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U.S. Naval Support Activity Souda Bay, Greece

BEACON August 2019


The Beacon Warfighting First, Operate Forward, Be Ready Warfighting First, Operate Forward, Be Ready

Commanding Officer, NSA Souda Commanding Officer, NSA Souda BayBay Capt. Ryan T. Tewell Capt. Ryan T. Tewell Executive Officer Executive Officer Cmdr. Cmdr.Werner WernerRauchenstein J. Rauchenstein Command Master Chief Command Master Chief CMDCM Brian Neal McDonough CMDCM T. Olds

BeaconAffairs Staff/Public Public Office Affairs Office Jacky Fisher

Public Affairs Officer, 266-1244

Carolyn Jackson Joel Diller

Public Affairs Officer, DSN 266-1244 Assistant Public Affairs Officer, 266-1392

Joel Diller Kostas Fantaousakis

Assistant Public Affairs Officer, DSN: 266-1392 Community Relations, 266-1348

Kostas Fantaousakis

Community Relations and The Beacon Designer, DSN: 266-1348 SoudaBayPAO@eu.navy.mil Public Affairs Specialist and The Beacon Assistant Designer, DSN: 266-1642

Contact Email (All PAO personnel): MC2 Kelly Agee Contact Email (All PAO personnel):

SoudaBayPAO@eu.navy.mil

The Beacon Beaconis is the the professional professionalonline onlinenewsletter newsletterof ofNSA NSASouda SoudaBay Bay Public PublicAffairs. Affairs.Information Information contained The in The Beacon not does necessarily reflect the official the U.S. the Department contained in Thedoes Beacon not necessarily reflect the views officialofviews of theGovernment, U.S. Government, the of Defense or the Department of the Navy. Editorial content is prepared by the Public Department of Defense or the Department of the Navy. Editorial content is prepared by theAffairs Public Office of NSA Souda Bay. Affairs Office of NSA Souda Bay. for publication in The Beacon should be submitted to SoudaBayPAO@eu.navy.mil ArticlesArticles for publication in The Beacon should be submitted to SoudaBayPAO@eu.navy.mil Story submissions must be routed through tenant command or departmental senior leadership. Story submissions must be routed through tenant command or departmental senior leadership. Securityand andpolicy policy review must completed before submissions be considered for publication. Security review must bebe completed before submissions cancan be considered for publication.

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Contents

Information Systems Technician 1st Class Donald Davis teaches Utilitiesman 3rd Class Ryan Rylie how to correctly operate the throttle July 27 during the Basic Riders Course at Naval Support Activity Souda Bay.

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Triad Corner

Under Secretary of the Navy Vists NSA Souda Bay

Torpedo Mission Increases Marathi Port Capabilities

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ECO-Challenge

August Naval History

Calendar of Events

Cover Photo: Sailors assigned to the Los Angeles-class attack submarine USS Olympia (SSN 717) prepare to transport a Mark 48 torpedo on to the pier in Souda Bay, Greece, July 10. Photo by MC2 Kelly Agee, Public Affairs Page 3


Triad Corner

Hello Team Souda, We are more than halfway through 2019 – and as I reflect on the first half of the year, I am proud of what we have accomplished. Following our Operations Readiness Assessment in June, July was slated to be a time of routine operations when we could catch up on some administrative issues and maybe take a little leave. It was not to be! Air operations was out in the heat supporting the arrival and departure of many different types of aircraft while the airfield ramp expansion is fully underway to provide additional aircraft capacity. Down at Marathi, Port Operations Department and Naval Munitions Command completed a successful offload and then reload of a torpedo from a moored submarine for the first time here, demonstrating another way that Team Souda supports the Fleet. We also hosted several distinguished visitors, including Under Secretary of the Navy Thomas Modly during his visit to the Mediterranean region. I want to shout out THANK YOU to all of you who stood the watch over the July 19th weekend – you showcased our capabilities and spirit as well as the important role of NSA Souda Bay in this AOR. Under Secretary Modly has now seen firsthand the excellent work that you do Page 4

day in and day out. I know he was impressed – he said so! By now, you have heard about the changes to our liberty policy, but this topic is so important that I want you to hear about it from me. The CO, CMC, and I believe this is a positive step toward protecting our junior Sailors when they first arrive in Souda Bay. The updated policy prohibits E-1 to E-4 personnel from drinking alcohol and sets a curfew of midnight for the first 90 days onboard the installation. A liberty buddy is now required for E-1 to E-4 barracks residents when leaving the installation during the first 180 days. These restrictions are nothing more than a temporary boundary that removes unnecessary distractions for Sailors experiencing many new things: responsibilities, freedoms, friends, new and unfamiliar hazards, and the Greek culture. Our goal is to help our new team members have a smoother, safer transition and help protect our relationship with our Greek hosts, which is vital to our success in mission and recreation. Finally, any note from me would not be complete without a few words about risk management. With ORM we identify the hazards, assess them and then make risk decisions. We should also use our previous


experience to implement controls and make changes for future actions. We talk about ORM all the time in the military, but you may not think about applying it to your personal life. Use this thinking before you go to the beach, plan a road trip, or drive downtown. Think about the hazards that you may face. Know the level of risk you are about to take. If you can lower the risk, then do it! Of course, as always, if you ever realize that

you need help, call a shipmate! Call me! Team Souda will be there for you! Don’t hesitate; you will be doing us a favor as well as yourself. Thank you, Team Souda, for your effort and professionalism. Continue to be safe, make wise choices and enjoy the Mediterranean sunshine!

~ XO

In the 11th episode of "On the Horizon: Navigating the European and African Theater" podcast, Adm. James G. Foggo III highlights the great power competition in the Black Sea and the importance of maritime security in the Gulf of Guinea. Foggo, commander, U.S. Naval Forces Europe-Africa (CNE-A), shared his thoughts on exercise Sea Breeze and his trip to celebrate the Ghanaian Navy's 60th anniversary and attend the International Maritime Defense Exhibition and Conference. For the first time in the podcast's history, he invited two guests to join him: CNE-A Fleet Master Chief Derrick Walters and Logistics Specialist 1st Class Ahmed Tabsoba.

The podcasts is available on the following platforms: https://www.spreaker.com/show/on-the-horizon https://www.c6f.navy.mil/Press-Room/Podcast/ https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/public-affairs-officer/on-the-horizon-navigating-the-european-and-african-theaters

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Modly speaks with Port Operations Sailors at the Marathi NATO Pier Facility.

Under Secretary Visits Team Souda Photos and story by MC2 Kelly Agee, Public Affairs

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nder Secretary of the Navy Thomas Modly stopped in Crete, Greece, July 19-20, and spent time with the Naval Support Activity Souda Bay team as part of his visit to the Mediterranean region. Capt. Ryan T. Tewell, commanding officer NSA Souda Bay, briefed Modly on the installation's strategic mission and ongoing projects. Modly toured NSA Souda Bay's facilities, which are hosted on board the Hellenic Air Force 115th Combat Air Wing military base. He also traveled to the Marathi NATO Pier Complex where he saw firsthand the piers, Joint Test Operations Center, port operations, harbor security and the NATO Ammo Depot. During his visit, Modly met with Sailors and discussed some of the advantages and challenges of being stationed in Greece.

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"I really appreciate that he would come out to Souda Bay to see our command. I can tell that he cares about our Sailors and what we are doing here," said Boatswain's Mate Seaman Casandra Hernandez, who works in Port Operations. Modly said NSA Souda Bay's strategic location provides the Navy a clear logistical advantage with regard to supplying ships and Sailors in the Mediterranean Sea with what they need to maintain long steaming hours – from weapons and food to letters from home. However, he noted working with our partners and allies around the world is also part of the mission here. "It's not just the operational side, but it's the relationships that are built over time that are really critical for us," Modly said.


Modly speaks with Capt. Theodoros Mikropoulos, commander of Hellenic Naval Base Souda, at the Marathi NATO Pier Facility.

Modly with Capt. Andrew Lindey, master of the dry cargo and ammunition ship USNS Medgar Evers (T-AKE-13).

It's not just the operational side, but it's the relationships that are built over time that are really critical for us

,,

,,

Under Secretary of the Navy Thomas Modly

Modly and Port Ops Sailors at the Marathi NATO pier facility.

Under Secretary of the Navy Thomas Modly speaks with Capt. Ryan T. Tewell, commanding officer Naval Support Activity Souda Bay, and Capt. Rose E. Rice, assistant naval attache at the U.S. Embassy in Greece, in a conference room at the installation.

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Torpedo Mission Increases Marathi Port Capabilities Story by Joel Diller and MC2 Kelly Agee, Public Affairs

Sailors assigned to the Los Angeles-class attack submarine USS Olympia (SSN 717) transport a Mark 48 torpedo from the pier in Souda Bay, Greece, July 11.

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aval Support Activity Souda Bay, Greece, added to its port services capability in July by overseeing the successful transfer of a Mark 48 torpedo onto a submarine at the Marathi NATO Pier Facility.

exchange payloads,” said Tewell. “Now, they can complete this activity here at Souda Bay, and then relocate to waters around Africa, Europe, or the Middle East much more quickly.”

During the operation, Sailors assigned to the Los Angeles-class attack submarine USS Olympia (SSN 717) transported the torpedo to the pier and performed maintenance on its guidance wire communication system.

Tewell said that a coordinated effort between many departments and organizations allowed for Team Souda to accomplish its mission: port operations, safety, security, public works, Fleet Logistics Center Sigonella Det Souda Bay, and Navy Munitions Command Atlantic Detachment Souda Bay.

“Showing that this type of operation can be done in Souda Bay adds to the array of capabilities that we offer to the fleet,” said Capt. Ryan T. Tewell, NSA Souda Bay commanding officer. “It’s another way that we can support the Joint Force from our strategic location in the Eastern Mediterranean.” Submarines operating in the U.S. 6th Fleet’s area of responsibility now have the ability to visit Souda Bay to replenish or perform maintenance on their payload while executing their mission at sea. “Previously a submarine may have had to travel thousands of miles outside of an AOR to reload or Page 8

Outside organizations that worked together to make the mission a success included members of the Hellenic Navy, U.S. 6th Fleet, Submarine Group 8, Task Force 68, Task Force 69, Trident Refit Facility, Kings Bay, Ga. and Naval Submarine Support Facility, New London, Conn. NMCLANT Det. Souda Bay, responsible for managing the ordnance flowing in and out of Souda Bay and maintaining the inventory stored at the NATO Ammo Depot, provided coordination with Olympia and their higher headquarters.


According to Chief Aviation Ordnanceman Travis Turner, Sailors with rates of Aviation Ordnanceman or Gunner’s Mate do not often experience an operation involving a Mark 48 torpedo and a submarine. “I learned a lot by seeing [Olympia’s] capability,” said Turner. “It was also great for my Sailors to see the process and how it’s done from cradle to grave.” Olympia, homeported in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, is currently on a scheduled deployment supporting maritime operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of operations. NSA Souda Bay is an operational ashore base that enables U.S., allied, and partner nation forces to be where they are needed and when they are needed to ensure security and stability in Europe, Africa, and Southwest Asia. For more information, visit us at www. cnic.navy.mil/SoudaBay or find us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/NSASoudaBay/ or Twitter at www. twitter.com/NSA_SoudaBay.

Sailors assigned to the Los Angeles-class attack submarine USS Olympia (SSN 717) transport a Mark 48 torpedo onto the pier in Souda Bay, Greece, July 11.

Sailors assigned to the Los Angeles-class attack submarine USS Olympia (SSN 717); Sailors assigned to Navy Munitions Command CONUS East Division Detachment Souda Bay; Naval Support Activity Souda Bay, Greece, port operations workers; and personnel assigned to NSA Souda Bay pose for a photo with a Mark 48 torpedo on the pier in Souda Bay, Greece, July 11.

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Souda Certifies Riders in Motorcycle Safety Courses Story and photos by MC2 Kelly Agee, Public Affairs

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ine Naval Support Activity Souda Bay, Greece, team members received certification in a series of motorcycle safety courses July 22 to August 2 and can safely ride in Crete. Four team members qualified in the Basic Riders Course, one in the Advanced Riders Course and four in the Train-the-Trainer Course. John Tillman, NSA Souda Bay’s Physical Security Officer and the base’s Motorcycle Safety Representative said, “There are two kinds of people. Those that love to ride motorcycles and those that don't know they love to ride motorcycles. From being a beginner to becoming an experienced rider, you can always learn to be a safer rider.” The four experienced riders certified in the Train-theTrainer Course are now qualified to be motorcycle instructors. This allows the base to have the number of instructors needed to set a regular motorcycle training course schedule,” said the Base Safety Department personnel. Legalman 1st Class C.B. Casey, one of the newlycertified instructors, has been a motorcycle rider since 2016. Casey said she took the course to become an instructor because she wanted people to be able to ride safely. “I knew that we needed instructors out here and I knew

that I would be out here long enough to make an impact on the command,” she said. Military members who are already qualified in the Basic Riders Course are required to requalify every three years. “As an experienced rider I already have the skills but this course is about refreshing my skills,” said Utilitiesman 2nd Class Kshitiz Malia, who has more than six years of experience and took the Basic Riders Course. Malia said he is thankful to have new trainers at the command. “They are great,” said Malia. “They have been riding for a long time and they have much more experience and they are passing (on) the knowledge.” Tillman said Crete is a “unique driving experience” noting the difference in terrain, from the backroads, to downtown, to the winding mountain roads. “Riding a motorcycle here is vastly different than riding in (the continental U.S.),” he said. “Taking a course here gets you the opportunity to get some coaching from riders already experienced in driving in the obstacle course that is Crete!” If you are interested in taking a motorcycle course, contact the Safety Office at DSN #: 266-1527.

Information Systems Technician 1st Class Donald Davis teaches students how to shift gears July 27 during the Basic Riders Course at NSA Souda Bay.

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Information Systems Technician 1st Class Donald Davis teaches students how to shift gears July 27 during the Basic Riders Course at NSA Souda Bay.

Information Systems Technician 1st Class Donald Davis teaches

Lt. Evan Possley how to correctly operate the throttle July 27 during the Basic Riders Course at NSA Souda Bay.

Information Systems Technician 3rd Class Joseph McGowen

learns how to stop quickly and safely July 27 during the Basic Riders Course at NSA Souda Bay.

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Who Will Triumph?

Registration Still Open for the 18th Annual Eco-Challenge Photo and Story by MC2 Kelly Agee, Public Affairs

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Bisesi, a native of Miami, Fla., said the Eco-Challenge has a lot to offer members of Team Souda.

Each team member will conquer one challenge:

“This is a chance for us to hike in a beautiful spot such as the Gouverneto Monastery, or swim and kayak in the Marathi area. Also (it is a chance) for us to enjoy the world-class nature and beauty that Crete has given us, all while getting a stellar workout. Plus it’s with friends!”

t 7 a.m. September 7, teams of five will pit themselves against Mother Nature, the glorious Akrotiri Peninsula, and other teams competing in the 18th annual Eco-Challenge.

• An 8-kilometer hike • A 16-kilometer run • A 40-kilometer bike ride • The 6-kilometer kayak course • A 2-kilometer swim Air Traffic Controller 3rd Class Benjamin Bisesi will tackle the run that starts at the Agia Triada Monastery and finishes at Loutraki Beach. He said there is a connection between being a Sailor and competing in the Eco-Challenge. “It is a team challenge, and the Navy is absolutely a team environment. Everyone needs to do their best in order for the mission to be a success.”

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NSA Souda Bay’s Morale, Welfare and Recreation Fitness Center is organizing the event. Byron Gale, the Center’s director, said the event strengthens the base’s relationship with our host nation. Historically host nation teams participate in the event. “It develops teamwork and good sportsmanship,” Gale said. “With the socialization at the awards ceremony with everyone it helps build moral support and comradery with the host nation.” Visit the MWR Fitness Center by August 30 to register your team for the Eco-Challenge.


Fleet & Family Support Program 40th Anniversary Story and photo by Joel Diller, Public Affairs

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aval Support Activity Souda Bay hosted a special meal at the Fleet's Inn galley July 29, to commemorate the 40th anniversary of the Fleet and Family Support Program. The Fleet and Family Support Program contributes to quality of life operations on Navy installations by implementing self-resilience programs that strengthen the military family, support mission readiness, and facilitate a strong community network of services through community outreach and partnerships. This includes our Department of Defense civilian community in an overseas environment.

The Fleet and Family Support Center is located on the ground floor of the Omalos Tower barracks (Building 11). For more information or to schedule an appointment, call DSN: (314) 266-1690 or (30) 282102-1690 or find them on Facebook @FFSC Souda Bay.

"FFSC's mission is to preserve and restore the military's mission capabilities," said Kirsten Diller, Fleet and Family Support Center director. "Here at Souda Bay we do this by addressing the needs of our installation's personnel and their family members and the unique challenges of a military lifestyle in Crete. Diller said that since NSA Souda Bay is primarily a dependent-restricted tour for Sailors, the FFSC here focuses on providing important services such as counseling, family advocacy, sexual assault prevention and response, a lending locker, and information and referral. During the meal, Cdr. Werner J. Rauchenstein, NSA Souda Bay executive officer, and Diller cut the ceremonial cake to recognize the program's impact on the Navy. Rauchenstein said this anniversary is important because "it is where the United States Navy actually started taking care of the human side of us. We have deep appreciation for our Fleet and Family Support Center."

Kirsten Diller, Fleet and Family Support Center director, with Cdr. Werner J. Rauchenstein, NSA Souda Bay executive officer.

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Fun & Friendship Day

Story and photos by Kostas Fantaousakis, Public Affairs

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olunteers from NSA Souda Bay's Security Department participated in a day of food, fun and games July 25 at the Daily Care Center for Children and Young Adults of Chania. Volunteers organized an American-style barbecue of grilled burgers and hot dogs. As the food was being prepared, several Sailors played soccer and basketball with the boys while others helped them practice their English language skills. Throughout the event, the boys asked many questions about popular music stars and famous NBA players. Master-at-Arms 3rd Class Donovan Manderson was the event organizer. "We organized this event to give back to the less fortunate and make friends,” said Manderson. “Trying to provide children with a positive role model is also very important."

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Master-at-Arms 1st Class Christina Deleon stressed the importance of getting in touch and appreciating different cultures. “I've been to many countries and visited care centers there and I just love interacting with the children; the boys love it. They get in touch with our culture and we get in touch with theirs. Just playing with them is an amazing experience for both of us,” said Deleon.


Sailors played several games of basketball and soccer during this action-packed event.

Master-at-Arms Seaman Recruit Johamed Rodriguez was in charge of the barbecue process and made sure the food was properly prepared and ready in time for lunch. “Since we are so far away from home it is good to share with the boys a taste of what American-style food tastes like,” said Rodriguez. “Volunteering and interacting with the local community helps (keep) your mind off … not being with your family. Making a connection with other people is like making a new family here where you live and work,” said Master-at-Arms Seaman Rayleen Silva. “Events like these are very important for both the children supported by the Center and base volunteers,” said Carolyn Jackson, NSA Souda Bay public affairs officer. “Children supported by the Center become familiar with base volunteers, and Sailors are able to give back to the host nation community,” she said.

Master-at-Arms Seaman Recruit Johamed Rodriguez & Master-at-Arms Seaman Rayleen Silva were in charge of the barbecue.

After the lunch, as the Sailors were about to leave, the boys insisted they play another game of soccer. The volunteers happily accepted the challenge and had another session of friendly competition until it was time to finally say goodbye. Find out about upcoming community outreach events by emailing SoudaBayPAO@eu.navy.mil. Master-at-Arms 1st Class Christina Deleon (left), Master-atArms 3rd Class Winder Pena (center) and Master-at-Arms 3rd Class Donovan Manderson (right) serve food for their young friends at the Center.

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Community Outreach Story and photos by Kostas Fantaousakis, Public Affairs

Sailors assigned to NSA Souda Bay, in conjunction with the Chaplain's office, participated in a community outreach event by delivering a significant amount of clothing donations to the Horizon Volunteer Association in Chania, Greece, July 12. Horizon supports local children and adults with cancer. NSA Souda Bay's Chaplain's office collects and delivers clothing donations to the local community several times a year to support those in need.

Sailors from U.S. Naval Support Activity Souda Bay volunteered for a community outreach project July 19, helping to clean up Kladisos beach in Chania, Greece. Page 16


Holidays in Greece: August 15 Source: www.visitgreece.gr, the official tourism website for Greece

The Church of Panagia Evangelistria in Tinos. Image source: Archdiocese of Athens (www.religiousgreece.gr)

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ugust 15 is one of the largest religious celebrations in Greece after Easter and Christmas. It is a national holiday dedicated to the Assumption of the Virgin Mary (in Greek: Koimisis tis Theotokou). Churches throughout Greece celebrate the holiday with traditions which vary from place to place. The formal religious ceremony is held during the day, with mass and prayers in the morning and in the evening. Each town’s icon of the Virgin is adorned with flowers and ribbons and carried around the streets, so that everyone can touch it. Greeks of the Orthodox faith prepare themselves by fasting for 14 days, from August 1-14. The fast is joyfully broken on the 15th. The essence of the celebration is that everyone is welcome and treated like family, participating body and soul in the commemoration. The Sacred Church of the Megalohari, located on the island of Tinos, is a site of religious pilgrimage. It is dedicated to an icon discovered in 1823 after Sister Pelagia, a nun, had a vision: the Virgin Mary herself appeared in a dream, showing her the icon’s location. This icon is renowned for its miraculous and curative virtues, and the church was built to honor it. The Holy Icon is considered older than the Byzantine period.

The Holy Icon. Image source: Archdiocese of Athens

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95th Reconnaissance Squadron Change of Command Photo and story by MC2 Kelly Agee, Public Affairs

Lt. Col. Kevin D. Larson (right) accepts the U.S. Air Force 95th Reconnaissance Squadron, Det. 1 guidon from Col. Eric C. Paulson, commander, 55th Operations Group, 55th Wing, Offutt Air Force Base, Neb., during his change of command ceremony July 8, 2019.

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t. Col. Kevin D. Larson assumed command of the U.S. Air Force 95th Reconnaissance Squadron, Det. 1, from Lt. Col. Todd C. Williams during a change of command ceremony July 8 at the NATO Missile Firing Installation Officer’s Club in Chania, Greece. Larson enters the position after serving as Deputy Division Chief of the Command & Control, Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance Division, A3, Air Combat Command, Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Va. Larson is returning to Souda Bay after being stationed here for 18 months during Libyan operations Odyssey Dawn and Unified Protector in 2011 and 2012. “I was ecstatic,” Larson said, about learning of his return to Souda Bay. “Very rarely does a commander get to go to a remote location to command where one knows the ins and outs of the local area and the joint mission. It is exhilarating to be able to walk into command with confidence and an understanding of the team's purpose from day one.” Larson said the mission here is an important one, and one of the reasons why he is excited to be here.

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“My team is a part of the joint mission that NSA Souda Bay provides the U.S. Armed Forces and (Department of Defense) agencies across the globe. Due to its location, it is never a dull moment here. We are small enough to be a tight-knit unit while getting the job done!” Col. Eric C. Paulson, commander, 55th Operations Group, 55th Wing, Offutt Air Force Base, Neb., presided over the ceremony, which included a presentation of the colors, remarks by each member of the official party, passing of the guidon, and a first and last salute from the outgoing and incoming commander. Larson said that in addition to commanding the squadron, he is looking forward to being part of the local community. “Honestly, I felt like I was coming home,” said Larson. “The citizens of Greece have always been hospitable to my family and approachable on all facets of life. I have a lot to learn from the local populace, and I will enjoy every second of my time here!” The U.S. Air Force 95th Reconnaissance Squadron is a tenant command at NSA Souda Bay. It provides operations, logistics, intelligence, and administrative support to the 55th Wing for the conduct of sensitive reconnaissance and contingency operations in the European Theater.


Reenlistments

Master-at-Arms 1st Class Jaqualin Johnson reenlisted on August 2. Chief Warrant Officer 4 Marcus Watkins, NSA Souda Bay security officer, presented the Certificate of Reenlistment during a ceremony in front of Building 1.

Master-at-Arms Second Class Brandon Morales reenlisted on July 30. Chief Warrant Officer 4 Marcus Watkins, NSA Souda Bay security officer, presented the Certificate of Reenlistment during a ceremony in front of Building 1. Photos by MC2 Kelly Agee, Public Affairs.

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Awards

July Awardees Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal Master-at-Arms 1st Class Kevin Jones Master-at-Arms 1st Class Michael Sanders Construction Electrician 2nd Class Kyle Drummond Master-at-Arms 2nd Class Chris St. John Master-at-Arms 3rd Class Rebekah Provencher

Flag Letter of Commendation Master-at-Arms 2nd Class Bethany Mavromatis

Letter of Commendation Master-at-Arms 2nd Class Matthew Fort Master-at-Arms 3rd Class Michael Defranco Master-at-Arms 3rd Class Calvin Novak Page 20


at Quarters

August Awardees Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal Air Traffic Controller 1st Class Daniel Ferdinand Master-at-Arms 1st Class Matthew Kuester Master-at-Arms 1st Class Brian Smith Master-at-Arms 2nd Class Carlos Martinez Master-at-Arms 2nd Class Christian Pena

Flag Letter of Commendation

Master-at-Arms 2nd Class Oscar Echeveria

Letter of Commendation

Master-at-Arms 3rd Class Kelvin Fernandez Master-at-Arms 3rd Class Mark McGourn Master-at-Arms Seaman Cynthia Campos Master-at-Arms Seaman Victoria Hurtado Aviation Boatswain’s Mate Airman Allen Levine Aviation Boatswain’s Mate Airman Dwayne Smith Air Traffic Controller Airman Landon Sills

Senior Sailor of the Quarter

Master-at-Arms 1st Class Michael Mccarroll

Sailor of the Quarter

Air Traffic Controller 2nd Class Kerry Ford

Junior Sailor of the Quarter

Master-at-Arms 3rd Class Erick Garza

Blue Jacket of the Quarter

Air Traffic Controller Airman Emily Tucker

Best Practice Award for scoring 100 percent

during the annual Regional Consolidated Hazardous Material Reutilization and Inventory Management Assessment Visit by Fleet Logistics Center Sigonella Headquarters May 20 to 24. Achilles Gougoustamos Theodoros Milios Page 21


UMUC celebrates 70 years of overseas education Story and photo by MC2 Kelly Agee, Public Affairs

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aval Support Activity Souda Bay team members participated in the 70th Anniversary Celebration of the University of Maryland University College July 18.

According to the University’s official website, in 1949, at the request of the U.S. Department of Defense, UMUC became the first institution to send a team overseas to teach college classes to active-duty service members. From a single classroom on a military base in postwar Germany, the program quickly expanded across Europe and Asia, sending faculty wherever they were needed — even into war zones — and making UMUC a leading higher education provider to the U.S. military, veterans, and their family members around the world. "My colleague, Jessica Nardi, and I are delighted to support Sailors at NSA Souda Bay," said Jerry Glover, UMUC Senior Program Coordinator. "It's a small education program, but I believe it contributes significantly to the morale and welfare of Sailors while they're here, and I take pleasure in seeing Sailors here advance their careers and their own personal growth through the UMUC program," he added. At the celebration, Souda Bay team members enjoyed drinks, snacks and a birthday cake. For more information on the UMUC program at NSA Souda Bay, call 266-1285.

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Why Manage the

Radio Frequency Spectrum? Story by Navy and Marine Corps Spectrum Office Europe and Africa

Q: What is the Radio Frequency spectrum? • The portion of electromagnetic energy which can be used by electronic devices to communicate wirelessly. Q: What devices communicate using the RF spectrum? • Amateur “ham” radio, Citizens Band, hand-held “walkie-talkies”, Remote Control toys, satellite television, AM/FM radio, home telephone handsets, cellular telephones, Bluetooth and WiFi speakers, microphones, game controllers, baby monitors and computers. Q: What’s the difference between AM and FM radio? • With AM radio, the amplitude, or overall strength, of the signal is varied to incorporate the sound information. • With FM radio, the frequency, or the number of times each second that the current changes direction, of the carrier signal is varied.

Source: PBS.org Q: Why is understanding the RF spectrum important to U.S. Navy personnel? • RF interference has increased due to an increased use of technology by both non-U.S. militaries and local civilian entities near military bases we share with Host Nations. • While not all instances of interference are caused by U.S. Forces, Host Nation entities are paying closer attention to U.S. Forces’ activities on these installations. • Devices from the U.S. shipped in household goods may not be authorized in the country they moved to.

Q: What personal devices from the U.S. are not authorized in Greece? • U.S. cordless or wireless phones with a Digital Enhanced Cordless Telecommunications 6.0 rating are not authorized for use in Greece & throughout the European Union. This includes any device operating outside the 2.4 GHz commercially acceptable range. DECT 6 is used in Mexico, USA, and Canada only and operates in the 1.8 to 1.99 GHz range, which can interfere with European cell phone services. Q: Are drones from the U.S. authorized in Greece? • Before operating a drone in Greece, service members should know their device’s frequency range and Greek and European Union regulations. Operating drones in and around military installations and airports is strictly forbidden. Q: What are the top 5 things Souda Bay personnel need to know about the RF spectrum? 1. Even though we cannot see, hear, or touch the RF spectrum directly, it is classified as a natural resource which belongs to each country within its sovereign borders and territory. 2. The RF spectrum is finite in that there is only a limited amount to go around and we cannot make more. 3. Domestic companies, international companies and civil agencies are putting pressure on their governments to allocate even more spectrum to commercial applications. 4. The ability of naval forces to support diverse operations and crises is largely dependent on their ability to communicate. Special Forces, submarines, Battle Groups and Marines are often first to arrive in a theater and must rely on the RF spectrum to remain highly maneuverable, flexible, and tactically effective. 5. U.S. Forces are obligated to follow Host Nation procedures regarding the use of RF emitting equipment from these installations. Refusal to comply with Host Nation regulations and policies have legal, political, and monetary ramifications. If you have questions or would like to learn more, contact Chris Knapp, NSA Souda Bay Installation Spectrum manager at 266-1358/1338 or the Navy and Marine Corps Spectrum Office Europe at 626-2004/3738/5354.

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August naval HIST 1864 - Aug. 6

1912 - Aug. 22

Congress establishes the U.S. Navy Dental Corps. The primary mission of the Corps is to prevent or remedy dental conditions that may interfere with the performance of duty by members of the active Naval forces. Rear Adm. David G. Farragut successfully navigates through a deadly torpedo field laid by Confederates to block the channel into Mobile Bay, Ala. During the battle, Farragut gives his famous quote, Damn the Torpedoes, Full speed ahead!

1942 - aug. 28

1870 - AuG. 13

The armed tug USS Palos becomes the first Navy ship to transit the Suez Canal. The Suez Canal is the shortest trade link between Europe and countries on the Indian and Pacific Oceans. Because the majority of the world's goods are transported by sea, it greatly reduces the time and cost of transporting goods. Design24 & research MC2 Kelly Agee, Public Affairs Page

120 women are commissioned as ensigns or lieutenant junior grades as WAVES (Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service) and report to "USS Northampton," Smith College, Northampton, Mass.


TORY and HERITAGE 1957 - Aug. 12

1998 - Aug. 15

Lt. Cmdr. Don Walker lands a F3D Skyknight on board USS Antietam (CV 36) making it the first test of the Automatic Carrier Landing System.

USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6) is commissioned at Pensacola, Fla. The ship is homeported in San Diego, Calif. Their mission is to embark, deploy and land elements of a Marine Landing Force in amphibious assault operations by helicopter, landing craft, amphibious vehicle or any combination thereof.

1987 - Aug. 8

USS Fort McHenry (LSD 43) is commissioned at Lockheed Shipyard, Seattle, Wash. The Whidbey Island-class dock landing ship is named for Fort McHenry in Baltimore, Md. This fort's 1814 defense inspired Francis Scott Key to write the lyrics for the Star Spangled Banner.

2018 - Aug. 3

Capt. Ryan T. Tewell, commanding officer, Naval Support Activity Souda Bay, renders a salute as he is “piped aboard� during a change of command ceremony held onboard the installation. Souda Bay, Greece. (U.S. Navy photo by Joel Diller/Released) Source: https://www.history.navy.mil Page 25


Calendar

Now - Sept. 30: Lazy Triathlon Incentive Program

Where: MWR Fitness Center Compete in a triathlon at your own pace. Run 25 miles, bike 112 miles and swim 8,000 meters by Sept. 30 and earn a Lazy Triathlon T-shirt.

Now - Oct. 30: Swimming Pool Workouts

Where: MWR Fitness Center MWR Fitness Center now provides swim workouts.

Aug. 20: Wild Card 5K Run

Where: MWR Fitness Center at 7 a.m. Run a 5K and earn a T-shirt.

Aug. 22: DJ Night and Lesson Where: Shipmates at 6:30 p.m. Learn how to mix music.

Aug. 28: Big Screen Movie Night

Where: Shipmates parking lot at 9 p.m. Come watch Avengers: Endgame.

Aug. 30: Community Relations Project

Where: Visit a local animal shelter from 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. To sign-up, email SoudaBayPAO@eu.navy.mil or call DSN # 266-1348.

Sept. 1 - Oct. 31: Climb Mt. Olympus

Where: MWR Fitness Center Use an elliptical and treadmill to climb 2,917 meters to the top of Greece’s tallest mountain and earn a free T-shirt.

Sept 6. and Sept. 20: Adventure League: Dungeons and Dragons

Where: Liberty Center from 5 to 8 p.m. Come play the classic role-playing board game. All are welcome, from newbee to veteran. Page 26


of Events

Sept. 7: ECO-Challenge

Where: Around the island of Crete from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. Build your five-person team and compete in this Souda Bay classic adventure with hiking, running, biking, kayaking and swimming events. Sign up at the MWR Fitness Center by Aug. 30.

Sept. 9-13: Soccer Tournament

Where: Soccer Field Register your team at the MWR Fitness Center by Sept. 2.

Sept. 10: Suicide Prevention Month Special Meal Where: Galley from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Sept. 11: Remembrance Ceremony

Where: Building 1 flagpole, time to be determined.

Sept. 12: Flag Football Coach Meeting

Where: MWR Fitness Center at 11 a.m. This is also an opportunity to register your team.

Sept. 16 - 20: Command Fitness Leader Course

Where: Fire Department Training Room from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. Take this 5-day course to earn your CFL certification.

Sept 6. and Sept. 20: Liberty Girls Night In-Scary Movie Night Where: Liberty Center from 5 to 9 p.m. Come watch some of the top-rated horror films of all time.

Sept. 12: National Chocolate Milkshake Day Where: Liberty Center at 5 p.m. Stop by for a delicious chocolate milkshake.

Page 27


Want to to Participate Participate in in aa Community Community Outreach Outreach Project? Project? Want Kostas Fantaousakis, Community Relations Specialist. Call 266-1348 or • POC: . Email: SoudaBayPAO@eu.navy.mil • •. Call 694-043-1157 E-mail: konstantinos.fant.gr@eu.navy.mil All Hands emails are sent calling • •. Look for All-Hands e-mails callingfor forvolunteers volunteers •

694-043-1157

Ask to join the ComRel projects volunteers distro list.

• . Ask to join our volunteers distribution list

Got a ComRel idea? Contact PA for guidance.

Have an idea for a project? Call public affairs for help. We volunteer, but ALWAYS provide quality service!

Page 28

Page 28

Profile for NSA Souda Bay PAO

Beacon, August 2019  

Beacon, August 2019  

Profile for soudapao
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