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SONOMA COUNTY BILINGUAL RESOURCE GUIDE T O H E A LT H & W E L L N E S S

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What’’ss Inside: Coping with COVID Eating well in a pandemic Home fire safety Safe outdoor family y play Suicide prevention Working from home e Yoga and the kids

B y Sonoma We st Publisher s / Octo ober / 2 02 0


2 Living Well 2020

Thank you to our sponsors This bilingual publication is made possible by our advertisers, sponsors and community partners. Special thanks to our sponsors!

Corazón Healdsburg Corazón Healdsburg works to strengthen the Northern Sonoma County community by bridging the racial, cultural and economic divides that exist among us today. We operate a bilingual resource center in Healdsburg and offer family support programs, education for all ages, financial guidance, legal assistance and emergency response. We coordinate and amplify the local Latinx voice, and we organize festive cultural events throughout the year where the Latinx community can celebrate and share their culture. Everything we do supports our goals of overcoming cycles of poverty for participating families and empowering them to create new relationships — with each other, with the community at large and with local systems and services that are meant to exist for everyone. Corazonhealdsburg.org • (707) 395-0938

Northern California Public Media Northern California Public Media (NorCal), located in Rohnert Park, provides our community with the best of PBS, NPR and Independent Public Media. NorCal encourages full participation in society and community by providing educational, informational and cultural telecommunication services on two television stations, KRCB TV Channel 22 (PBS member station), KPJK TV Channel 17 (Independent Public Media) and on their radio station KRCB FM 91.1 (NPR Member Station). Norcalpublicmedia.org • (707) 584-2000

County of Sonoma Energy and Sustainability Division The County of Sonoma Energy and Sustainability Division offers tools to property owners, tenants and County employees to find the information, resources, rebates, contractors and financing for making improvements related to energy efficiency, sustainability, wildfire safety, and seismic strengthening. Sonomacountyenergy.org • (707) 565-6470 • GSenergy@sonoma-county.org.

Impact Sonoma The Impact Sonoma Tobacco-Nicotine Prevention Team’s (Impact Sonoma) goal is to prevent youth (under the age of 21 years old) from initiating tobacco use, Impact Sonoma further supports local jurisdictions and community members across Sonoma County interested in passing policies proven to further these goals. Impact Sonoma is a program of the Public Health Division of the Department of Health Services for Sonoma County. (707) 565-6680 • preventioninfo@sonoma-county.org

County of Sonoma The County of Sonoma is encouraging residents to vote early and vote safely in the November 3, 2020 elections. Due to the coronavirus, all Sonoma County registered voters will receive a vote-by-mail ballot this year. Once you receive your ballot in the mail, fill it out and drop it back in the mail, or you can deposit it in one of 20 secure drop boxes located around the county. You can also deliver your ballot to one of 30 polling stations throughout the county between Oct. 31 and Nov. 3. For more information on where to vote, visit sonomacounty.ca.gov/CRA/Registrar-of-Voters. The County of Sonoma is also reminding residents to wear a mask, stay six feet apart and avoid large gatherings to slow the spread of COVID-19. For more information about COVID-19, visit socoemergency.org.


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Introduction & Index G

reetings and thank you for picking up a copy of Living Well, our annual resource guide fostering health and wellness. How do we each take part in Living Well? The concept means so many things to so many people, and it’s taken on new importance this year, as we navigate the emergence of a global pandemic, after years of raging wildfires, challenging air quality, winter floods, social isolation and economic pain. We took a new approach this year to Living Well. In addition to informative and inspiring stories from our sponsors and advertisers, we are offering useful tips and resources on diverse topics, from eating

well, to staying safe, to supporting your kids’ distance learning and buying the right smoke alarm. A big step for us this year is offering this publication as a fully bilingual resource guide. It reads in one direction in Spanish, and the other in English, and our sponsors have embraced the effort, providing useful and timely information in both languages. The guiding principle behind Living Well is to provide concrete, useful and timely information that fosters your social, emotional, spiritual, environmental, occupational, intellectual, and physical health and wellness. Enjoy!

Safe outdoor play with family Page 33

Q&A on meditation with David Lincoln King Page 10

Julián López, a culinary Oaxacalifornian Pages 22-23

Index Sponsors……………………………………………………2 Introduction and index……………………………….3 Sonoma West Publishers…………………….………4 Sonoma County Local News Initiative…….……5 Yoga and distance learning…………………………6 Alliance Medical Center……………………………...6 Diversity and resilience………………………………7 Corazón Healdsburg……………………….………8-9 Meditation Q&A…………………………………..……10 Healdsburg Lumber Company………………..…10 Eating well in a pandemic………………………..…11 Northern California Public Media………..…12-13 Laura Kay Tew…………………………………………..14 Sonoma County Office of Education…….……14 Working from home………………………………….15 Sonoma County Energy and Sustainability Division……………………………………………..…16-17 Community First Credit Union…………………..18 Suicide prevention……………………………………19 Kaiser Permanente…………………………………..20

Make family hand washing fun…………..……..…..21 Vineridge Senior Living…………………………...……21 Chef Julián………………………………………………22-23 Local Design Company…………………………………24 Healthcare Foundation Northern Sonoma County.…………………………………………………..……25 Sonoma County Library………………………….…….25 North County Hospice……………………….…………25 KM Herbals……………………………………….…………25 Enso Village…………………………………………..….…26 Financial toll of the pandemic…………………….…27 Los Cien..……………………………………………….…….27 West County Health Centers…………………..….…28 Home fire safety…………………………………….……..29 Watza Creative Lab………………………………..…….30 River to Coast Children's Services..……………….31 City of Sebastopol………………………………….…….31 Sonoma County Public Health Division..………..32 Safe outdoor play……………………………..………….33 Impact Sonoma………………………………………34-35 Resources……………………………………………..…….36


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We are honored to introduce Living Well Our first bilingual publication Sonoma West Publishers Team

Please support local journalism

Rollie Atkinson Publisher / Owner

Sarah Bradbury Associate Publisher / Owner

What we offer throughout North and West counties

ZoĂŤ Strickland Cloverdale Reveille Editor

Heather Bailey The Windsor Times Editor

PRINT - Healdsburg Tribune & special sections such as Harvest, Living Well, Hometown Holidays, Progress, Women in Business and more. WEBSITE / NEWS SITES - Log on 24/7 to find your local news and community information. NEWSLETTERS - We deliver to your email every morning, Monday - Friday. SOCIAL MEDIA SUBSCRIPTION OPTIONS: PRINT - The Healdsburg Tribune. ONLINE WEBSITE. NEWS-SITE - The Healdsburg Tribune, The Windsor Times, Cloverdale Reveille and Sonoma West Times & News. NEWSLETTERS - Delivered to your email Monday - Friday.

Jim Schaefer Graphic Services Legal Notices, Obits

Maci Martell Creative Services and Social Media

THANK YOU Katherine Minkiewicz Staff Writer and Social Media

Jan Todd Bookkeeper and Office Manager

to all the people that helped to make this possible.

Jack Bauman Print Delivery

Cherie Kelsay Circulation and Subscription

READ LOCAL Camille Escovedo Staff Writer

Greg Clementi Sports Editor

Laura Kay Tew Sales Account Manager

Teresa Elward Marketing & Development Manager

www.sonomawest.com

Brad Schmaltz Sales Account Manager Cloverdale


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“I can’t imagine what it would have been like to go through a year like 2020 without our community newspapers informing us about what’s going on. They are essential to the future of our very democracy and we must do what we can to keep them operating.” — Senator Bill Dodd, California State Senate, District 3 Dear Neighbor, The Sonoma County Local News Initiative was founded for the very reason that Senator Dodd expresses. It is hard to imagine our communities staying informed and in touch without local newspapers. Our locally owned Sonoma West Publishers has been serving our communities for decades, publishing the Healdsburg Tribune, Sonoma West Times and News, the Windsor Times and the Cloverdale Reveille. Now, sadly, these newspapers are fighting for survival. But they are not alone. Over the last 10 years, 25 percent of American newspapers have gone out of business. Others have been purchased by hedge fund investment firms. The Local News Initiative has pledged to do everything possible to keep that from happening to our local newspapers. Even before the harsh economic impact of the current pandemic, advertising, the main source of revenue for newspapers had significantly dropped. Between 2008 and 2018, advertising in newspapers across the country fell an amazing 62 percent, leading to nearly half of the reporters in America losing their jobs. It is up to us to preserve local journalism, and together we can do it. The Local News Initiative is dedicated to supporting professional journalism and the civic engagement and community enrichment that local journalism stimulates. When we are informed and involved, we can make good decisions about our lives, our communities where we live, our local governments and our shared civic and cultural experience. We can hold our leaders accountable and we can know our neighbors. We are excited about several initiatives recently launched with Sonoma West Publishers: · Establishing a journalism internship program for students at Analy High School and El Molino High School made possible by the support of a local donor. · Sponsoring ‘Inside the News’ a virtual event speaker series with acclaimed journalists featuring live, interactive conversations about current issues and the future of journalism. · Seeking input and feedback from community about how to make our news publications even better. · Fundraising on behalf of Sonoma West Publishers to ensure more investigative journalism special editions in 2021, building on last year’s award winning in-depth studies on the health of our ocean and the social and health issues of vaping. The Local News Initiative is a nonprofit organization. Donations to support this work are tax deductible. Our website is SoCoLocalNews.org. Please contact us if you would like to get involved with the future of news and journalism right here in your own community. Working together, we will succeed. Looking forward to working with you, Nancy Dobbs President, Sonoma County Local News Initiative

READ LOCAL www.socolocalnews.org/s/

Nancy Dobbs President, Sonoma County Local News Initiative

VISION: Our journalism provides local citizens the information they need to make the best possible decisions about their lives, their communities, their governments and their shared civic and cultural life.


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Use yoga to engage kids during distance learning

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istance learning is now a fundamental part of education. This is not only a big adjustment for students – parents and teachers face new challenges as well. Whether you are trying to connect with students over Zoom, or stay engaged at home, navigating distance learning can cause stress. To keep kids focused on their studies, educators and parents are turning to yoga. Postures and breathing, combined with meditation and mindfulness are helping students handle the challenge of remote learning while easing the pressure on teachers and parents. Yoga helps build concentration, along with improving coordination, balance, strength and flexibility. Try starting with 5 or 10 minute sessions during the school day; once mid-morning and again right after lunch to refocus. Start with gentle breathing and then a

NAMASTE — Alesha Delaney instructs high school students at a weekend yoga club practice.

few easy poses. Forget perfection and encourage kids to try. Soon they'll learn their favorite poses and look forward to yoga breaks. You don't have to be a yoga expert to teach yoga basics. There

are many books and videos about yoga and children. You can even play yoga videos for kids so everyone can participate together. — BPT

Photo Tribune archive

Resources • yogaed.com • youtube.com (search for “yoga for kids”)

Spotlighting Alliance Medical Center's Emerging Latinx Leader

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lliance Medical Center highlights Rocio Duran as an emerging Latinx leader with a seven-year history helping to expand quality patient care to our local community. She is currently the Operations Manager helping to maintain the operational efficiency and quality of all clinic services, which plays a central role in maintaining safe and clinical staff workflows at all four AMC site locations.

Having a Latinx background, Rocio understands the needs of the Latinx community and works with all supporting staff members to enhance patient care needs. She helped develop a quality-based teamcare model that enables all clinical staff to provide individualized attention and clinical support to our patients, 70% of whom identify as Latinx. She’s also helped maintain Alliance’s Patient Centered Medical Home, which is a care delivery model that is coordinated to work around patient-specific needs with a specialized medical team, including but not limited to: physicians, medical assistants, nurses and member service representatives.

As a Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC), Alliance Medical Center continues to help close the gap between access to quality healthcare and community members who are uninsured or under-insured. Alliance is mission-driven to assist patients regardless of immigration status, race, age, identity, culture or language barriers. We have adapted our services to continue providing patient access by offering in-person, virtual and telephonic appointments to our community during these unprecedented times. In addition, we want to ensure that our community has access to healthy foods, which is why AMC has partnered with the Redwood Empire Food Bank and Farm to Pantry to conduct food distributions twice a week at each location in Windsor and Healdsburg. Alliance providers are ready to see you in person, virtually or telephonic. Please call our clinic for more information at 707-433-5494.


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Diversity and resilience Invest in the resilience and diversity of your local newspaper

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ow can your local newspaper help you in your quest to live well? Let’s look at two characteristics of a healthy community – diversity and resilience. Diversity is commonly used to describe ethnic diversity. If you conduct an internet search for “diversity” and then choose “images” you’ll be greeted with a sea of hands; image after image of hands of all sizes, shapes and colors – raised, clasped or joined in a circle. Diversity is crucially important to recognize and honor, especially as we undergo a national reckoning with uncomfortable truths in our nation’s history, laws and practices. Diversity also plays a role in living well, and it can become a powerful organizing force in a community, a family, and a healthy life. Embracing diversity includes respecting ethnicity, creed, color, religion, ability, age, sexual orientation, gender identity, country of origin, language, political affiliation and economic status. On every level, that means appreciating those who don’t look like you, speak like you, or think like you. It’s not easy, but it’s our work as a community, to aspire to be welcoming and genuine to each other. Diversity can make our communities resilient as well. In addition to new ideas and opportunities to grow and learn as people and families, economic diversity shelters us from the ups and downs of national and regional economic forces. Having a community served by diverse, locally owned businesses, keeps

us diverse and resilient. Not having to go down the highway to buy groceries, gas, paint, hardware or gifts makes us a stronger community, along with shopping local for car repair, medical care, insurance, education and take-out. In all these ways, resiliency and diversity go hand in hand, and that’s how we circle back to our premise. What local enterprise inspires, infuriates, educates, connects, explains, expounds, imagines and shares your life with you? Yes, it’s your local newspaper, and we’re proud to do it. But, we can’t do it alone. If you value diversity and resilience in your community, shop local, volunteer local, work and play local, and definitely read and support local.

“What local enterprise inspires, infuriates, educates, connects, explains, expounds, imagines and shares your life with you?” Like all newspaper publishers, Sonoma West Publishers is undergoing constant change, but since 1865, week after week, we have helped you appreciate your community and your life, and we hope you’ll consider helping us by investing in the resilience and diversity of your local newspaper. We’re about to undergo another big change. Please visit socolocalnews.org/s/ to learn how you can be part of the future of local media. — Sonoma West Publishers

Photo Jan Todd

STAYING INFORMED — Long-time readers of The Healdsburg Tribune sit in the Healdsburg Plaza to read the latest paper.

Living Well October 2020 A special supplement to the Oct. 29, 2020 edition of:

Staff Writers: Rollie Atkinson, Heather Bailey, Camille Escovedo, Katherine Minkiewicz, Zoë Strickland Consultants: Local Design Company, Ray Holley, Ricardo Ibarra Production: Maci Martell, Jim Schaefer Advertising & Sales: Teresa Elward, Brad Schmaltz, Laura Tew Office & Administration: Jan Todd Circulation: Cherie Kelsay All contents are copyrighted by ©Sonoma West Publishers, Inc. PO Box 518, Healdsburg, CA 95448 POSTMASTER: This mailing is made under Periodical Class Permit 238-460 USPS. Periodicals Class postage paid at Healdsburg, CA. 95448. Send address changes to: Sonoma West Publishers, PO Box 518, Healdsburg, CA. 95448


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Sponsored

Committed to Community

Photo Bryan Meltz

GROCERIES TO GO — Corazón Healdsburg distributes groceries to hundreds of families each week at Groceries to Go.

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orazón Healdsburg is committed to improving the health of our community. Many factors affect whether a person lives a long and healthy life, including education, economic stability and access to healthcare. We help our community navigate these challenges to become resilient, strong and healthy. As we grapple with the COVID-19 pandemic, which has disproportionately impacted our Latinx community, we have adapted and expanded our health-related services. COVID Education: We’re regularly sharing health tips and COVID prevention practices with our community via text message, social media and printed flyers at our weekly food distributions. We want everyone in our community to have the information they

need to stay safe and healthy. We’ve reached thousands of residents with this critical information. You can follow along at @corazonhealdsburg on Instagram and Facebook.

“Corazón Healdsburg is committed to improving the health of our community. ” Groceries to Go: In partnership with the Redwood Empire Food Bank, the City of Healdsburg and other generous nonprofits, we distribute fresh produce, shelf-stable and frozen food, and cooked meals donated from

Photo Corazón Healdsburg

POP-UP SITES — If you need a COVID test, reach out to Corazón for the next local pop-up testing site.

local restaurants via Sonoma Family Meal to hundreds of families a week. This food is available to anyone who needs it. Groceries to Go takes place at the Healdsburg Community Center, 1557 Healdsburg Ave. every Tuesday at 10 am. Moms to Moms Baby Showers: Prenatal education and the right supplies are vital for the health and happiness of new mothers and their babies. We support Alliance Medical Center’s prenatal program with a baby shower for mothers who have completed their series of prenatal, birthing, lactation and peer-to-peer support classes. Since the COVID outbreak, we’ve taken our showers on the road, and our masked staff has been Continued on next page...

Photo Corazón Healdsburg

BABY SHOWERS — Corazón has taken its baby showers on the road.


Sponsored

Photo Corazón Healdsburg

TESTS — Easily available COVID-19 tests are key to keeping our community safe and healthy.

delivering the handmade quilts and other much-needed items to the expectant mothers. Pregnant mothers who would like to take the prenatal classes should call Alliance Medical Center at 707-433-5494 for more information. Testing and Mask Distribution: Wearing a mask and regular testing are two of the most important things we can do to stop the spread of COVID. We’ve been distributing masks throughout the year and have hosted several COVID testing events. If you need a

Photo Corazón Healdsburg

MASKS — Everyone in our community should have masks to protect themselves from COVID-19.

mask or need to get tested, we can help. Please call us at 707-395-0938.

Continued from previous page...

Living Well 2020 9

707-395-0938 corazonhealdsburg.org

Support for COVID positive families: If you or someone in your family has tested positive for COVID, it’s important to isolate from other people living in your household. Anyone with COVID should not return to work until cleared by his or her doctor. If isolating isn’t possible at home, you may need to access the County of Sonoma’s Alternative Care Site or need help navigating sick pay paperwork. If your family is experiencing COVID and needs support, we can help. Please call us at 707-395-0938.

BRIDGING DIVIDES. STRENGTHENING COMMUNITY.

COMUNIDAD Creating dynamic cultural events for community members to gather together under the mutual language of celebration, food, and dance.

LA VOZ Working to strengthen the Latino voice in Healdsburg, ensuring that resident opinions, needs and desires are heard by the community at large.

CASA DEL CORAZÓN Our family resource center is a hub for Corazón programs and a drop-in center for residents to seek assistance from bilingual staff.

Learn more and contact us at corazonhealdsburg.org or 707.395.0938


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Q&A with David Lincoln King

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avid Lincoln King (davidlincolnking.com) has used deep breathing and meditation for years to help calm and center himself.

Q: How did you get started meditating? DLK: It was many years ago. I wanted to become more aware how to connect to Source/ Creation/Divine/God/Light, however you perceive it. Q: You and your husband lost your home in the Tubbs Fire in Coffey Park. How did deep breathing and meditation help you? DLK: It was priceless. I have lived a bit and I have experienced events that I thought of as tragic or awful. Upon reflection I would find the silver linings. After the fire, I looked immediately for the silver lining.

Q: During difficult times, what do you recommend? DLK: Pause several times a day, for even a minute or five minutes, close your eyes and focus on your breath. Breathe deeply. If your mind wanders, gently bring it back to your breath. — Sonoma West Publishers

Deep Breathing and Meditation Before all else, be kind to yourself. Allow the time you choose to meditate to be perfect, whether it’s a minute or an hour. Focus on your breath. Sit comfortably with your back straight. Meditation is a practice, so practice, you cannot get it wrong.

Photo Sonoma West Times & News archive

BREATHE — David Lincoln King, author of “The Fire This Time,” recommends to pause several times a day to practice meditating.


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Eating well in the time of COVID-19

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ating healthful, enjoyable meals was hard enough before we locked down and began to shelter and distance. Now, it’s even harder but there are simple ways you can eat healthy, make sure your family eats healthy, and support others in need. The University of Maryland Medical System offers advice for healthy eating during a pandemic. Follow a few simple guidelines and your work clothes will still fit when you give up your pajamas! The number one reason for overeating is stress. The UM website suggests you consider whether you want to eat because you are stressed, bored or feeling emotional. Are you actually hungry? Take a few minutes for mental detective work before you reach for a fork. If it could be stress or emotional eating, try stress management techniques; take breaks, connect with family and friends, try mindfulness. And, exercising instead of stress eating is the best way to stay fit. If you’re indoors all day, spending hours at your

Photo Sarah Bradbury

FOOD ASSISTANCE — The Redwood Empire Food Bank – and a network of local food pantries – is offering healthy, nutritious food to anyone who asks.

computer, you may be dehydrated and mistaking thirst for hunger. Try a glass of water before you check the refrigerator. When you eat, limit snacking at your desk. Slow down, savor

each bite, choose healthy foods and follow a schedule, so you don’t get too hungry and binge. Check out the MyPlate guidelines from the USDA on how to fill a plate with the right

balance of nutritious food and, as hard as it may be, avoid fried foods and anything covered in cheese or heavy sauce. If you can’t resist bagged snacks, look at labels and pick snacks that are light in sugar and fat. Some of us don’t have the time, resources or income to curate a beautiful plate of healthy food. Many of our service workers have been hit hard by the pandemic, but are working anyway. The Redwood Empire Food Bank – and a network of local food pantries – is offering healthy, nutritious food to anyone who asks. Consider becoming a hunger relief champion and support these worthy causes! — BPT

Resources

Photo BPT

BALANCED DIET — Check out the MyPlate guidelines from the USDA on how to fill a plate with the right balance of nutritious food and, as hard as it may be, avoid fried foods and anything covered in cheese or heavy sauce.

• USDA nutrition guidelines: choosemyplate.gov • University of Maryland Medical System: umms.org • Redwood Empire Food Bank: refb.org


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Sponsored

Northern California Public Media

Involved In Our Community N orthern California Public Media (NorCal) is a highly visible community information media hub that offers unique services and initiatives to the San Francisco Bay Area. We sat down with Darren LaShelle, NorCal’s President and CEO, to learn more. LaShelle explained, “We are a PBS member station on KRCB TV Channel 22, bringing you outstanding favorites like NOVA, Sesame Street, Nature and PBS NewsHour. Our other television station, KPJK TV Channel 60, airs independent public broadcast productions like Rick Steves’ Europe, Democracy Now! and America’s Test Kitchen from Cook’s Illustrated.” We learned that of special interest to Sonoma County is NorCal’s local NPR station, KRCB FM Radio 91, airing NPR favorites like Morning Edition, Fresh Air with Terry Gross, and All Things Considered. Midday finds local music personalities Brian Griffith and Doug Jayne on air with an

eclectic mix of music. Weekends KRCB FM Radio 91 airs the popular environmental show Climate One, Reveal, and a mix of music shows for Sonoma music lovers.

“We are a PBS member station on KRCB TV Channel 22, bringing you outstanding favorites like NOVA, Sesame Street, Nature and PBS NewsHour.” — Darren LaShelle, NorCal President and CEO LaShelle went on to explain that NorCal has been a vital resource to the community in

times of crisis, whether during the Tubbs Fire, the Kincaid Fire, the LNU and Glass Fires, or the on-going COVID-19 crisis. NorCal is a trusted voice linking the community with emergency updates, information and resources, and brings to its coverage a deep understanding of the area and its community members. To learn more about NorCal Public Media or to make a donation to our local PBS, NPR and independent public media channels go to norcalpublicmedia.org/donate.

707-584-2000 norcalpublicmedia.org


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We can all be a superhero in the fight against Corona avirus! Learn more about safe schools an nd support fo or families during COVID-19 at scoe e.org/covid


Living Well 2020 15

What we've learned from working at home

Photo BPT

NEW NORM — According to a nationwide survey conducted by Wakefield Research Electronics, most people affected by the crisis say they have had to master (or learn) how to complete their work entirely from home, including the new norm of conducting video conferences from the home.

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he recent transition to widespread working from home has been educational and eye-opening. Working at home means learning to cope with distractions, space constraints, managing time with family and learning new skills. And, according to new consumer research, it also means reassessing what’s most important. A nationwide survey conducted by Wakefield Research Electronics reveals the importance of close relationships. Social distancing has caused many to reassess who is most important to them, and how much they may have taken friends and family for granted. The global health crisis has turned socializing into a deliberate act. More than half of homebound people said they felt closer to loved ones than before the outbreak, and a quarter of them said that they felt more connected than before. For many, juggling priorities and obligations was difficult even before the

switch to remote working. Having to work at home shines a spotlight on how we cope and find a healthy work-life balance.

“Having to work at home shines a spotlight on how we cope and find a healthy work-life balance.” Here are some of the tricks people have discovered: • Half said they take frequent short breaks to balance work and home responsibilities. • 37 percent are starting work earlier, while 17 percent are starting work later to manage schedules better. • 35 percent are learning to keep their whole household to a schedule. • 23 percent use visual cues (like signs) to let others know when they’re working. Most people affected by the crisis say they have had to master (or learn) how to complete their work entirely from home,

including the new norm of conducting video conferences from the home. As one might expect, a majority of survey respondents admitted to making conference calls from a common area in their house. Some said they were stuck calling from a makeshift workspace in a lesser-used part of home. One-fifth of respondents admitted calling from a basement or attic, while others said they took work on the go; 18 percent have called from their cars, and 12 percent admit taking work calls in the bathroom. Overall, the experience of working from home has everyone reassessing what — and who — is most important to them. Among those who said they’ve discovered new technology, many said that they were using it for family or relationship management. No matter what your work-from-home experience has been, chances are it’s changed your attitudes about work and family life — and how to balance the two — in ways that will stay with you long into the future. — BPT


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Sponsored

Improvements Made Affordable

Photo iStock

IMPROVEMENTS — Sonoma County Energy Independence Program helps property owners make needed improvements related to energy, water, wildfire safety, and seismic strengthening.

Save energy and money while creating resilience

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iving in Sonoma County has many benefits and one of the lesser known is the resources that are available from the County’s Energy and Sustainability Division. The Division has been offering communityfacing services since the 2009 launch of the County’s financing program, the Sonoma County Energy Independence Program, which allows property owners to make needed improvements related to energy, water, wildfire safety, and seismic strengthening. Since the launch of the financing program, the Division has added several other services such as better building and solar consultations at no charge, homeowner workshops on a variety of subjects, Green Business Certification, and serve as a clearinghouse for all types of information and resources like rebates and incentives to get projects done. Now is a great time to contact the Division to learn more, schedule a consultation, or start your financing application. With a recent drop in the interest rate to 5.99% and terms of 10 or 20 years, it’s a great time to make improvements. Q. What types of improvements can you finance? A. Recently added improvements such as class A roofing, windows, ember resistant or

insulating exterior siding, gutters, eaves, vents, earthquake brace and bolt to name a few. Things like HVAC, solar systems, and battery back-ups have been eligible since the program started. The added measures bring the eligible list to over 100 improvements. Q. Is this for residential and commercial properties? A. The financing is available for any property in Sonoma County. However, nonprofit, tax-exempt property may have additional considerations.

“Now is a great time to contact the Division to learn more, schedule a consultation, or start your financing application.” Q. How does the program work? A. The financing is based on the current market property value. You can borrow up to 10%. Since the financing is property-based, there is no income or credit qualifying. You need to be current on any mortgages and property taxes. Q. What makes this different than traditional financing? A. Because it’s based on the property, your financial situation or portfolio are not considered. This type of “off-the-books”

financing is appealing to both residential and commercial property owners because it doesn’t compromise their ability to borrow personally. Q. How can I learn more or start an application? A. Visit the website at sonomacountyenergy.org/financing or call (707) 565-6470. About the Energy and Sustainability Division: The Division was established in 2006 as part of the Sonoma County General Services Department to advance efficient and sustainable government, residential, and business practices in Sonoma County. About the County of Sonoma: The County is comprised of 25 departments and agencies that provide a full range of services to the community. It encompasses over 1600 square miles and is home to almost 500,000 residents. Sonoma County government has a history of providing excellent and responsive public service while operating under sound fiscal principles.

707-565-6470 sonomacountyenergy.org/financing


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ENERGY AND SUSTTAAINABILIT Y DIVISION 2300 County Center Dr., Ste A105 Santa Rosa, CA 95403 GSEnergy@so onoma-county.org

707-565-6470

SONOMACOUNT YENERGY.ORG/FINANCING


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LOCAL A Financial Herro All the conveniences of a big g bank, but with an ofcial  chartter to acctually DO G GOOD! A NO T - FOR - PR ROFIT FINANCIAL CO - OP FOUNDED 19 59 BY LO CA L TEACHERS

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Living Well 2020 19

Suicide prevention Take steps now to be ready when you feel overwhelmed

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id you know that suicide is the 10th leading cause of death in the United States? One suicide affects an estimated 135 surviving people. We can lower the suicide rate, but it takes everyone to be aware of warning signs and how to get help. It is important to have a plan of action when suicidal thoughts come and go. If life feels overwhelming, instead of struggling on your own, you can take steps to reduce these thoughts and protect yourself. Develop a safety plan: Make a list of coping strategies and resources to help you with thoughts of suicide and list alternative ways to ease your pain. Your plan can include warning signs and steps you can take if the thoughts return. Your plan might include: • Warning signs: Triggers that may lead you to thoughts of suicide, such as an anniversary of a loss, alcohol, relationship stress, or changes in mood or behavior. • Reasons to live: Things that are important to you that bring you hope. • Coping skills: Things you can do to distract yourself from negative feelings or thoughts, like relaxation, physical activity, or reviewing your hopes and assets.

Photos courtesy of MHANI

SEEKING HELP — Counselors, doctors or agencies can help when you feel you cannot keep yourself safe.

• Safe places: Social places that help you feel safe or provide a healthy distraction. • People I can ask for help: Names and contact information for those you can turn to when suicidal thoughts don’t go away. • Professionals: Counselors, doctors, or agencies that can help when you cannot keep yourself safe.

SAFETY PLAN — It is important to have a plan of action when suicidal thoughts come and go.

• Items to remove: In order to be safe during a crisis; you need to remove or reduce your access to items that can be used to end

your life. Ask friends or family to help. — Sonoma West Publishers

Resources • National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: suicidepreventionlifeline.org, 800-273-TALK (8255) • Trevor Project (LGBTQ youth and young adults): thetrevorproject.org, 866-488-7386 • County Health 24-Hour Crisis Stabilization Unit: 24/7 crisis intervention, assessment, medication, and up to 23 hours of supportive care for individuals in an acute mental health crisis. Available for children, youth, adults, and families. 707-576-8181 • 24-Hour Suicide Prevention Hotline: For any Sonoma County resident who needs help. A vital resource to any family member, loved one, friend or ally who may be worried about someone who may be suicidal. 855-587-6373 • National Alliance for the Mentally Ill (NAMI): 866-960-6264 or warmline@namisoco.org • Suicide Safety Plan app: moodtools.org • Suicide Safety Plan: suicidepreventionlifeline.org • Beating the Blues: beatingthebluesonline.org • Lifeline For Suicide Attempt Survivors and Families: lifelineforattemptsurvivors.org


20 Living Well 2020

5 ways to o ease stress and d anxiet y about corronavirus It’s normal to fe eel scared, anxious, and worried aboutt the future during a crisis. Now is a time to be kind to each other — and to oursselves. Practicing se elf-care is unfold here are ssome more importan nt than ever ever. As the situation continues to unfold, simple things you y can do to take good g care of yourself. hy as you can 1. Eat as health Don’t forget the pro oduce aisle when stocking g up on essentials — in many markets, it’’s less crowded and better stocked than other sections.

2. Get creative e with exercise When you’re worrie ed, get out of your head an nd into your body. Have fun changing up yo ga or cardio video online our routine. Find a new yog that you can try at home. h

3. Ta Talk and liste en Talk with people ab bout how you feel — from a safe distance, of course. This can help everyyone feel more connected and less alone.

4. Practice kind dness Simple gestures me ean a lot, like offering to shop for a neighbor who may be more vulne erable. The benefits of kind dness go both ways — helping others just feels good.

5. Rest and relax Get enough sleep.. It’s important to replenissh your energy and recharge your brain. Unplug and take breaks from the news, especially before bed.

Learn more at kp p.org/c /coronavirus

V isit kp.org/selfcare f or help w i t h s t r e s s , s l e e p, a n d m o r e Mos t tools are available to ever yone. Kaiser Permanente e m e mb e r s can also access the myStrength app at no cos t. myStrength of fers personalized, interac tive programs for mental health and emotional wellness, including tools designed to help ease fear and anxiet y about coronavirus and COVID -19 specifically.* *myStrength® is not c u r r e n t l y av a i l a b l e t o Kaiser Permanente Washington mem e ber s. myStrength® is a wholly ow n e d s ub s i dia r y o f L i vo n g o H e a l t h, I n c .


Living Well 2020 21

Make hand washing fun for the whole family

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efore COVID-19, soap and a quick lather/rinse seemed like enough. Now, hand washing is center stage as we fight the spread of the virus and stay healthy. Regular hand washing is a great way to remove germs, avoid getting sick and prevent the spread, according to the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. It also helps protect you from cold and flu.

“Hand washing is center stage as we fight the spread of the virus and stay healthy.”

try a few simple steps: • Have a family meeting, explain that hand washing kills germs and how your family wants to be a part of the solution. • Discuss proper hand washing, including using water, soap and scrubbing for at least 20 seconds • Make it fun. 20 seconds seems like a long time, so try singing “Happy Birthday” twice, or customize a favorite nursery rhyme or popular song and sing for 20 seconds. • Positive reinforcement and recognizing a job well done goes further than scolding when stressing new habits. • Lead by example. Sing loud and proud so people know you're doing your 20 seconds. — BPT

The CDC recommends scrubbing your hands several times a day, but parents and caregivers may struggle to get kids to wash their hands. From impatient toddlers to distracted teens, hand washing may not happen correctly. To help your family wash their hands properly and have fun doing it,

Photo BPT

CLEAN HANDS — The CDC recommends scrubbing your hands several times a day for 20 seconds each time.

Resources CDC: cdc.gov/handwashing/handwashing-family.html Stanford: stanfordchildrens.org/en/topic/default?id=teaching-kids-to-wash-theirhands-1-972

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22 Living Well 2020

Julián López,

Photos Sarah Bradbury

CLIMBING UP — Julián López is currently a chef at Valette and SingleThread Farms, both in Healdsburg. He got his start in the restaurant business working as a dishwasher for Willi's Seafood, learning from colleagues in the kitchen along the way.

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omething that Julián López has learned is not to be overcome by fear. To reach his brother in Washington he had to travel alone at the age of 20 some 3,000 miles, from his native Oaxaca, in southeastern Mexico, across the American border. He interacted with strangers in a language he didn’t know, and flourished in a land he knew very little about. López is now a chef at Valette and SingleThread Farms, both in Healdsburg. But the climb was not easy or fast. He is now 38 years old. It’s been 18 years since he went to catch up with his brother and then ended up in

“I have talked about it a lot with my fellow Oaxacans: ‘Imagine transporting yourself to Oaxaca through food, but being in California.” — Julián López, Healdsburg chef

Healdsburg picking grapes with his relatives. The work in the kitchen began years later, when he had the opportunity to work at Willi’s Seafood, in the back of the location, as a dishwasher. “Washing dishes is a very hard job, but I always had the goal of taking a step forward, step by step, and learning from my colleagues in the kitchen,” López said one morning next to the tomato orchard that Valette maintains in the center of Healdsburg. But to move forward, López had to breathe courage and bend his fears. “I would see the chef and my kitchen colleagues, and I would think: ‘One day I want to be there.’” And to get there, he had to ask the uncomfortable questions, in English, a language that was not easy for him. “I had to learn not to be afraid of asking, because sometimes we have that fear. And it’s good to ask, and it's good to be wrong because that’s where you learn,” he said confidently during a break he took from his morning activities at Valette for this chat. Continued on next page...

PRODUCE — When he has time, López plays with ingredients that he does not use in any of the kitchens where he works, such as chapulines, chicatanas, quelite and chile de agua peppers to make traditional Oaxacan dishes.


Living Well 2020 23

a culinary Oaxacalifornian Continued from previous page... Unlike his work in the field harvesting grapes, the kitchen is in his DNA, López said, who like his Mixtec countrymen preserves that characteristic black hair and brown skin; a supernatural glow in the eyes. He remembers seeing his grandmother cook as a child, his mother making tortillas, and his father was a butcher for a long time in that land of the Mixteca Alta of Oaxaca, in the district of Tlaxiaco. “Everybody should go try the barbacoa my dad made, with the meat cooking under the ground all night and smelling that aroma when the hole was uncovered in the morning,” he recalled. López likes the dishes he prepares in the restaurants where he cooks, but his dream is to merge the ingredients he ate in his childhood with those he’s known in California. “I have talked about it a lot with my fellow Oaxacans: ‘Imagine transporting yourself to Oaxaca through food, but being in California,’” he would tell his friends. When he has time, López plays with ingredients that he does not use in any of the kitchens where he works, such as chapulines, chicatanas, quelite, chile de agua peppers to make traditional Oaxacan dishes, such as mole, tlayudas or memelas. Those dishes are the weekend joy for his two kids and wife. “The kids like hamburgers but they love tlayudas,” he said. “I would like to present that fusion,” said López. “Tomatoes are common here, why not

PREPARING — López likes the dishes he prepares in the restaurants where he cooks, but his dream is to merge the ingredients he ate in his childhood with those he’s known in California.

merge them with our quelite? They raise ducks here, why isn't there a mole with duck? In Mexico we eat carnitas a lot and here they make pork belly, why not make a taco with that?,” he questions himself. With the reputation that Oaxacan cuisine has acquired in recent years, declared Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity by

UNESCO in 2018 and winning in this infamous 2020 — with its local wildfires and global pandemic — the Latin American ‘Street Food’ series on Netflix, without a doubt his idea could result in an Oaxacalifornian gastronomic delight in the North Bay. — Ricardo Ibarra

CUISINE — López likes to present a fusion between Californian and Oaxacan cuisine. “Tomatoes are common here, why not merge them with our quelite?” he wondered. “In Mexico we eat carnitas a lot and here they make pork belly, why not make a taco with that?”


24 Living Well 2020


Living Well 2020 25

Thank you to all our Mental Health Talent Pipeline participants, and to our visionary donors who support this initiative, for your commitment to providing bi-lingual, bi-cultural Mental Health Services in Sonoma County!

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EB

R AT

IN

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CE

To donate or volunteer please call 707.473.0583 or email kbender@healthcarefoundation.net

“You gave our hearts a rest so we could just breathe...” Since 1977, we’ve provided quality, compassionate care that helps patients and families live as fully as possible. Our mission standards are reflected in the current Family Caregivers Survey (Medicare.Gov Hospice Compare) datasets, which rank our hospice services higher than the national averages for: • Family experience of care • Quality of patient care • Managing pain and treating symptoms Our comprehensive, multi-generational grief support services are available to all — families of hospice patients and the community at large. All programs are available in English and Spanish.

Years 707.473.0583 | info@healthcarefoundation.net | healthcarefoundation.net SPECIAL THANKS TO E. & J. GALLO WINERY AND HOTEL HEALDSBURG OUR WINE COUNTRY CARES SPONSORS Healthcare Foundation is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization Federal Tax ID #68-0474109

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26 Living Well 2020

Welcome elcome to to a comm munity unity

tha engag that engages. ges. Here in the world’s first Zen-inspired life plan communit y, residents id t will ill en ngage d directly i tl with ith the th lland d beneath b th us, with the world around a us, with the people beside us and with the opporttunities ahead. Mindful in our practices, harmonious in our design and committed to growing our own food, Enso Village will accord the same respect to our natural resources as to our human ones. A collaboration between the world-renowned San Francisco Zen Center and Kendal, a Quaker-based leader in transfo forming the aging experience, Enso Village welcomes all fa faiths, backgrounds and beliefs. To learn more about our plans for the future, and where they might fit into yours, please contact us at 000-0000000 or online at enso.kendal.org.

We’re open to all who are open to life.

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Living Well 2020 27

The pandemic's financial (and emotional) toll

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nfortunately, no matter how hard we work to be financially responsible, obstacles outside our control sometimes make it hard to keep up. Prudential’s 2020 Financial Wellness Census found that nearly half of Americans perceive their financial mobility as fixed; many don’t feel it’s within their power to improve their financial future. Now that the pandemic has thrown us into an economic tailspin, discouragement and anxiety are high. Amanda Clayman, Prudential’s Financial Wellness Advocate, says there are actions and mindsets you can put in place to help you feel hopeful.

“Focusing on what you can control can make you feel resilient and empowered.”

Practice self-care: The pandemic has created a perfect storm for burnout, endangering financial futures and threatening personal health. Self-care can revive your

decision-making skills and provide the clarity to de-stress. Take a walk, a bath or just give yourself a moment to breathe. Stay connected: Despite being apart physically, lean on your personal communities for support. If you are living alone, you may crave interaction. Zoom calls, FaceTime and conversations across the street are not the same as a hug and a coffee, but they are still vital and rejuvenating human contact. Act with purpose: You may not have the power to fix the outside world but you can still reflect on what gives your life meaning and put purpose at the center of how you allocate your time and money. Set attainable goals: When you feel empowered to move forward, set simple, achievable goals, and remind yourself what is and is not in your control. Find things you can do and do them, one at a time.

Photo courtesy MHANI

FINANCIAL STRESS — Prudential’s 2020 Financial Wellness Census found that nearly half of Americans perceive their financial mobility as fixed; many don’t feel it’s within their power to improve their financial future.

communities, cultivating a sense of purpose and setting achievable goals. Take control of these aspects of life, so you can

find a path toward resilience and hope for the future. — BPT

Focusing on what you can control can make you feel resilient and empowered. Prevent burnout by controlling how you care for yourself, connecting with your personal

Mission: Los Cien advances belonging, trust and equity by engaging with our community, facilitating honest dialogue, and elevating Latinx pride and power in Sonoma County.

OUR VISION IS OF ORGULLO (PRIDE) & EQUITY FOR LATINOS IN SONOMA COUNTY! VALUES

• Diversity • Discipline and accountability for results and impact • Relationships and commitment to family and community • Trust, respect, unity, compassion and equality • Synergy and creativity • Sharing and teaching • Self-reflection Photo Zoë Strickland

EMPTY STREETS — Numerous businesses were forced to close their doors during the COVID-19 pandemic, putting a financial strain on local business owners and workers.

Please visit our website for a list of our virtual events: www.loscien.org


28 Living Well 2020

Dr. DeEtte DeVille with patient at the Russian River Health Center

Dr. To Tori Davis with prenatal patient at the Occidental Area Health Center

Dr. Surani KKw wan, FNP with pediatric patient at the Russian River Health Center

Dr. Ed Chio with patients during “Give Kids a Smile” week at the Sebastopol p Community Health & Dental Center

West Co ounty Health Centers envisions healthy com mmunities building relationships and partnerships thaat support health and wellbeing fo for all people. West Countty Health Centers is proud to offer medical,, dental and behaviorral health f ili and d iindiv dividuals Sonoma County. We servve h lth care for families id l iin western t S C t W over 15,000 p people at seven locations.

The wholle staff there alwa Th ways trea ats me with compassion and respect and mak kees e me feeel heard — which, as you know, w, is important for the healing prrocess. – WCHC Patient T H E N E W R U S S I A N R I V E R H E A LT H & W E L L N E S S C E N T E R The h Health Center e e of the Fut uture—An Integrat e a eed Hub for Heealth & Wellb e eing

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Living Well 2020 29

Home fire safety W

hen office, school and home now share one roof, keeping your house and family safe has never been more important. Thanks to enhanced safety technology, you can better protect against the threats of smoke, fire and carbon monoxide. Consider upgrading to alarms with the latest safety enhancements. Alarms should be installed on every level of the home, including bedrooms and near sleeping areas. 10-year battery: According to the National Fire Protection Association, 60 percent of fire deaths occur in homes without working smoke alarms, and dead batteries cause 25 percent of smoke alarm failures. A significant advancement in alarm technology is the development of 10-year sealed battery alarms. This technology makes battery replacements and low-battery chirps a thing of the past. Upgrading to 10-year alarms will give you one less thing to worry about.

“Consider upgrading to alarms with the latest safety enhancements.” Combination smoke and carbon monoxide alarm: For ultimate home safety, select a combination smoke and carbon monoxide alarm. Known as the silent killer, carbon monoxide is a colorless, odorless and tasteless gas, making it impossible to detect without an alarm. A variety of smoke and carbon monoxide alarms, including hardwired, combination and 10-year battery-

Photos BPT

MODERN ALARMS — Thanks to enhanced safety technology, you can better protect against

the threats of smoke, fire and carbon monoxide. powered models, are available to meet your needs and local requirements. With the convenience and simplicity of one device, the combination alarm helps protect you from three potentially deadly threats. Voice and location: Alarms with voice and location technology use a loud, pre-recorded human voice that lets you know the type and location of danger when fire or carbon monoxide is detected. Children aged 6 to 10 are awakened more readily by voice than a beeping alarm, ideal for homes with young kids. Voice and location alarms also help save time by identifying where smoke or carbon monoxide is detected in the home, so you can determine the fastest and safest way out. — BPT

Resources Sonoma County Fire District has alarm information: sonomacountyfd.org/smokeand-co-alarms The American Red Cross has a free smoke alarm program: redcross.org/local/california/northern-california-coastal/about-us/our-work/home-firecampaign.html

COMBINATION ALARM — For ultimate home safety, select a combination smoke and carbon monoxide alarm.


30 Living Well 2020


Living Well 2020 31

The City of Sebastopol Connecting You to Community Resources

Current health guidelines • Socoemergency.org Help with questions • Call 211 • Text your zip code to 898211 • Visit www.211sonoma.org Information on Sebastopol resources • Visit www.CityOfSebastopol.org • Email info@CityOfSebastopol.org • Call 707-823-1153 Food • Grocery stores and farmer's markets are open. Many have special hours for at-risk customers. • Call 211 for assistance if you cannot leave your home or need free/low-cost food resources.

• Contact Redwood Empire Food Bank ○ 707-523-7900 ○ www.refb.org Emotional/mental health • Sonoma County Warm Line ○ 707-565-2652 (10am to 7pm) Small business • Visit https://bit.ly/SebBusinessResources If you have symptoms or have come into contact with someone with COVID-19 • Call your health care provider. • If you do not have a health care provider, contact Sebastopol Community Health Center.

○ 707–824–3391 ○ www.wchealth.org

COVID-19 testing • Visit https://bit.ly/SoCoTestingInfo. To report an individual or business not following health orders • Call 1-833-SAFE707 • Email safe707@sonoma-county.org


32 Living Well 2020


Living Well 2020 33

How to play outdoors and stay safe with the family W hile this has been a challenging year with many sports and activities limited or canceled, there are still plenty of ways families can stay active and healthy. Healthcare professionals agree that physical activity is critical for children’s physical, mental and social development. In fact, the World Health Organization recommends children and teens ages five to 17 engage in at least 60 minutes of moderate to rigorous movement every day. When access to team sports are limited and young people can’t fully participate in the camaraderie of physical activities due to COVID-19, what can they do to stay healthy, active and safe? Through its Team Up for Kids mission, Boys & Girls Clubs of America and the Buffalo Wild Wings Foundation created sports programming that enables young people to comply with safe social distancing and health guidelines. Here are three exercises to move and have a ball in today’s new normal:

Toss Challenge: Find five balls and five containers (like boxes or buckets), line up the containers, stand back and toss a ball underhand into a container. If it’s too easy, move further away. Try again to see if you can be successful with only five throws. If you’re right-handed, try throwing with your left. If left-handed, throw with your right.

“The World Health Organization recommends children and teens ages five to 17 engage in at least 60 minutes of moderate to rigorous movement every day.” Throwing Drill: Set up a target in an open space, like a backyard or park. Use colored tape or chalk to make an X on the ground or wall. Throw your sports ball toward the X. If it did not reach the target, make changes to your throwing technique until you improve. Increase the distance

Photos Tribune archive

RUN AND PLAY — Kids and their parents run and play outside by the Healdsburg Plaza during a Fourth of July parade downtown.

once you can accurately hit the target five times in a row. Catching Drill: Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart, knees slightly bent. Hold your sports ball in your hands in front of your chest. Throw it up into the air, watching it carefully, and catch the ball as it falls back to the ground. Increase the height of your throw gradually. Try throwing the ball up and away from you, so you run for the ball, like in a real game. — BPT

Resources CDC: cdc.gov/physicalactivity/ basics/children/index.htm Nemours: kidshealth.org Boys & Girls Clubs of Sonoma Marin: bgcsonoma-marin.org

PLAY BALL — Playing games and engaging in other physical activities outside can help prepare kids for school sports.


34 Living Well 2020

Sponsored

Want to quit smoking or vaping? Help is there for you

Photo Tribune archive

YOUTH SUPPORT — To prevent and reduce youth tobacco use and access, Impact Sonoma concentrates its efforts on supporting local jurisdictions interested in passing effective local policies.

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he Impact Sonoma Tobacco-Nicotine Prevention Team, a program of the Sonoma County Department of Health Services, provides support and resources to the community to address the health effects of tobacco/nicotine use. To prevent and reduce youth tobacco use and access, Impact Sonoma concentrates its efforts on supporting local jurisdictions interested in passing effective local policies. All this work is led by the many individuals and organizations that make up Tobacco-Free Sonoma County, a community coalition that uses its voice and expertise to support strong policies, programs and services, all to put an end to the #1 preventable cause of death that tobacco use represents. After years of seeing the adult smoking rate drop in Sonoma County to its present rate of 11 percent, a recent significant increase in youth vaping jolted school officials and parents into action and their concern has now captured the attention of the broader community and elected officials. Twenty five percent of Sonoma County high school juniors say they are vaping regularly. Unfortunately, youth don’t see them as tobacco products,

which many youth are repulsed by. The comparatively pleasant taste and smell, and completely different look belies the hidden danger of this tobacco product. Research shows that these products expose users to hundreds of harmful chemicals, and a whopping amount of nicotine that often exceeds what can be inhaled from a cigarette.

“Anyone interested in quitting smoking may call 1-800 NOBUTTS for English or 1-800-NO-FUME for Spanish, or text: Quit Smoking to 66819 for support in either language.” To further compound the negative effects, new research is showing how vaping and smoking can make COVID-19 infections more likely with more severe symptoms. A study from Stanford University issued in August 2020 shows that those between the ages of 13 to 24 who have used a vape are five times more likely to be diagnosed with

COVID-19 compared to those of the same age who have never vaped. And, for those who have both vaped and smoked cigarettes, they are seven times more likely to be diagnosed with the virus than those who have never used vaping products or cigarettes. The complications that are seen with COVID-19 have prompted more people to seek help to quit. Whether you are just thinking about quitting or fully committed, on your first quit attempt or your tenth, there’s support out there for you. Anyone interested in quitting smoking may call 1-800 NO-BUTTS for English or 1-800NO-FUME for Spanish, or text: Quit Smoking to 66819 for support in either language. If it is vaping you are interested in quitting, the phone number is 1-844-8-NO-VAPE or by texting: NoVapes to 66819. For a limited time, free nicotine patches can be mailed straight to your front door for those 18 years and older who call the quit lines. What can you do if you don’t smoke or vape but someone in your condo or apartment Continued on next page...


Sponsored

Living Well 2020 35

Continued from previous page... complex does? There are non-smoking laws that protect people who live in government funded or Section 8 housing, or in a jurisdiction that has passed a smoke-free multi-unit housing policy. In Healdsburg, Sebastopol, Rohnert Park, Cotati, Sonoma, Petaluma, Windsor and unincorporated Sonoma County, policies are in effect to protect residents of multi-unit housing (apartments, town homes, condos) from second-hand smoke and vaping exposure. Prohibitions in these jurisdictions include: smoking cigarettes, recreational marijuana, or vaping in the common areas within a complex, inside the home, on the patio/balcony/deck, or the parking lot. Individuals and families should be aware that there is a policy for your protection, and managers/landlords/owners are expected to enforce these ordinances.

Photo Tribune archive

VAPING DANGERS — A study from Stanford University issued in August 2020 shows that those between the ages of 13 to 24 who have used a vape are five times more likely to be diagnosed with COVID compared to those of the same age who have never vaped.

You’r o e nott giving up p. You’re quittin Yo ng.

Staying Home? Protect your lungs from secondhand smoke and vape.

A program of the Sonoma County Department of Health Services

3rd quit attempt


36 Living Well 2020

Community Resources

W

e hope this edition of Living Well has inspired you and provided tools to help you stay well, care for yourselves and others, with concrete, useful and timely information that fosters your social, emotional, spiritual, environmental, occupational, intellectual, and physical health and wellness. Many of the articles and information in this publication offer useful resources. For your convenience, we have gathered them all here in one place, along with other trusted resources.

Novel coronavirus and COVID-19

Yoga and distance learning

• County of Sonoma: socoemergency.org/emergency/novel-coronavirus/?v=1

• yogaed.com • youtube.com (search “yoga for kids”)

• Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html

Suicide prevention

Eating well in a pandemic • USDA nutrition guidelines: choosemyplate.gov • University of Maryland Medical System: umms.org • Redwood Empire Food Bank: refb.org

Hand-washing

• National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: suicidepreventionlifeline.org, 800-273-TALK (8255) • Trevor Project (LGBTQ youth and young adults): thetrevorproject.org, 866-488-7386 • County Health 24-Hour Crisis Stabilization Unit: 24/7 crisis intervention, assessment, medication, and up to 23 hours of supportive care for individuals in an acute mental health crisis. Available for children, youth, adults, and families. 707-576-8181 • 24-Hour Suicide Prevention Hotline: For any Sonoma County resident who needs help. A vital resource to any family member, loved one, friend or ally who may be worried about someone who may be suicidal. 855-587-6373 • National Alliance for the Mentally Ill (NAMI): 866-960-6264 or warmline@namisoco.org

• CDC: cdc.gov/handwashing/handwashing-family.html • Stanford: stanfordchildrens.org/en/topic/ default?id=teaching-kids-to-wash-theirhands-1-972

Outdoor play and exercise • CDC: cdc.gov/physicalactivity/basics/children/index.htm • Nemours: kidshealth.org • Boys & Girls Clubs of Sonoma Marin: bgcsonoma-marin.org • Sonoma County Regional Parks: parks.sonomacounty.ca.gov

• Suicide Safety Plan: suicidepreventionlifeline.org

Fire safety • Sonoma County Fire District has alarm and fire safety information: sonomacountyfd.org/smoke-and-co-alarms • The American Red Cross has a free smoke alarm program: redcross.org/local/california/northern-california-coastal/about-us/our-work/homefire-campaign.html

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LIVING WELL 2020 ENGLISH  

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