Issuu on Google+

Design for Designers explores the working relationship between a Graphic Designer and clients, and the ways in which influence, experience, and insight are used by Designers to achieve professional and desirable results for both the client and the designer’s working portfolio. Design for Designers focuses on those creating design for the design industry, or fellow designers, and how creative concepts and outcomes are often utilised to gain prestige and acknowledgement among industry contemporaries. Through case study interviews, Design for Designers looks at how positive working relationships can be consistently achieved and maintained, with sourced images showcasing the work of multi-national design professionals and successful design solutions throughout various sectors.


Applied Branding : Project Review

YCN Professionals Awards Craig Ward : New York City, USA

Awards identity for YCN Professional Awards Photography + Typographic Design wordsarepictures.co.uk


04 : 05


Applied Branding : Project Review

Just In Case MENOSUNOCEROUNO : Mexico

“Modern Mexican design for the end of times.” - thedieline.com Branding + Packaging Design menosunocerouno.com


06 : 07


Applied Branding : Project Review

Studio Branding Glad : United Kingdom

“The Glad brand provides an opportunity to have a bit of fun with language, adding wit and personality to each communication.� Branding + Brand Stationary Design weareglad.com


08 : 09


Applied Branding : Project Review

RoAndCordials RoAndCo : New York City, USA

“...Having recently moved into a new studio space on White Street, we decided to double the gift as an invitation to our white themed office warming party.� Branding + Packaging Design roandcostudio.com


10 : 11


Robbie Porter robbieporter.co.uk Robbie Porter is an Illustrator, currently living in London, United Kingdom.

What is your name? Robbie Porter What is your specialism with your design practice? Editorial Illustration How do you balance design for designers (or yourself) and design for clients? For me personal work is about developing and drawing for fun where as client work tends to be using the skills learned from personal work that I can apply quickly & well. It probably balances out about 70% personal 30% professional in an average week but I'd like to get it closer to 50/50. How do you manage client expectations and quality design outcomes? I’d hope to be hired because a client liked my style of work and ideas, so hopefully their expectations would be to produce work in ‘my way’ with a job I send off a bunch of roughs first, they choose one, then I produce a final piece possibly in a variety of colour schemes, then they ask for any final changes. I guess it’s best to keep the dialogue going so that they know the direction you’re heading in and can help you steer it towards a conclusion that you are both happy with. Do you, generally, prefer client, or design lead work? ...Personal work is more creative but it can also be easy to repeat yourself client work is more problem solving which can be very satisfying but you might have to compromise with the content.

Image (right) : Curtain Call


12 : 13


Editorial + Typographic Design : Project Review

Elle Denmark March 2013 Elle Denmark : Denmark

Photographer : Katrine Rohrberg Model : Alberte Wibrand Editorial + Photographic Design elle.dk


14 : 15


Editorial + Typographic Design : Project Review

USED Magazine SS / 12 USED Magazine : United Kingdom

“USED is a biannual Fashion and Art magazine� Editorial + Photographic Design usedmagazine.co.uk


16 : 17

Editorial + Typographic Design

Kinfolk Magazine Vol. VII Kinfolk : Oregon, USA

“...Whether it’s a new cooking skill, road trip route, or camping guide, Kinfolk is a blueprint for a balanced, intentional lifestyle..” Editorial + Photographic Design kinfolkmag.com


Editorial + Typographic Design : Project Review

Editorial + Typographic Design

Elle France February 2013 Elle France : France

Photographer : David Burton Model : Amber Anderson Editorial + Photographic Design elle.fr


18 : 19

Editorial + Typographic Design Editorial + Typographic Design


Editorial + Typographic Design : Project Review

Editorial + Typographic Design

Harper’s Bazaar April 2013 Harper’s Bazaar : United Kingdom

Photographer : Alexi Lubomirski Model : Kate Winslet Editorial + Photographic Design harpersbazaar.co.uk


20 : 21

Editorial + Typographic Design Editorial + Typographic Design

Elle Hungary October 2011 Elle Hungary : Hungary

Photographer : Zoltan Tombori Model : Barbara Palvin Editorial + Photographic Design ellemagazin.hu


Mathias Haddal Hovet (Heydays) heydays.no Mathias Haddal Hovet is the Studio Manager of design studio, Heydays, based in Oslo, Norway.

What is your name? Mathias Haddal Hovet What is your specialism with your design practice? Conceptual thinking and graphic design in general. How do you balance design for designers (or yourself) and design for clients? From my point of view, every task has a client, either it’s me or someone outside the company. There's a problem and we are to find the best possible solution within a time frame and budget. You use the same tools, way of thinking, and approach to most problems, big or small. Map problem, search solution, develop, deliver. How do you manage client expectations and quality design outcomes? By mapping expectations and limitations early. Before you do anything really. Quality varies, as in everything in life - and motivation can be killed by bad chemistry. But you always try to stay professional and solve the problems you are paid to solve, in a way both you and the client can be proud of. I guess it’s best to keep the dialogue going so that they know the direction you’re heading in and can help you steer it towards a conclusion that you are both happy with.

Do you, generally, prefer client, or design lead work? A combination. Every project needs solid input from the client. We need their information to learn and understand their business, product or service. Then, since we are paid to challenge and ask the though questions, we need to gain their trust and together solve the project. We design and they correct and give input. The most important part is that the roles are not mixed, and that designers do the design work and that the client gives input about the product (its not up to the designer to guess who the target audience is).

Image (right) : Heydays Brand Stationary


22 : 23


Packaging Design : Project Review

Blue Nectar No. I Blue Nectar Design : United Kingdom

“... At the Packaging Innovations Show in London we distributed the ale as a calling card to prospect clients.� - thedieline.com Branding + Packaging Design bluenectardesign.co.uk


24 : 25

NYC Spaghetti Alex Creamer : Australia

“... On the underside of the box is a model of the Chrysler building (created by Ben Thorpe) that when pushed into the spaghetti creates a skyscraper impression on top.� Branding + Packaging Design alexcreamer.co.uk


Packaging Design : Project Review

Packaging Design

John Lewis Candles Charlie Smith Design : United Kingdom

“... A neutral background with a highlight colour for the text which changed to reflect each fragrance.� - thedieline.com Branding + Packaging Design charliesmithdesign.com


26 : 27

Packaging Design


Tobias van Schneider vanschneider.com Tobias van Schneider is a German designer, currently living in New York City, USA.

What is your name? Tobias van Schneider What is your specialism with your design practice? I specialize on Interactive Experiences as well as Digital Branding. I have a broad background, coming from traditional print going into more digital interactive experiences and they always will be connected in some way, at least that’s my goal. How do you balance design for designers (or yourself) and design for clients? Well, this is a pretty easy job I think. Design for Designers is just for one particular target audience, and the easy thing about it is that you’re exactly in the same target group. This makes it easy for you to design for this particular group, since it’s basically for you. Designing for clients usually takes much more time and much more research... In the end it’s about what YOU like to do. If you’re a designer that only want’s to design for designers, that’s totally fine. I like both, but I prefer designing for the people outside of my “designers bubble” How do you manage client expectations and quality design outcomes? I tend to educate clients when it comes to design. Managing client expectations also depends on what expectations YOU have. In an ideal world I have my own expectations, the client works with me because he can identifies with those expectations. If there is no alignment of expectations from both sides in the beginning I wouldn’t suggest working on together.

Do you, generally, prefer client, or design lead work? ...The challenge is to combine both of it and especially trying to educate your client or choose the client carefully so it matches up with your expectations.

Image (right) : Les Avignons


28 : 29

Case Study 3


Image + Applied Image : Project Review

The Kama Sutra A - Z Malika Favra : United Kingdom

“25 limited edition screenprint of each letter... Signed and Numbered by the artist.� Image + Applied Image malikafavre.com


30 : 31


Image + Applied Image : Project Review

Image + Applied Image

Mr. Nicecream for Tesco R Design London : United Kingdom

“Mr Nicecream. Launched in February 2013. Featured in Design Week, Packaging News & The Drum.� Image + Applied Image r-design.co.uk


32 : 33

Image + Applied Image

Beirut at Terminal 5 Jamie Reed (Human Shaped Robot) : North Carolina, USA

“Beirut with Laetitia Sadier at Terminal 5 in New York. Printed with gold, brown and blue inks on light blue French Speckletone Starch Rain paper.� Image + Applied Image humanshapedrobot.com


Rotate 180ยบ Close Cover Start Reading Design for Clients


Rotate 180ยบ Close Cover Start Reading Design for Designers


Image + Applied Image

Image + Applied Image

Image + Applied Image

32 : 33


Image + Applied Image : Project Review

Image + Applied Image Image + Applied Image

Image + Applied Image

Stanley Chow Stanley Chow : United Kingdom

“Paul Weller cover illustration for The Big Issue.� "... It earned me some recognition... being posted on gigposters.com" - White Stripes Bootleg Poster Editorial + Applied Image stanleychowillustration.com


30 : 31

Image + Applied Image

Image + Applied Image


Image + Applied Image : Project Review

Image + Applied Image

Image + Applied Image

Noma Bar for Financial Times Noma Bar : United Kingdom

“Risk Addicts for Financial Times� Editorial + Applied Image www.ft.com + nomabar.com


28 : 29


Dima Kuzmichev (Qus - Qus) qus-qus.com Qus Qus is a Design studio founded by Dima Kuzmichev in St. Petersburg, Russia.

What is your name? Dima Kuzmichev

What is your specialism with your design practice? Graphic design, Editorial, Branding, Experience, Strategy, Ideas. How do you balance design for designers (or yourself) and design for clients? That's an interesting question indeed. But currently I guess it doesn't matter who your clients are. Design should be more human centered. I mean it's not something beautiful for you or just for your portfolio. It's for people. Design can make things better, easier, more useful or playful. Design can solve really serious problems. Design and branding are able to connect people and company. Design is able to enrich your life or improve your mood. Etc, etc, etc. I think design is not a decoration, is not just a beautiful picture. Design is a really important thing now. It's important for people, for business, for economy and even for the planet... How do you manage client expectations and quality design outcomes? Sometimes it's difficult. But now I realise that the designers or agencies should work "with" clients rather than "for" clients. And it's a completely different story. So, from the very beginning you should work as partners, not as "designer and client", you should discuss problems and different solutions together. You can tell them your own point of view on the problem and client's ideas, why it doesn't work or how we could make it better. What kind of style (for example) would work better for this audience and so on. And if you understand each other the product will be good. Otherwise, just don't work with this client.

Do you, generally, prefer client, or design lead work? It depends on tasks and clients. If you have a really difficult task, with a lot of restrictions it may be interesting to find a great solution for the client in this difficult situation. And it's a challenge. In the second case, If a client has a really strong vision of their company and the product they make, you don't have a lot of freedom to experiment, but it would be really interesting too. You should understand their philosophy, their way of life and create the product/brand which reflects their own story (but if you like their story). And of course it's not about bad design, good design should be done by default. But story - is the first. And in the third case, if a client doesn't have a really strong vision on what they want, and you have enough freedom to experiment, it's interesting, of course. But it should not be just experiments for yourself, it should reflect the main idea of strategy you create and of course it should work well for the client's business. Image (right) : Orekhprom Booklet


26 : 27


Packaging Design : Project Review

Harvey Nichols Construct : United Kingdom

“Construct created a limited - edition carrier bag design for Harvey Nichols to commemorate a year of key British celebrations." Branding + Packaging Design constructlondon.com


24 : 25


Packaging Design : Project Review

Slingshot Coffee Co. Dapper Paper : North Carolina, USA

“Bottled Cold Brew Coffee Handcrafted in Raleigh, North Carolina” -slingshotcoffeecompany.com Branding + Packaging Design dapperpaper.blogspot.co.uk


22 : 23


Anthony Burrill anthonyburrill.com Anthony Burrill is a Graphic Artist, Print - Maker and Designer, currently living in the United Kingdom.

What is your name? Anthony Burrill

What is your specialism with your design practice? Graphic design / Print making / Illustration How do you balance design for designers (or yourself) and design for clients? Currently it's an even split with commissioned projects and my own self-authored work that's how I like it, an even balance between things I have to do and things I want to do. How do you manage client expectations and quality design outcomes? By communicating as much as possible, that's the secret to a good working relationship also setting realistic deadlines is important, it's crucial to give a project enough time to develop. Do you, generally, prefer client, or design lead work? Both, I like to have a healthy variety in projects. Image (right) : Everyday Beautiful - youngcreativecouncil.com Don't Say Nothing - peopleofprint.com


20 : 21


Editorial + Typographic Design : Project Review

Love Magazine February 2013 Love Magazine : London

Photographer : Tim Walker Model : Cara Delevingne Editorial + Photographic Design thelovemagazine.co.uk


NumĂŠro Tokyo October 2011 NumĂŠro Tokyo : Japan

18 : 19

Photographer : David Vasiljevic Model : Melissa Tammerijn Editorial + Photographic Design numero.jp


Editorial + Typographic Design : Project Review

Vogue Korea March 2013 Vogue Korea : Korea

Photographer : Daniele Duella + Iango Henzi Model : Doutzen Kroes Editorial + Photographic Design style.co.kr/vogue/


16 : 17


Editorial + Typographic Design : Project Review

Vogue Australia March 2013 Vogue Australia : Australia

Photographer : Angelo Pennetta Model : Lara Stone Editorial + Photographic Design vogue.com.au


14 : 15


Editorial + Typographic Design : Project Review

US Vogue April 2013 US Vogue : USA

Photographer : Patrick Demarchelier Model : Joan Smalls Editorial + Photographic Design vogue.com


12 : 13


Owen Davey owendavey.com Owen Davey is a Freelance Illustrator, currently living in the United Kingdom.

What is your name? Owen Davey What is your specialism with your design practice? Illustration How do you balance design for designers (or yourself) and design for clients? I like working within boundaries, so I just stretch as much as I can within constraints clients put upon me, and try to push the design for design elements if I can. If you get a good Art Director, this can be pretty easy anyway. How do you manage client expectations and quality design outcomes? ... I always try to make my work as good as it possibly can be, so I've never had a complaint about quality. I've had to edit content, but the quality hasn't ever been brought into question. Do you, generally, prefer client, or design lead work? Well clients are good because they give you a place to start with a project and get you to step out of your comfort zone. They also give you money. But then doing stuff for myself can be really fun too. Don't get much chances to do it, to be perfectly honest though. Image (right) : The Leisure Society (Alone Aboard the Ark)


10 : 11


Applied Branding : Project Review

The People’s Supermarket Unreal : United Kingdom

“The People’s Supermarket is a community-based shop that’s managed and owned by members and open to all.” Branding + Packaging Design unreal-uk.com


08 : 09


Applied Branding : Project Review

Claridge’s Construct : United Kingdom

“... The quintessential London luxury hotel, appointed Construct to reposition the brand and create a new identity and suite of branded communication items...” Branding + Packaging Design constructlondon.com


06 : 07


Applied Branding : Project Review

Surname & Surname NB Studio : United Kingdom

“... The identity is built around the name, a tongue in cheek response to the traditional agency format; a comment on ego and authorship...� Branding + Packaging Design nbstudio.co.uk


04 : 05


Applied Branding : Project Review

Piece of Cake Sorbet : New Zealand

“Art Direction & identity for Brisbane based cake company Piece of Cake including website, photography, and packaging.� Branding, Photography + Packaging sorbetdesign.co.nz


Design for Clients explores the working relationship between a Graphic Designer and clients, and the ways in which client feedback, input, and insight strengthens the resolve and design development within collaborative projects. Through case study interviews, Design for Clients looks at how positive working relationships can be consistently achieved and maintained, with sourced images showcasing the work of multi-national design professionals and successful design solutions throughout various sectors.


Design Context Publication