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October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Think Pink A local resource guide for early detection, education, self-care, support services and more

Finding hope, support in family

INSIDE Page 3: How reframing the conversation about breast cancer can help. Page 4: Exercising with a group can improve your outlook and your sense of connection. Page 5: Identifying and taking steps to lower your risk of breast cancer. Page 7: Barbara Recchia founded a triathlon to help fellow cancer patients and survivors. Page 8: Medical facilities rely on foundation support to help their patients.

A survivor’s story By Amie Windsor

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isa Cadwalader’s story begins with a mammogram. “My cancer was found during a routine mammogram,” Lisa, who is my aunt through marriage, told me. “I am and will always be a proponent of mammograms.” During the summer of 2005, Lisa, a program manager at a Silicon Valley tech firm, went in for her regularly scheduled appointment, thinking about other things — work, friends, family. It wasn’t until the doctor told her he found three areas of concern that she began to worry. “He wanted to do some biopsies,” Lisa said. A week later in early August, her doctor called her back with life-altering news. “He told me two were benign but the

third one was cancerous,” she said. Cadwalader, an optimistic, older sister to two, sat and breathed as her doctor explained her diagnosis and treatment options. Diagnosis and treatment Lisa considers herself lucky; she was diagnosed with invasive ductal carcinoma, determined to be between stages I and II. “I almost feel guilty,” Lisa said. “I have friends who had horrible cases, who died of cancer.” Oncologists and surgeons ran Lisa through her options: she likely wouldn’t need a full mastectomy. A lumpectomy to remove the mass, followed by radiation and chemotherapy, would likely kill the cancer. “The surgeon didn’t know how far in or how many lymph nodes he’d have to remove,” Lisa said. “That was the scary

part.” She admits she was terrified. Going into unknown territory, Lisa worked to have as much control as she could of this new situation, going full throttle into her treatment plan. “I consulted a surgeon and booked an appointment on Aug. 9,” Lisa said, less than two weeks after her mammogram. “I didn’t want to spend a bunch of time figuring things out. Once I made my decision, I ran with it.” During the lumpectomy, Lisa’s surgeon removed 13 lymph nodes, clearing her body of cancerous cells. To ensure remission, Lisa went through four months of chemotherapy every three weeks, followed by radiation therapy. While undergoing therapy, Lisa tried to keep her life as normal as possible.

See Lisa Page 9

Page 10: New study evaluates alternative therapies.

COMFORT — Lisa and her cat Charlie, who laid on her every time she went to rest on the sofa.

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The Windsor Times

October 12, 2017


Personalized Risk Assessment

Dr. Kimbro is a Sonoma Magazine

2017

Some cancers such as breast, ovarian and colon cancer may be linked to genetic mutations (BRCA or Lynch Syndrome mutations).

Dr. Laura Kimbro is a menopause and hormonal specialist specifically trained to evaluate variables that determine risk for cancer.

Call for f or an appointment appointmen ppointment p today t oda y

Dr. Laura Kimbro DO, FACOG Menopause Specialist www.center4womenshealth.org Think Pink

Center For Women’s Health 8911 Lakewood Dr., Suite 23 Windsor, CA

ph: 707-892-2146

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Breast cancer shift What reframing the conversation means for you By Dr. Laura Kimbro

A

DR. LAuRA KIMbRO DO, NCMP, FACOG

is a menopause and hormone specialist at the Center for Women’s Health in Windsor. To learn more, visit www.center4 womenshealth.org.

recent headline stated, “Survival rates rising in breast cancer fight” with the tagline “Disease starting to be seen more as an illness to be managed.” By reframing the discussion around breast cancer, and considering it as something to be managed, I hope women will feel empowered and less hesitant to inquire about their own risk, seeking professionals who can provide guidance on living a long and healthy life. But this reframing doesn’t resolve the question, “Do I get a mammogram or not?” As a menopause specialist, it’s a conversation I have frequently with patients. “When should I start having mammograms if my Mom and her sister had breast cancer?” and, “Does that mean I shouldn’t take hormones? I heard it causes cancer.” There is a lot of controversy about mammograms and hormone treatments, more specifically, how to address the high amount of false positives provided by regular mammograms. The

current screening schedule is a onesize-fits-all, annual approach that has been both adopted and renounced by members of the medical community. In the United States, most women start screening for breast cancer at age 40. This has been the standard for the past 30 years and is the guideline recommended by some professional organizations. However, women receive different screening recommendations depending on the clinician or specialist they visit. This has left many women confused about what age to start screening, how frequently to screen and until what age. The advice I give to my patients is to start with an assessment of genetic risk, breast density and lifestyle factors. If genetic risk is identified, with a simple, in-office test, we can understand real risk factors and build a plan personalized to their specific results. Today, with advances in our understanding of breast cancer, we know much more about women’s individual probability of developing the disease. Better estimates of a woman’s personal risk provides us with an opportunity to see if we can do better, and

improve detection rates while reducing the number of unnecessary breast biopsies. The decision to have a genetic test narrows the risk factor for some individual women, which is often less daunting than the, “One in eight women get breast cancer” statistic that is the broad statement made for the general population. Knowing your own risk will allow you to explore the frequency of screenings and perhaps support the need for increased surveillance to effectively decrease that risk. Or possibly your risk doesn’t require a screening quite as often, how do you know? The answer is to talk with a health care provider who has taken the time to understand when and where genetic testing is advantageous for you. Even without genetic testing, your risk of many cancers and diseases can be estimated and you can then learn strategies for focus and clarity. Knowing your personalized risk allows you to develop a strategy to enhance detection, decrease your stress and to adopt changes in diet and lifestyle that could decrease your risk.

Knowing your personalized risk allows you to develop a strategy to enhance detection, decrease your stress and to adopt changes in diet and lifestyle that could decrease your risk.

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Support and encouragement can be found in a group Connection and a sense of community can help the process of healing

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veryone loves to belong. Perhaps it’s part of our animal nature to feel safer in a pack than going it alone in the world. We satisfy that primal need by joining communities — in our workplace, in our neighborhood, and at all the places we frequent. When we are part of a community, we feel supported and more confident. A community can be defined as “a social unit with a shared focus.� Exercising in community with others is not just great for our physical health, but it boosts our mental-emotional wellbeing. We enjoy a flood of endorphins when we exercise, and we thrive on the feeling of connection. Whether recovering from cancer, illness, or injury or just getting healthier, staying connected with others for support can be instrumental in the process. There are many programs in the community that provide valuable support, such as Parkpoint Health Clubs' Exercise 2 Wellness — a free cancer recovery program offered in Healdsburg, Santa Rosa, and Sonoma for patients in

any stage from diagnosis through recovery. Participants of the program enjoy skilled instruction and guidance through a combination of classes and exercises, so that patients can nurture their bodies back to wellness in a safe and supportive environment. Programs such as these not only build physical strength, balance and flexibility, but also empower each participant to stay active and enjoy the support and encouragement of a group. Group participants report feelings of renewed energy levels, mental-emotional stress relief, and a comforting sense of belonging. And don't forget, community can be anything that meets the definition of a social unit with a shared focus, so find a sense of community that works for you and gives you the support you need. Try a local walking group, meet regularly over tea with friends or other cancer survivors, or take an educational or an exercise class. There’s a group out there just for you. — submitted by Heidi Desmond

Group participants report feelings of renewed energy levels, mental-emotional stress relief, and a comforting sense of belonging.

PARTNER — Parkpoint Health Club Personal Trainer Krista Williams leads a Cancer Recovery Program participant through exercises to regain strength.

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Prevention strategies Healthy lifestyle choices ensure a lifetime of breast health By Dr. Lela Emad

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nowing the facts about breast cancer empowers a woman to take the necessary steps to detect the disease in its early stages, while encouraging her to make lifestyle changes to reduce the odds of developing the disease in the first place. Despite decades of pursing an all-out cure and national efforts aimed at education and prevention, breast cancer remains the most common cancer among women in the United States, second only to skin cancer. Today millions of women are surviving the disease, thanks in part to early detection, improvements in treatment and by enacting healthy lifestyle choices. The first step in staying healthy The key to not only surviving a breast cancer diagnosis, but to thriving for years to come is early detection followed by early treatment. Routine breast exams and general awareness of how to maintain breast health are both important elements in staying healthy. Practitioners at the Women’s OB/GYN Medical Group encourage routine screening methods including regular self-breast exams, breast checks during annual gynecologic exams, and screening mammography — all approaches that work to detect breast problems early. And, I like to tell my patients that when we can catch and treat breast problems early, we have a better

shot of ensuring the long-term success of the therapy that follows. Know your breast cancer risks Some women who have one or more risk factors for breast cancer never actually develop the disease. Increased awareness about the risk associated with certain factors — particularly those that revolve around lifestyle choices that can be changed — can only serve to empower patients to make better choices. Some risk factors such as age, genetics or race obviously cannot be changed. Other factors, including environment, can also be difficult to modify. While some factors influence risk more than others, a person’s risk for developing breast cancer can change naturally due to aging and by making certain changes in habits and daily practices. According to the American Cancer Society there are several factors that can affect a woman’s breast cancer risks including: Having children after age 30 (shown to increase the risk of breast cancer in some cases). Birth Control (oral and injectable contraceptives stand out in studies as contributors to breast cancer). Alcohol consumption (the more consumed, the higher the risk). Weight (women who carry extra pounds have a higher risk for developing breast cancer, primarily due to the higher insulin levels that accompany

obesity). Smoking (evidence suggests a link between smoking and breast cancer risk, particularly in premenopausal women). Known factors that lower risk Researchers continue to pursue the link between diet and breast cancer risk and many studies indicate that diet does play a role. More and more studies cast a wary eye towards red meat consumption, and there is an increased risk associated with high-fat diets, which perpetuates weight gain and obesity (a known breast cancer risk factor). There may be sure way to prevent breast cancer as of yet, but there are things we can do to help lower the risk. A short list of actions includes; Breast Feeding – for women who breast feed for 1.5 to 2 years studies suggest that there may be some benefit in reducing breast cancer risk. Physical Activity – a growing body of evidence indicates that a person’s risk of developing almost any cancer, particularly breast cancer is reduced by adopting a daily routine of physical activity. For example, as little as 1.25 hours of moderate physical activity per week may reduce the risk by up to 18 percent according to some studies. Limit dose and duration of hormone therapy — combination hormone therapy for more than five years is known to increase the risk of breast cancer. If you and your healthcare provider decide that the benefits of short-term hormone

therapy outweigh the risks, use the lowest dose possible. How OB/GYN providers can help Self-check breast exams are easy to perform in the home and should be conducted monthly in addition to annual breast exams with a physician. Depending on a patient’s age and individual health, a physician may recommend a more frequent interval of regular checkups with a health care provider. And of course, if you suspect a breast health problem contact a provider immediately.

DR. LELA EMAD is a physician with the Women's OB/GYN Medical Group.

breast Density and breast Cancer Screening Q & A What is breast density? Breasts are made up of fibrous, glandular and fatty tissue. Dense breasts have a lot of fibrous or glandular tissue and less fatty tissue. Breast density may change over time and is not related to how hard or soft breasts feel during a physical exam. Why is breast density important? Dense breasts are more difficult to screen with a mammogram. Dense breast tissue appears white on mammograms but so do many lumps, both cancerous and benign. This means abnormalities can “hide” within the image of the tissue. Some research shows that women with dense breast tissue may have a higher chance of getting breast cancer. How do I know if I have dense breasts? A radiologist reviewing your mammogram will assign a breast density score from 1 to 4. Your mammogram results will say if you have dense breasts. Score 1: Mostly fatty Score 2: Scattered fibroglandular density Score 3: Dense in some areas Score 4: Extremely dense If I have dense breasts, do I still need a mammogram? Yes. A mammogram is the only medical imaging screening proven to reduce deaths from breast cancer. Most cancers are seen on mammograms, including in women with dense breasts. Nine in 10 women with early stage breast cancer can be cured with proper treatment. Regardless of breast density, Sutter Health recommends all women age 40 and older discuss with their doctor when they should start having routine mammograms.

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Are there other tests besides a mammogram to check for cancer? Several other tests may help find cancers that are not seen on mammograms: ultrasound, breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and tomosynthesis. For women who have risk factors for breast cancer in addition to dense breasts, any of these three tests may be useful. Additional imaging beyond mammography has not been proven to find cancers at an earlier stage or to prevent breast cancer deaths. Women with additional risk factors for breast cancer may benefit from additional imaging studies. Talk with your doctor about your risks and the next steps that are right for you. What should I do? Regardless of breast density, Sutter Health recommends all women age 40 and older should discuss with their doctor when to start having routine mammograms, and then follow those recommendations. Women with additional risk factors or concerns should talk with their doctor. Together, you can determine if other screening tests are right for you. Availability of tests may vary. How can I lower my chances of getting breast cancer? Do — exercise regularly, eat a healthy diet and maintain a normal weight Don’t — smoke or drink more than one alcoholic beverage each day (on average) — This question and answer patient information was created and approved by the Sutter Health Diagnostic Imaging Oversight Committee

Think Pink A special supplement to the October 12, 2017 edition of:

The Healdsburg Tribune The Windsor Times

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Fighting the good fight Barbara recchia, survivor and race founder, continues the cause with Barb’s Tri

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ust beyond the finish line at the inaugural Barb’s Tri on the third Saturday in July, Healdsburg’s Barbara Recchia stood dispensing equal amounts of medals and hugs. A two-time cancer survivor and dedicated triathlon founder and volunteer, Recchia has been on a crusade to help others that have been similarly afflicted for more than two decades. Recchia was the namesake and driving force behind Barb’s Race, an allwomen’s triathlon that raised more than $1 million in its 15-year existence in the fight against cancer before being dropped following the sale of the Vineman brand to Ironman Inc. in 2015. Last year, she joined forces with Skip Brand of the Healdsburg Running Company, Athletic Director Adam Ray of Scena Performance and race sponsor Bellwether Farms, to resurrect the event in 2017. Now known as Barb’s Tri, the inaugural race took place on July 22 and included 100 women, competing on a picturesque course that started and finished at Memorial Beach in Healdsburg. The event picked up where its predecessor left off in raising over $33,000, with proceeds going to the Sutter Institute for Health and Healing in Santa Rosa, an organization which offers physical, emotional and spiritual care and

comfort for cancer patients to relieve the effects of their treatment. The race included a minimum fundraising requirement for each participating athlete, roughly equal to the registration fee. “Because of their efforts we were able to support so many more people in our community with a cancer diagnosis,” Recchia said of the participating athletes. “I was so honored to hang a medal on them to thank them for their fundraising efforts and celebrate their finish.” Barb’s Tri offered female athletes a variety of triathlon race distances, including an Olympic distance (.93 mile swim, 27.9 mile bike, 6.2 mile run), and a Sprint distance (.5 mile swim, 14 mile bike, 3.1 mile run). The event also included an Olympic Relay, with three athletes on each team. Barbra Friedman, a massage therapist from Forestville, was the top individual fundraiser for Barb’s Tri 2017, raising an impressive $6,335 in just three weeks. For Recchia, who personally raised $5,000 this year, the collective efforts of fellow race organizers, volunteers and participants was both gratifying and emotional. “I was so thrilled by the amount we raised with only 100 participants — the women really got behind the cause and did an amazing job with fundraising,”

she said. “I was so inspired by their reasons for signing up and I especially enjoyed meeting the racers at the finish.” A lifetime of giving Recchia was honored for her remarkable contributions with the USA Triathlon Lifetime Achievement Award in 2014, receiving the award in Milwaukee, Wisconsin at the USA Triathlon Athlete of the Year and Multi-sport Awards Banquet.

According to the USA Triathlon organization, the award “Memorializes those who have made significant contributions to USA Triathlon and the multisport lifestyle. These contributions, whether they have been in performance, leadership, volunteerism or mentorship, demonstrate impact on the multi-sport lifestyle and support an extended commitment to the sport.

Making a difference — Healdsburg’s Barbara Recchia, (left) congratulated a finisher at the inaugural Barb’s Tri on July 22, an all women’s triathlon that raised more than $33,000 in the fight against cancer.

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Promoting quality healthcare through philanthropy Foundation supporting technology and programs By Debbie Mason

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he Healthcare Foundation Northern Sonoma County has been providing grants for services and equipment to care for women with breast cancer since the foundation’s inception in 2001. Technology grants to Healdsburg District Hospital have provided a new CT suite of equipment, women’s diagnostic center equipment and this year provided for the purchase of a new “wide” MRI that will create the opportunity for bet-

ter diagnosis and treatment for women’s cancer and other issues. Donors to the foundation have made possible the enhancement of the hospital’s emergency department, developed the region’s only certified Stroke Center and many other technology upgrades that benefit all local employers and families by keeping access and quality healthcare nearby. Annually, the Healthcare Foundation raises dollars in the region from northern Santa Rosa/Windsor to Cloverdale and beyond, from donors who under-

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stand that investing with the Healthcare Foundation means our neighbors who live and work here will have access to the medical and dental health they need — without worrying about their ability to pay for those services. This year, the Healthcare Foundation’s grant commitments include $100,000 each to Alliance Medical Center, Alexander Valley Healthcare and PDI Surgery Center to ensure that those who need screenings, medicine and medical and dental care can been seen locally, close to home. In addition, the Healthcare Foundation will provide scholarships to nurse practitioners from Sonoma State University. This year, the Healthcare Foundation has been actively convening nonprofit providers, as well as local residents to create a 10-year vision of a healthier community.

The foundation earlier this year made a $50,000 grant to Corazón Healdsburg to support its outreach and engagement work with low income Latino residents.

DEbbIE MASON is the CEO of Healthcare Foundation Northern Sonoma County The board and staff are committed to executing listening efforts on a regular basis to involve service providers and local residents in developing solutions. The foundation earlier this year made a $50,000 grant to Corazón Healdsburg to support its outreach and engagement work with low income Latino residents. For more information or to contribute to the Healthcare Foundation, visit healthcarefoundation.net.

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LISA: Continued from page 1 “I scheduled chemo on Thursday afternoon, then took off Friday from work and had the weekend to recover,” Lisa said. On Monday, she’d be back to work. Lisa’s not a workaholic, but she is a dedicated employee and loves what she does. During her treatment, her work provided a semblance of order and routine, and she had close friends — Amy Garcia and Willa McManmon — who supported her. “We call ourselves the three chicks,” Lisa said. Lisa admits she called the two colleagues before her family to share her diagnosis. “I wasn’t comfortable telling my family on the phone,” Lisa said, noting that her dad had died two years earlier. “It was just a lot.” Losing her identity When I first met Lisa six years ago, she struck me as a confident, intelligent woman with a laugh and smile that makes people gravitate toward her. Her identity has been shaped by her family, her work and her hair. Lisa’s not vain, but she loves her hair and, rightfully should. Whenever the family gets together I can’t help but notice how lush, blonde and full of life it is. It’s a good reflection of her personality. Upon beginning treatment, Lisa’s oncologist warned her that around day nine or 10 after chemotherapy began, her hair would begin to fall out. “That was hard,” Lisa said. “I didn’t think I could deal with that.” So, to take control, Lisa made an ap-

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“I decided early on that ‘woe is me’ pointment with her hairdresser. First, wasn’t going to do much for me,” Lisa she got her hair cut short and had a wig said. “I needed to be strong for myself made. She made a follow up appointand for my family.” ment to have her hair shaved off, once Strength under duress is one of Lisa’s chemotherapy started. defining attributes and is likely one in“The appointment was probably day nine of chemo,” Lisa said. “Sure enough, stilled in her growing up. The Cadwalader clan is compassionate, raised to that morning when I was in the shower love, be kind and care for family uncongetting ready, a large clump came out.” ditionally. After she shaved her head, she wore a When she did eventually tell her famwig to work in an attempt to feel more ily about her diagnosis, they reacted the like herself. At home, with friends and way the Cadwaladers do: They went all family, she’d let herself be bald or under in, supporting a scarf, if she was Lisa every way cold. she needed. After I know I have my friends, “Mom came to chemotherapy, family, community and prayer chemotherapy when her hair with me every began growing to get me through anything. time,” Lisa said. back, she didn’t “She’d cook recognize herself. healthy food for “Chemotherapy me and stay with me.” gets over, right? And you eventually As she regained her strength, Lisa start to see this peach fuzz starting to also found solace in friends and family, grow,” Lisa, who has dyed her hair spending time with family and friends in blonde her whole life, said. “But it came one of her favorite places: Sea Ranch. in as this salt and pepper afro. It grew in Sea Ranch has been a home away kinky and brunette. It was a shock to the from home for the Cadwalader family system, to not recognize myself in the since Lisa and her two sisters, Lynn mirror. I didn’t feel like myself. I tried, Cadwalader and Sara Windsor, were litbut the longer it got, the less I felt like tle girls. They’d come up the coast with myself.” other families, spending holidays and With a lost sense of identity, it was summer vacations in the coastal comeasy to feel down. “We’re big criers in munity. this family,” Lisa said. “There were a “Its just absolutely peaceful there,” couple of times I just let it all out. Lisa said. “It’s relaxing, restful and a Finding support place to get rid of any stress.” Yet, she didn’t let herself drown in She also got support from furry sorrow.

friends, both alive and stuffed. Lisa’s cat Charlie, who was by her side for 18 years, snuggled up on Lisa’s stomach, right beneath her chest, when she came home after work or therapy to rest on the couch. “She wouldn’t leave my side. I’d come up, lay on the couch and she’d lay on me,” Lisa said. Then there was chemo bunny. “Alma (Lynn’s daughter) gave me this (stuffed) bunny to take with me when I went to chemotherapy,” Lisa said. “And sure enough, he went with me every time.” Hopeful for the future It’s been 12 years since Lisa was diagnosed with breast cancer. With each passing year she gets a little less anxious about her yearly mammogram, but still holds her breath for a moment. To this day, Lisa isn’t sure why she had the experience she had. She doesn’t know why her body became susceptible, since breast cancer doesn’t run in the family. “I smoked in college and early on in my years in Silicon Valley and sometimes I think that’s what did it,” she said. “I do regret that.” But Lisa isn’t one to dwell on the past; she’s always looking forward with hope. “Deep down, I don’t think it’s going to come back,” Lisa said. “And I have the peace of mind that if it does, I’ll deal with it. I’ve been through it before and I know I have my friends, family, community and prayer to get me through anything. I’m just going to keep living my life in a way that makes me happy.”

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Alternative therapies Music, yoga, massage, acupuncture can all help

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ot all talk about breast cancer has to include surgery, chemotherapy or other invasive procedures. Breast cancer awareness and treatment can also be about singing, yoga and stress management. A recent study by Society for Integrative Oncology (SIO) surveyed the

effectiveness of alternative or integrative treatments and found both surprising and not so surprising outcomes. The study evaluated over 80 different therapies in all. Based on the findings, the SIO found that the use of music therapy, stress management and yoga reduced anxiety and stress. Also, meditation, relaxation, yoga, massage and music therapy

were good for depression and mood disorders and improved quality of life. The findings recommended acupressure and acupuncture for reducing chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. There was a lack of strong evidence supporting the use of ingested dietary supplements or botanical natural products as part of support-

ive care or to manage breast cancer treatment-related side effects. “Studies show that up to 80 percent of people with a history of cancer use one or more complementary and integrative therapies, but until recently, evidence supporting the use of many of these therapies had been limited,� said Heather Greenlee, the lead SIO author. — Rollie Atkinson

Studies show that up to 80 percent of people with a history of cancer use one or more complementary and integrative therapies.

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Breast Cancer. Let’s Fight It. Together. From GIRLFRIENDS FOR A CURE to the proceeds from WINE WOMEN & SHOES Sonoma County YOU help us fund our mission to fight breast cancer and provide better health for all.

[ FRONT ROW L TO R] CEO Debbie Mason, with board members Donna Merideth, Amy Mandrier, Denise Martin, Malinalli Lopez, Bill Hawn and Barbara Grasseschi. [ MIDDLE ROW L TO R] Clay Fritz, Kim Lloyd, Laura Kimbro, Sarah Katz, Ross Stromberg. [ BACK ROW L TO R] Marketing Coordinator Rudy Campos, with board members James Berry, Peter McAweeney and Scott Hafner. [ NOT PICTURED] Board members Kelly Comstock Ferris, Bob Gain, Erin Gore, Ariel Kelley, and Lisa Meisner.

The Healthcare Foundation Northern Sonoma County has been Sonoma County’s leading proponent for the health of all who live, work and play in the northern region of our beautiful county. Since our inception in 2001, we’ve granted more than $22 million towards Healdsburg District Hospital’s technology improvements funding purchases of the CT Suite, MRI, and the Women’s Diagnostic Center equipment for better diagnosis of breast cancer, prostate cancer and more . Our health access contributions of nearly a $1 million each to Alliance Medical Center and Alexander Valley Healthcare provide reduced cost or free access for women and families to get the medical and dental care they need, without regard to their ability to pay. As we expand our grant making to embrace mental health and early childhood development, we invite you to become a Healthcare Hero and pledge your support for the next three years. Your contribution will be an investment to help us develop a healthier community for all. If you would like to learn about the Healthcare Foundation, please contact Debbie Mason, CEO at 707.473.0583 or dmason@healthcarefoundation.net.

Be a part of investing in healthcare for our community! I want to build a healthier community! I will help with a donation: $ I would like to pledge to make this gift for NUMBER OF YEARS

Call me to talk about legacy and major giving PHONE

I’m already a legacy donor and I’d like you to know that NAME

EMAIL

ADDRESS

CITY

STATE

ZIP

Please clip and return coupon to: Healthcare Foundation P.O. Box 1025 | Healdsburg, CA 95448 To donate online go to: healthcarefoundation.net

June 23, 2018 Clos du Bois Winery

THANK YOU WINE COUNTRY CARES SPONSORS

healthcarefoundation.net | info@healthcarefoundation.net | 707.473.0583

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Early Detection Saves Lives Make an appointment today!

Alliance Medical Center  707-433-5494  www.alliancemed.org  1381 University Avenue, Healdsburg  8465 Old Redwood Highway, Windsor

Breast Cancer Awareness Month Think Pink

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Profile for Sonoma West Publishers

Think Pink 2017  

Think Pink 2017