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l l l l l

Best of 12 right-angle-weave

lllll projects

Marta S.


project

puttin’ on the ritz Leslee Frumin

technique

:: right-angle weave

See pp. 35–36 for helpful technique information.

Leslee’s fashion-conscious sister requested this necklace of pearls and semiprecious stones. She gets tons of compliments on the piece, but doesn’t reveal her source . . . or the fact that her source made it up in a day with right-angle weave! More wonderful beadwork projects are available at interweavestore.com © 2010 Interweave Press LLC. Not to be reprinted. All rights reserved. page 1


1) Right-angle weave. Work a 61-unit chain of right-angle weave: Unit 1: Use the thread to string 1 pearl and 1 charlotte four times, leaving a 7' tail to work the clasp and fringe. Pass through the first 6 beads to exit the third pearl. Units 2 and on: String 1 charlotte and 1 pearl three times. String 1 charlotte. Pass through the last bead of the previous unit and first 4 beads just strung, exiting from the second pearl (Fig. 1). Repeat fifty-nine times.

Materials

Fig. 3: Working the first fringe

4) Finishing. Pass through the

charlotte above the last pearl and attach the clasp as in Step 2. Secure the tail threads with 3 or more half-hitch knots tied between beads, then trim.F

3 g gold size 13° charlottes 30 amber 9×6mm top-drilled cubic zirconia teardrops 244 peach 3mm pearls 1" of fine gold french wire 1 gold 10mm S-clasp with citrine inlay 15' of 6 lb braided beading thread

Tools

Size 12 beading needle Scissors

Finished size: 16¼"

Artist’s Tips

Fig. 1: Units 1 and 2

2) Clasp. Use the tail thread to string 1 charlotte, ¼" of french wire, and one half of the clasp; pass back through the charlotte and through the first pearl. String 1 charlotte and ¼" of french wire; pass through the clasp again and back through the charlotte and the pearl. Tie a knot to secure the thread, then pass back through 1 charlotte and 1 pearl to exit the bottom pearl toward the necklace (Fig. 2).

Fig. 2: Connecting the first half of the clasp

3) Fringe. String 1 charlotte, 1 pearl, 1 charlotte, 1 teardrop, 1 charlotte, 1 pearl, and 1 charlotte; skip a bottom pearl and pass through the next bottom pearl (Fig. 3). Pull snug and tie a halfhitch knot. Repeat entire step twentynine times.

• If adjusting the length of this necklace, it is a good idea to work from the center of the thread. Without cutting the thread, unroll about 2½' of FireLine from the spool. Thread the needle and start stitching using right-angle weave as in Step 1. When the working end of the thread is about 12" long, unroll 2½' from the spool, cut the thread, add a needle to the new end, and continue to work the necklace as before. Check the necklace length in a mirror. Attach one half of the clasp and work the fringe. Recheck the length. Add or subract units with the 12" tail. Add fringe as needed and attach the second half of the clasp as in Steps 2–4. • If working with a box clasp, make sure the necklace is not twisted when attaching the second half of the clasp. You may find it helpful to keep the clasp closed during stitching to prevent one of the halves from accidently getting attached upside down.

Leslee Frumin, a bead and metal artist from San Juan Capistrano, California, teaches off-loom bead weaving and metal/jewelry techniques. She has been published and won awards in both areas, and her work is frequently featured in trade magazines. Her passion for all the colors and textures made possible by beads, metals, and stones keeps her excited. Her motto is so many beads, so little time.

Resources Check your local bead shop or contact: Cubic zirconia: Africa Stones (wholesale only), (626) 962-5800, www.africa stones .com. Kit for this project: www.leslee frumin.com.

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project

turquoise couture J e n n i f e r Va n B e n s c h o t e n

Inspired by high-end earrings found on the pages of a fashion magazine, these easy-to-make right-angleweave earrings are the perfect addition to any fashion-forward wardrobe.

Artist’s Tips • To strengthen and stabilize the earrings, weave as much of the extra working thread as possible into the beadwork before trimming. Be careful not to break any beads—if it feels tight when you insert the needle into a bead, don’t force it.

techniques

:: s ingle- and doubleneedle right-angle weave

See pp. 35–36 for helpful technique information.

• When working with two needles, stash the extra needle to prevent tangling the thread or losing the needle. If using a padded work surface, weave the needle into the padding; if working on a hard surface, use a small piece of clear tape to secure the needle. • This pattern is extremely versatile. Try replacing the turquoise rounds with 3mm gemstone, fire-polished, or crystal rounds, or size 8° seed beads.

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1) Center. Use 5' of conditioned

thread and two-needle right-angle weave to work the center strip of the earring: Row 1, Unit 1: Place one needle on each end of the thread. Use the right needle to string {1 size 15° and 1 turquoise round} four times. Slide the beads to the middle of the thread and pass the left needle through the last turquoise round strung to form a circle. Row 1, Units 2–8: Use each needle to string 1 size 15°, 1 turquoise round, and 1 size 15°. Use the left needle to string 1 turquoise round; pass the right needle back through it to complete the unit. Repeat to make a strip 8 units long (Fig. 1).

Materials

Fig. 3: Side 1, Row 2, Unit 2

String 1 size 15°, 1 turquoise round, 1 size 15°, 1 turquoise round, and 1 size 15°; pass through the top bead of the fifth unit in Row 1. String 1 size 15° and pass through the adjacent side bead of the previous Row 2 unit; weave through beads to exit from the top bead of Row 2, Unit 2 (Fig. 4).

Row 2, Unit 3:

String {1 size 15° and 1 turquoise round} three times and 1 size 15°; pass through the last bead exited to form 1 unit (Fig. 5a). Weave through beads to exit from the top bead of the third unit in Row 1. Work 1 unit as before (Fig. 5b). Set the needle aside.

Points:

2) Side 1. With the beadwork horizon-

tal and the working threads to the right, use single-needle right-angle weave to create one half of the earring: Row 2, Unit 1: Using the needle that is currently pointing up, weave through beads to exit the right side of the top turquoise round of the seventh unit in Row 1. String {1 size 15° and 1 turquoise round} three times and 1 size 15°; pass through the last turquoise round exited and the first 6 beads just added to form 1 unit (Fig. 2).

a

b

repeat Side 1 using the other needle.

4) Loop. Weave both needles

String 1 size 15° and pass through the top turquoise round of the sixth unit in Row 1. String 1 size 15°, 1 turquoise round, 1 size 15°, 1 turquoise round, and 1 size 15°; pass through the adjacent side bead of the previous Row 2 unit and the first 4 beads of this unit (Fig. 3).

Row 2, Unit 2:

Finished size: 3"

Open the loop of 1 ear wire as you would a jump ring, attach it to the seedbead loop, and close the ear-wire loop. 5) Repeat Steps 1–4 for a second earring. F Jennifer VanBenschoten lives in the Adirondack Mountains of upstate New York with her husband, her son, and their critters. You can see more of her work and purchase kits on her website, www.vanbeads.com. Jennifer is the Guide to Beadwork for About.com.

Resources Fig. 5: Adding the points

3) Side 2. Flip the work over and

Fig. 2: Side 1, Row 2, Unit 1

Tools

Scissors 2 size 10 beading needles 2 pairs of chain- or flat-nose pliers

Fig. 6: Completing the loop

Fig. 4: Side 1, Row 2, Unit 3 Fig. 1: Row 1, the center strip

1 g metallic silver size 15° seed beads 104 turquoise 3mm rounds 1 pair of sterling silver ear wires White size B nylon beading thread Thread conditioner (optional)

through beads to exit from opposite ends of the side bead at the start of Row 1. Use each needle to string 5 size 15°s. Use both needles to string 1 turquoise round. Use the left needle to string 11 size 15°s; pass back through the beads just strung with the right needle to form a loop. Weave each needle through the beadwork to reinforce (Fig. 6). Secure the thread and trim.

Check your local bead shop or contact: Turquoise: Beads World, (212) 302-1199, www.beadsworldusa.com. Ear wires and Nymo nylon beading thread: Fire Mountain Gems and Beads, (800) 355-2137, www.firemountaingems.com. Seed beads: Out On A Whim, (707) 664-8343, www.whimbeads.com.

For a bold look, use carnelian 3mm rounds instead of turquoise.

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option


project

pewter lace S m a d a r G r o ss m a n

techniques

:: d  ouble-needle right-angle weave :: netting :: brick stitch

See pp. 35–36 for helpful technique information.

Use three different stitches to weave a lacy, chic bracelet suitable for holiday wear.

Artist’s Tips • Use longer bugle beads to create a wider bracelet. • Do not eliminate the B beads if altering the design; they help protect the thread from the sharp edges of the bugles.

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1) Base. Place a needle at each end of

4' of thread. Use A and 6mm rounds to work double-needle-right-angle weave: Unit 1: Use one needle to string 14A and slide them to the middle of the thread. String 1A on the right needle and pass the left needle back through it; pull tight to form a circle. Unit 2: Use the right needle to string 5A and one 6mm round; use the left needle to string 5A. Pass the left needle back through the 6mm round; pull tight. Unit 3: Use the right needle to string b 6A; use the left needle to string 5A. Pass the left needle back through the last 1A strung on the a right needle; pull tight (Fig. 1a). Units 4–23: Repeat Units 2 and 3 ten times. Unit 24: Use each needle to string 7A; pass each needle back through the Fig. 1: Starting last 4A strung on and ending the base the opposite needle (Fig. 1b). 2) Nets. Use the left needle to string 6A; pass back through the first 2A added to the left side of the previous unit, forming a net between the final 2 units (Fig. 2a). Weave through the nearest 6mm round and back through the final 2A on the right side of the following unit. Repeat, adding 6A between units and weaving side to

a

b

Fig. 2: Adding nets between units

side (Fig. 2b). Repeat entire step using the right needle, adding 6A nets to the empty spaces. Weave each needle through the end unit so it exits from the center. Use the thread ends to tie a square knot (Fig. 3); secure the threads and trim. Fig. 3: Securing the thread 3) Edging. Begin 4' of thread that exits from the first A of the first 6A net, toward the beadwork. Work stacked brick stitch: Set 1: String 1C, 2B, and 1C; pass under the thread between the second and third A in this net and back through the second C and second B just strung. Gently pull the thread to tighten. String 1B and 1C; pass under the thread between the third and fourth A in this net and back through the beads just strung. Large bridge: String 1A, one 4mm round, 1A, 1B, and 1C; pass under the thread between the fourth and fifth A in this net and back through the C and B just strung (Fig. 4a). Set 2: String 1B and 1C; pass under the thread between the fifth and sixth A in this net and back through the beads just strung. String 1B and 1C; pass under the thread between the sixth A in this net and the second A in the base unit. Pass back through the beads just strung. Small bridge: String 1A, 1B, and 1C; pass under the thread between the second-to-last A in the next base unit and the first A of the next net. Pass back through the C and B just strung. Set 3 and on: String 1B and 1C; pass under the thread between the first and second A in this net and back through the beads just strung. String 1B and 1C; pass under the thread between the second and third A in this net and back through the beads just strung (Fig. 4b).

Materials

4 g nickel-plated silver size 11° seed beads (A) 2 g metallic hematite size 11° seed beads (B) 3 g matte gunmetal 3mm bugle beads (C) 24 metallic hematite 4mm fire-polished rounds 11 metallic hematite 6mm fire-polished rounds 2 sterling silver 5mm jump rings 1 pewter 15mm floral toggle clasp Smoke 6 lb braided beading thread

Tools

2 size 10 beading needles Scissors 2 pairs of chain- or flat-nose pliers

Finished size: 8"

a b Fig. 4: Embellishing the base

Repeat from the large bridge ten times down the length of the bracelet. Work a large bridge and Set 2 once more. Weave through beads to repeat the entire step down the other side of the bracelet. Secure the thread and trim. 4) Clasp. Use jump rings to attach one

half of the clasp to each end unit. F

Smadar Grossman lives in Israel, where she’s been beading and designing jewelry for three years. She’s a self-taught beadweaver who finds the discipline challenging but enjoyable and a great medium for expressing herself. See more of Smadar’s work at www .smadarstreasure.blogspot.com.

Resources Check your local bead shop or contact: FireLine braided beading thread, jump rings, similar clasp, and all beads: Artbeads.com, (866) 715-2323.

More wonderful beadwork projects are available at interweavestore.com © 2010 Interweave Press LLC. Not to be reprinted. All rights reserved. page 6


project

earth and sky Ma r c i a D e C o s t e r

techniques :: :: :: ::

ladder stitch brick stitch right-angle weave picot

See pp. 35–36 for helpful technique information.

Have fun creating lacy bead caps using a variety of seed beads, crystals, and pearls; then join two together over a larger bead. The result is a beaded bead dressed up with sparkle and color. Wear one alone for a solo dazzler or string with several others for a stunning necklace. More wonderful beadwork projects are available at interweavestore.com Š 2010 Interweave Press LLC. Not to be reprinted. All rights reserved. page 7


1) Bead caps. Work each bead cap separately and join 2 together around a larger bead: Round 1: Use 3' of thread and one color of C to work a strip of ladder stitch 12 beads long. Stitch the first and last beads together to form a ring. Round 2: String 3C; pass down through the next bead in the previous round and up through the following bead. Repeat around for a total of 6 picots. Weave through beads to exit from the first bead added in this round (Fig. 1).

Repeat around, using either A or B consistently, for a total of 6 additional picots. Exit from the second bead added in this round (Fig. 3). Don’t cut the thread.

Fig. 3: Adding picots

Note: If your 16mm beads have wide holes, use B to work 1 or 2 rounds of decreasing brick stitch inside Round 1 of each cap (Fig. 4).

Fig. 1:

Finishing Round 2

*String 3C and pass down through the third bead of the picot you’re exiting. String 1D and pass up through the first bead of the next picot. Repeat from * around for a total of 6 additional picots with 1D between each. Weave through beads to exit from the second bead added in this round (Fig. 2).

*String 3A (or 3B). Pass through the Round 3 bead just exited to work another picot. Weave through beads to exit from the tip of the next picot of the previous round.

Round 4:

Tools

Size 12 beading needles Wire cutters Crimping pliers Scissors

Finished Size: 17½"

Round 3:

Fig. 2: Working Round 3

Materials

3 g turquoise shiny size 15° seed beads (A) 5 g bronze metallic size 15° charlottes (B) 7 g each size 11° seed beads in turquoise-lined clear, turquoise matte, gold metallic, and brown luster (C) 3 g gold metallic size 8° seed beads (D) 42 total 3–4mm cube, crystal bicone, and fire-polished round accent beads in bronze and turquoise 14 dark brown 11×9mm glass bicones 1 sapphire 14mm crystal rivoli 6 chalcedony or amazonite 13–19× 18–25mm faceted nuggets 7 dark brown 16mm ceramic rounds 26 gold-filled or brass 6mm daisy spacers 2 gold-filled 2mm crimp tubes Smoke 6 lb braided beading thread 24" of .018 beading wire

Fig. 4: Working brick stitch inside Round 1

Repeat Rounds 1–4 thirteen times for a total of 7 pairs of matching bead caps, using different bead colors in each round so each final beaded bead is unique. Set aside. Round 5: Position 2 matching bead caps on each end of one 16mm bead so they mirror one another. *Use one working thread to string 1 accent bead. Pass through the tip of the matching picot on the opposite cap. Pass back through the accent bead and into the tip of the picot you originally exited. Weave through the beads to exit from the tip of the next picot (Fig. 5). Repeat from * around until the caps are connected. Secure the thread and trim.

Fig. 5: Connecting the caps

For extra embellishment, use A or B to work 5-unit-long strips of right-angle weave between the strips of picots, attaching them to the D beads of Round 3.

Optional:

2) Bezel. Use 3' of thread to work 1 row

of right-angle weave 19 units long, using B for the top and bottom and C for the sides of each unit. Check to see that it fits snugly around the rivoli, leaving a 1-bead-wide gap for finishing. Weave a second row using B and C as before.

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Use B to work 1 more round. Use B and follow a right-angle-weave thread path to join the row ends (Fig. 6).

Fig. 6: Joining the row ends

Weave through all the top B and pull tight to form a cup (Fig. 7). Place the bezel facedown into the cup.

3) Assembly. Use the beading wire to string 1 crimp tube and 8C. Pass back through the tube and crimp, leaving a 1" tail. String {1 bicone, 1 spacer, 1 beaded bead, 1 spacer, 1 bicone, 1 spacer, 1 nugget, and 1 spacer} six times. String 1 bicone, 1 spacer, 1 beaded bead, 1 spacer, 1 bicone, 1 crimp tube, and 30C or enough C to fit snugly around the bezel. Pass back through the tube, snug the beads, and crimp. Use 1' of thread to secure the strand’s 8-bead loop to the back of the bezel. Secure the thread and trim close to the work. F

Fig. 7: Pulling the beadwork so it cups

Weave through beads to exit from 1B on the opposite edge of the ring. Use B to work 1 round of right-angle weave. Weave through all the top B as before and pull tight to enclose the rivoli. Weave through the beads to exit from 1B on the top of the initial row. String 1A and pass through the next B. Repeat around to embellish the edge of the bezel (Fig. 8). Set aside.

Fig. 8: Embellishing the edge of the bezel

Marcia DeCoster is a beadweaving artist who enjoys living and working in her art deco home in Southern California. Right-angle weave offers many different design options, which you can find in her new book, Marcia DeCoster’s Beaded Opulence: Elegant Jewelry Projects with Right-Angle Weave (Lark Books, 2009). Visit www.marciadecoster.org to see Marcia’s extensive teaching schedule. To hear more about her travels, read her blog at www.maddesignsbeads.blogspot.com.

Resources Check your local bead shop or contact: Swarovski crystal beads and rivoli, seed beads, spacers, and wire: Out On A Whim, (800) 232-3111, www.whimbeads .com. FireLine braided beading thread: FusionBeads.com, (888) 781-3559.

More wonderful beadwork projects are available at interweavestore.com © 2010 Interweave Press LLC. Not to be reprinted. All rights reserved. page 9


project Strong cubic right-angle-weave tile “gates” swing and sway between beaded posts to form this cleverly engineered bracelet.

medici gate Ha n n a h B e n n i n g e r

techniques

:: c ubic and flat right-angle weave

See pp. 35–36 for helpful technique information.

Artist’s Tips • It may be easier to learn cubic right-angle weave by practicing with larger beads first. • With cubic right-angle weave, it’s important to match the color of your thread as closely as possible to the color of your beads because a lot of thread shows.

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1) Posts. Use A to work cubic rightangle weave, first forming the center of the post and then the decorative ends: Cube 1: Leaving an 8" tail, use 3' of waxed black thread and A to work 3 units of flat right-angle weave. To work a fourth unit that connects Units 1 and 3, string 1A and pass down through the end 1A of Unit 1, 1: Working then string 1A and Fig. Units 1–4 (indicated pass up through in blue) and joining them into one side the end 1A of of the first cube Unit 3. Exit from (indicated in red) a bottom 1A; pass through all the bottom beads to form one side of the cube (Fig. 1). Fig. 2: Completing Weave through the the first cube beads to exit from a top 1A; pass through all the top beads, completing the first cube (Fig. 2). Cube 2: String 3A; pass through the last A exited in the previous cube and up through the first 1A just added to complete the first unit of this cube. String 2A; pass through the next A at the top of the previous cube, up through the nearest 1A of this cube’s first unit, the 2A just strung, and through the following 1A at the top of the previous cube. String 2A; pass down through the nearest 1A of this cube’s second unit, the nearest 1A at the top of the previous cube, and up through the first A just added. String 1A; pass down through the nearest 1A of this cube’s first unit, the closest top 1A of the previous cube, up through the nearest 1A of this cube’s third unit, and through Fig. 3: Working Units 1–4 of the the 1A just added. second cube (indicated in blue) and Pass through all passing through the top beads, the top beads to complete the cube completing the second cube (Fig. 3). (indicated in red)

Repeat Cube 2 to form a rectangle 12 cubes Materials long. Weave through 5 g matte gunmetal size 15° seed beads (A) beads to exit from a 5 g opaque mauve size 15° seed beads (B) 3 g silver-lined opal pale lavender size side 1A of the elev15° seed beads (C) enth cube. Size D nylon beading thread in black Ends: Use A to form and lavender 1 cube on the left side Beeswax of the eleventh cube; repeat on the right Tools side of the eleventh Scissors Size 13 beading needles cube. Secure the working thread and Finished size: 7" trim. Place a needle on the tail thread and weave through beads to exit from Fig. 4: Adding a side bead of the cubes to the sides second cube. Use A of the post ends to form 1 cube on the left side of the second cube; repeat on the right side of the second cube (Fig. 4). Secure the tail thread and working threads and Fig. 6: Tile color pattern trim; set aside. Rows 3–6: Work 4 more rows of cubic rightRepeat entire step six times for a total angle weave, continuing to follow the of 7 posts. bead color pattern in Fig. 6. Secure the thread and trim; set the tile aside. 2) Tiles. Work a flat square of cubic right-angle weave with a diamond pat- Repeat entire step seven times for a total of 8 tiles. tern in the center: Row 1: Leaving a 4" tail, use 4' of waxed 3) Hinges. Use B to work flat rightlavender thread and B to work a strip angle-weave loops that will act as of cubic right-angle weave as in Step 1, hinges joining the tiles to the posts: but this time make it 8 cubes long. Exit Loop 1: Start 3' of waxed lavender thread from 1B at the side of the eighth cube. that exits from the third edge B at Row 2: Use B to form 1 cube on the top the top of 1 tile. Use B to work 1 unit of the final cube of Row 1. Use C to of right-angle weave off the bead just form a second cube, incorporating exited and a second unit off the the top of the next Row 1 cube and fourth edge B. Continue working flat the side of the cube just made as the right-angle weave to form a strip bottom and side of this new cube 2 units wide and 5 units long (Fig. 7). (Fig. 5). Repeat, adding 6 more cubes across the row, following the bead color pattern in Fig. 6. Cubes 3–12:

Fig. 7: Flat right-

angle-weave strip

Fig. 5: Adding the second cube to Row 2 Figure 7

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Getting Started with Cubic RAW

If you’re familiar with flat right-angle weave (RAW), you’re ready for cubic RAW. Imagine a child’s block with six sides. Each side is made up of a unit of 4 beads sewn in RAW. Beginning with 3 units of flat RAW, you will join the sides into a tube using common beads, and do the same to the top and bottom, forming a six-sided cubic unit of 12 beads.

B o n n ie B r o o k s

1) Use 3' of thread to

string beads 1–4 in alternating colors as shown, leaving a 6" tail. Tie a knot and pass through Fig. A Beads 1 and 2 (Fig. A).

7) To join the 4 beads of

the same color on this side of the cube into a unit, pass through Beads 8, 7, 1, and 12 (Fig. G).

13) Turn the cube to

Fig. G

8) Pass through Beads 8

2) String Beads 5–7 in alternating colors as shown. Pass through Bead 2 from the previous unit and Beads 5 and 6 (Fig. B).

and 7 again and exit Bead 2 (Fig. H).

14) Repeat Steps 9–13 to continue

making a strip.

9) Begin the second

Fig. B

3) String Beads 8–10 in alternating colors as Fig. C shown. Pass through Beads 6, 8, and 9 from the previous unit (Fig. C). 4) Stitch these

3 units into a tube by stringing Bead 11 and passing through Bead 4 of the first unit. String Bead Fig. D 12 and pass through Bead 9 of the third unit. Continue to pass through Bead 11 (Fig. D). 5) Hold the cube so that the side with Bead 11 (the bead that the thread is exiting) faces you. To join Fig. E the 4 beads of the same color into a unit, pass through Beads 3, 5, 10, and 11 (Fig. E). 6) Pass through Bead 4 on the corner and Bead 12 on the opposite side of the cube (Fig. F).

Fig. H

the other side. Pass 4 through Beads 18, 19, 3, and 13. Continue to pass through Bead 18 Fig. M and then through Bead 17 on the corner (Fig. M).

Fig. F

cube by stringing Beads 13–15 in alternating colors as shown. Notice this unit shares Bead 2 with the first Fig. I cube. Pass through Bead 2 and then through Beads 13 and 14 again (Fig. I). 10) String

Beads 16–18 in alternating colors as shown. Pass Fig. J through Bead 14 again to make Unit 2 of the second cube. Pass through beads 16 and 17 again (Fig. J). 11) String Bead

19 and pass through Bead 4 of the first cube. String Bead 20 and pass through Beads 17, 19, 4, and 20 (Fig. K).

Fig. K

12) Turn the cube so

that Bead 20 faces 4 you. Pass through Beads 1, 15, and 16. Continue to pass Fig. L through Beads 20, 1, and 15 again and exit Bead 14 on the corner (Fig. L).

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Wrap the strip around 1 post. Right-angle-weave a sixth unit that attaches to the other side of the same 2 cubes the strip originated from (Fig. 8).

Post:

Fig. 8: Looping and connecting a flat rightangle-weave strip around a post

Weave through the beads along the top of the tile to exit from the seventh edge B. Form another strip as before, wrap it around the post, and secure it to the other side of the same 2 cubes the strip originated from (Fig. 9a). Loop 3: Weave through beads across the body of the tile and exit from the first edge B at the bottom of the tile. Form a strip as before, wrap it around a second post, and secure it to the other side of the same 2 cubes the strip originated from (Fig. 9b). Loop 2:

a

b

c

Weave through beads along the bottom of the tile to exit the fifth edge B. Form a strip as before, wrap it around the post just added, and secure it to the other side of the same 2 cubes the strip originated from (Fig. 9c). Secure the thread and trim. Repeat entire step to connect the remaining tiles and posts in the same manner. Note: The ends of the bracelet should be free of loops. Loop 4:

4) Clasp. Use cubic right-angle weave to work a beaded toggle clasp: Clasp loop: Start 3' of waxed lavender thread that exits from the top of the second cube on the long edge of the bracelet’s first tile. Use B to work a strip of cubic right-angle weave 1 cube wide and 4 cubes long. Weave through beads to exit from the right side of the last cube stitched; use B to work a strip of cubic right-angle weave 1 cube wide and 5 cubes long. Weave through beads to exit from the bottom of the last cube stitched; use B to work a strip of cubic rightangle weave 1 cube wide and 2 units long. Form a final cube that incorporates and attaches to the seventh cube on the long edge of the bracelet’s first tile (Fig. 10). Secure the thread and trim. Clasp-bar post: Repeat Step 1 to form a post, but this time make it only 10 cubes long. The cubes that form the decorative ends will attach to the second and ninth cubes.

Fig. 10: Working the clasp loop Clasp-bar connection: Start

3' of waxed black thread that exits from the top of the fourth cube on the long edge of the bracelet’s eighth tile. Use A to form a strip 2 cubes wide and 3 cubes long. Form a fourth cube that incorporates and attaches to the center 2 cubes of the clasp-bar post (Fig. 11). Secure the thread and trim. F

Fig. 11: Connecting the clasp-bar post Hannah Benninger has been fascinated by beads since childhood. She wishes she had more free time to execute her many beady ideas.

Resources Check your local bead shop or contact: Mauve seed beads: Turtle Island Beads, (608) 356-8823, www.turtleislandbeads .com. Nymo nylon beading thread and all other beads: FusionBeads.com, (888) 781-3559.

Fig. 9: Tile-loop positions

Love beadwork projects? get 24 more! Enhance your skills and your jewelry collection with these stunning designs in two of beaders’ favorite stitches: herringbone and peyote.

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modern art cuff

project

k at e m c k i n n o n

The cleverly engineered, removable ram’s horn clasp used in this stunning double-layered bracelet gives the design an unexpected versatility—since the closure isn’t stitched to the beadwork, the inner layer doesn’t bunch up.

techniques

:: right-angle weave :: square stitch

See pp. 35–36 for helpful technique information.

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1) Gray strip. Work a large strip of right-angle weave for the inside layer of the cuff: Row 1, Unit 1: Use 3' of size D thread to string {2B and 1A} four times, leaving a 4" tail. Pass through the beads again to form a circle, exiting from the first 2B strung. Row 1, Units 2–8: String 2B, 1A, 2B, 1A, and 2B. Pass through the last 2B exited on the previous unit and through the 2B/1A/2B just added (Fig. 1); repeat to form a strip 8 units wide. Exit from the second B added to the final unit.

Row 2, Units 4–8: Repeat Row 2, Units 2

and 3, to work a total of 8 units. Exit from the top 2B of the final unit. Rows 3 and on: Repeat Row 2 to work a strip of right-angle weave long enough to reach the wrist circumference, minus 2¼". Embellishment: Weave through beads to exit from the intersection of 4 units at the corner of the strip. String 1 sequin and 1E; pass back through the sequin and through the next beads on the strip to exit from the intersection of the next set of 4 units along the strip’s long edge (Fig. 4). Repeat to add sequin fringes down the edge of the strip. Secure the thread and trim.

Materials

4 g silver-lined gray size 15° charlottes (A) 5 g silver-lined gray luster size 11° seed beads (B) 5 g matte silver-lined amber size 11° seed beads (C) 3 g matte metallic copper size 11° seed beads (D) 1 g purple luster size 11° seed beads (E) 45–50 copper iris 6mm textured sequins 1 sterling silver 23×30mm ram’s horn clasp Gray size D and O nylon beading threads Beeswax or thread conditioner (optional)

Tools

Scissors Size 12 beading needles

Finished size: 7¼" b

a

Fig. 1: Working Units 1 and 2 of Row 1

String 2B, 1A, 2B, 1A, and 2B; pass through the last 2B exited from the previous unit, through the beads just added, and the next edge 2B of Row 1 (Fig. 2).

Row 2, Unit 1:

Fig. 5: Square-stitching the copper band

2) Amber strip. Repeat Step 1, this

Fig. 2: Starting Row 2

String 2B, 1A, and 2B; pass through the side 2B of the previous unit, the last 2B exited in Row 1, and the first 2B just added. Row 2, Unit 3: String 2B, 1A, and 2B; pass through the next edge 2B on Row 1, the side 2B of the previous unit, the 2B/1A/2B just added, and the next edge 2B of Row 1 (Fig. 3). Row 2, Unit 2:

Fig. 3: Working Units 2 and 3 of Row 2

time using C instead of B and forming the strip so it’s 6 units wide instead of 8 units. Work the embellishment fringes as before, randomly placing them in the center 4" of the strip and sometimes using D instead of E. 3) Ends. Connect the strips with

square-stitched bands: Copper bands: Start 3' of size O thread that exits toward the edge from the bottom 2C of the amber rightangle-weave strip’s first unit formed in Step 2. String 2D, pass through the last 2C exited and the 2D just added, and string 1A (Fig. 5a). String 2D, pass through the next 2D from the previous row and the 2D just added, and string 1A (Fig. 5b); repeat to the end of the strip, omitting the final 1A. Pass through the row just

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a t e d

il

Fig. 4: Stitching the fringe embellishment

stitched to reinforce it. Continue working rows of square stitch, adding 2D over 2D and adding 1A between each stitch, to form a band 17 rows long. Do not trim the thread. Repeat entire step to form a second copper band at the other end of the amber strip. Connection: With the embellished side of the gray strip faceup and the embellished side of the amber strip facedown, connect the final row of the copper band to one short end of the gray strip using a square-stitch thread path and


Artist’s tips • If altering the size of this cuff, remember that it has two layers and will need to be longer than a simply strung piece. For example, Kate makes her own strung pieces 6 to 6½" long, but in this piece, she needs the finished cuff to measure about 7¼" long. Add or subtract a bit from each of the copper bands as you are finishing the piece.

making sure the band is centered side to side. Weave through all the copperband rows again to reinforce; secure the thread and trim. Repeat this entire section using the other end of the copper strip and the free end of the gray strip to end up with a long circular band; do not trim the thread. Loops: Fold the copper band with the thread attached in half so the first and seventeenth square-stitched rows meet. Note: One half of the clasp will

go through this loop, so test to make sure the copper strip will rest on top of the gray strip and that all of the sequins will face up once stitched. Use a square-stitched thread path to join the rows and secure the loop (Fig. 6). Repeat the square-stitched thread path to reinforce; secure the thread and trim. To wear, slide one half of the clasp into the loop just formed and attach the other half to the fold of the other copper band. F

• Kate squares up the units of the strips, if necessary, by gently pushing a graduated square bezel mandrel into each “cell.” Don’t have a bezel mandrel? Just pick up a piece of square brass tubing from the hardware store in a diameter slightly smaller than the holes and wiggle it around in each cell. • Experiment with patterns and color fades in your beadwork. Even subtle changes, such as the use of differentcolored beads that anchor the sequins, can be exciting.

Fig. 6: Stitching one of the copper bands into a loop

For subtle shimmer, add sequins between the layers of beadwork as Kate did on the blue-andorange cuff below.

kate mckinnon is a writer, metalsmith, and bead engineer who lives and works in her hometown of Tucson, Arizona. She is fascinated by the quest to make things stronger, simpler, and more flexible. Kate is the author of Sculptural Metal Clay and Jewelry Architect (Interweave, 2010).

Resources Check your local bead shop or contact: Seed beads: Jane’s Fiber & Beads, (888) 497-2665, www.janesfiberandbeads.com, or BeadFX, Toronto, www.beadfx.com. Nymo nylon beading thread: Fire Mountain Gems and Beads, (800) 355-2137, www .firemountaingems.com. Ram’s horn clasp: Kate McKinnon Designs, www.katemc kinnon.com. Sequins: Gail Crosman Moore, www.gailcrosmanmoore.com.

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1) Bezel. Thread one needle on each

project

end of 3' of thread to work a doubleneedle right-angle-weave bezel: Round 1, Unit 1: Use the right needle to string 3A, 1B, 2A, and 1B; slide them to the center of the thread. Pass the left needle back through the last B strung to form a right-angleweave unit (Fig. 1).

celestial sparkle m ay b r i s e b o i s

Round 1, Units 2–11:

Stitch seven ultrasparkly components and connect them to create a bracelet fit for a goddess.

Use the right neeFig. 1: Working dle to string 2A and Unit 1 1B; use the left needle to string 3A. Pass the left needle through the last B strung to form a unit (Fig. 2). Repeat nine times Fig. 2: Units 1 and 2 of Round 1 to form a tight right-angle-weave strip 11 units long. Note: The work will curve, which will aid in adding the rivoli later. Round 1, Unit 12: Use the right needle to string 2A; use the left needle to string 3A. Cross the needles through the first B strung in Unit 1 to form a ring. Weave through beads so the needles exit the 3-seed-bead side of Unit 1 from opposite directions (Fig. 3).

Fig. 3: Completing Round 1

Note: This group of side beads is hereafter called an “edge set.” Round 2, Unit 1: Use the right needle to string 1B; use the left needle to string 1B and 2A. Pass the left needle down through the B on the right and continue through the previous round’s next edge set. Round 2, Units 2–11: Use the right needle to string 1B; use the left needle to string 2A. Pass the left needle down through the B just strung and continue through the previous round’s next edge set (Fig. 4). Repeat around to add a total of 11 units.

technique

:: double-needle rightangle weave

See pp. 35–36 for helpful technique information.

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Fig. 4: Starting Round 2

Use the left needle to string 2A. Pass the right needle up through the first B added in this round and back through the 2A just strung to complete the round, but don’t pull tight (Fig. 5).

Round 2, Unit 12:

Fig. 5: Completing Round 2

Skip the next 3-bead edge set of the first bezel and pass through the following one. String 3A, 1B, and 3A (Fig. 7a). Pass back through the next edge set of the second bezel, pass through the 6mm round, the skipped edge set of the first bezel, the first set of beads added in this step, and the next four 3-bead edge sets of the second bezel to complete the figure-eight connection (Fig. 7b). Repeat to connect all the bezels in a row. Exit from a 3-bead edge set at the end of the bracelet.

Materials

2 g size 15° seed beads (A) 180 olivine AB 3mm crystal bicones (B) 6 ruby 6mm crystal rounds 7 crystal vitrail medium 14mm foiled crystal rivolis 1 sterling silver 12mm round box clasp with garnet cubic zirconia inlay 4 brass 5mm jump rings Smoke 6 lb braided beading thread

Tools

Scissors 2 size 11 beading needles

Finished size: 7" Insert 1 rivoli facedown so the rivoli’s back is toward the loose thread. Squeeze the rivoli into place between the bicones. Once it is properly seated, tighten the last stitch from Round 2, Unit 12. Weave one needle through the 2-bead edge sets at the back of the rivoli; repeat with the other needle in the opposite direction, tightening the back of the bezel. When the needles meet, tie a square knot (Fig. 6).

Rivoli:

a

o opti

b Fig. 7: Connecting 2 bezeled rivolis

3) Clasp. String 6A; pass through

Fig. 6: Tighten-

ing the back to secure the rivoli

Weave through beads to the front of the rivoli and repeat this section to tighten the front of the bezel. Secure the thread and trim. Set the bezeled rivoli aside. Repeat entire step six times to create a total of 7 bezeled rivolis.

the next edge set at the end of the bracelet to form a loop. String 5A; pass through the sixth seed bead previously strung and back through the last edge set exited in Step 2 to form a second loop. Repeat the thread path to reinforce; secure the thread and trim. Use 2 jump rings to attach one half of the clasp, connecting a ring to each seed-bead loop (Fig. 8). Repeat entire step at the other end of the bracelet using the other half of the clasp. F

Easy Earring Ensemble For perfectly coordinated earrings, repeat Step 1 to make 1 bezeled rivoli, stitch 1 wireguard (or seed-bead loop) to one 3-bead edge set, and attach 1 ear wire to the wireguard/ beaded loop. Repeat for a second earring, and voilà.

may brisebois started beading in 2001. Visit her website at www.beadifulgifts.com.

Resources Check your local bead shop or contact: Clasp: A Grain of Sand, (704) 660-3125, www.agrainofsand.com. Swarovski crystals, FireLine braided beading thread, and all other beads and findings: BEADiful, (678) 455-7858, www.beadifulgifts.com.

2) Connections. Attach 5' of

thread to one of the bezels, leaving a 20" tail and exiting through a 3-bead edge set. String 3A, 1B, and 3A; pass through a 3-bead edge set of a second bezel. String one 6mm crystal round.

n

Fig. 8: Attaching one half of the clasp

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project

pharaoh’s daughter Ma r c i a D e C o s t e r

The rich texture and smart shaping of this crenulated collar are achieved by using graduated sizes of seed beads and gathering a strip of right-angle weave into a ruffle.

techniques

:: right-angle weave :: peyote stitch :: fringe

See pp. 35–36 for helpful technique information.

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1) Rib 1. Use 3' of doubled thread, seed beads, and right-angle weave to work the first rib: Row 1, Unit 1: String 1A and 3B; tie a knot to form a tight circle and pass through the first 2 beads. Row 1, Unit 2: String 2B and 1A; pass through the last B exited from the previous unit and the 2B just added. Row 1, Unit 3: String 1A and 2B; pass through the last B exited from the previous unit and the 1A and first B just added. Row 1, Units 4–8: Repeat Units 2 and 3 until you have a strip 8 units wide. Weave through beads to exit from the A added in the final unit (Fig. 1).

Work across the row with 3C in each unit. Row 5: Work across the row with 1C/1B/1C in each unit. Row 6: Work across the row with 1B/1A/1B in each unit (Fig. 4). Row 4:

Rib 2

Rib 1

{

{

Materials

8 g olive matte size 15° seed beads (A) 6 berry AB size 15° seed beads 10 g bronze metallic size 11° seed beads (B) 23 g olive matte AB size 8° seed beads (C) 31 olivine AB2x 3mm crystal bicones 6 volcano 4mm crystal sequins 30 bronze 3mm fire-polished rounds 2 gold-filled 6×8mm magnetic clasps Smoke 4 lb braided beading thread

Tools

Scissors Size 12 beading needle

Finished size: 16"

Fig. 4: Ribs 1 and 2

3) Ribs 3–10. Repeat Rib 2 eight more

Fig. 1: Working Row 1, Rib 1

Work across Row 1 using 3A in each unit (Fig. 2).

times.

Row 2:

Fig. 2: Row 2 of Rib 1

Fig. 7: Working a 2-unit decrease in Rib 17

Work the ribs as before but make a 1-unit decrease in Row 3 of each rib for a total of 10 (Fig. 8), 9, and 8 units respectively.

Ribs 20–22:

4) Increasing ribs. Work the ribs

as before, making increases at the beginning of Row 1: Rib 11: Repeat the bead pattern for Rib 2 but work a 1-unit increase at the end of Row 1 so the rib is 9 units wide (Fig. 5).

Repeat Row 2. Fig. 8: Working a 1-unit decrease in Rib 20 Row 4: Work across the row using 3B in each unit. Row 5: Work across the row using 3C 6) Remaining ribs. Work the rein each unit. maining ribs as before: Fig. 5: Working a 1-unit increase to begin Rib 11 Row 6: Work across the row using 1C Ribs 23–30: Repeat Rib 2 eight more (side)/1B (top)/1C (side) in each unit. Ribs 12 and 13: Repeat Rib 11, increastimes. Row 7: Work across the row using Rib 31: Repeat Rib 2; work 1 more row ing by 1 more unit in each rib so 1B/1A/1B in each unit (Fig. 3). using 3A in each unit and 1 more Rib 12 is 10 units wide and Rib 13 row using 3B in each unit. is 11 units wide. Ribs 14–16: Work the ribs as before but make 2-unit increases in Row 1 of each rib for a total of 13 (Fig. 6), 15, and 17 units respectively. Artist’s Tip Row 3:

Fig. 3: Completing Rib 1

2) Rib 2. Continue working right-angle

weave using beads in the following order to create the second rib: Rows 1 and 2: Work across the row with 3A in each unit. Row 3: Work across the row with 3B in each unit.

Fig. 6: Working a 2-unit increase to begin Rib 14

5) Decreasing ribs. Work the ribs as before, making decreases in Row 3: Ribs 17–19: Work the ribs as before but make a 2-unit decrease in Row 3 of each rib for a total of 15 (Fig. 7), 13, and 11 units respectively.

It is quite easy to decrease accidentally when changing bead sizes in right-angle weave. Thus, it is helpful to count the number of units at the end of each row to confirm the correct number before moving on to the next row.

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7) Clasps. Securely sew the clasp

halves to the ends of the necklace, one between Units 2 and 3 and one between Units 6 and 7 (Fig. 9). Secure the thread and trim. Set the collar aside.

Slide the tube over the clasps attached to Rib 31. Arrange the tube so the sequins face up and the tube’s edge nearest the beadwork touches Row 3. Securely stitch the edge at the back of the tube to the back of the necklace. Secure the thread and trim.

Assembly:

necklace. Repeat from *, pulling gently after each addition to cause the beadwork to ruffle, until you reach the final rib (Fig. 11). Even the thread tension to form a smooth curve. Secure the thread and trim. F

Fig. 11: Gathering the beadwork into a ruffle

Fig. 9: Attaching the clasps

8) Clasp cover. Use 3' of doubled

thread to create a beaded tube: Tube: Peyote-stitch a strip 10 beads wide and 48 rows long using 1B in each stitch. Fold the tube so the first and last rows interlock. Weave the beads together to zip the strip into a tube. Fringe: Weave through beads to exit toward the beadwork, from a center B on the tube. *String 1 sequin and 1 berry size 15°; pass back through the sequin and the next center B on the tube (Fig. 10). Repeat five times to add a total of 6 sequins.

Fig. 10: Embellishing the clasp cover

9) Final shaping. Start a 2' dou-

bled thread that exits from the first side C of Rib 1 on the inside of the collar. *String 1 bicone and pass through the next side C on the inside of the necklace. String 1B, 1 fire-polished round, and 1B; pass through the next rib’s first side C on the inside of the

marcia decoster is a bead artist, beadweaving instructor, and author of Marcia DeCoster's Beaded Opulence: Elegant Jewelry Projects with Right-Angle Weave (Lark Books, 2009). She lives in San Diego and considers her job perfect: sharing her knowledge with others, meeting interesting beaders, and playing with beads. Visit Marcia's website, www.marciadecoster.com or read her blog at www.maddesignsbeads.blogspot.com.

Artist’s Tip  hen adding the clasps, W make sure you have matching magnets opposite one another.

Resources Check your local bead shop or contact: FireLine braided beading thread and all beads and findings: The Beading Frenzy, (650) 347-2323, www.thebeadingfrenzy.com.

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project

terracita bracelet Ma r c i a D e C o s t e r

Every year, Marcia travels to the quiet coastal town of Manzanillo, Mexico, loaded down with design inspiration and beads. In December 2004, she brought with her a book containing Frank Hess– designed costume jewelry from the 1950s. A bracelet designed with rose montée-studded medallions caught her eye and inspired her to create similar shapes encrusted with crystals and fire-polished beads and joined end to end.

technique

:: right-angle weave

See pp. 35–36 for helpful technique information.

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1) Medallion base.

Use 4' of thread to string 16B; tie a knot with the tail thread to form a circle. Pass through the first 2 beads to begin the first round of circular right-angle weave: Unit 1: String 8B; pass through the last 2 beads passed through and the first 2B just strung (Fig. 1). Round 1:

thread direction for each unit. String 4B; pass down through the first 2 beads of the first unit, back through 2 beads of the circle, through the last 2 beads of the previous unit and the first 2 beads

Unit 8:

Materials 10 g bronze luster size 15° seed beads (A) 15 g olivine gold luster size 11° seed beads (B) 5 g green luster size 11° seed beads (C) 24 olivine AB 4mm crystal bicones 72 black 4mm fire-polished rounds 96 green mottled 4×2mm nailheads 1 gold 6×8mm magnetic clasp* Beading thread in color to match beads

Tools

Scissors Size 12 beading needle

Finished Size: 8¼" Fig. 4: Finishing Round 1 Fig. 1: Working Unit 1

String 6B; pass back through the next 2 beads of the circle, up through the last 2 beads of the previous unit, through the 6 beads just strung and the next 2 beads of the circle (Fig. 2).

Unit 2:

just strung (Fig. 4). Round 2: String 7B and pass through the last 2 beads passed through and

2) Embellishment. Cover the base net with accent and seed beads: Filling: Pass through a pair of beads between 2 units in the second round. String 1 nailhead and pass through the next pair of beads (Fig. 7). Continue around to add a nailhead to each unit in Round 2, then repeat to add a 4mm bead to each unit in Round 1.

Fig. 5: Starting Round 2 Fig. 2: Stitching Unit 1

String 6B and pass through the last 2 beads of the previous unit, the last 2 beads of the circle, and the first 2 beads just strung (Fig. 3).

Unit 3:

the first 2 beads just strung (Fig. 5). Continue working right-angle weave, stringing 5B and passing through 2 beads of the previous round in alternating directions for each unit; string 3B to complete the sixteenth unit (Fig. 6). Fig. 7: Filling the Units of Round 2

Exit from a bead between Rounds 1 and 2. String 3A and pass through the next 2 beads; continue around for a total of 16 picots (Fig. 8). Center: Exit from a bead in the foundation circle. String 1 bicone, skip 2 beads, and pass through the following 2 beads; repeat three times to add 4 bicones to the center of Picots:

Fig. 3: Working Unit 3

Repeat Units 2 and 3, stringing 6B and alternating the

Units 4-7:

Fig. 6:

Finishing Round 2

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3) Connections. Work 2 right-

Fig. 8: Adding picots

the medallion. Pass through the first bicone, string 1A, and pass through the next bicone; continue around (Fig. 9). Pass through the

angle-weave units along the edge of a medallion, using 2 of the edge beads and 6C to form the first unit. Work 2 more units using C beads, passing through edge beads of a second medallion, to make a 4-unit connection (Fig. 10). Embellish each unit with a nailhead as before, then weave through all the beads to reinforce the connection. Pass through beads to the opposite edge, and repeat to connect the next medallion.

Fig. 11: Attaching the clasp

marcia decoster is a bead artist, beadweaving instructor, and author of Marcia DeCoster’s Beaded Opulence: Elegant Jewelry Projects with Right-Angle Weave (Lark Books, 2009). She lives in San Diego and considers her job perfect: sharing her knowledge with others, meeting interesting beaders, and playing with beads. Visit Marcia's website, www.marciadecoster.com or read her blog at www.maddesignsbeads.blogspot.com.

Resources Fig. 9: Working the center

bicones and seed beads several times to reinforce. Weave through beads to exit from the outer edge of the last round. Pass through all the edge beads, pulling the thread tight to snug the beads together and shape the medallion; pass through the beads again to reinforce, then set aside. Repeat Steps 1–2 for a total of 6 medallions.

Fig. 10: The right-angle-weave connections

4) Clasp. Using C beads, work a

Check your local bead shop or contact: Swarovski crystals and seed beads: Out On A Whim, (800) 232-3111, whimbeads .com. Nailheads: Creative Castle, (805) 499-1377, www.creativecastle.com.

4-unit strip at the end of the bracelet, opposite from the last connection. Work a fifth unit and attach one half of the clasp (Fig. 11). Weave through beads several times to reinforce, secure the thread, and trim. Attach the other half of the clasp to the underside of the first medallion near the center of beads. F

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project

egyptian collar S h e ll e y N y ba k k e

This mighty necklace’s multilayer right-angle-weave rectangles are woven separately and then connected with loops of beads.

technique

:: right-angle weave

See pp. 35–36 for helpful technique information.

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1) Rectangle. Use seed and cube

beads to work a 3-layer rectangle with right-angle weave: Layer 1: Use 6' of thread and seed beads to work a right-angle-weave rectangle 9 units long and 4 rows wide. Weave through beads to exit toward the work from the bead that connects the last 2 units made (Fig. 1a). Layer 2 (vertical beads): String 1 seed bead and pass through the next Layer 1 vertical seed bead; pull the thread tight until the bead clicks into place. Repeat to add a total of 3 seed beads. Weave through the next 2 Layer 1 beads to begin the next row (Fig. 1b). Repeat this row seven times to add a total of 24 beads.

the end of this layer (Fig. 3a). String 1 seed bead; pass through the next Layer 2 horizontal bead. Pull tight so the bead clicks into place. Repeat down the strip to add a total of 6 seed beads. Weave through the next 2 Layer 2 beads to begin the next row (Fig. 3b). Repeat this step to add a total of 12 beads. a

Tools

b a Fig. 3: Layer 3 horizontal beads indicated in purple

b

Materials

100 g raw brass size 11° metal seed beads 1 turquoise 4×6mm rondelle 691 raw brass 2.5mm metal cornerless cubes 1 raw brass 5mm dimpled round 1 brass 17×17.5mm dragonfly link 2 brass 18mm square links 1 brass 1" head pin 1 brass 1½" eye pin 3 brass 5mm 18-gauge jump rings 1 brass 8×13mm lobster clasp 4" of brass 6×9mm etched oval chain Smoke 20 lb braided beading thread

Use cubes to work off the beads already added in this layer for a total of 7 right-angleweave units (Fig. 4). Secure the thread and trim. Set aside.

Scissors Size 10 needle Wire cutters Chain-nose pliers Round-nose pliers

Finished size: 19"

(adjustable to 21")

Layer 3 (cubes):

Fig. 1: Layer 2 vertical beads indicated in orange

Use seed beads to work off the Layer 2 vertical beads to complete 21 right-angle-weave units, adding a total of 28 beads (Fig. 2).

Layer 2 (horizontal beads):

last one exited on the first rectangle (this completes the top half of the loop). String 4 seed beads, 1 cube, and 4 seed beads; pass up through the last bead exited on the first rectangle to form an oval loop, connecting the rectangles (this completes the bottom half of the loop). Weave through beads to exit down through the next Layer 1 horizontal side bead on the long side of the first rectangle (Fig. 5).

Fig. 4: Adding the Layer 3 cubes

Repeat entire step twelve times for a total of 13 rectangles.

Fig. 2: Layer 2 horizontal beads indicated in green

Weave through beads to exit toward the work from a horizontal bead left of center at

Layer 3 (seed beads):

2) connecting Loops. Connect the rectangles with loops of seed and cube beads: Loop 1: Start 6' of thread that exits up through 1 rectangle’s top right horizontal bead on the long side. String 4 seed beads, 1 cube, and 4 seed beads; pass down through the bead on a second rectangle that mirrors the

Fig. 5: Connecting 2 rectangles

Repeat the stringing sequence from Loop 1 to connect the second side beads of the 2 rectangles.

Loop 2:

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For this and the following loops, be sure that the top half of the loop remains above the bottom half of the prior loop (the loop halves will begin to stack). Weave through beads to exit from the rectangle’s third side bead. Loops 3 and 4: Connect the 2 rectangles as before, stringing 4 seed beads, 2 cubes, and 4 seed beads for the front and back halves of the loop. Weave through beads to exit from the first rectangle’s next side bead. Loops 5 and 6: Repeat as before, stringing 4 seed beads, 3 cubes, and 4 seed beads for each half of the loop. Loops 7 and 8: Repeat as before, stringing 4 seed beads, 4 cubes, and 4 seed beads for each half of the loop. Loop 9: Repeat as before, stringing 4 seed beads, 5 cubes, and 4 seed beads for each half of the loop. Repeat entire step five times to connect a total of 7 rectangles. Connect 3 rectangles to one end of the necklace, replacing the 4 seed bead/cube/4 seed bead sequences with 6 seed bead/cube/6 seed bead sequences; repeat to add 3 rectangles at the other end of the necklace in the same manner. 3) End loops. Form seed-bead

loops to connect the ends of the necklace to the square links: Start 6' of thread so it exits up through the middle Layer 1 horizontal bead on the long side of one end of the necklace.

String 14 seed beads and 1 square link and pass through the last rectangle bead exited. Weave through beads to exit down through the next Layer 1 horizontal side bead (Fig. 6). String 14 seed beads; pass through the square link in the same direction as before and down through the rectangle bead last exited. Weave through beads to exit up through the next Layer 1 horizontal side bead. Repeat entire step down the side using 16–18 seed beads instead of 14 for the last 2 loops. Weave through beads to repeat the loop sequence on the other half of the same rectangle, making sure all the loops lie in the same direction. Secure the thread and trim. Repeat entire step on the other end of the necklace to attach the remaining square link. 4) Clasp. Add an embellished extender chain and clasp to the links: Extender: Use 1 jump ring to connect 2½" of chain to 1 of the square links. Chain embellishment: Use the eye pin to string the rondelle and 5mm round; form a wrapped loop that attaches to the free end of the previous chain. Open the eye-pin loop as you would a jump ring and string the head end of the dragonfly link; close the loop. Use the head pin to string 1 seed bead; form a simple loop that connects to the tail end of the dragonfly link (Fig. 7).

Artist’s Tip For added sparkle, replace the cornerless cubes with 3mm crystal bicones or rounds. To avoid thread breakage when working with crystals, switch to a double strand of 10 lb braided beading thread and a size 12 needle. Shelley Nybakke owns The Bead Parlor in Bloomington, Illinois, where she also teaches a variety of classes. She has the wonderful privilege of traveling and teaching workshops around the country. She thinks a day without beads is hardly ever worth getting out of bed for.

Resources Check your local bead shop or contact: FireLine braided beading thread and all beads and findings: The Bead Parlor, (309) 827-7708, www.thebeadparlor.com.

Fig. 7: Embellishing the clasp chain

Use a jump ring to connect the clasp to one end of 7/8" of chain. Use the remaining jump ring to connect the free end of the previous chain to the remaining square link. F

Clasp:

Fig. 6: Attaching one end to 1 link

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project

starshine jewel S c a r l e t t la n s o n

techniqueS

:: tubular right-angle weave :: tubular peyote stitch :: ladder stitch :: h erringbone stitch variation :: picot :: fringe :: spot stitch

See pp. 35–36 for helpful technique information.

This stunning and versatile accessory features an otherworldly fancy stone framed with crystals and a dramatic flash of labradorite accents. The piece is woven with an embellished version of herringbone stitch and closed with a matching embroidered silk ribbon. More wonderful beadwork projects are available at interweavestore.com Š 2010 Interweave Press LLC. Not to be reprinted. All rights reserved. page 28


1) Bezel. Use 3' of thread and tight

tension to work tubular right-angle weave and peyote stitch, creating a bezel for the fancy stone: Round 1: Use C to stitch a strip of rightangle weave 23 units long and 1 unit high. Connect the first and last units by stringing 1C and passing down through the end 1C of Unit 1. String 1C and pass up through the end 1C of Unit 23 and the first 1C strung for this unit (Fig. 1). Pull tight to draw the strip into a ring.

2) Embellishment. Work rounds of simple fringe off the bezel: Round 1 (fringe): String 1 sand opal bicone and 1C; pass back through the bicone to form a fringe. Pass through the next bottom 1C in the round (Fig. 4). Repeat around to add

Fig. 4: Adding the first round of fringe

Fig. 1: Stitching Round 1 into a ring

String 1B and pass through the next 1C at the edge of the ring; repeat, peyote-stitching around, to add a total of 24B (Fig. 2).

Bottom, Round 2:

Fig. 2: Working Round 2 at the bottom of the bezel

Work around in peyote stitch with 1A in each stitch. Weave through beads to exit from 1C at the other edge of Round 1. Top, Round 2: Work around in rightangle weave using A, pausing a quarter of the way around to set the fancy stone, faceup, into the beadwork (Fig. 3). Continue working Bottom, Round 3:

a total of 24 fringes. Weave through Round 1 of the bezel to exit a horizontal C, toward the bottom of the bezel. Round 2 (fringe): Pass through the next 2 C of the right-angle weave unit to the right. String 1A, 1 purple haze bicone, and 1A; pass back through the bicone, string 1A, and pass down through the nearest horizontal C to the left in Round 1 of the bezel to form a fringe. Pass through the next 2 C of the current right-angle weave unit. String 1A, 1 purple haze bicone, and 1A; pass back through the bicone, string 1A. Pass down through the nearest horizontal C to the right to form another fringe. Repeat around to add a total of 24 fringes (Fig. 5). Weave through beads to exit the bezel from 1C, at the top of Round 1.

Fig. 3: Working Round 2 at the top of the bezel

right-angle weave with A, pulling the beadwork tight against the fancy stone with each stitch and connecting the first and last units as in Round 1. Weave through the round again to tighten and reinforce, closing any gaps so the fancy stone is firmly seated. Weave through beads to exit 1C at the bottom of Round 1.

Fig. 5: Working the second round of fringe

String 1 rondelle and pass through the next top 1C of the bezel’s Round 1. Repeat to add a total of 24 rondelles. Secure the thread and trim. Set the bezel aside.

Round 3:

Materials

3 g palladium size 15° seed beads (A) 10 g matte metallic silver green iris size 11° seed beads (B) 3 g metallic silver green iris size 11° seed beads (C) 2 g transparent silver size 11° seed beads (D) 24 clear purple haze 3mm crystal bicones 44 light rose satin 4mm crystal bicones 69 sand opal 4mm crystal bicones 1 clear starlight 18×25mm crystal oval fancy stone 93 labradorite 3×1.5–2mm faceted rondelles 2 labradorite 6mm faceted briolettes 13" of brown 4mm silk cord Smoke 6 lb braided beading thread

Tools

Size 12 beading needles Scissors

Finished size: 1¼ × 7" Artist’s Tips • Experiment with different colors and textures of cord, such as suede or velvet. You can also switch the cords to match your outfit. • Cull your beads before working Round 3 of Step 2 to choose 24 of the skinniest rondelles (about 1.5mm thick) for the bezel’s gemstone embellishment row (it’s unwise to force a too-thick stone into this round). If you find that these skinnier rondelles have holes too small to pass through, remove your needle and thread the bead without it (you won’t be passing through these rondelles again, so you won’t need to worry about getting a second thread to pass through).

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3) Long band. Leaving a 12" tail, use 3' of thread and modified herringbone stitch to work the long half of the bracelet band: Base: Work a strip of ladder stitch 2B high and 9B long, leaving an 8" tail. Exit up through the last 1B added. Row 1: String 1B, 1A, and 1B; skip 1 base B and pass down through the next 2 base Bs and up through the following 2B. Repeat across the row to form 3 picots. Step up for the next row by looping under the thread between the bottom base beads, passing up through the last 2 base Bs exited, and through the final bead added in this row (Fig. 6). Fig. 6: Finishing Row 1 of the long band

String 1B, pass through the previous row’s nearest A, string 1B, and pass down through the next B of the previous row; string 1C and pass up through the next B in the previous row. Repeat across the row. To complete the row, pass down through the first B added in the previous row. String 1 sand opal bicone and 1D; pass back through the bicone and up through the final B added in this row (Fig. 7).

Row 2:

one side of Round 3 at the back of the bezel; keep the band centered (Fig. 10). Fig. 8: Adding fringe at the end of Row 3

rose instead of 1 sand opal bicone. Row 5: Repeat Row 3, using As in place of the rondelles and using 1 light rose instead of the sand opal bicone. Rows 6–69: Repeat Rows 2–5 sixteen times. Row 70: Repeat Row 3. Rows 71–74: Repeat Rows 4, 5, 2, and 3, in that order, omitting the bicone fringes. Make the step-ups for each row by looping between threads. Secure the working thread and trim; do not trim the tail thread. Set the long band aside. Buttonholes: Leaving a 6" tail, use 2' of thread to work a new piece of beadwork by repeating the base row and Rows 1 and 2 of this step, omitting the bicone. Repeat Row 3, but instead of adding new rondelles, stitch into the matching rondelles of the long band’s Row 71; omit the bicone. Stitch 1B into the gap on the outer left edge of the band; weave the tail thread through beads to stitch 1B to the outer right side of the band (Fig. 9). Weave the working and tail threads through the beadwork around the buttonholes to reinforce; secure the threads and trim.

the long band to one side of the bezel

4) Short band. Create a band as before: Band: Repeat the base row and Rows 1–14

(ending on a repeat of Row 3) of Step 3 to create a band 1" long; set aside. Buttonholes: Leaving a 6" tail, use 2' of thread to work a new piece of beadwork by repeating the base row and Rows 1–6 of Step 3, but switch the specified bicone colors (use light rose for sand opal, and vice versa). Repeat Row 3 of Step 3, stitching into the rondelles of the 1" band’s Row 14 to create buttonholes. Weave through the edge beads and add the light-rose fringe necessary to continue the pattern down the sides of the band. Weave through the beadwork around the buttonholes to reinforce; secure the threads and trim. Attachment: Use the short-band’s tail thread to attach its base row to the opposite side of the bezel, stitching through Round 3 and keeping the band centered as before. 5) Cord. Tie a knot at the end of 3' of

Fig. 7: Working Row 2 of the long band

String 1B, 1 rondelle, and 1B; pass down through the next 1B, the adjacent 1C, and up through the next 1B. Repeat once. For the final stitch, string 1B, 1 rondelle, and 1B; pass down through the next 2B. String 1 sand opal bicone and 1D; pass back through the bicone and up through the final 1B added in this row (Fig. 8). Row 4: Repeat Row 2, passing through rondelles instead of As and using 1 light

Fig. 10: Stitching

thread, leaving a 10" tail. Stitch into the cord ¼" from one end at the seam. String 1A, stitch into the cord right next to the last stitch, and exit ¼" farther down the seam (Fig. 11); repeat down the length of the seam, leaving ¼" of bare cord at the end.

Row 3:

Fig. 9: Creating buttonholes

Use the long band’s tail thread to securely stitch the B at the end of the base row to 7 of the As on

Attachment:

Fig. 11:

Spotstitching the cord

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String 10A, wrap the beads around the cord, and pass through them again to create a ring; pull tight. Work 6 rounds of tubular peyote stitch using 1A in each stitch. Trim any excess cord so it is flush with the end of the tube. Stitch into the cord and exit from the end. String 1 briolette; pass back into the cord end and into the peyote-stitched tube; repeat the thread path to reinforce. Weave through the tube beads to exit from the last round. Work 2 more rounds

Ends:

of tubular peyote stitch using 1A in each stitch so the beadwork frames the base of the briolette. Secure the thread and trim. Use the tail thread to finish the opposite end of the cord in the same manner. Assembly: Overlap the ends of the bracelet so the short band covers the long band, with the buttonholes aligned. Weave one cord end up through one hole and the other cord end up through the second hole. Tie a bow to secure. F

Artist’s Tip

Scarlett Lanson has discovered many new and ingenious ways to stitch with seed beads. Her creative uses of crystals, gemstones, and pearls in tandem with woven beadwork make her designs stand out. She intends to publish an inspirational book for beaders and run her own bead store in the future. Visit her website at www.thebeaders muse.com and contact her at scarlatte424@ yahoo.com.

Resources

 his design is absolutely stunning as a choker. Simply create a T longer embellished cord, thread all of the buttonholes, and tie the ends together at the back. Wear the focal off to the side for a glamorous and fashionable look.

Check your local bead shop or contact: Kits, including Swarovski crystal bicones and fancy stone (#4120), FireLine braided beading thread, and all other beads and findings: Scarlett Lanson, scarlatte424@ yahoo.com, www.thebeadersmuse.com.

Pump Up Your Peyote Stitch Join artist and author Melinda Barta in 6 watch-and-learn lessons as she shows you step by step how to create jewelry with one of seed-beaders' favorite stitches. Master flat, circular, and tubular peyote basics and learn how to step them up a notch with advanced variations and embellishments to add texture, trim, and more! Order your copy today to: • Get started the right way with a comprehensive tools and materials overview. • Learn must-know odd- and even-count stitches and shaping techniques. • Create pieces even faster with two-drop techniques for quick stitching. • Have even more fun with seed beads with 5 easy embellishments. • Discover the formula for creating your own one-of-a-kind patterns. • And more!

Watch a Sneak Peek Today at interweavestore.com/PeyoteDVD

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project

ellipse necklace Ma r c i a D e C o s t e r

This elegant necklace draws visual power from the strong geometry in its curved and layered rightangle-weave pendant.

techniqueS :: r ight-angle weave :: peyote stitch :: picot :: ladder stitch

See pp. 35–36 for helpful technique information.

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Materials

P e n d ant

1) Square. Use E to work a right-

angle-weave square (Fig. 1a) that will a later be turned and used as the pendant’s central diamond: Side 1: Use 5' of thread to stitch a strip of right-angle weave 9 units long and 3 rows wide. b Side 2: Work 3 units and turn. Work back and forth on these 3 units for a total of 6 short rows (you will now have an L-shaped 9-by-9 unit). Side 3: Weave through beads to exit the inside edge of the final row of c Side 2 and work a new row of 3 units. Work back and forth on these 3 units for a total of 6 short rows (you will Fig. 1: Working the central square and first ellipse now have a U-shaped 9-by-9 unit). Side 4: Weave through beads to exit the corresponding 3 edge beads of the inside edge of the final row of the adjacent side of the square. Side 3 and work 3 units. Work one Repeat entire step on the opposite more 3-unit row. Join the last row corner of the square to create an upper of Side 4 to the beads of Side 1 to ellipse. Secure the thread and trim. complete the square. Set the blue pendant layer aside. Repeat Steps 1 and 2, this time using 2) Ellipses. Working off opposite C instead of A, and F instead of E to corners of the square, use E and A to make the bronze pendant layer. work 2 right-angle-weave ellipses: Side 1, Row 1: Weave through beads to 3) Layers and edges. Use G and exit the third edge bead from a right-angle weave to join the layers corner. Use 3E to work the first unit. along their outside edges (each unit Moving toward the corner, weave a will consist of 1E, 1G, 1F, and 1G). second unit using 1E for the bottom Work 1 row of right-angle weave bead and 1A for the side bead. On using E along the entire outside edge the third unit, use 1A for both the of the blue layer. Note: To work the bottom and side beads (Fig. 1b). Side 1, Rows 2–11: Work 3 units across in the same bead-size pattern as Row 1. The work will curve. Side 1, Rows 12 and 13: Work 3 units across using all E. Weave through beads to exit the inside edge bead of Row 13. Side 2, Row 1: Work 1 unit of 3E. Moving toward the center of the curve, stitch a second unit using 1E for the top bead and 1A for the side bead. On the third unit, use 1A for both the top and side beads (Fig. 1c). Side 2, Rows 2–9: Work 3 units across in the same bead-size pattern as Fig. 2: Working the extra row of E and Side 2, Row 1. Join the final row to the point increase

12 metallic gold size 15° seed beads 1 g blue metallic size 15° seed beads (A) 2 g dark bronze size 15° seed beads (B) 1 g bronze size 15° hex-cut beads (C) 1 g silver-lined orange size 15° seed beads (D) 5 g blue metallic size 11° seed beads (E) 3 g dark bronze size 11° seed beads (F) 1 g light brown AB size 11° seed beads (G) 1 g reddish bronze size 11° cylinder beads (H) 12 topaz AB 4mm crystal sequins Smoke 4 lb braided beading thread

Tools

Scissors Size 11 beading needle

Finished size: 25"

(with 1¾

5" pendan t)

corners, add an additional unit of right-angle weave using 3E (Fig. 2). 4) Bail. Start 3' of new thread that exits

from the outside edge of the third unit left of the tip on the blue layer’s upper ellipse. Repeat Rows 1–11 of Step 2, using E along the outside as before and C (instead of A) along the inside edge (Fig. 3). Fold the strip in half and join the

Fig. 3: First half of the bail

last row to the same blue layer’s edge beads that are attached to the first row. Repeat on the other side of the blue layer’s upper ellipse to make a second bail to mirror the first.

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×


artist’s Tip To increase your speed, choose a manageable thread length no longer than about 5'. Thread longer than this will actually slow you down. The time it takes to weave in a new thread is minimal compared to the extra pulls of thread, plus the time spent to overcome possible tangles. 5) Embellishment line. Weave

through beads to exit from an inside C at the tip of the bronze layer. String 1D; pass through the side 1C of the next row’s adjacent unit. Repeat to create an orange line along the inside edge of the ellipse (Fig. 4a), continuing through the outside edge of the square (Fig. 4b), into

a

b

Fig. 4: Embellishing the bronze layer

the corresponding B of the next ellipse, and up the other side of the square. Secure the thread and trim.

N e ck lac e

6) Beaded beads. Use sequins,

cylinder beads, and seed beads to peyote-stitch a beaded bead (Fig. 5): Tube: Use 4' of thread to peyote-stitch a rectangle 9H wide and 28 rows long. Zip the ends together to form a tube. Weave through beads to exit 1H at the tube’s edge.

Fig. 5: Beaded bead

String 3E; pass down through the next edge bead and up through the following. Repeat around to add a total of 7 picots. Repeat to add picots along the other edge of the tube. Weave through beads to exit 1H at the midpoint of the tube. Sequins: String 1 sequin and 1 metallic gold size 15°; pass back through the sequin and through the next 1H. Weave through beads to exit 1H four rows away; repeat to add a total of 6 sequins. Weave through beads to exit from an H edge bead. Rim: Ladder-stitch a strip of 20D. Position the strip along the edge around the tube and stitch the first and last beads together to form a ring. Sew through the strip and the tube edge every few beads to tack the strip in place. Repeat on the other end of the tube. Do not cut the thread. Repeat entire step for a second beaded bead. Picots:

7) Rope. Work a tubular right-angleweave rope 5 units around and 25" long, using 1E for both the top and bottom and 1B for the sides of each unit. Before joining the ends together, use the rope to string 1 beaded bead, the bail, and 1 beaded bead. Use the working thread from the beaded beads to sew them into place on the rope, 1½" from each side of the bail. F

artist’s Tips • Although it is never our intent, occasionally a favorite piece may require repair. In preparation for this possibility, Marcia always fills a ziplock bag with a few of each bead used in the design and labels it with the project name. These bags live in her “to repair” drawer should she ever need to utilize their contents. • Marcia finds she is often inspired to create a palette for a design before she’s ready to bead it. She fills a small pencil box with the chosen beads, labels the intended project, and places it in her “to be beaded” pile. marcia decoster is a bead artist, beadweaving instructor, and author of Marcia DeCoster’s Beaded Opulence: Elegant Jewelry Projects with Right-Angle Weave (Lark Books, 2009). She lives in San Diego and considers her job perfect: sharing her knowledge with others, meeting interesting beaders, and playing with beads. Visit Marcia's website, www.marciadecoster.com or read her blog at www.maddesignsbeads.blogspot.com.

Resources Check your local bead store or contact: FireLine braided beading thread and all other beads and findings: The Beading Frenzy, (650) 347-2323, www.thebeading frenzy.com.

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techniques Ladder stitch

Square stitch

R i g h t- A n g l e W e a v e

For single-needle right-angle weave ,

To decrease within a row, string 1 bead and skip a loop of thread on the previous row, passing under the second loop and back through the bead. To increase within a row, work two stitches in the same loop on the previous row.

Begin by stringing a row of beads. For the second row, string 2 beads, pass through the sec ond-to-l ast bead of the first row, and through the second bead just strung. Continue by stringing 1 bead, passing through the third-to-last bead of the first row, and through the bead just strung. Repeat this looping technique to the end of the row. For circular square stitch, string the first round of beads and pass through them again to form a circle. Start a new round by stringing 2 beads; pass through the last bead of the first round and through the 2 beads just strung. Repeat all around, passing through the next bead of the previous round for each 2 new beads strung. At the end of the round, pass through the whole round again to tighten the beads. Start a new round by stringing 2 beads; pass through the last bead of the previous round and through the 2 beads just strung. String 1 bead and pass through the next bead of the previous round and the bead just strung. Repeat around, stitching 1 or 2 beads to each bead of the previous round, adjusting the count as necessary to keep the work flat.

Fringe

Netting (single thread)

String 2 beads and pass through them again. String 1 bead. Pass through the last stitched bead and the one just strung. Repeat, adding 1 bead at a time and working in a figure-eight pattern. Use this stitch to make strings of beads or as the foundation for brick and herringbone stitches. Brick stitch

Begin by creating a foundation row in ­ladder stitch. String 2 beads and pass under the closest exposed loop of the found­ation row and back through the second bead. String 1 bead and pass under the next exposed loop and back through the bead just strung; repeat.

Exit from your foundation row of beads or fabric. String a length of beads plus 1 bead. Skipping the last bead, pass back through all the beads just strung to create a fringe leg. Pass back into the foundation row or fabric. Stringing

Stringing is a technique in which you use beading wire, needle and thread, or other material to gather beads into a strand.

Begin by stringing a base row of 13 beads. String 5 beads and pass back through the fifth bead from the end of the base row. String another 5 beads, skip 3 beads of the base row, and pass back through the next; repeat to the end of the row. To turn, pass back through the last 3 beads (one leg of the last net). String 5 beads, pass back through the center bead of the next net and continue.

R i g h t- A n g l e W e av e ( D o u bl e N e e d l e ) Start

D A

B

C

To begin double-needle right-angle weave, use one needle on each end of the thread to string 3 beads to the center of the thread. *Use one needle to string 1 bead, then pass the other needle back through it. String 1 bead on each needle, then repeat from * to form a chain of right-angle units (A). To turn at the end of the row, use the left needle to string 3 beads, then cross the right needle back through the last bead strung (B). Use the right needle to string 3 beads, then cross the left needle back through the last bead strung (C). To continue the row, use the right needle to string 2 beads; pass the left needle through the next bead on the previous row and back through the last bead strung (D).

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B

string 4 beads and C pass through the first 3 beads again to form D the first unit (A). For the rest of the row, A string 3 beads, pass through the last bead passed through in the previous unit, and the first 2 just strung; the thread path will resemble a figure eight, alternating directions with each unit. To begin the next row, pass through beads to exit the side bead of the last unit. String 3 beads, pass through the last bead passed through, and the first bead just strung (B). *String 2 beads, pass back through the next edge bead of the previous row, the last bead passed through in the previous unit, and the last 2 beads just strung (C). Pass through the next edge bead of the previous row, string 2 beads, pass through the last bead of the previous unit, the edge bead just passed through, and the first bead just strung (D). Repeat from * to complete the row, then begin a new row as before.


techniques F l at p e y o t e s t i t c h

One-drop peyote stitch begins by stringing an even number of beads to create the first two rows. Begin the third row by stringing 1 bead and passing through the second-to-last bead of the previous rows. String another bead and pass through the fourth-to-last bead of the previous rows. Continue adding 1 bead at a time, passing over every other bead of the previous rows.

H e rr i n g b o n e S t i t c h

Tubul a r Pe yote S titch

Begin with a foundation row of evencount ladder stitch. String 2 beads, pass down through the second-to-last bead in the ladder, and up through the next bead. String 2 beads, pass down the next bead and then up through the following. Repeat to the end of the row. To end the row, pass back through the last bead strung. To begin the next row, string 2 beads and pass down through the second-to-last bead of the previous row and up through the following bead. Repeat, stringing 2 beads per stitch and passing down then up through 2 beads of the previous row. The 2-bead stitch will cause the beads to angle up in each column, like a herringbone fabric.

String an even number of beads and make a foundation circle by passing through them two more times, exiting from the first bead strung. String 1 bead and pass through the third bead of the foundation circle. String 1 bead and pass through the fifth bead of the foundation circle. Continue adding 1 bead at a time, skipping over 1 bead of the first round, until you have added half the number of beads of the first round. Exit from the first bead of the second round. String 1 bead, pass through the second bead added in the second round, and pull thread tight. String 1 bead and pass through the third bead added in the second round. Continue around, filling in the “spaces” 1 bead at a time. Exit from the first bead added in each round.

Two-drop peyote stitch is worked the same as above, but with 2 beads at a time instead of 1. TENSION B EAD

A tension bead (or stopper bead) holds your work in place. To make one, string a bead ­larger than those you are working with, then pass through the bead one or more times, ­making sure not to split your thread. The bead will be able to slide along but will still provide ­tension to work against when you’re beading the first two rows. picot

F i n i s h i n g a n d S ta r t i n g New Threads

Tie off your old thread when it’s about 4" long by making a simple knot between beads. Pass through a few beads and pull tight to hide the knot. Weave through a few more beads and trim the thread close to the work. Start the new thread by tying a knot between beads and weaving through a few beads. Pull tight to hide the knot. Weave through several beads until you reach the place to resume beading.

To make a picot, string three (A) or five (B) beads and weave into the next high bead. This sequence is woven into the gaps of edge beading to create a lacy effect and is sometimes used to transition to decreasing stitches. A

Pa s s T h r o u g h v s Pa s s B a c k T h r o u g h

Pass through means to move your needle in the same direction that the beads have been strung. Pass back through means to move your needle in the opposite direction.

B

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