Page 1

P O R T F O L I O FOD:R, SEMESTER 1, 2018 Sophie Viet-Jacobsen 828294 Studio 02 - Naomi Ng


A

B

O

U

Sophie Pernille Viet-Jacobsen T: 0416 483 263 E: sviet@student.unimelb.edu.au L: english, danish Web:https://sviet6.wixsite.com/ sophieviet

T


C O N T E N T S

MODULE 01..............................................05 MODULE 02..............................................10 MODULE 03..............................................15 MODULE 04..............................................20


M

O

D

U

0 How

L

E 1

to

draw

a

croissant


C

MODULE 01

O

N

C

E

P

T

Module 1 was concerned with the dissection of sorts of a croissant. The task was about representing the croissant in other ways than the actual piece of food that it was. Beginning with taking good quality photos in a homemade studio, the croissant was then cut into 4 parts, the sections scanned and then composed on a 1:1 scale onto A3 paper (seen left). PHOTO OF ELEVATION SECTION A

The scans were then represented through technical drawings using fineliner and pencil, also on a 1:1 scale. After this, the section drawings were outlined and transformed to a 45 degree angle, and arranged to construct an axonometric representation of the croissant.

SECTION B PHOTO OF ELEVATION

PHOTOCOPIED PLAN

84 mm SECTION C

PHOTO OF PLAN VIEW

6


MODULE 01

P

R

O

C

E

S

S

59 mm

158 mm

84 mm

84 mm

59 mm

SKETCH OF ELEVATION

158 mm

C

B

A

57 mm 47 mm

CROSS SECTION A

74 mm

35 mm

CROSS SECTION B

60 mm

7

CROSS SECTION C

Pencil and fineliner sketches, scanned and composed. 41 mm


MODULE 01

P

R

O

C

E

SECTION A

SECTION B

SECTION C

Axonometric projections of section cuts.

8

S

S


M 0

O

D

U

L

E 2

F l a t n e s s v s P r o j e c t i o n


MODULE 02

C

O

N

C

E

P

T

Module 2 developed upon the axonometric drawing skills that were completed in the first module. It was a task in projecting two flat images, stills from Mario World, into an axonometric 3D drawing. It was important to develop an understanding of axonometric projection as part of the module was to “construct what did not exist”. For myself, this included adding things like stepping stones, mushrooms, and creating an ‘underworld’ to add to the idea of a journey through the world. These drawings were initially produced on tracing paper and were then scanned and edited in Adobe Illustrator. Beginning with the outline, the drawing was coloured in, aspects were changed and/or added and the image was developed into a 3D projection, in full colour. It was important to keep the image coherent and holistic. Features such as colours, and line weight were important in terms of the overall image, to create something captivating, as well as technically correct.

11


MODULE 02

P

R

O

C

E

S

S

The still images were placed on a 45 degree angle, and each element was projected up on to a piece of tracing paper following the object from base to tracing paper, as true to the still as possible. This allowed for the images to become 3D, as such.

12


MODULE 02

P

R

O

C

E

S

Initial sketch The first stages of the axonometric projection process. Using a T-square and ruler, the flat lines were projected on a 1:1 scale, on a 45 degree angle to the still.

Adding Detail Adding the clouds and coins and deciding how the image could fit together coherently and cleanly.

Scanning into Illustrator The drawing was scanned into

Final Sketch

Adobe Illustrator and then outlined, touched up and somewhat rear-

Using an A1 piece of tracing paper, I amalgamated

ranged during the editing process.

my axonometric projections - one based on the Mario still, and the other, underworld, my own ideas.

13

S


M

O

D

U

L

0 P a t v S u r

E 3

t f

e s a

r

n

c

e


MODULE 03

C

O

N

C

E

P

T

THE MAKING OF A NEW LANDSCAPE Module 3 was about reconstructing a section of Tasmanian landscape. First came the production of a virtual representation through use of 3D software Rhino and paneling tools. Then came the creation of a tangible, 3D model, based on the virtual prototype. It began with the slightly curved base terrain - this was the foundation of the panelled landscape. In Rhino, off set points were used to create a ‘roof’, so that the panels we used had a height limit ranging from 10mm to 59.4 mm. I created 8 unique panels and arranged them onto my grid and reconstructed the landscape. These panels were unrolled, printed out and rebuilt (pictured left) on a 1:1 scale. I decided to run with the notion of a fragmented, crumbling structure, much like the rough beaches of Tasmania. This meant that my landscape started tall and dense, rolling into a sparse and low, right corner. This progression appears from the top left to the bottom right according to this photo of the constructed model.

16


17


MODULE 03

Close up and angled photographs of the 3D model.

18


MODULE 03

P

Unrolling the panels. These were created using Rhino 5, 3D software, printed and cut out to construct each panel or several at once.

19

R

O

C

E

S

S


P Offset Points. Points were placed above the grid created ontop of the terrain. This was to determine the height and gradual descent of it. The point to the right, off of the grid, is the attractor point. This is the direction in which the offset points were attracted to, i.e. which way they gravitated towards.

Unique panels. Each panel was created uniquely so as to give a sense of variation and to allow me to create my overall fragmented look. As seen above, the panels themselves go from structurally in tact to fragmented and more complex.

Development of a Pattern. Working with the birdseye view in mind, the structure was developed such that the piece was readable from above. The effect created was one of a sweeping movement into fragmentation.

R

O

C

E

S

S


M

O

D

U

L

0 F r v F i

E 4

a e

s

m

e

l

d


C

MODULE 04

O

N

C

E

P

Hypatia

Module 4 was a task that focussed on perspective, both architecturally and personally. Beginning with this extract from Italo Calvino’s Invisible Cities, an isometric diagram with notations was created, based on the narration (by Marco Polo). This was followed by a realisation of this diagram in the form of two camera viewpoints, or perspectives. Because of the title of my city, Hypatia, I decided to have an overarching theme of feminism and empowered women.

23

T


P

MODULE 04

R

O

C

Key

Movement

0

1m

2.5m

5m

Passage of time

Water

Light Mood

Light/Dark

Heavy/scared mood

Interior/Exterior threshold

Perspective 1

Perspective 2

Notational isometric diagram, demonstrating the path that Marco Polo takes and the things he encounters.

24

Crowds/ People

Fog/ Mist

E

S

S


P

MODULE 04

R

O

C

E

S

Perspective 1 The scene depicted here is taken from the first page of the story: “magnolia gardens reflected in blue lagoons”, “...crabs were biting the eyes of suicides...”.

Anotate your drawing, give us a short description of the scene above

25

Hypatia is the name of the first female philosopher and mathematician to be reasonably well documented. Following a theme that stayed true to the name of the city, I developed this concept and decided to make the main theme feminism. This is mainly in linkage with the way that I imagine women were perceived in the time of Marco Polo, the 13th Century. I have represented the “suicides” as women(in the form of sirens) that do not live up to his expectations and have made him want to “demand justice from the sultan”. I included a full moon, often linked to cyclical female energy, e.g. the menstrual cycle which strengthens the atmosphere of female power and leadership across the perspective. The landscape outside the Old Quad are meant to be a compilation of the events and sights that Marco Polo has explained prior to meeting these women. This is to indicate confusion and a feeling of deja vu of paradise and experiencing fear at the same time. Similar to how a dream overlays itself, this perspective is meant to feel chaotic and scary as well as coherent and full of symbols hidden in small details such as the dead roses and the full moon.

S


P

MODULE 04

Perspective 2 Perspective 2 is a scene that aims to depict the personification of Hypatia, the city. Firstly, the perspective that the scene is viewed from includes Marco Polo. This is to imply that he is being watched by a third party, namely the city. It was my aim to make the inanimate aspects feel alive, such as the face in the tree or through all of the greenery, aligning with the idea that the ‘walls have eyes’. The person who I have chosen to be the philosopher on the lawn is Hypatia herself. Though the passage says “he”, I wanted to divert from a totally literal translation and follow my theme of female empowerment and the aura of the city. I have ncluded representations of the philosopher’s words: “signs form a language, but not the one you think you know”, and decided to place somewhat hidden symbols and signs in the picture. Firstly, the walls and rocks on the grass have witchcraft signs and labyrinths. I also chose to put the rocks in a line to demonstrate that they have been arranged. I wanted the audience to feel like they need to decipher something, that there was hidden message. There are also “signs” such as the wind that is blowing the leaves and the rain - a storm. I think that this correlates with the classic ‘show me a sign’, seen in pop culture.

Anotate your drawing, give us a short description of the scene above

26

R

O

C

E

S

S


R

E

F

L

E

C

T

I

O

N

FOD:R allowed me to build upon existing, unexercised skills as well as learn new ones. It was an entirely new playing field for me, using Adobe software for all of the modules, but one I was glad to be a part of. Each module seemed to draw out different strengths and weaknesses, and ones that I wasn’t aware of. The journey that this course took me on was one that I was proud to come out of the other side of and one that demonstrated that I was capable of high achievement when I really put my mind to it. Once I’d finished Module 4, I realised that having followed the path and trusting the process, the things I learnt were perfectly complementary to one another. Each module seemed to be reflected in one another, and what was most rewarding was being able to know how to do something because of another module. Module 1 taught me the importance of consistency, accuracy and quality of photograph. Module 2 showed me the potential of Adobe Illustrator and what a complex and exciting world graphic design could be. Module 3 taught me the benefits and drawbacks of physical model making, introduced me to the universe of Rhino, and the idea of a nonlinear workflow. Module 4 reminded me that there was still room for metaphor, meaning and emotion in digital design, allowing me to explore something I thought was only possible through painting or literature. The presentations for each module was initially one of the most daunting aspects of the entire course to me – despite having been warned about the workload. After my first module’s presentation, and having to present in other subjects, I actually started to forget about my fear of public speaking. The whole subject uilt my confidence immensely and having to present decidedly became one of the parts I looked forwards to. With preparation, I was ready for questions and to assert my ideas and concepts truthfully and concisely. In addition to the presentations, the journals and WIX aspects of the modules was something that I found essential to communicating my ideas. I was able to express myself in ways that I was familiar with.

27

Portfolio sophie viet jacobsen  
Portfolio sophie viet jacobsen  
Advertisement