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NOW

COPENHAGEN 2018

FASHION //

STYLE

EXAMINING THE DIFFERENCE

TRULY ZELMA CELEBRATING THE SMART STYLE OF A BUDDING ICON

SELFIE SCENARIO IS THE MODERN WOMAN’S SELF-PORTRAIT VAIN?

LEFT ON

RED

DANISH DESIGNER ASTRID AGERSKOV’S MEDEA COLLECTION ON DISPLAY

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now

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copenhagen

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NOW SOPHIE BERGQUIST editor in chief

FREDERIK VALDEMAR KJELDGAARD creative director

styling MATTHEW GREENSTEIN LOTTA LAVANTI ISABEL SOUZA makeup artist SIGNE JUHL

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CONTENTS EDITOR’S LETTER

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CONTRIBUTORS

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TRULY: ZELMA

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LOST & FOUND

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SELFIE SCENARIO

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LEFT ON RED

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LAST LOOK

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Editor’s Letter// In many ways, living in Copenhagen has

formity and homogeneity, a collection of

challenged me in subtle yet significant in- stories are told about the power that is posstances. Through introductions to new sesed when individuals dare to be different. people, places, experiences and ideas, how I think about fashion, style and expression of

Standards are most visible when broken;

self has been set in evolutionary motion. In status quos are most noticeable when defied. a city that immediately felt like home, I have Given this, I thank every individual who I come to appreciate the fleeting moments of have encountered over the past few months inspiration that have brought me to pursue that has forced me to look twice. Because the projects showcased within this issue. one glance usually isn’t enough to appreci-

ate a bright yellow fur coat, or wide leg white

The balance Copenhagen introduced to my pants in the dead of winter, or a head-to-toe everyday life resulted in a newfound work mix of polka dots and pastels. It’s these small

ethic with which I approached the creation moments – of color and texture and pattern of this year’s issue. Collaboration and in- and risks- that I celebrate for their ability

dividual work; preparedness and improvi- to challenge the stereotype of style that I sation; trust in others and trust in myself; had begun to formulate about Copenhagen. ability to follow while also leading; being

informed but creative. These dichotomies That said, being colorful, stylistically loud are visually articulated in the pages that and ‘maximalist’ is not how all choose to follow. By seeking out noteworthy indi- make a stand against sameness. It’s actuviduals in a city that is known for its uni- ally not even close to how I would de-

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fine my own approach to individual- very core, or at least who you want to be. ity or expression of self through style. By clarifying these definitions, I’ve come The experience of creating this issue in

to better understand my personal rela-

Copenhagen has allowed me to real- tionship to each and how they are in conize that I thrive off of being able to ob- versation with one another in the way serve the big picture, the binary realities that I present my self. Because of this, I that can exist in the same time and place.

feel more capable of capturing and celebrating the individuality of those around

From this, a clarification of the distinc- me in the projects associated with NOW. tion between fashion and style has come

The continuous act of observing, process-

to my attention. Through various con- ing, analyzing and then creating is a cycle versations I’ve had, I’ve come to formu- that will always be present in my quest to late my (loosely held) definitions of each. better understand the world around me Perhaps fashion can be understood as a

and the place that I am finding within it.

malleable industry, heavily influenced by commercial needs and socio-economic And so; thank you Copenhagen, for the factors, resulting in the introduction happiest and most inspiring days, for the of ephemeral trends. And then there is

opportunities to create things that I am

style; an aesthetic aura that surrounds a proud of, and for showing me how to be an person or place, a timeless and steadfast

individual first – even when surrounded

way of visually and creatively communi- by the pressures of sameness. From now cating to the world who you are at your

on, I will carry your influence with me. Stay Stylish,

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CONTRIBUTORS SOPHIE

BERGQUIST

A Media Studies student from the University of Virginia pursuing fashion journalism, Sophie founded NOW as a way to explore a potential career path. A lmost four years later, she continues to create content for and organize the production of annual issues

of

the

publication

as

Editor

in

Chief.

She plans on further incorporaing her feminist media studies thesis research with the creation of next year’s issue of the magazine. Outside of her work for NOW, Sophie enjoys annoying those around her by how many pictures she takes and avoiding hangriness.

FREDERIK

VALDEMAR KJELDGAARD With roots in a mix between art and documentary photography, Frederik sees photos as strong tool of communication. Combined with his ability to make very strong visual imagery, this makes him a powerful and easy-to-understand photographer. Frederik is still very new to fashion photography, but he has already rooted himself deep within the Copenhagen Fashion Week network, working with the hosts themselves. Frederik draws inspiration from old legends like Richard Avedon, William Eggleston and many more. 8

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SHANE BLY KILLORAN Shane received her B.F.A in Acting from New York University. She realized she enjoyed the rehearsal process more than performing. This took her to the University of London where she pursued post-graduate work in theatre, including her Doctoral candidacy. She is currently working as a Co-Creator and Actress with various productions based in New York.

Shane’s writing and work in theater, among

many things, explore her relationship to feminism.

MATTHEW GREENSTEIN A rising senior at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Matt studies Political Science and Entrepreneurship. Fashion and photography have recently become a part of his life, which he enjoys as mediums of expression and individualism. As Matt sees it, fashion exists as a bridge between all art forms. Individuals represent themselves, their personalities, and their view of the world most prominently with what they wear. While his academic and professional pursuits have not included much within this realm, it was Matt’s contribute

to

this

issue

pleasure to of

NOW.

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CONTRIBUTORS ISABEL SOUZA Isabel is a senior fine arts major at Syracuse University. Her work explores several media including ceramics, printmaking, metal-smithing and photography. She is greatly inspired by textiles and fashion - where her passions for color, pattern, form and function overlap. After collaborating with NOW, she went on to complete a fashion photography internship in Florence, Italy for a boutique, Mrs. Macis. The workshop and showroom spoke to her love of vintage fashion and salvaged objectspulling inspiration and up-cycling textiles from the 50s, 60s and 70s. Isabel hopes to curate a gallery of her own one day- filled with her hand made and hand picked treasures.

BRIAN HELMS Brian is an architecture student at Hobart College. Through his studio courses, he has experimented with furniture-making, urban design, modeling, and fashion. Brian grew up in the suburbs of Connecticut where he enjoyed hobbies such as drawing and the sport of rowing. He was recruited to college for rowing, where he quickly got involved in extracurricular activities incorporating his passion for environmental studies and entrepreneurship. In his third year of school, Brian had the chance to study abroad in Copenhagen. During his stay in Denmark, he experienced the rich culture of urban fashion. Although his future remains unknown, he will surely incorporate his design experience. 10

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@now_mag

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truly: zelma

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21 year old Anthropology student ZELMA

FELDMAN

LEWERISSA

gives us a look into her home and

mind

as

we

explore

what makes her style so unique

shot by FREDERIK VALDEMAR KJELDGAARD directed by SOPHIE BERGQUIST

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IN THREE WORDS, YOUR PERSONAL STYLE IS... Maximalist, ironic and daring.

WHAT IS YOUR DEFINITION OF FASHION?

I’m studying anthropology so set definitions are always a complicated matter. However, my definition would be something like a culturally conditioned playground for performative bodily and political expression. A reaction to - and interaction with - materials, heritage and subcultures.

FROM THERE, HOW DO YOU DEFINE STYLE?

A fusion of environments one has passed through. A dynamic material language. A privilege to be able to reflect upon and have agency around.

HOW DO YOU SEE YOUR STYLE IN RELATIONSHIP WITH DANISH OR SCANDINAVIAN STYLE?

My style is not very typical. Minimalism and classics have never spoken to me. Given my mixed background, I would say that I grew up in a fusion of a cultural environment that definitely has played a role in producing my taste and desires when it comes to the development of my style. However, colorful, chaotic and trashy aesthetics have been sneaking into the Scandinavian fashion scene in recent years, which is something I feel I can relate to. 15


WHAT IS YOUR STYLE MOST INFLUENCED BY? I saw an exhibition featuring the Turkish artist Gülsun about a year and a half ago. Her contrasting universe of tapestries, plastic and traditional Turkish fabric really captured the kind of vivid aesthetic and use of materials I adore. I would say that her work has influenced my style since then.

My style has been marked by all my travels and the places I have lived in. I went to school in India and traveled a lot within the country. I did fieldwork in Atlanta strip clubs and fell in love with some of the dancers’ sophisticated and revealing costumes that were characterized by fishnets, stones, bold colors, swimsuit fabrics and plastic shoes. I enjoy experimenting with ‘hyperfeminity’ and I don’t mind showing off some flesh. I see my booty as a part of my outfit, ok?

I still travel quite often with my job and to visit friends or family. I simply love to look for odd and quirky things in random markets and in small hoarder shops. Otherwise, I have always loved cartoon characters, their dreamy outfits and reckless attitudes. I also enjoy exploring Instagram accounts like @clear_bones and @uglyworldwide when I want some easily accessed inspo.

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FAVORITE THING IN YOUR CLOSET?

I’m kind of a compulsive hoarder, so I buy new things a little too often. I mainly shop in thrift stores, which allows me to buy a ton of stuff while not feeling like I’m ruining the environment. That means my favorites change quite often. However, at the moment it is a red vintage 70’s dress. Flowery with a bit of a flamingo vibe. I’m also obsessed with kitsch jewelry. I love my two plastic fruit necklaces that I bought from a little stall at a market in Yaffo, Tel Aviv.

WHAT ARE YOU WEARING WHEN YOU FEEL MOST CONFIDENT?

I love to dress up like I’m going to a party everyday… extra extra. It is hard to say what makes me feel the most confident, because confidence is a mindset. But maybe that is just in theory. I actually do like to dress up when I’m feeling bad or when I for some reason feel under stimulated. I rarely feel like I get dressed, I like to think that I dress up everyday. I’m constantly overdressed, whatever that means. At the moment I really like wearing floral dresses that are light and flowy but still a little tight here and there, showing off some figure. A pair of sparkly earrings that capture the sunlight put me in a mood! Chunky sneakers that allow me to walk fast and dance on my way makes me feel like I’m ready to sway with the day.

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lost & found VINTAGE-SOURCED TREASURES from POP UP SHOP THE

HOUSE of

FINDINGS are DISCOVERED in an ANTIQUE HOME

STYLED, PHOTOGRAPHED and MODELED by ISABEL SOUZA and SOPHIE BERGQUIST 22

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seek and you shall find // Isabel wears cotton cream pants with a vintage chiffon blouse and gold accessories provided by HoF 23


head in the clouds// Sophie wears a barely-pink set with a vintage shell necklace, provided by HoF

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wonder woman snoozin’// Isabel wears a leather corset and silk skirt, with a gold medallion necklace and belt 26

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ready for takeoff // who says a leather corset isn’t practical? 28

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sunbeam sound machine// Sophie wears a Kimono jacket with silk polka-dot parachute pants, courtesy of HoF

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crescent mooning// Sophie wears a white silk kimono, provided by HoF

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kickin’ it, old school // snakeskin boots update vintage linen 33


AstroLOGICAL // Isabel gazes through a vintage headpiece with an Aries pendant hung around her neck

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the house of FINDINGS // A pop-up shop known as “A Collection of Collections� featuring: vintage upcycled handmade clothing accessories jewelry art decor from the 1890s - 1990s Founded and curated by Mayra Barbara Gonzalez Currently based in Miami, FL

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@now_mag

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nowmagazineonline.com

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SELFIE SCENARIO //

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A conversation between two generations of women is sparked about what it means to create a self portrait in the age of social media. How are the borders between self expression, empowerment and vanity now navigated?

written by Shane Bly Killoran and Sophie Bergquist graphics by Brian Helms 39


Dearest Niece aka Sophie aka Editor, Personally, because I had known I wanted to be an actress from a super young age and because of the fact that I did some modeling as a kid, I have a long, rather complex relationship with the camera. As a feminist, it becomes more complicated. As a woman, I have to doubledown on the complication. Certainly lovehate with a dash of respect, a hint of envy and a large serving of fascination. My graduate studies, while in the context of theatre, centered around the representation of women on stage from the late - Victorian era until the 1997 opening of the play, Closer on Broadway. I’ve spent a lot of time studying images, how they’re ordered and thus, analyzing and assessing from all points of view; that of woman, actress, model, student and photography/art fan. So, my take on the Selfie is rather visceral and mercurial. On any given day, I change my mind about it or at least shift a perception. But I suppose the notion I always come back to, is intent. What is any given person’s motivation behind taking and posting the Selfie? And, why as a culture do we even care? I’m endlessly fascinated by the need to, for example, see yet another picture of Kim Kardashian pouting her lips or featuring her ass on social media. She and her celeb contemporaries participate in the Selfie because we keep looking at it and subsequently celebrating it. It’s confusing and largely boring, to me anyway.

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In this #metoo moment, a moment that I hope will be a ‘forever after,’ I champion women of all ages taking control of their ‘image.’ I love that women of every age & walk of life have embraced this form of self-expression and self-acceptance. I cheer the confidence and prowess the Selfie can capture. I love the idea of women across the globe discovering themselves through the lens, learning what they want to celebrate about their bodies and their journey. It’s truly a fantastic time, specifically for women and the beginnings of shifting the lens of that pesky male gaze. The male gaze isn’t fantasy and you don’t even need to consider yourself a feminist to recognize it. The fact is, men have dominated the visual arts, period. It then stands to reason that we have been looking at art (in any form) from that gender perspective. Film, photography and the advertising industry have historically been dominated and determined by men. So it stands to reason that our collective eye is drawn to the imagery and messaging that we’ve been conditioned to seek and how we deem certain women or products ‘attractive.’ It’s a fact that packaging is the largest single factor in the decision to purchase any given product. Therefore, when it comes to how women have been and are represented in an image, the bottom line is, they need to sell.

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Which brings me back to the Selfie and my questions surrounding the intent behind posting. I’m all for capturing a joyful moment in life. Or an empowered or proud or even sad one. By all means, capture and claim your own experience. But I suppose as I scroll through social media on any given day, I look at image after image and have to wonder, is this ‘you’ or is this the ‘you’ that you want to be seen? Are you trying to be sexy? And if the answer is ‘yes,’ fine. But at the same time, I see women and men falling into a zone that is all about lips, breasts, pecks and ass. Basically, I see people recreating the idea of what we’ve been taught is sexy rather than what we, in our authentic selves, think, know or feel is sexy or charming or cute.

moment, pout, side-eye or smile? Is it us or is it a prototype of the self, seeking external validation to make the internal feel valued?

Take ownership of your image, redefine the concept behind what that image means, make the gaze yours, invite us into your world and gaze but first, I ask, how Are we selling or sharing? Are we proving can that be done differently than what came or living? What is the ego seeking? And before? And, will we know the difference? who are we in the midst of that pose, I wonder. Love Always, Shane aka Aunt aka Writer

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Dear Aunt, To me, this conversation of self-representation is

own image. As you have so keenly pointed

one that is particularly interesting to have with

out, the visual arts (film, photography, even

you, as we are women of different generations.

advertising) have long been determined by the

It goes without saying that we have come of

male gaze. With the introduction of the smart

age under different circumstances. The years phone’s front camera, the masses suddenly were in which I was beginning to understand what

given the power to create self-portraits. Given

it means to be a woman have very much been

this, shouldn’t it be understood that a moment

dominated by the presence of social media of adjustment is necessary? Adjustment to and the constant exposure to images that

understanding that the self-portrait is no

reinforce the contemporary beauty ideals that

longer a medium reserved for artists, male

you have introduced in your opening letter.

artists in particular. The technology that makes

It is a relatively new phenomenon that women the modern Selfie possible is intuitive and have the opportunity and power to create their now accessible to many people around the world. not

Should be

we

celebrating

this

monumental

modern

achievement?

In order to adjust to understanding modern

the

self-portrait,

your discussion of intent becomes interesting to me. As I see it, social media,

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Instagram in particular, is a valuable virtual gaze and the beauty ideals that we are so used space where inspiration and a daily opportunity to seeing heavily reinforced on social media. to express oneself can be found. It has become a way for me to keep a visual journal of memories, Idealized forms have always existed. However, experiences and places. I share things that I find

the

technologies

with

which

we

now

aesthetically pleasing, I like things that catch my

achieve them are seamless. Perhaps this is what

attention, I follow people and accounts that interest

makes the modern self-portrait so controversial.

me. To me, posting is more than self-promotion. While artists have been interpreting and And so, posting a picture of myself is part of representing ‘flawless’ beauty since the very how I use this space to express myself creatively.

beginning, the ability to do so in such a realistic

However, not everyone sees it the same

way through digital means is relatively recent.

way.

To

many,

women

posting

pictures It’s this new and all-encompassing power

of themselves is purely an act of vanity. of editing, paired with an over-exposure to unrealistic beauty ideals on social media that It is much easier to categorize someone’s Selfie

has led our current media environment to

as vain rather than creative, narcissistic rather

be an interesting site to observe the Selfie.

than expressive. And so, I argue that recognizing the intention behind the capturing and posting

When

the

boundaries

between

the

real

of a Selfie is both important and difficult. In the

and hyper-real can so easily be blurred,

same breath, I note that for every thoughtfully posted, and internalized through the porous and

creatively

produced

self-portrait

on

borders of social media – how can the self-

Instagram, there are hundreds more that are portrait in the digital age be seen as an vain, self-promotional, etc. Interestingly, these

authentic representation of individuality and

might also be the photos that are more closely

creativity? Is it in vain to argue that the Selfie

aligned with an aesthetic that caters to the male

holds the creative power of self-expression? With love, Sophie

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LEFT ON The Medea Collection from Danish designer A S T R I D A G E R S K O V brought to life in Copenhagen’s Meatpacking District by model and stylist LOTTA LAVANTI

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shot by FREDERIK VALDEMAR KJELDGAARD directed by SOPHIE BERGQUIST modeled by LOTTA LAVANTI makeup by SIGNE JUHL set assistance by MATTHEW GREENSTEIN

RED

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caged cardinal // a red jumpsuit is the perfect uniform for making an escape

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can’t box her in // a hand knit crop sweater adds layers to a silk sundress

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keep it rail // this woman is waiting around for no one

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Dorothy 2.0 // a yellow brick road is no match for this color combo

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like a lady // with snaps up & down a pant leg, she may sit wherever, and however, she pleases

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thinking outside the box // done best in extrawide leg pants

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getaway car // it doesn’t take much to get going in this sweater & stocking situation NOW


the medea collection// Her revenge was devastating and

The Medea collection is a sensual

bloody before escaping in a godly tribute to all of the female body and golden chariot. Medea was both a womanhood in general. The colour heroine and a villian, but she was also scale is exploding with vibrant a true rebel and feminist of her time.

and bold choices, while creating a feminine and alluring mood.

The Medea collection is inspired by

Euripides’

tragedy

Medea Flowy silhouettes combined with

and how it reflects back on

experimenting

modern

deconstrued

day

and

feminism.

knitwear menswear

and styles

create a look, that is both strong Modern third wave feminism is all

and delicate. The fight for women’s

that Medea hoped for in a society

rights is happening right now.

- justice motivated, boundary breaking, inclusive, empowering Do and open to all types of women. battle

you

have armor

your ready?

Astrid Agerskov

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LAST LOOK. Thank For

you,

the

Copenhagen.

happiest

inspiration

of

and

days,

the

the

balance.

NOW 2018 was strongly influenced by my time spent getting to know this

incredible

city.

Dedicating

this issue to Copenhagen is an inadequate way for me to honor how much my time spent in this city has and will continue to impact

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my

outlook

and

the

on

fashion,

significance

style

of

color.

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@now_mag

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NOW 2018  
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