Issuu on Google+

SOMnews University

Dean’s Message:

of

Maryland School

What’s On My Mind

I wish to share some good news on our most recent AAMC research rankings. The 2005 data for grants and contracts are summarized in the slides pictured with this message. In terms of total direct research expenditures, among all 126 public and private medical schools, the SOM now ranks 18th overall (up from 22nd in 2004), as seen in Slide 1, and 8th among public medical schools (up from 9th place in 2004), as seen in Slide 2. Slide 3 shows that we ranked 3rd (up from 4th), among public medical schools in research grants and contracts expenditures per clinical faculty. Among public and private medical schools, our clinical faculty remained steady at 5th, as seen in Slide 4. Our basic science faculty ranked 21st in research expenditures per faculty in public medical schools (down from 14th in 2004), as indicated in Slide 5. This would not have been possible without the extraordinary efforts of our faculty and staff. Thank you once again for all of your hard work throughout the year. I feel confident that we will continue this trajectory despite the tight national research budget. Also, I hope you enjoy the bicentennial coverage in this special July issue of SOMnews. Very best regards for a productive, successful and rewarding year! Sincerely yours,

of

Medicine

J u ly 2 0 0 7 V o l . 8 N o . 1 1

1

2

E. Albert Reece, MD, PhD, MBA Vice President for Medical Affairs, University of Maryland John Z. and Akiko K. Bowers Distinguished Professor and Dean, School of Medicine

3

4

5

Bicentennial Update

The second half of the School of Medicine’s bicentennial year will feature baseball, an international radio broadcast, the final lecture in the Hippodrome series and community outreach programs. Details are available at www.sombicentennial.umaryland.edu. July 11–August 15: Mini-Med for Kids!

September 24: “Perspectives on the Central Nervous System” at the Hippodrome Theatre*s

For six consecutive Wednesday mornings, School of Medicine faculty will talk with children at the Salvation Army’s Franklin Square Boys and Girls Club, which sits in our West Baltimore neighborhood. For the first time, Mini-Med School will teach children ways to improve their health and how to stay healthy for life.

This will be the final evening in a year-long bicentennial lecture series. Joining School of Medicine speakers from 7–9 p.m., will be former U.S. Attorney General Janet Reno talking about Parkinson’s disease; CBS anchor and weatherman Mark McEwan talking about stroke; Nancy Wexler, PhD, a Huntington’s disease specialist from Columbia University; and Dr. Bob Arnot, former CBS and NBC health reporter and moderator for the series. There is no charge but tickets are required. Call 6.2007 or e-mail at 2007@som.umaryland.edu.

August 9: Flicks from the Hill* Relax on Federal Hill with fellow Baltimoreans as they watch Field of Dreams, featuring School of Medicine alum Archibald “Moonlight” Graham (Class of 1908), outside the Visionary Arts Museum. Sponsored by the School of Medicine, the movie starts at 9:00 p.m. The event is free; movie-type snacks will be provided. Contact Mary Cain, special events coordinator, at 6.3901 or mcain@som.umaryland.edu for more information.

August 13 and August 22: Project Medical Education National, state and local elected officials will become School of Medicine students for the day. The goal is to provide a firsthand understanding of the complexities and requirements of the biomedical education enterprise.

September 6: Celebrate the bicentennial with the O’s and Red Sox!s The School of Medicine has special group-rate tickets and an entire section reserved for Bicentennial Night at Camden Yards. Aside from the classic baseball rivalry and a chance to relax with friends and family, you can watch Dean E. Albert Reece throw the first pitch, cheer during the special scoreboard recognition and visit our booth in the Eutaw Street Concourse. Gates open at 5:30 p.m.; the game starts at 7:05 p.m. All tickets are $13 and go on sale July 5. You can pay by credit card online at www.sombicentennial.com. If you prefer to pay by check, e-mail your request to 2007@som.umaryland.edu.

October 13: “A Prairie Home Companion” live from the Hippodrome!*s Garrison Keillor and the gang from Lake Woebegone will broadcast their live radio show from the Hippodrome at 5:45 p.m., sponsored by the School of Medicine. Tickets go on sale August 13 through the Hippodrome and TicketMaster. For details, including prices, visit WYPR’s site at www.wypr.com.

November 4–5: Association of American Medical Colleges Annual Meeting, Washington, D.C.

Garrison Keillor

A bicentennial reception and exhibit will be among the highlights of the annual meeting of this organization of North American medical schools, teaching hospitals and academic societies.

November TBD: Research Expo 2007 School of Medicine faculty members will meet informally with health and science reporters based in the Mid-Atlantic region to showcase the breadth of our research. Please visit the bicentennial site at www.som.umaryland.edu for more information and to purchase items from the Bicentennial Boutique, send a virtual post card, or check out the 200 Facts. Details also are available at 6.2007. *open to the public stickets required


A Gala Celebration

Honors the School’s Bicentennial n May 18, 1,400 people gathered at the Baltimore Convention Center to celebrate the University of Maryland School of Medicine’s Bicentennial. The black-tie gala was attended by faculty, staff, students, alumni and friends, many of whom were in town for commencement and reunion weekend activities. The evening featured dinner, dancing and entertainment in a period setting that was befitting this unique event. Special guests included Governor Martin O’Malley, Michael Busch, Speaker of the Maryland House of Delegates and School of Medicine founder John Beale Davidge (portrayed by actor Alan Wade), who made a special appearance. As guests entered the Convention Center they were greeted by actors portraying key figures from the early days of the School of Medicine, such as Dr. Samuel Mudd, an 1869 graduate who treated John Wilkes Booth, and Dr. James Carroll, an 1891 graduate, who was instrumental in the discovery of the yellow fever vaccine.

One of the most interesting portrayals came from the grave robber, who, legend says, provided our early medical students with cadavers for dissection. During the pre-dinner reception, former classmates and recent graduates visited with each other, and alumni and faculty members reunited. A façade of Davidge Hall was the focal point of dinner in the ballroom, where the evening’s program began with welcome remarks from Dean Reece, followed by remarks from Governor O’Malley and honorary co-chairs Dr. Melvin Sharoky, ‘76, and his wife Alexias. John Beale Davidge shared his story as one of the founders of the University of Maryland School of Medicine. Descendants of Dr. Davidge and School of Medicine co-founder Dr. Nathaniel Potter were among the many political and campus dignitaries present for the gala event. Present meets past: Dean E. Albert Reece greets John Beale Davidge (portrayed by actor Alan Wade) on stage at the gala; the two discussed the School of Medicine’s achievements over the past 200 years and the potential for many more great accomplishments.

A Bicentennial Convocation for the Class of 2007

The Bicentennial Convocation for the Class of 2007 was held at the Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall the morning of May 18th. The ceremony involved a number of special guests, including representatives from the four medical schools older than the University of Maryland School of Medicine—Penn, Columbia, Harvard and Dartmouth—and Abraham Verghese, MD, MFA, MACP, DSc (Hon), whom the class chose as guest speaker. Plenty of friends and family were on hand as well to celebrate as the graduates received their doctoral hoods. As they gathered in their green-piped robes before the ceremony, the graduates couldn’t hide their excitement. “It’s a culmination of eight years of hard work and dedication,” said Ted Sung, L-R: Representatives from the four medical schools older who is going on to a residency in Emergency than Maryland, at pre-commencement with Dean Reece: Darrell G. Kirch, MD, president, AAMC; Dean Reece; Charles Medicine at North Shore University HosMannix, JD, MPA, associate dean and chief operating officer, pital in Manhasset, NY. “Years of learning Dartmouth Medical School, 1797; Daniel David Federman, professionalism and humanism and how to MD, senior dean for Alumni Relations and Clinical Teaching, be a healer.” Harvard Medical School, 1782; Lanny G. Close, MD, Howard W. Smith Professor of Otolaryngology, chair, Department of “It’s a great day,” said Catherine Zorc. Otolaryngology, Columbia University College of Physicians “We’ve worked really hard to get to this and Surgeons, 1767; and Alan G. Wasserstein, MD, vice point, and now we’re finally graduating. dean for Faculty Affairs, University of Pennsylvania School of Many of us have taken years off and done Medicine, 1765. other things, other careers, but we knew we wanted to be in medicine, and to have today finally come is very special.” Zorc’s residency is L-R: Members of the bicentennial Class of 2007 at pre-comin pediatrics at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, which she expects will be similar to mencement; Lilian Ebuoma, Lei Chen, Ketaki Abhyankar, Christine Adaniel and Stephanie Addison. the work she did as a teacher in the Baltimore City schools. “I’ll be working with the same population and working hard,” she said with a laugh. Christine Adaniel will head to a residency in internal medicine at New York University Hospital Center with “a lot of fond memories, great friendships and great faculty mentors to whom I can always come back and talk.” Stephanie Addison will carry with her to a pediatrics residency at Milton S. Hershey Medical Center in Pennsylvania two important life lessons. “Without family and support you are nothing,” she declared. “And always believe in yourself.” Lilian Ebuoma certainly did, even when it seemed she might never reach her dream of going to medical school. “I’ve been waiting for this day all my life!” raved Ebuoma, who served five years in the Navy as a corpsman before being accepted at the School of Medicine. She will serve L-R: Kunwardeep Sohal and Minghan “Leo” Tsay pose together before proa transitional residency at York Hospital in Pennsylvania cessing into the Meyerhoff auditorium. before going on to Massachusetts General to study diagnostic radiology. L-R: Dean E. Albert Reece, MD, PhD, MBA, stands with the three School All the graduates seemed to agree with Leo Tsay’s take on the day, “It’s great to finally of Medicine deans who directly preceded him; Donald E. Wilson, MD, MACP, John Murray Dennis, MD, and John H. Moxley, III, MD. be done!”

SOMnews

Could Modern


Stevie V. and The Heartattackers provided musical entertainment for the many gala guests who danced the night away.

A visual history of the School of Medicine unfolded on two jumbo screens as guests enjoyed dinner. Comedian Dennis Miller provided after-dinner entertainment and kept the crowd laughing while he remarked on topics ranging from politics to pollution. Class of ’75 alum, Richard “Rick” Taylor, MD, with his wife, After dinner, guests Kathy, take a memorable picture in front of the Davidge Hall danced to the tunes replica at the gala. of Stevie V. & The Heart Attackers. Led by alumnus Dr. Stephen Valenti, ’78, and comprised of numerous other School of Medicine alumni, they played a selection of hits from the 50’s to the present including rock, soul, Top 40 and swing. The band was formed in 1997, and during the past nine years has performed only once per year at a local fundraiser called Heartfest.

Tom Scalea, MD, professor, Department of Surgery, Sharon Henry, MD, associate professor, Department of Surgery, and Governor Martin O’Malley celebrate the bicentennial.

The bicentennial gala was made possible by generous corporate, departmental and alumni sponsors. The Medical Alumni Association of the University of Maryland, Inc, served as the presenting sponsor of the event; Whiting-Turner was the platinum bicentennial sponsor; and gold sponsors included Mercantile Bank, Provident Bank, Somerset Pharmaceuticals, Inc., the University of Maryland Medical System, University Physicians, Inc., and Dr. James Frenkil, Class of ’37, and Mrs. Carolyn McGuire Frenkil. Profits from the gala will help the Fund for Medicine assist the School of Medicine’s missions in medical education, biomedical research, patient care and community service.

School of Medicine bicentennial gala honorary co-chairs Melvin Sharoky, ’76, (far left) and his wife Alexias (far right), enjoy the night’s festivities with Richard Colgan, MD, associate professor, Department of Family & Community Medicine, and his wife, Deborah.

Trauma Care Have Saved Abraham Lincoln? Could President Abraham Lincoln survive a gunshot wound

frontal lobes of Lincoln’s brain were from an assassin’s bullet had it occurred in 2007 instead of 1865, due to modern spared. Since these lobes are home to advances in trauma care? If so, what would have been the impact on history? language, emotions and problem-solvThose questions were the focus of the 13th annual Historical Clinicopathoing, he says Lincoln’s cognitive abilities logical Conference (CPC) sponsored by the University of Maryland School would have remained intact. A slide from Dr. Scalea’s presentation of Medicine and the Veterans Affairs (VA) Maryland Health Care System in “The issue would have been his Baltimore. ability to express his ideas because of Held in Davidge Hall, this annual conference is devoted severe damage to other parts of the brain,” says Dr. Scalea. He says that to the modern medical diagnosis of disorders that affected with modern rehabilitation, unavailable in the 1860’s, Lincoln may have There is little question that been able to communicate. “We have all seen people make a seemingly prominent historical figures. More than 300 alumni, faculty President Lincoln would members, students and local history buffs attended the CPC, miraculous recovery,” he says. But he cautions, “Brain injury is very hard which was one of the School of Medicine’s bicentennial and have been disabled,” says to predict.” graduation events. Lincoln died within 10 hours of being shot on April 14, 1865. U.S. Dr. Scalea. “However, President Lincoln sustained a massive head wound after presidential historian Steven Lee Carson explored the question of the bullet from John Wilkes Booth’s derringer entered the whether there would have been chaos if Lincoln had lived. Carson is a I believe if he had been back of his head and stopped just behind his left eye, destroylecturer, author, playwright and editor as well as a commentator for radio brought to the Shock ing the left side of his brain in the process. and television who has spoken at the White House and the Kremlin. Trauma Center in 2007, At the conference, Thomas Scalea, MD, professor, DepartHe points out that the Constitution had no provision for presidential ment of Surgery, director, Program in Trauma, and physihis survival, while not guar- disability or incapacity in 1865. The 25th Amendment, proposed by the cian-in-chief at the R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center, anteed, would have been a 89th Congress 100 years later and ratified in 1967, describes the process explained how Lincoln would be treated at Shock Trauma. by which a president is declared unable to discharge the powers and du“There is little question that President Lincoln would have very reasonable expectation. ties of office and how the vice president becomes acting president. been disabled,” says Dr. Scalea. “However, I believe if he Carson says Edwin M. Stanton, Lincoln’s Secretary of War, took over had been brought to the Shock Trauma Center in 2007, his the government for about 24 hours because of initial concern of a possurvival, while not guaranteed, would have been a very reasonable expectation.” sible attempt to assassinate Vice President Andrew Johnson as well. These fears were Dr. Scalea says modern emergency medical care would involve rapid transfueled, in part, after Secretary of State William H. Seward and his family were attacked port to a qualified trauma center, may have included airway management in the in their home on Lafayette Square across from the White House on the same night field and would certainly have involved fluids and other supportive measures. Lincoln was shot. A Booth accomplice was indeed assigned to assassinate the vice Immediately upon arrival at Shock Trauma, sophisticated technology such as president, but got drunk instead. The man was later hanged with the other conspiraa CT scan would be used to image the wound and doctors would give medicators. Johnson was sworn in as president. tions to reduce the effects of brain swelling. Lincoln also would have undergone The Lincoln case is a departure from past conferences, when the name of the faa surgical procedure to remove accumulated blood and reduce pressure on his mous person whose death was being analyzed was kept secret until the end. In Lincoln’s brain. While nothing could undo the bullet’s damage, Dr. Scalea says efforts case, the details of his assassination are so well known, organizers decided to reveal his could be directed to prevent further damage, known as secondary brain injury. name in advance. He adds that advanced respiratory care, early nutrition and frequent re-imaging Philip Mackowiak, MD, professor and vice chair, Department of Medicine, and would all be utilized. Monitoring to measure brain pressure and/or cerebral blood director of medical care at the VA Maryland Health Care System, created the CPC. flow might also be helpful. He has authored a new book, Post Mortem: Solving History’s Great Medical Mysteries But beyond survival, would Lincoln have been able to communicate, relate (American College of Physicians, 2007), which re-examines 12 of the cases that have to his environment or make meaningful decisions? Dr. Scalea observes that the been presented at these CPCs.

SOMnews


Awards Breakfast Honors High-Achieving Graduates

Class of 2007

FACULTY GOLD Medal FOR OUTSTANDING QUALIFICATIONS FOR THE PRACTICE OF MEDICINE Lilian Olubukola Ebuoma Gary Thomas Schwartzbauer BALDER SCHOLARSHIP AWARD FOR OUSTANDING ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT Brent Albert Becker UHLENHUTH AWARD FOR EXCELLENCE IN THE ANATOMICAL SCIENCES Mitchell Adam Gutshall MARSHALL L. RENNELS AWARD FOR EXCELLENCE IN NEUROSCIENCE Gary Thomas Schwartzbauer ELIJAH ADAMS AWARD FOR EXCELLENCE IN BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY Owen Clayton Thomas

As part of graduation activities during the bicentennial year, student scholarships and awards were presented at a special breakfast.

THEODORE E. WOODWARD PRIZE IN INTERNAL MEDICINE Abigail Ames Lenhart THEODORE E. WOODWARD AWARD IN PHYSICAL DIAGNOSIS Paula Michelle Yellon LEONARD M. HUMMEL MEMORIAL AWARD FOR EXCELLENCE IN INTERNAL MEDICINE Scott Daniel Sherr MILTON S. SACKS AWARD IN HEMATOLOGY David Wing-Hang Lam DEAN’S AWARD FOR EXCELLENCE IN RESEARCH Michael H. Kwon LOUIS, IDA, AND SAMUEL COHEN AWARD FOR PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES OF SCHOLARSHIP, ABILITY AND COMPASSION FOR PATIENTS Tiffany Lynn Morton I. EARL PASS MEMORIAL AWARD FOR EXCEPTIONAL PROFICIENCY IN INTERNAL MEDICINE Audrey Olivia Segal C. JELLEF CARR AWARD FOR EXCELLENCE IN PHARMACOLOGY Gary Thomas Schwartzbauer SHELDON E. GREISMAN PRIZE IN MEDICAL PHYSIOLOGY Zaakir Khaliq Yoonas

WILLIAM ALEXANDER HAMMOND AWARD FOR EXCELLENCE IN NEUROLOGY Ishita Arya AMERICAN ACADEMY OF NEUROLOGY MEDICAL STUDENT PRIZE FOR EXCELLENCE IN NEUROLOGY Adelene Emerald Jann

A. BRADLEY GAITHER MEMORIAL AWARD FOR EXCELLENCE IN GENITOURINARY SURGERY Mark Steven Shimko

EDWARD J. KOWALEWSKI AWARD FOR EXCELLENCE IN EDUCATION AND TRAINING IN FAMILY MEDICINE Craig Daniel Sillick

THE SOCIETY FOR ACADEMIC EMERGENCY MEDICINE AWARD FOR EXCELLENCE IN EMERGENCY MEDICINE Alisa Mae Gibson

WILLIAM H. MOSBERG, JR., M.D. AWARD FOR NEUROSURGERY Gary Thomas Schwartzbauer

THE THOMAS E. GILLESPIE AWARD FOR EXCELLENCE IN ORTHOPAEDICS Elisa Jeanne Knutsen

THE INESI AWARD IN BIOCHEMISTRY Audrey Olivia Segal

MARTIN HELRICH PRIZE FOR EXCELLENCE IN ANESTHESIOLOGY Alexander Ivan Kim

EUGENE SYDNEY BERESTON AWARD FOR EXCELLENCE IN DERMATOLOGY Michael David Gober JOSEPH E. WHITLEY AWARD FOR ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE IN RADIOLOGY Tara Ann Morgan

LOUIS HARRIMAN DOUGLASS AWARD FOR EXCELLENCE IN OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY Richelle Nicole Medford ROBLEY DUNGLISON AWARD FOR EXCELLENCE IN PREVENTIVE MEDICINE Suna Choi Seo ABRAHAM LILIENFELD AWARD FOR EXCELLENCE IN EPIDEMIOLOGY AND BIOSTATISTICS Anne P. Spillane

STUDENT NATIONAL MEDICAL ASSOCIATION SERVICE AWARD Jared Wayne Reaves THE JOANNE HATEM, M.D. MEMORIAL PRIZE FOR CARING AND COMPASSION TOWARD PATIENTS Gary Thomas Schwartzbauer

FRANCIS DONALDSON PRIZE FOR EXCELLENCE IN PATHOLOGY Jennifer Michelle Reese

WILLIAM D. KAPLAN, M.D. AWARD FOR HUMANISM IN THE PRACTICE OF MEDICINE Ranisha Gautam Patel

CHARLES L. WISSEMAN, JR., AWARD FOR EXCELLENCE IN MICROBIOLOGY AND IMMUNOLOGY Gary Thomas Schwartzbauer

WILLIAM C. GRAY, M.D. AWARD IN OTORHINOLARYNGOLOGYHEAD AND NECK SURGERY Gary Thomas Schwartzbauer

J. EDMUND BRADLEY AWARD FOR EXCELLENCE IN PEDIATRICS Paula Max-Wright

ROBERTS R. R. ROBERTS, M.D. MEMORIAL PRIZE IN MEDICINE Brent Albert Becker

JACOB FINESINGER AWARD FOR EXCELLENCE IN PSYCHIATRY Zaakir Khaliq Yoonas

HARLAN I. FIRMINGER, M.D. AWARD FOR EXCELLENCE IN GENERAL AND SYSTEMIC PATHOLOGY Cedric Corey Regelin

EUGENE B. BRODY AWARD FOR EXCELLENCE IN PSYCHOTHERAPY Jeremy Matthew Doniger Jeremy Michael Wilkinson

THE JAMES AND CAROLYN FRENKIL AWARD Audrey Olivia Segal

WAYNE W. BABCOCK AWARD FOR EXCELLENCE IN SURGERY Adriana Francesca Jones

KENNETH L. MALINOW AWARD FOR EXCELLENCE IN PSYCHIATRY Melanie V. Rowson

HANS R. WILHELMSEN PRIZE FOR OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT IN SURGERY Joseph Robert Scalea

JEREMY HALLISEY AWARD FOR COMPASSION AND HUMANISTIC QUALITIES IN ANESTHESIOLOGY Nana Dwemoh Benneh

STUDENT SERVICE AWARDS Sara Bigelow Faber, President Amanda Marie Kramer, Vice President Heather Michelle Lazusky, Secretary Adriana Francesca Jones, Treasurer

of

M e d i c i n e J u ly 2 0 0 7 V o l . 8 N o . 1 1

Dean for Public Affairs, at jlitchman@som.umaryland.edu.

or to the month you wish to see your submission included to Jennifer Litchman, Assistant

Jo Martin, Alyssa Menkes and Bill Seiler, Contributors JBrushwood Graphics Design Group,

Maryland School Design J Submitting information to SOMnews: Please email your submission six weeks pri-

of

Medical Affairs, University of Maryland, and Dean, School of Medicine J Jennifer

SOMnews is produced by the University of Maryland School of Medicine,

Office of Public Affairs J E. Albert Reece, MD, PhD, MBA , Vice President for

University

Litchman, Executive Editor J Heather Graham, Managing Editor J Caelie Haines,

SOMnews

Mark Your Calendars! The annual State of the School of Medicine Address will take place on Tuesday, September 25, 2007, at 3:00 PM in MSTF Auditorium. An hors d’oeurve reception will follow in MSTF Atrium. All faculty, staff and students are welcome to attend.

Mini-Med School for Kids!

In celebration of the bicentennial, the School of Medicine will hold a community outreach program for children called Mini-Med School for Kids! For six consecutive Wednesday mornings, School of Medicine faculty will talk with children at the Salvation Army’s Franklin Square Boys and Girls Club.   Mini-Med School for Kids! targets underserved children (ages 8-14) in hopes of delivering key messages about important health and lifestyle issues. Through these efforts, the program strives to educate and empower the children to help them make better choices which will affect their health and the quality of their lives.

Session I – Wednesday, July 11, 2007

Session IV – Wednesday, August 1, 2007

Anatomy Larry Anderson, PhD Professor, Department of Anatomy & Neurobiology

10:00 – 11:00 AM Asthma, Smoking, Drug and Alcohol Abuse & Addictions Kevin Ferentz, MD Associate Professor, Department of Family & Community Medicine

10:00 – 11:00 AM

Session II – Wednesday, July 18, 2007 10:00 – 11:00 AM Heart Health & Exercise Shawn Robinson, MD Assistant Professor, Medicine

Session III – Wednesday, July 25, 2007 10:00 – 11:00 AM Diabetes, Obesity & the Importance of Nutrition Kari Bichell, MD Assistant Professor, Department of Family & Community Medicine

Session V – Wednesday, August 8, 2007 10:00 – 11:00 AM STDs/HIV Ligia Peralta, MD Associate Professor, Department of Pediatrics

Session VI – Wednesday, August 15, 2007 Student Day at the School of Medicine 10:00 – 11:00 AM Tour of the School of Medicine Medical Students Violence Prevention and Tour of R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center Carnell Cooper, MD Professor, Department of Surgery 11:00 – 12:00 PM


http://medschool.umaryland.edu/newsletters/July_2007