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Georges Duboeuf Beaujolais Vineyards

buttermilk lime dressing for fried green tomatoes, a Sauvignon Blanc that also has tropical fruit notes, like guava, and even some herbal essences, will provide a great accompaniment to the food. Sauvignon Blancs from New Zealand may be too minerally and citrus-y for this dish; better to try a fine Californian Sauv Blanc such as the Two Angels label, with grapes from vineyards in High Valley, which are the highest-elevation white grape vineyards in the state. Normally, sparkling wine is served either at the beginning or end of a meal. For our Southern dinner, to drink with the buttermilk biscuits with seasonal jams and honey butter, a little bubbly is in order. Once only produced in France’s Champagne region, there are sparkling wines made today (in the same way that Champagne is produced and with the same grapes and similar quality, usually at much lower prices) from nearly every wine-producing region in the world. The yeast-y quality of many of them, especially those produced with the Chardonnay grape, brings up the same yeast-like fl vor of the biscuits. And, if the bubbly is not bone dry, your taste buds will pick up the honey and fruit fl vors of the butter and jam. Finally, serving a dry sparkling wine in the middle of a meal is a great palate cleanser for what will follow. Argentina is making some terrific Brut Sparkling Wines, with Pascual Toso one of the finest. You might not think of French wine when the dish is fried chicken, mashed potatoes, pan gravy and collard greens, and you’d be correct if you’re considering the complex red wines from France’s famous Bordeaux or Burgundy vineyards. However, there are many other wine regions of France that are less well-known, with red wines on the lighter, fruiter side that have the right fl vor profile for the dispirit fl vors of this staple of Southern cuisine. The southern part of Burgundy is known as the Beaujolais region. It’s become world famous for Beaujolais-Nouveau, also known as the first wine of the harvest, which is exactly what it is: the very first wine to come from the Beaujolais vineyards each year taking approximately six weeks for the Gamay grape to go from vine to bottle. The next step up from Nouveau is Beaujolais-Villages, the grapes of which come from 38 villages in the northern part of Beaujolais. The wine is not released for six to eight months after harvest, which is in late September or early October, depending on the weather during the year. The Gamay grape is light bodied and fruit-forward (mostly what is called black fruit like blackberries and black cherries), low in tannins and somewhat high in acidity, which makes it perfect for foods (especially those a little on the salty side) that may need the lift of a wine where the fruit is prominent. The man who brought Beaujolais to world-wide attention with his tireless promotional efforts and high-quality wines is Georges Duboeuf, and his 2015 Beaujolais-Villages is probably going to the easiest (and best) to find on etail shelves in the St. Louis area. So give French – and Argentine, Italian, California – or any other wine from around the world a try with your next Southern meal. See www.stlouishomesmag.com for more information. STLOUISHOMESMAG.COM JAN/FEB 2017

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January/February 2017  

Killer Kitchens. 25 pages of kitchen inspiration.

January/February 2017  

Killer Kitchens. 25 pages of kitchen inspiration.

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