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s mras Your Monday morning cuppa HFI buzz!

31th Dec 2008

Christmas Eve in Mumbai

Yuletide Spirits Hit Bangalore

By Geetaa & Sukanya, Mumbai

17th December. A day that saw the Bangalore office bustling with action – people going out to buy gifts, menus being decided, games being planned, and masks being designed. Christmas indeed was a reason to end the year with a smile. The celebrations began with a heady mix of cocktails and mocktails concocted by our in-house bartenders Anirudh, Vivek and Anand. The evening then progressed to people exchanging gifts through our very own Santa, Satheesh, who arrived in complete Santa-regalia. Sarit and Narayan did a wonderful job of barbequing the chicken, albeit an hour’s effort of trying to get the coal lit up. Barbequed chicken, plum cake and biryani constituted the menu. After having their stomachs filled and their throats wet, all of them decided to have an impromptu session of Antakshari which actually went on for more than an hour and signaled the end of a fun-filled evening.

For all those who weren’t there for the party on Christmas Eve here’s what you guys missed well well we’re not talking about Santa distributing gifts nor did we find them under the beautifully decorated Christmas tree what you did miss was a celebration that left a smile on everyone’s face. The theme of this “Gastro Musical” celebration was “Red & White” and it was good to see that most people complied those who didn’t; for instance Saurabh, changed into red to suit the occasion later! So, the “Gastro” aspect included a traditional Christmas cake (awesome cake man wish they got a bigger one, though!), Vada Pav and some (cold) drinks. The “Music” aspect was about, well Music! Our very own HFI idols Vir and Saurabh mesmerized the crowd with their self composed, fusion music And here’s the News they’ve now formed a band called “Aaroh” which means ‘the Ascending Octave’ and we hope to get some free CDs of their first release very soon! The celebration also included a surprise breakdance performance by Kapil, who left us openmouthed with his repertoire of dance moves! We discovered some other hidden talents as the musical part of the celebration continued Apart from our known talents Ram, Khushboo and Sudhir, we also had Sonal, Kamlesh and Kapil singing some old Hindi songs, and trust us we must give a serious thought about having an “HFI Idol” competition!


Somras ||

31th Dec 2008

Your Monday morning cuppa HFI buzz!

Why I won't see Ghajini...

Exploiting the desire of order

By Renuka Pinto, Mumbai

By Ankit Shekhawat, Mumbai While doing some awaragardi in the blogosphere I stumbled upon a project I came across a project that is for greater mortals who can’t stand chaos and want to put things to order as soon as they spot it. The Aware Puzzle Switch project designed by Loove Broms and Karin Ehrnberger from Interactive institute, Stockholm is really is as simple as a series of light switches which “encourage people to switch off their light, by playing with people’s built-in desire for order.”

Firstly, it's a remake of a remake. The ‘lineage’ is basically : Memento > Southie Ghajini > Aamir's Ghajini. So what we are getting is a third-hand version of the original and brilliant film “Memento'“ by Christopher Nolan based on his brother's short story “Memento Mori”. The original is a must-watch film presented in a unique, non-linear style of story-telling that completely blew me away. The basic premise of Memento (and therefore Ghajini) is a man searching for his wife's killers. The hitch is that he also has a form of amnesia because of which he can't store any new memories. But the true genius of Memento is that the story is told in two alternating, separate narratives. The first is a black and white chronological sequence. This is alternated with the search for the killers which is shown in color in a reverse chronological order. As a viewer you have to keep track of everything and piece it together in your head as the movie unfolds. I felt like I needed some tattoos to help me remember what was happening throughout the movie.

The Aware Puzzle Switch - One type is shown above; below, a different design in ‘On’ (left) and ‘Off’ (right) positions.

Secondly, there's no credit given to the original guys. The least Aamir Khan can do during all his endless promotional videos of bulging biceps and six pack overdoses is pay tribute to the genius of the original creators. You have to see Memento to realize how much effort and craftsmanship has gone into its making. I personally have enjoyed many 'inspired' storylines e.g. Mrs Doubtfire translated as Chachi 420. But that was a light-hearted comedy and Chachi 420 had a completely different storyline from the original. Ghajini is a dumbed-down lift-off and I for one expect higher standards from an actor like Aamir Khan with a Taare Zameen Par and a Raakh behind him. From Somras: We have heard many people in the office express various views about Ghajini. Renuka’s article represents one such view. If you think differently, tell us why and we’ll be happy to publish your views too. A healthy debate is always welcome!

We would love it if you contributed movie / food / book reviews, news stories, photographs or any other fun stuff/happenings to somras@humanfactors.com. Your comments and feedback are also welcome.

The switches look ugly, out of order or have a lever hanging off the wall at a crazy angle (which would suggest to people that they ‘put it right’) while they are switched on. It can be easily argued about many of us would respond to stimulus of lack of order. However playing with design and human impulse could create interesting results. To what all areas can we extend these intersections. Are there any other impulses that we can exploit.? This one is particularly my favorites from Architecture of control archives ( A study of the way a technology is designed to control how its owners make use of it. ) primarily because how simple the idea is. This project was also showcased in Persuasive 08 conference this year.

Somras 31 December 2008  

31 December 2008