers and organizations in making individual considerations and strengthens their ability to communicate on the platforms that people are actively using. Successful companies do away with the idea that everybody is equal, must learn the same curriculum, and have the same experiences to bring value to the company. In five years, job descriptions will no longer exist. The young people will define their own tasks and bid on them, as we know it from online auctions. The young people will choose their manager and switch to another when they want to be inspired and learn something new. Traditional systems, measurements, and control measures are on the way out. What will replace them? Meaningfulness, passion, and authentic forums, where individuals work for a manager who is value based, competent, and personally involved. Why should the young people choose to work under your management? What strengths or talents do you have that will appeal to the next generation? Those are important questions in the battle for the very scarce resources five years ahead. Through my lecture “Take Power Over Your Career” and in my book Ignite Your Career, I had the opportunity to discuss career with many young people. Actually, many young people in high schools and universities give me the feedback that they feel frustrated about their future career. They say that their competences are not utilized at work and that a lot of talent is being wasted. They feel that they don’t earn the professional respect that they deserve because they don’t have a certificate to document their competences and because they don’t have a lot of experience. Their boundless energy and positive attitude are being overlooked. Is eight to ten years’ experience with IT, media, and online social networking not a competence? As I see it, a young person must possess three key competences to be able to help companies into a new era:

The Lazy Brats  

Blog from Soulaima Gourani

The Lazy Brats  

Blog from Soulaima Gourani

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