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S O NY A M A N T E L L S E L E C T E D

W O R K S

CORNELL UNIVERSITY 2012-2018


SONYA MANTELL EDUCATION Cornell University Ithaca, NY Bachelor of Architecture | 2013-2018 Minor in Design and Environmental Analysis (DEA)

PUBLICATIONS & HONORS National Council on Education for the Ceramic Arts | 2018

Presented at the annual symposium in Pittsburgh about projects involving 3D printed ceramics and digital fabrication

Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture | 2017

Published paper entitled “Clay Nonwovens” with David Rosenwasser and Jenny Sabin, and invited to speak at MIT

Congressional Art Competition | 2012

Congressional district 1st place Year long exhibition of winning piece at the U.S. Capitol

ACTIVITIES & VOLUNTEER Habitat for Humanity Cornell University Volunteer | February 2015 - present

Volunteer to build houses (foundation, insulation, roof, etc.) 2017 Spring Break trip to West Virginia 2015 Spring Break trip to North Carolina

Thumbnail Association Cornell University Treasurer | September 2015 - May 2017 Managed the budget, gave biweekly financial reports Organized events involving presentations from speakers Contributed to branding, advertising, & social media COMPUTER SOFTWARE: Rhino, AutoCAD, VRay, Grasshopper, Sketchup, Microsoft Excel, InDesign, Photoshop, Illustrator MODEL MAKING: 3D printing, laser cutting, wood & metal work, rockite LANGUAGES: English (fluent), Mandarin (fluent)

2207 2nd Street, East Meadow, NY 11554 +1.516.236.2592 slm342@cornell.edu www.linkedin.com/in/sonya-mantell-587628121

WORK EXPERIENCE URBANUS Architecture & Design Beijing, CN Architectural Intern | December 2017 - January 2018 Botanic Garden of International Horticultural Exhibition 2019, Beijing / created series of drawings for clients and for the website Assisted with execution of final documents for the January 2018 press release (the exhibition will be open from April 29 - October 7, 2019)

FXCollaborative New York, NY Architectural Intern | September 2017 - November 2017 Revised construction drawings, renders, and diagrams Developed high-rise massing proposals and 3D computer models for a large scale urban project Researched & compiled Passive House information for a brochure for potential clients

Beyer Blinder Belle New York, NY Design Intern | May 2017 - August 2017 Sidewalk Toronto / aided with contributions to Sidewalk Labs’ submission following a Request For Proposals Prepared files for and constructed a 3D printed site models for planning projects Updated multiple iterations of 3D computer models, master plans, diagrams, renders, packets, and presentations for clients

Weston Baker Creative Group New York, NY Design Assistant | June 2016 - August 2016 Graffiti House, Astoria / produced 3D computer model, interior and exterior renders / surveyed construction site and communicated with developers Norse House / contributed to design and representation in the form of technical drawings, renders and diagrams Pitched ideas for branding, advertising, graphic design, web design, and social media presence

AZA Design New York, NY Architectural Intern | July 2015 - August 2015 AIA New Jersey Design Competition (residential) / created and finalized materials and presentation for submission Edited construction documents, renders, and digital models of interiors for clients such as Victoria’s Secret, Theory, and Michael Kors


NORSE HOUSE

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GOWANUS GATEWAY

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MUSEUM OF 20TH CENTURY ART

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DIGITAL FABRICATION & CLAY NONWOVENS

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BOTANIC GARDEN

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MUSEUM FOR HOUSING SPOLIA

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ADAPTIVE MODIFICATIONS

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THUMBNAIL X

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SELECTED ARTWORK

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Iceland Summer 2016

Brooklyn, New York Fall 2017

Berlin, Germany Fall 2015

Ithaca, New York Spring 2017

Beijing, China Winter 2018

Ithaca, New York Spring 2015

Ithaca, New York Spring 2014

Ithaca, New York Fall 2017

2012-2017


NORSE HOUSE SUMMER 2016 SITE: Iceland PARTNER: Weston Baker COMPLETED AT: Weston Baker Creative Group (NYC)

SLEEPING SPACE

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LIVING SPACE

MAXIMIZE VIEWS

EFFICIENT STRUCTURE

Norse House is an Icelandic trekking cabin designed to adapt to the variety of site conditions across the country, while providing a relaxing environment for visitors after a long day of hiking. The design is inspired by Iceland’s traditional wooden beam structures, as well as its modern indigenous architecture. The form is a response to programmatic needs and external conditions, and the red is a traditional Icelandic color found on their flag. Each cabin includes 8 bunk beds, a kitchen, bathroom, storage space, and a central lounge area oriented towards the glazed facade providing views to the surrounding site. Private functions are condensed to the back to maximize communal space. Water is collected from the slope of the angled roof and filtered inside the kitchen. All materials used in construction, including the wooden beam structure and the tin and glass panels, can be deconstructed to fit within a singe storage unit that can be carried to the site via helicopter. Norse House provides each visitor a unique and memorable experience, complimenting the excitement of their daily explorations throughout Iceland.


FLAT LAND

SLIGHT SLOPE

MOUNTAINOUS TERRAIN

VOLUME

INTERIOR LAYOUT

STRUCTURE

TIN & GLASS ENVELOPE

NORSE HOUSE

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FLOOR PLAN

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WOOD BEAM STRUCTURE


COMMUNITY CENTER

EXTENSION OF PUBLIC PARK

GOWANUS CANAL CSO TANK & TREATMENT FACILITY

GOWANUS GATEWAY FALL 2017 SITE: Brooklyn, New York PROFESSORS: Thomas Phifer & Gabriel Smith

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B A C K G R O U N D : The Gowanus Canal borders several neighborhoods, and has been nicknamed “one of the nation’s most extensively contaminated water bodies.” It was declared a Superfund site by the EPA in 2010, and is currently undergoing extensive cleanup.

P R O G R A M : This proposal ameliorates a program that would otherwise be perceived negatively, a Combined Sewer Overflow (CSO) tank facility, by integrating it with much needed community spaces such as a public park, outdoor recreation, and areas for working. Rather than being separated, indoor community functions are mixed, and intermingle throughout the site.

C O N T E X T & A T M O S P H E R E : Through its scale and geometric language, this autonomous building weaves itself within the collective mismatched jungle that is Gowanus. Interior programs are designed to allow for potential future change, and are lifted from ground level to “disappear” from the site and open access to the canal. The dark texture of the concrete relates to the ruggedness of Gowanus’ surrounding materials, which are stained with remnants of its industrial past. Contrasting from the heaviness of the rough exterior, the interior is bright and exposed with light seeping in from multiple directions.

G O A L : Gowanus Gateway, located at the canal’s head, activates the site by attracting local communities while cleaning the water.


WASTEWATER TREATMENT As part of the EPA’s long term control plan to clean the canal, Gowanus Gateway will incorporate an 8-million-gallon underground tank that will intercept overflow of CSO solids from outfalls at the northern end. CSO (combined sewer overflow) occurs when the sewer system is at full capacity and a diluted mix of rain water and sewage are released into the waterway.

CSO OUTFALLS CSO outfalls indicate the location where sewage runoff enters the canal after the system overflows.

FLUSHING TUNNEL From 1911 to 1960, this tunnel pumped dirty water from the canal into Buttermilk Channel . In 1999, the flow was reversed to pump water from the channel into the canal to “flush” the canal with clean water.

BROWNFIELD & RUNOFF The Gowanus Canal has a history of industrial abuse from the factories that bordered the waterway. Most contamination comes from Manufactured Gas Plants (MGP), Asphalt Plants, Coal Yards, Oil/Petroleum businesses, and multiple combination of sources.

SUPERFUND RTA 1

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The canal cleanup is divided into four sections, Remediation Target Areas (RTA) 1-3b. RTA 1, has the second highest level of contamination, and will be cleaned from 2017-2018.

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SUPERFUND RTA 2

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RTA 2, at the middle of the canal, has the highest level of contamination and will be cleaned after RTA 1 (2019-2020). RTA 3a and 3b (south of this map) will be cleaned last (2021-2022), and have the lowest level of contamination.

SITE PLAN 09


GROUND FLOOR PLAN

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SECOND FLOOR PLAN


CIRCULATION CORES

- Accessible from exterior & interior

THIRD FLOOR

1. Private Office Spaces 2. Public Working Space

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SECOND FLOOR

1. Private Office Space 2. Public Working Space

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GROUND FLOOR

1. Boat House 2. CSO Facility 3. Cafe & Restaurant 4. Vending Area 5. Pool Storage 6. Pool House 7. Information Center

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BELOW GROUND

1. Decks for Pedestrians 2. Canoe / Kayak Landing 3. Swimming Pool

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STUDY MODELS

SITE ELEVATION

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STUDY MODELS : INTERIOR LIGHT

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STUDY MODELS : MASSING

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M U S E U M O F 2 0 TH CENTURY ART FALL 2015 SITE: Berlin, Germany PROFESSOR: Henry Richardson

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Art is displayed through two types of exhibition spaces: one type having small, interconnected rooms to allow for a more intimate experience through control of zoning and circulation, and the other type having large, open spaces to display larger art pieces, and allow for a more social environment.

The two exhibition types are separated by the central atrium, which points towards the adjacent church. The structure is influenced by the geometries of the nearby site. Five primary walls, containing circulation and private spaces, are extruded on the north-south axis connecting the facades of Mies van der Rohe’s Neue Nationalgalerie and Hans Sharun’s Philharmonic Hall. Spaces are carved into these walls based upon geometries perpendicular to adjacent building facades along the east-west axis.

The height of the building increases from South to North in response to the increasing heights of the nearby buildings, and offers unique views throughout the city. Public green space is located at both ends of the museum, on top and underneath the structure.


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NEUE NATIONALGALERIE

OFFICES

PUBIC TERRACES These green spaces can be accessed by the public without needing to enter the museum. They are connected through exterior an interior stairs, and are separated by skylights. Each terrace gradually decreases in height to create a comfortable visual connection with Mies’ Nationalgalerie.

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CAFE & SHOP

PRIMARY CIRCULATION

EXHIBITION TYPE A Visitors can more intimately experience art through these smaller, interconnected rooms. The maze-like quality of this space lets curators differentiate collections, and direct circulation in a more controlled manner. The disconnection of floor plates allows for natural light from above to flow throughout each level.

CENTRAL

Exhibition type A and type connected by this central a is framed and highlighted to sensitivity to the existing site which can be accessed by connects to the secondary l


THEATER

L ATRIUM

e B are separated, yet also atrium. The adjacent church o accentuate the museum’s e. Here, is the main lobby, y both main entrances, and lobby for the theater.

THEATER LOBBY

RESTAURANT

EXHIBITION TYPE B Exhibition type B is characterized by big, open spaces to display larger art pieces, and allow for a more social environment. This space is more flexible to change, and can be used to host large social events. Each level is connected by a large central space, and is glazed on the Northern facades to direct views throughout the site.

CONNECTION TO TIERGARTEN

VIEWING ROOM The highest room extends above the primary walls to offer visitors a unique, panoramic view of Berlin. The Northern facade is angled parallel to the Tiergarten to further the museum’s connection with the park. This space is public, and can be accessed without needing to enter the museum.

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SITE PLAN

SKYLIGHTS & ATRIUM

Skylights are located throughout the bu is completely exposed to the sky, accen

GEOMETRIC RELATIONSHIP TO

5 primary walls extend perpendicular to lation, restrooms, and storage. 2 masses Church to the West. Northern glazed fac

NEUE STAATSBIBLIOTHEK LIBRARY NEUE NATIONALGALERIE MUSEUM

MUSEUM OF 20TH CENTURY ART

PHILHARMONIE CONCERT HALL

ST. MATTHAUS CHURCH

GEMALDEGALERIE MUSEUM

TIERGARTEN PARK


uilding to allow light to reach the lowest levels. The central atrium ntuating the division of the building.

O SITE

the Neue Nationalgalerie, 2 of which are widened to hold circus are split to create a central atrium which points at St. Matthaus cades are angled to highlight different views across Berlin.

PRIMARY ACCESS The two main entrances connect to primary circulation paths throughout the site. The two main entrances feeds visitor traffi based on the most travelled paths.

CONNECTION TO TIERGARTEN The Tiergarten is one of the most visited parks in Berlin, and filters many visitors and residents each day. Green space extends from the park throughout the museum to connect visitors to both sites. The tallest space within the museum points toward the park to create a unique visual connection to the Tiergarten.

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SECOND FLOOR PLAN

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NEUE NATIONALGALERIE

M U S E U M O F 2 0TH C E N T U R Y A R T


BERLINER PHILHARMONIE

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POTENTIAL APPLICATION AS BUILDING FACADE (shown on Langen Foundation in Neuss, Germany)

DIGITAL FABRICATION & CLAY NONWOVENS SPRING 2017 SITE: Ithaca, New York COLLABORATORS: David Rosenwasser & Jenny Sabin ACADIA (Association for Computer Aided Design) 2017, published research paper & invited to speak at MIT NCECA (National Council on Education for the Ceramic Arts) 2018, presented at David L. Lawrence Convention Center 24


Sibley Hall, Ithaca, NY

This project develops a new approach for robotic fabrication, applying traditional craft methods and materials to a fundamentally technical and precise fabrication methodology. It touches upon explorations in robotic fabrication, additive manufacturing, complex patterning, and techniques bound in the arts and crafts. This project seeks to develop a system of porous cladding panels, which negotiate circumstances of natural daylighting through parameters dealing with textile patterning and line typologies. While additive manufacturing has been built predominantly on the basis of extrusion, technological developments in the field of 3D printing view the visibility of the extruded line as a nuisance. The blurring of recognizable layers is often seen as progress, but it removes visible traces of a fabrication process. Historically, however, construction methods in architecture and the building industry have celebrated traces of making, ranging from stone cutting to log construction. With growing interest in digital craft within the fields of architecture and design, we seek to reconcile our relationship with the extruded bead and reinterpret it as a fiber rather than a 3D drawing tool. The traditional clay coil is to be reconsidered as a structural fiber rather than a tool for solid construction. In order to build upon this body of robotically fabricated clay structures, three distinct but connected challenges existed: the construction of a simple end effector for extrusion; the development of a clay body; and the use of computational design tools to develop formwork and toolpath geometries.


To view a short video of the process, please visit: https://vimeo.com/244747756


CONSTRUCTING THE END-EFFECTOR

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MATRIX 1: Investigations of varying curvatures upon base forms. 28


MATRIX 2: Effect of single form upon whole screen system. Each column demonstrates a different tile combination. 29


MATRIX 3: Effect of increasing air pressure upon tiles of different tool-paths. 30

Final Screen


n System shown in perspective, front elevation, and section. The three figures on the right display possible variations for bracing the system. 31


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Sibley Hall, Ithaca, NY


BOTANIC GARDEN WINTER 2018 SITE: Beijing City, China COMPLETED AT: Urbanus (professional project) WORKED ON: Plans & Sections

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Designed by Urbanus for the International Horticultural Exhibition 2019, this Botanic Garden focuses on an interior garden that can be experienced throughout the building. The design reflects the philosophy of the exhibition, to “make horticulture part of nature; let nature touch the soul.” Urbanus’ proposal is one of many which will be represented at in the Yanqing District of Beijing City, close to the Great Wall of China. The goal of the exhibition is to display distinguished horticulture from all over the world, and to harmoniously integrate gardening, city and nature into a new model of ecological conservation. The exhibition lasts for 162 days, opening on April 29, 2019 and closing on October 7th. During an internship at the Urbanus Beijing office, I worked under the direction of principal architect Wang Hui to create four plans (ground floor, second floor, third floor, master plan) and two sections for this project. The main task was to highlight the light and diaphanous atmosphere, as well as the glowing energy given off by the lush vegetation.


GROUND FLOOR PLAN

*Renders courtesy of Urbanus

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MUSEUM FOR HOUSING SPOLIA SPRING 2015 SITE: Ithaca, New York PROFESSOR: Vincent Mulcahy

This museum is sited on Cornell University’s campus adjacent to the Fuertes Observatory. Upon approach, the building is dark, massive, and object-like. However, the interior, with its bright illumination from natural light filtered through each fragmented wall, contrasts the darkness of the exterior.

This museum provides a unique experience that integrates the viewing of the exhibition inside, with the natural landscape outside. The fragmentation of the walls provide backdrops for each art-piece, and appears to be frames for visitors looking in from outside.


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ROOF PLANES

GLAZING

PRIMARY WELDED STEEL STRUCTURE

CORRUGATED METAL FACADE

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ADAPTIVE MODIFICATIONS SPRING 2014 PROFESSORS: Val Warke & Jim Williamson

This series of models are adaptations of each other, each designed to portray elements specific to varying precedents. Each model is inspired by either a traditional or modern architectural dwelling of a unique culture.

The initial moving model (pictured on the far right) was first designed as a representation of the S Residence by Shigeru Ban. The pushing of the horizontal elements initiate the upward twisting of the roof to create more space below. The wire not only holds the roof together, but also implies the invisible geometry responsible for the fluidity of movement. Successive models are influenced by the Shabono dwellings of the Yanomami people of the Amazon Rain-forest, South African Zulu beehive huts, and Icelandic Turf Houses.

Material use (two different types of wood) and the language of linear repetition was kept constant through each model to accentuate the differences and evolution of the overall design. The lighter wood is always being pushed and acted upon by the darker wood. 40


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THUMBNAIL X Thumbnail is an open forum for the exchange of ideas, based on the Pecha Kucha model. This event is hosted at Cornell University once a semester, where a select number of speakers are chosen to present about a topic they are familiar with as long as it relates to that semester’s theme. These invitations are sent to the invited speakers and are designed according to Fall 2015’s theme “X”. A single sheet of paper folds into itself to create the form of an X not only on the front, but also on the back.

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SELECTED ARTWORK

BATHROOM PERSPECTIVE marker

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GEOMETRIC LANDSCAPE pen & acrylic paint


SELF PORTRAIT acrylic paint

POLLUTION acrylic paint

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WITHOUT A HOME IN ROME marker

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THE BOSS chalk pastel

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SONYA MANTELL

slm342@cornell.edu 1.516.236.2592

Selected Works 2018  
Selected Works 2018  
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