Page 1

Sept 2009

Issue 4

THETORONTODRUGBUST Morning Lane Regular features Life As A Rock Star with Clint Hell

Radioboxer The Beat Rats

Interviews with Jen

Triphazard Photographer - Ben Gebo

Independent and Unsigned music & the Creative Arts


A


Am vullaore dit Septueros Somojo Magazine Welcome to the fourth issue of Somojo Magazine. A new section at the front of the magazine to give some space to the press releases and other news items that we get and more great interviews for you to enjoy.

Contents Sept 2009 • The Toronto Drug Bust

page - 7

• Morning Lane

page - 12

• Triphazard

page - 16

• The Beat Rats

page - 20

• Radioboxer

page - 25

• Interview with photographer Ben Gebo

page - 33

KW If you are a solo artist, in a band, a photographer, film maker, writer or artist and would like to be interviewed or have your work featured in the magazine, we would love to hear from you. editor@somojomagazine.com Interviews with Jen jen@somojomagazine.com More articles and interviews can be found on our website - www.somojomagazine.com

Websites for this edition

Regular features • Interviews with Jen - Dweeb

page - 30

• Life As A Rock Star

page - 27

• Gigs Wanted

page - 42

http://www.torontodrugbust.com http:// www.morning-lane.com http://www.triphazardmusic.com http://www.myspace.com/beatrats http://www. radiobrokemyheart.com

All content copyright © Somojo Magazine 2009 and the respective authors. No part of this publication can be used or reproduced in any format without the written consent of the copyright owners.

http://www.dweebmusic.co.uk http://www.bengebo.com/ Photography Credits Morning Lane by Hannah Yates www.hanbag.com Clint Hell by Nick Cee

Somojo Magazine Sept 2009 | 3


THE BEAT RATS: A Cellar Full Of Rats! DUE OCTOBER 13. In 1964 it was Beatlemania, in 2009 it’s time for Beat Rat mania! This New York City-based quartet whisks you back to the days of The Star Club in Hamburg, Germany - but with only a slight modern touch! Their no-frills brand of Mersey-inspired garage pop is a hook and guitar-filled delight! “New York: birthplace of the Velvet Underground, The Ramones, Sonic Youth, The Strokes, The Yeah Yeah Yeahs and home to all things cool and trendy since the late 60’s. The Beat Rats are the latest sons of the Big Apple to pick the torch for rock’n’roll and run with it. These boys aren’t, however, running down the more obvious paths the city is known for (I.E. Punk, Hardcore and Noise Rock).. They are reaching back to the halcyon days of The Beatles, Mod Pop and Garage Rock. If these guys were bigger anglophiles they’d be living in a flat in Shoreditch. ‘The Beat Rats Theme’ is a statement of intent, all surf guitar, hip shaking rhythm and petulant, catchy vocals, and it doesn’t outstay it’s welcome. Each track on the album is a short, sharp blast of classy retro rock. Not that they repeat themselves. ‘I Can’t Wait’ has a slower, more bar room blues feel that could either be about a woman or a drug dealer. ‘Rat Fink’ hints at the Banana Splits as much as any real band. While also bringing to mind Link Wray and the soundtrack to ‘Pulp Fiction’. the production on the album is pretty basic, but it fits the overall mood of the record, making it sound as if the band recorded on an 8-track with analog equipment, in a Greenwich Village loft. For all I know they did. I’m guessing the real way to experience the band at it’s best is live (we’ve done that folks with the bonus 5 song live EP!), with sweat pouring out of the walls and everybody in the room shaking ass and taking names.” - Bubblegum Slut Fanzine COMES WITH AN EXCLUSIVE FIVE-SONG BONUS LIVE EP! TRACK LISTING: “RATFINK”, “MARYANN”, “GUITAR BOOGIE”, “THE BEAT RATS THEME”, AND “MINE ALL MINE”! YEAH YEAH YEAH BABY!!!! GREAT!! EVRIM TUZUN, has been awarded “The Most Remixed Song of The World “ Trance World 2009. Singer, Songwriter and Composer Evrim Tuzun who wrote the original, has been awarded “The Most Remixed Song of The World / Trance World 2009” for his track ‘Hemen Hemen’ at recent a ceremony in Istanbul. DJs from all over the world (including Italy, USA, Japan, France, Turkey, England, Spain) have released more than 200 remixed versions of the track which can be heard on www.hemenhemen.net. On his speech at the award ceremony Evrim said: “ Wow… The Most Remixed Song of The World award really means a lot to me. I wanna thank my family, my friends, my beautiful fans, and the best DJs with remixes from all over the world who have made this award possible. Every piece of this award was created with love… So I have to say this: I’m not afraid to share my love... with you…”

How To Make It In Music 2

Written by musicians for musicians, this 300 page must-have magbook reveals the core information every serious artist should know when trying to make their mark on the music scene. This revised 2nd edition provides an understanding of the business vital to make it in music. Available from WHSmith and Borders, as well as online at amazon.co.uk and magbooks.com from 8th October for only £7.99 4 | Somojo Magazine Sept 2009


R.D.S.K

French Gothic/Rock/Metal band R.D.S.K have signed to Cauldron Soundwerx Productions in the USA. Founded in early 2008, R.D.S.K is a project inspired by many influences, which mixes rock music and Gothic by adding a touch of symphonic metal. Their current album “Apocalypse of Mind” is currently being finalized. www.somojo.net/R.D.S.K

FREE ALBUM DOWNLOADS FROM ALICE SWEET ALICE!

Yes, that’s right, free full album downloads and fully legal! Just pop along to www.alicesweetalice.org and you can get both of the excellent albums from Alice Sweet Alice, ‘First Light’ and ‘Moloko & Ultraviolence’ for free!

Free Advertising in Somojo Magazine

Somojo radio www.somojo.net is currently

Artists, Bands, DJ’s, Equipment Hire, Photographers, Producers, Promoters, Record Companies, Recording Studios, Solo Artists, Venues, Web Designers.......

seeking sponsors to take them into 2010 as their global audience grows.

We fully understand the big black hole that can suck up advertising budgets quicker than you can blink an eye, so we’re trying to do something to help and giving everyone the chance to grab some free advertising space in Somojo Magazine.

• Radio Shows.

The idea is that we get music fans, bands, venues, record labels, promoters etc to point people in the direction of sister radio station www.somojo.net and ask them to create a free account. It can be a fan, artist, promoter, record label or any other account and then when the account is created the new account holder sends a quick to note to admin telling us who recommended Somojo to them. This is important or we won’t know who referred them. All accounts on Somojo are free and they take about 5 minutes to create and all account holders get access to free mp3s and free copies of every edition of Somojo Magazine, so we think it’s a fair deal. We keep track of the number of referrals from each source and reward those who refer the most people with advertising space in Somojo Magazine or cd’s and t-shirts if the referrer doesn’t have a business to advertise. Full details can be found on our website. www.somojomagazine.com

Sponsors are sought for • Podcasts. • The Somojo Charts Interested parties should contact Kevin on kevin@somojo.net

Got any news? Do you have a new album to promote, new music video, new independent film being released, new book about to be published? Want to get your news in front of the global audience that reads Somojo Magazine? Send us your press releases and news bulletins and we’ll put them in Somojo Magazine or on the front page of our website. Send info to - editor@somojomagazine.com

THE TORONTO DRUGBUST

OFFICIAL WEBSITE LAUNCH: September 23 RADIO SINGLE RELEASE: October 2009 (The Dandy Song) MUSIC VIDEO RELEASE: November 2009 (The Dandy Song) ALBUM RELEASE: December 2009/January 2010 (Enfant Terrible)

Somojo Magazine Sept 2009 | 5


Photograph (c)


THETORONTODRUGBUST www.torontodrugbust.com Would you mind introducing yourself and telling us what instruments you play?

Do you work with other musicians or are you purely a solo artist?

Sir Izak K.O. also known as Izak Kosir, founding member of The Toronto Drug Bust. I was born and raised in Ljubljana, Slovenia. To name a few heroes: Oscar Wilde, Marianne Faithfull, Leonard Cohen, Charlie Chaplin and The Little Prince. The main instrument I play is rock’n’roll (laughs), but then also guitar and sometimes I sit down behind the drums. I write songs and sing lead vocals for TDB. And I’m still trying to learn the piano ... I can play a few tunes but I don’t understand the keyboards well enough yet to be able to improvise. I’ve been postponing this since forever - there is a lazy side of me also, although many consider me to be a workaholic.

The Toronto Drug Bust is a band that plays my music. It’s a group of international musicians that can change its members, morph, adapt and so on. It’s sort of a free rock’n’roll market, I suppose. It’s an idea that’s still growing basicly. You never know, maybe YOU could be in my band in the near future (laughs). A very important part of it is also my producer Rami Helin from Finland, who is otherwise the lead singer of Turku Romantic Movement. He also plays guitar for TDB. He helped me put this album together. Great musician, modest guy, terrific performer.

Discography.

Phew ... there’s quite a few. Well, me and Rami are probably in the forefront. I write the music, sing lead vocals and quite a bit of backup vocals also and I play rhythm guitar. Rami sang some backup vocals, played a lot of guitar and produced the whole album. We had some other great guitar players like Mikael Lundin also known as Micke Ghost (Canadian Cowboy, Plast) from Sweden plus Tadej Kosir (Neisha, Bro) and Miso Drobez (General Musashi) from Slovenia. Bass guitar on all tracks was played by a guy we now call Nietzsche (laughs), but his real name is Nejc Krzic. He is the younger brother of my longtime friend Andraz, the singer of the band Moonlight Sky. We had two drummers that played on the album - Ziga Kozar (Neisha) and Martin Janezic - Buco (Sausages, Tribute 2 Love, Neisha). Buco also played vibraphone on a song entitled Emerald Green. For the complete list of musicians that played on the album you’ll have to check the CD inlay, beacuse I really don’t want to leave anyone out - they all did such a great job.

How long have you been a musician? Well, I started writing songs as soon as I learned my first chords on the guitar. That would be around the age of 16. It’s amazing how many songs can come out of only four chords (laughs) ... I remember I had trouble holding F major in the beginning, so I just didn’t use it in my songs. But most songs (covers) that I wanted to play had F major, so I just had to learn to hold it ... you could say I learned it the hard way (laughs). Later I was in a few local blues rock bands in Ljubljana where I sang lead vocals.

Sometimes I party in a big black car with big fat cigars............. Somojo Magazine Sept 2009 | 7

www.somojo.net/The_Toronto_Drug_Bust

The debut album Enfant Terrible is set to be released in December 2009/January 2010. The album is ready and willing (laughs). Currently we are just waiting for the final word from one of the record labels and then we decide where we will release the record. At the moment I can’t tell you more about that.

Who are the musicians in your (live and/or recording) band?


www.somojo.net/The_Toronto_Drug_Bust

What made you decide to be a solo artist and not want to be in a band? Well, actually I am a solo artist but I am also in a band, so I did something that was once considered impossible (laughs). I like the idea and the rawness of a band but on the other hand I need call my own shots and have absolute freedom as an artist. And that’s very hard to achieve if you are in a closed group, because everyone has its interests and ambitions. What music did you listen to while growing up? I think I started with The Beatles. My mum had a bunch of their albums that we used to listen to while driving in the car. I was probably around the age of seven or so. A few years later bit later I had a Michael Jackson period. Then I switched back to the British scene as I really got into The Rolling Stones and David Bowie. Two artists that I really love but are not for everyday listening are Marianne Faithfull and Leonard Cohen - I will hopefully see them both live this summer. From the newer acts I like Jack White, MGMT, Franz Ferdinand ... those three are the first that come to my mind. And let’s forget my friends Turku Romantic Movement and Neil Leyton. What was your first guitar? It was actually a classical guitar I borrowed from an old friend of mine. The first one I bought was a cheap acoustic guitar I bought for around 150 euros ... and I only bought it because it was blue (laughs). I usually used a bunch of my brother’s guitars, who is an acomplished guitar player. My mum always jokes about that the guitars in our flat seem to be multiplying. There’s really a lot of them laying around ... What is your current equipment? I use a 12-string acoustic Ibanez, an electro-acostic Cort and a Telecaster. As far as amps go ... any good Fender or Marshall will do. And a Shure microphone. Are you self taught or did you have lessons? Self taught. A friend of mine showed me how to play You Can’t Always Get What You Want by The Rolling Stones and that was my introduction into the world of guitar ... I picked up things here and 8 | Somojo Magazine Sept 2009

there - mostly by listening to music and watching video clips. The same goes for the drums, I pretty much taught myself how to play by watching in listening to others. I LOVE to play the drums. In the next band I’m going to be the drummer (laughs). If you had an unlimited equipment budget what would be on your shopping list? Neverland! Ha, ha ... no, just kidding. O2 Arena (laughs)? I really don’t know. Oh, you mean equipment. Oops. I’m not such an equipment freak actually ... it’s more about the content with me. I guess I’d buy anything that would get me the sound I want. Do you use the same equipment live as you do when in a studio? Pretty much. That also depends on other musicians that I work with and what they use. Do you record at a purpose built studio or do you record at home with portable digital equipment or pc/mac with audio software? In a “real” studio. But I record the basics at home on the computer. Which software do you use? I know you want me to say Pro Tools (laughs), but actually I use some random recording programme that’s really easy to use. Rami uses Pro Tools and that stuff. I don’t know much about these things ... I should put that on my list right next to piano lessons (laughs). Any new recordings planned? Well, I admit that I really want to get back in the recording studio as soon as possible. But I guess I’ll have to wait and promote the debut album first and take the band on the road. But we might record some new stuff during that process, since there’s a bunch of songs ready to be played. When is the new album Enfant Terrible released, how long has it taken to produce? It should be released December 2009/January 2010. It started life in London as part of a project that was led by Neil Leyton and Rich Ragany.


Where was it recorded? Like I said - it started life in London, but things took a new turn with producer Rami Helin and we recorded it in Ljubljana at the Garbage Studio and some of it was recorded in Helsinki at Kick Out The Jams! studio. Mastering was done by Hennka Niemistö at Chartmakers. Do you find the process of recording enjoyable and does it get easier the more you do? Recording is hard work, it really is. The first few takes of a song are enjoyable and in the beginning it’s easy to stay in character or in a required mood. But it gets harder as you do more takes and you tend to lose perspective ... so, that was my biggest challenge of the recording process. The results though can be very rewarding. It’s always a bitch to be limited with the fact that you have only a certain amount of time on your hands and you have no choice but to get the job done in that time period. It can be very stressful Do you try to capture your ‘live’ sound on recordings or do you think that the ‘live’ sound and recorded sound should be different experiences for your fans? Good question. That depends. I think on most songs we tried to capture the live sound which could be transfered onto the stage. But on a song like In Line, which has a more dance groove, we used more backup vocals with some distorted effects ... so that would be hard to recreate onstage. I guess some songs take a new form onstage, while others pretty much stay the same - at least the basic form. But as a bluesmen by heart I always tend to improvise onstage, so I can asure you that TDB songs have a life of their own once let out of the cage (laughs).

Do you have any favourite tracks on your album? Each day there’s a different one, really. Depends on the mood. I know that in the beginning it was Dandy, then for a long time it was Cigar Superstar. When we put The Best Of Me on Somojo and MySpace, I thought it sounded pretty good. Then when I heard the final mix of In Line (laughs) ... and the list goes on and on. While I was at the seaside recently I rediscovered Emerald Green and The Death Of Romance. They’re my babies, you know (laughs) ... Do you write songs/tracks only about personal experiences? Mostly but not all the time. If you read my lyrics you could say that my main focus is relationships ... my friend Sara Germain says it’s because my tarot symbol is The Lovers. But it’s either my personal experience or an experience of someone close to me or something that inspired me that day. Do you find song writing easy or difficult? When it comes it comes easy. And when it doesn’t there’s just nothing there. You can’t force it. A good song basicly writes itself. Sometimes I feel just like a messenger (laughs). It’s strange to read some of the lyrics I wrote ... I’m surprised at myself sometimes when I see how sincere I can be. It’s very therapeutic. Is there anyone who you would like to collaborate with on writing songs or performing? Rami is a good match to work with. It would be an honour to collaborate with some of the people that inspire me to write music. Who are your favourite song writers? Among the top five: Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, John Lennon and Paul McCartney, Leonard Cohen, David Bowie, Jack White. Which countries have you gigged in? Home sweet home for now. Hoping for a European tour when we get the engine running. Somojo Magazine Sept 2009 | 9

www.somojo.net/The_Toronto_Drug_Bust

Rich had some songs that he wrote and he wanted me to sing them. Leyton was going to be the producer and playing bass ... and Tommie Riott on drums. And then we added a few of my songs in the mix. That’s where The Dandy Song was first recorded with a whole band. Leyton then moved back to Lisbon, Rich got a baby and so everything more or less faded away. It was a great experience though, they’re both very talented.


www.somojo.net/The_Toronto_Drug_Bust

Which countries would be at the top of your list to tour?

Probably it does sound retro and it is influenced by British rock. What does it sound like do you?

United Kingdom, Germany, Finland ... basicly anywhere that is home to rock’n’roll.

How do you relax?

Who would you like to tour with?

I work (laughs). And sometimes I party in a big black car with big fat cigars (laughs).

Me, myself and I (laughs). Well, I guess it would not be bad to open for some of the bands I listen to ... but let’s not get ahead of ourselves.

Have you ever entered any ‘battle of the bands’ type competitions?

How do you promote your music and get your music to new fans? Internet and local media.

No. And I never would. Music is not sports. What’s your best/worst experience at a gig?

Yes, but we’re not really active there.

My worst experience is probably the one that I don’t remember (laughs) but then again that could also be my best. But that was quite a long time ago. I don’t do that anymore and please don’t ask me what (laughs).

Do you think such sites are good for independent and unsigned artists?

Do you get nervous before a gig - how do you calm down?

That depends on what kind of music they play. Internet is a good place for unknown artists. But you always need a plan to get your message across and it’s never enough to be just on MySpace or a similar site. You need to put your music out there and be heard. But not all artists have the will and the time to play the role of a manager as well.

I do get nervous and I don’t really calm down untill the show is over. Is that normal (laughs)?

Do you use any websites like ‘Reverbnation’ or ‘Soundclick’?

So you think the internet overall is a good place for new artists? Yes, for sure. It’s the only place for new artists if they don’t have a big record label deal. Would you sign with a major record company? I’m not prejudice against major record labels as long as they give me a fair contract. You can sign a bad or a good contract with an indie or a major record label. What would call your style of music? The sound of music (laughs). Rock’n’roll. I know we live live in a world where everything has to wear a label and a price tag. But I feel under pressure if I have to name the style of Toronto Drug Bust ... I don’t think it’s really indie, although some say it is. 10 | Somojo Magazine Sept 2009

What is your day job if you have one? I do. I work as a journalist for a major newspaper. I write about pop culture mostly. Would you like to be a full time working musician or are you happy with things as they are? I love to write, so I’m happy with my current situation. But we’ll see what the future brings. I like to keep my options opened. Has your music been used on any film soundtracks? No. But I wish it had been in Velvet Goldmine (laughs). Is it something you’d like to get involved in if the opportunity came along? Sure. I’m no stranger to film. Thanks for listening!


Somojo Magazine Sept 2009 | 11


www.somojo.net/Morning_Lane

MORNINGLANE

Would you mind introducing yourselves and telling us what instruments you play? We are Morning Lane, a 4-piece London based Indie/Rock band. We have Stephen on vocals and guitar, John (JW) on Lead Guitar, Ross on Bass and Jean-Marc (JM) on Drums and we all sing BV’s where we can! Discography. ML released an album ‘Cry With a Smile’, (2006) by an earlier version of the band and there have been various EPs along the way. Since the new line-up, we are due to release our first single/video ‘Everything to Everyone (E2e) this autumn! How long has the current band line up been together? John is the latest addition to the ML family. He came on board about 6 months ago, though ML has been around for about 4 years. How did you meet each other? We are all from different parts of the world, (Australia/France/Scotland/England) so this is 12 | Somojo Magazine Sept 2009

not a story of 4 local boys who grew up together or went to school together or whatever, but for various reasons we all ended up in London and met through auditions and gigs. Did you always want to be in a band? Yes and No. We have all played in various bands for years but a while ago Stephen was a promising pro-footballer until gigs and late nights took their toll! How long have you played your instruments? JM has been playing drums for over 20 years, Ross on the bass for about the same. Stephen has been singing for about 12 years and John has been playing his axe for about 15 years. What was your first instrument? JM – recorder, Ross – flute, John – piano and Stephen – xylophone. That’s no joke! What is your current equipment? JM has a custom made Sonor kit. Ross plays Lakland basses with an Ashdown amp and EBS pedals.


Are you self taught or did you have lessons? We are mainly self taught, though JW has studied music at a college, but he doesn’t talk about it! If you had an unlimited equipment budget what would be on your shopping list? Hmm… not sure. Have never really thought along the lines of unlimited budgets. Is that the same as having a gazillion dollars? Do you use the same equipment live as you do when in a studio? Mostly, yes because we like to sound like the same band live as we do on recordings! Do you record at a purpose built studio or do you record at home with portable digital equipment or pc/mac with audio software? Both! 3 out of the 4 of us have Logic 8 on Macs at home so we get to record plenty of ideas and demos and send them to each other but when we want a serious recording or need to record drums, we go into a studio. Which software do you use? We all have Logic Studio 8 and use various outboard equipment - keep it real! Do you have any new recordings planned? YES!! We are in the process of recording our latest EP (out soon!) and are writing new tracks for a forthcoming album we will record next year. The tunes you can hear on our MySpace page (www.myspace.com/morninglane) were demo tracks recorded by us but we have since gone to a studio and are at the mixing stage.

Do you find the process of recording enjoyable and does it get easier the more you do? We LOVE recording, cos that’s where you can throw ideas around you know? Every musical aspect of being in a band is enjoyable for us in a different way: writing, rehearsing, recording and playing live, thought there is a fair amount of hard graft that goes with it! Do you try to capture your ‘live’ sound on recordings or do you think that the ‘live’ sound and recorded sound should be different experiences for your fans? Our ‘Holy Grail’ is to capture the band’s feel and vibe on a recording - live or not and it’s more difficult than you might think! We like to play with the arrangements a little when we play live to keep everyone on their toes, but we always give a fair representation of the recordings the fans have heard. Do you any favourite tracks from your original material? Ohh that’s a tricky subject... I think, naturally, we all have different favourite tracks but at the minute, a new track we have written called ‘How it Ends’ is a firm favourite for all of us - but you’ll have to wait for the album or come to see us live to hear it! Do you have a favourite track that you do a cover version of? Covers??? We’ve done all that! (we do jam some U2 occasionally) :-) Who are the main song writers for the band? Generally, someone will bring an idea to the table and we’ll go with it and see what happens. The great thing about this band is we all chip in. Do you write songs only about personal experiences? Mostly yes - there are some instances where reality and the imagination get all mixed up; kind of like a movie based on a true story!

Somojo Magazine Sept 2009 | 13

www.somojo.net/Morning_Lane

John uses a Taylor Solid Body electric with TC Electronics effects and a Fender Hot-Rod Deluxe amp. Stephen has a Maton acoustic guitar from Oz. We use Rotosound strings and Shure In Ear Monitors.


www.somojo.net/Morning_Lane Do you find song writing easy or difficult? It seems to flow quite easily for us to be honest, although sometimes we might have a riff or a melody or even a whole song floating around for weeks before it’s finished.

In fact, we do…we are on Reverbnation but we only just got on there. I think we shot up over 600 places up the charts in one day! Sounds great but we are not sure exactly that means!

Is there anyone who you would like to collaborate with on writing songs or performing?

Do you think the internet overall is a good or bad thing for new artists?

We could be here for a very long time with this one...! We occasionally collaborate with A. Guinness or Jack Daniels if things are going well... Which countries would be at the top of your list to tour? We’re all from different countries so we all would love to ‘conquer’ those but really, we’re not fussed where we tour as long as people love the music. Who would you like to tour with? Kings of Leon would be interesting.... Do you use any websites like ‘Reverbnation’ or ‘Soundclick’? 14 | Somojo Magazine Sept 2009

Well, we feel that the internet has really changed the way the music industry works. In fact, not only music but a lot of other industries as well. It has certainly taken some of the power away from the record companies and allowed artists to be in direct contact with their fans, which is great. The only bad thing is that now anybody can put their music online so there is so much out there, it can be a little overwhelming for the average person to try to keep up with it all. We can all become spam! How did you come up with your name for the band? When JM, the founding father of ML cam to the UK many moons ago, he lived in a small studio flat in Hackney in a street called... (Morning Lane!)


With all the various websites out there for independent and unsigned artists, is there still something that is missing from them that you think would benefit unknown artists? Promotion, distribution and advertising. It is all very well and good having your music online somewhere but if no one knows you, it might as well be under your bed! Would you sign with a major record company?

How would you describe your music to someone who hasn’t yet heard you? We would stick some earphones in their ears and then ask them to describe it because, honestly, what does “Rock” mean? What does “Pop” mean? How would bands like U2 and Pink Floyd describe their music if we didn’t know them? Who do you listen to or do when chilling out? We have a MASSIVE range of music we listen to but we also listen to our own stuff too... we like it, that’s why we made it! Have you ever entered any ‘battle of the bands’ competitions? We don’t really dig those but we do play at showcases, one recently with JAR music. We must have done OK because we have been asked back to play at the big showcase at the O2 Academy in Angel on 25 October.

What’s your best/worst experience at a gig? The best was recently at the O2, Islington when everything was just perfect and the crowd was so up for it! The worst... Ross broke his bass during the first song once, which was interesting but even that wasn’t really bad….it was just funny. Do you get nervous before a gig? How do you calm down? We practice hard so we are all pretty confident in ourselves and each other so we don’t get too nervous. We only get a good level of nerves; the type that makes you sharp and perform better. Has your music been used on any film soundtracks? Yes. There is a TV series called The Amazing Adventures Of A Nobody, which features a few of our tracks. It was aired on cable TV. Is it something you’d like to get involved in if the opportunity came along? We are definitely interested in this and feel that some of our songs really lend themselves to be used on commercials, TV series or movies, so yes, defo keen for more of that. http://www.morning-lane.com

Somojo Magazine Sept 2009 | 15

www.somojo.net/Morning_Lane

If it was a decent deal yes, but mainly for marketing, distribution and the clout a major company has. It would need to be beneficial for the band though, so we’re not so desperate we’d take the first thing that as offered to us.


www.somojo.net/Triphazard

www.triphazardmusic.com Would you mind introducing yourselves and telling us what instruments you play? Stef Stokes - Vocals Jenni Stokes - Keyboard/Synth/Backing Vox Mark Dutch - Guitar/Backing Vox Paul Dutch - Drums How long has the current band line up been together? 5 years How did you meet each other? Through high school. Did you always want to be in a band? Yes

What is your current equipment? Guitar, Keyboard, Synth and Drums. Are you self taught or did you have lessons? Stef - Singing lessons, Jenni - Piano lessons, Mark - Guitar self taught, Paul - Drum lessons If you had an unlimited equipment budget what would be on your shopping list? A lot..... a truth drum kit fully speced, diesel head through an orange cab, moog keyboard and Roland triton. Do you use the same equipment live as you do when in a studio? Yes

Stef - Jazz, Pop and Rock

Do you record at a purpose built studio or do you record at home with portable digital equipment or pc/mac with audio software?

Jenni - Classical and Popular.

Purpose built studio.

Mark/Paul - Classical, Classic Rock, Queen, The Beatles.

Which software do you use?

What music did you listen to while growing up?

Pro tools, hard disk How long have you played your instruments? Stef - 18 years, Jenni - 21 years, Mark - 10 years

Do you have any new recordings planned?

Paul - 14 years

Yes

What was your first instrument?

Do you find the process of recording enjoyable and does it get easier the more you do?

Stef and Jenni - Piano Mark and Paul - Drums/percussion

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Yes, we love it! Can spend a month recording, it becomes a routine the more you do it.


Yes, in all of our recording we have captured our live sound.

Do you find song writing easy or difficult? It changes on occasions, once we have connected with a song it’s easy to finish it off. Is there anyone who you would like to collaborate with on writing songs or performing?

Do you any favourite tracks from your original material?

Enter Shikari, Radiohead, Biffy Clyro

Stop.Rewind.Fast-Forward or Anywhere but Monday

Who are your favourite song writers?

Do you have a favourite track that you do a cover version of? We don’t usually play covers, if we had to choose it would be Amy Winehouse - Back to Black. Who are the main song writers for the band? We write songs as a band.

Don’t have one, but love the lyrics of Brandon Boyd from Incubus. Which countries have you gigged in? UK. Which countries would be at the top of your list to tour? Canada, USA.

Do you write songs only about personal experiences? Sometimes. Somojo Magazine Sept 2009 | 17

www.somojo.net/Triphazard

Do you try to capture your ‘live’ sound on recordings or do you think that the ‘live’ sound and recorded sound should be different experiences for your fans?


www.somojo.net/Triphazard

Who would you like to tour with? Little Boots.

How would you describe your music to someone who hasn’t yet heard you?

You will soon be playing the after show party for Franz Ferdinand. How do you feel about that?

Who do you listen to or do when chilling out?

NME called it UK emo pop but I would describe the new sound as electronic pop rock.

Love the fact that we been asked to play the gig! We think it’s a great opportunity for us and as always we will give it 110%.

90’s dance, Robert Miles, piano music

How do you promote your music and get your music to new fans?

Yes and won it :o)

We use every means possible, mainly internet. Do you use any websites like ‘Reverbnation’ or ‘Soundclick’? Yes. Do you think such sites are good for independent and unsigned artists? Yes, we have gained many opportunities’ and gigs from online websites. Do you think the internet overall is a good or bad thing for new artists? That’s a hard one. It is certainly good in terms of unsigned bands getting wider recognition. However, the internet has caused many issues in terms of illegal downloading.

Have you ever entered any ‘battle of the bands’ competitions?

What’s your best/worst experience at a gig? Funniest gig we played was outside on the back of a lorry where Stef and Mark got attacked by a rather large bumble bee. Do you get nervous before a gig? How do you calm down? Don’t get nervous, we love playing live so we enjoy it. Has your music been used on any film soundtracks? No Is it something you’d like to get involved in if the opportunity came along? Yes

With all the various websites out there for independent and unsigned artists, is there still something that is missing from them that you think would benefit unknown artists? I think they do enough if they did anymore they would be boardering on being a record label. Would you sign with a major record company? Of course! How did you come up with your name for the band? Stef and Jenni’s dad

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www.somojo.net/The_Beat_Rats Would you mind introducing yourselves and telling us what instruments you play? Frank Max: guitar/vocals, Paul Garwood: guitar/ vocals, Tony Matura: bass/vocals, Bluto Mongo: drums. Discography.. Frank: Our first album (CD) A Cellar Full Of Rats! is out October 13th. How long has the current band line up been together? Paul: Since July ‘06 How did you meet each other? Tony: Frank and Paul met in High School and later met both Mongo and I hanging out in clubs in New York. How did you come up with your name? Frank: We knew it had to have the word Rats in it and we also wanted the word Beat or Beats. The Ratbeats kinda stank. What music did you listen to while growing up? Paul: The Beatles—ya think? How long have you played your instruments? Mongo: We’ve suffered years for our music. Now it’s your turn.

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What is your current equipment? Frank: Remember Kiss? “Kiss uses Gibson Guitars and Pearl drums because they want the best.” Well, “The Beat Rats use beat up ol’ flintsticks and barrels ‘cause they don’t make ‘em like they used to.” Are you self taught or did you have lessons? Frank: You mean you can’t tell we didn’t have lessons? If you had an unlimited equipment budget what would be on your shopping list? Paul: The Beat Rats are seriously guitarded. We’ve got a bad case of vintage guitar acquisition syndrome. Too many axes—no more shopping! Do you use the same equipment live as you do when in a studio? Tony: Pretty much. What you hear is what you get live. For better or worse. Do you record at a purpose built studio or do you record at home with portable digital equipment or pc/mac with audio software? Frank: We use a studio. When we record we just wanna bust our konks on playing the songs. There’s plenty of dials on the amps to screw around with.


Do you have any new recordings planned? Paul: We’re planning to go back into the studio pretty soon to record another album’s worth of noize. Do you find the process of recording enjoyable and does it get easier the more you do? Frank: We dig recording. It’s the engineers and studio techs that don’t find it enjoyable when we start mucking about. Do you try to capture your ‘live’ sound on recordings or do you think that the ‘live’ sound and recorded sound should be different experiences for your fans? Paul: We do. We blast our songs in the studio the same way we would at a show. If we don’t get the vibe in a take or two, we move on. There’s enough music out there that’s been labored over. Do you any favourite tracks from your original material?

Frank: We got a song called “My Jolana” and we get a kick outta people’s reaction when we tell ‘em it’s not about a girl, it’s about my Jolana guitar. Do you have a favourite track that you do a cover version of? Tony: We dig doing Ray Charles’ Maryann and we’ve got a version on the bonus live tracks CD you get with the first album. Do you write songs only about personal experiences? Frank: The lyrics just have to fit the tunes. The experiences can be either personal or not. We really just wanna rock so the tunes and riffs come first. Lyrics that suck go bye-bye. Do you find song writing easy or difficult? Paul: Both at times, but there’s a backlog of songs clogging up the pipes right now and we wanna get ‘em out! Which countries have you gigged in? Mongo: We’ve only played the most drunken establishments in the USA.

www.somojo.net/The_Beat_Rats

Which software do you use? Paul: Female.

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www.somojo.net/The_Beat_Rats

Which countries would be at the top of your list to tour? Tony: We just gotta get to England and Germany, those are at the top of the list.

How would you describe your music to someone who hasn’t yet heard you? Frank: Merseypunk music. Like a snotty Gerry and the Pacemakers. Who do you listen to or do when chilling out? Mongo: We’re just now getting to the point where we can stop our minds dead. We get a kinda comatose look on our faces and our mouths hang open. Mostly, we’re in it to rock ‘n’ roll so we gotta snap outta that brain-lock scene. What’s your best/worst experience at a gig? Tony: Each of us has gone down on stage at some point. Frank does it on purpose at almost every show. Paul went down a couple of times with his guitar and he just keeps playing. Frank: Tony did some fancy steppin’ one night and took some drums along with him. Mongo likes to bust up his kit at the end of shows. One night he tried to exit right through the center of his kit; like over the kick drum. He got his leg caught in the apparatus and ended up sucking the floor. All in good fun.

Who would you like to tour with? Paul: Hey we’re ready to go now—whoever! How do you promote your music and get your music to new fans? Frank: We hope jawboning in your magazine is one way—The Beat Rats don’t wanna be pests. We dig the web. Do you think the internet overall is a good or bad thing for new artists? Frank: It’s been good for us. We dig cyberspace and try not to get lost in it.

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Would you sign with a major record company? Paul: Would a major record company want to sign us? That’s the question. Do you get nervous before a gig? How do you calm down? Frank: Tito Puente laid down the law; “If you ain’t nervous, it don’t mean anything.” So you can usually find us hanging at the bar, knocking back some black & cokes before we go on. (and after).

www.somojo.net/The_Beat_Rats

What are your day jobs if you have one? Paul: That’s the $64,000 question. Like, we gotta bail now and see if we still have day jobs! Rawwk On Pplz!

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Discography. We only got our debut album RADIO DRAMA but we are working on our new record. How long has the current band line up been together? A bit more than a year now. How did you meet each other? J: Well I met Vanne some years ago and we started to play music. We got tired of the duo thing and then I found Gian and his brother Ales and kind of tricked them into forming a band. The rest of the guys were just life’s weird gifts. Gian: My brother forced me to go to jota’s house to watch a movie or something...but later I found out it was a secret audition. Esteban: I answered to an ad when they were looking for a guitarist and a drummer (Tekila is my brother) , then i went to see them at a show and fell in love with the whole thing. Santos: I believe in destiny without a doubt when I think of how i met Jota and Vanne. The real story you can find in my new book.... Radioboxer... Radio Drama for your Momma! Did you always want to be in a band? Gian: not really....first I wanted to be an astronaut, then a firefighter, then a soccer player, then I wanted to open an empanada stand at the beach and THEN I got interested in music. How did you come up with your name? Santos: I didn’t, my parents came up with my name. J: Santos, I think they mean the band’s name. However we would leave this question unanswered. Not because we are like all mysterious and shit but because is not a very good story. What music did you listen to while growing up? Radioboxer: We all grew up listening to different

music. From boleros and old Spanish ballads to Iron Maiden, Nirvana, Pulp, Queen and many many others. One thing about us is that we really listen to everything. Are you self taught or did you have lessons? J: Not really. I mean We all got a little lessons here and there but mostly as an introduction to the instrument and that’s that. Santos and Vanne had had lessons since then but for specialized stuff such as bolero “pasillos” in the guitar and Opera singing. If you had an unlimited equipment budget what would be on your shopping list? Santos: Vox Amp. Tekila: OCDP Drum Set Gian: All of radiohead’s gear...or at least a new controller, somebody spilled beer on it and now one key gets stuck every time I press it. J: I don’t know. I don’t dwell too much on that kind of fantasies and I don’t know shit about what is good in term of equipment. I’ll probably call our producer and ask him what should I buy and then see how it feels. And then burn it on stage, after all I got unlimited money bitches!!! Do you use the same equipment live as you do when in a studio? Radioboxer: No, Ferny the sound engineer/ producer/greatest human in existence has tons of vintage equipment which we loved using. Specially his Peavey 60’s amps. Do you record at a purpose built studio or do you record at home with portable digital equipment or pc/mac with audio software? Radioboxer: We record most of our stuff on a professional studio but I think the main reason we do that is not as much for the facilities (which were awesome) but for the valuable input of our producer Ferny Coipel. However it all depends of what you want to get out of your song. You cannot engineer intimacy or certain feelings for a tune you know? Which software do you use? Radioboxer: We used Pro-Tools and Garage Band for RADIO DRAMA. Somojo Magazine Sept 2009 | 25

www.somojo.net/Radioboxer

Would you mind introducing yourselves and telling us what instruments you play? Vanne (voice), J (Bass), Santos (Guitar), Esteban (Guitar), Tekila (drums) and Gian (Keyboards) and together we are known as RADIOBOXER.


www.somojo.net/Radioboxer Do you have any new recordings planned? Radioboxer: Yeah, we have already most of the material for our second album and we think is going to be pretty f*****g awesome. Do you try to capture your ‘live’ sound on recordings or do you think that the ‘live’ sound and recorded sound should be different experiences for your fans? Radioboxer: We try to get it as close as we can but when we are on stage we let the “live” feeling to flow freely. If you know your song completely then you are able to enjoy it without thinking too much on what you are doing or why. Do you any favourite tracks from your original material? Radioboxer: I think we all enjoy Placebo Effect a great deal. But other favourites are GMV and Reckless Behavior. Who would you like to tour with? Tekila: Vanne, Jota, Santos, Gian, Esteban, Chubbs (santos’ dog), Malko (Gian’s Dog) 26 | Somojo Magazine Sept 2009

J: I like that list too but I think we can lose Malko. I hate that dog. How do you promote your music and get your music to new fans? Radioboxer: Facebook, Myspace, Press Releases, Viral Videos, and good old fashion kick ass concerts. Would you sign with a major record company? J: It really doesn’t matter if it is a small or major record company. As long as they let us do our thing. They have to respect the vision of the band and understand that is the band who ultimately that decides what goes and what doesn’t artistically. I mean if that is cool and you are not getting f****d over what you deserve to get paid you are good. Is there anything you’d like to add? Gian: Radioboxer is just ONE word. J: A very awesome word.


Life as a Rock Star

Tales from the real world with Bodies frontman

Clint Hell www.somojo.net/bodies

I do not believe in luck. Sure I’m aware that a lot of things happen by chance, but pure luck…? Come on!? How many times have you actually heard or experienced someone close coming into millions or reaching a dream goal without trying hard? I know I haven’t got a single such case at hand. Sure, there are instances of people being approached by modelling agents in the street. Even singers that get a break and a record deal from singing in the street or on the bus. But then again, it’s not pure chance, is it? If you chose not to sing on the bus or in the street no one would have noticed you for sure. It’s more about timing – being in the right place at the right time. Instead, I believe you prepare for luck. Now take the lottery or lotto. You have to prepare for luck by buying the ticket, filling out the numbers or whatever it is you have to do. I believe that we prepare for luck in the same way in our everyday life. Basically, it’s like when you’ve just bought a new car. Suddenly you see the very same model on every road, on every corner, in every parking lot… If you set your mind on getting a new job, you open your eyes to the possibility that there may be an opening somewhere – you talk to people and that way they too open their eyes and look for the opportunity on your behalf. You talk a little extra to people you meet that are in the field or could help you in any way. And you also open the window to feeling ‘good enough’ for – or even that you deserve – the job. Or whatever it may be. Me? I’m not so sure I’ve taken my own advice on this. Perhaps that is why I am where I’m at? Not a bad place, I will agree to that, but things could always be a little better, right? ;-) Anyway, I’m definitely sure about having missed a lot of opportunities, simply because I wasn’t prepared enough to see it as an opportunity. So, what happens is that you open yourself to the slightest chance and when you are open to it, you will actually see the opportunity when it comes along. The formula, if we were talking physics, chemistry or math, would then be; Preparedness + Opportunity = Luck. I do not believe in luck. Do you?

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www.somojo.net/Dweeb

Interviews with Jen [dweeb]

http://www.dweebmusic.co.uk

Hello [dweeb] and thank you for taking the time out of your busy schedule to do this interview with me. Jen: Let’s start by telling us your names & what each of you do. [dweeb]: Well we have Tim on lead vocals, guitar and synth, The Bman on lead guitar and BV’s, Matt on bass, synth and BV’s and Dave on drums Jen: How did [dweeb] get started? [dweeb]: We met at a school of music and theology in Coventry, UK, called Nexus. We got together as a bit of fun but ended up giving up places at uni to pursue the band more fully once leaving Nexus.

30 | Somojo Magazine Sept 2009

Jen: I see you guys are touring now any chance of you touring in the US? [dweeb]: Yeah that’s right. We’re about to head off on tour in Slovakia for two weeks, and then to Denmark for two weeks at the end of October. We have talked with our label about the possibility of going to the US but to really make an impact we would need to go and live there for a year. This would be a massive commitment for our families so it’s something that needs some serious thought! However, if we were to land a support tour for a few months then we’d be well up for doing that! Jen: What is your most memorable experience since you have been touring? [dweeb]: Oh wow that’s a hard one, there’s been a lot! For the last two years we’ve been out to play this amazing festival in Slovakia called Camp Fest.


The audience are crazy out there and they seem to really love us, so it’s been pretty awesome to go and rock out with a few thousand crazy Slovaks. Jen: What are your shows generally like? [dweeb]: Really high energy. We like to have a lot of fun with the audience. We don’t just want to simply perform but we love to engage the crowd and have a good time together. We also want our shows to challenge people to think. We’re four people who are passionate about God, he changed our lives and we like to get people thinking about that. It’s not something we force on anyone, we’re just having this continually life changing experience and so naturally that comes out in our songs. Jen: What kind of feed back did you get after your feature on BBC? [dweeb]: Incredible feedback! In fact we’ve never seen anything else like it in our band’s history. We had literally hundreds of emails and myspace messages of people who had been affected and challenged by the show - there were some incredible stories actually. It was a big risk but it turned out to be well worth doing.

[dweeb]: Yes indeed! We are currently writing for a new album. We’ve developed the sound so it’s not just It Came From Outer Space mark 2! So there’s a bit of an electro edge to the sound now with rock very much at the core. We’ve signed a new deal with Fierce? for this album which we are very excited about. The plan is to release in April 2010, this will be followed by a big tour, so it’s gonna be a great year! Jen: What would you like to tell your fans and new found fans? [dweeb]: I guess if we had to say one thing it would be this.... Hope. Whatever stage you’re at in life, however hard it gets, no matter how you feel about yourself on any given day, there is always, always hope. We are convinced that true hope comes from Jesus, it is always there and it is a hope that does not disappoint us, that does not let us down. In him there is always hope.

Jen: Anything crazy or bizarre ever happen while performing? [dweeb]: Oh yeah plenty! On one occasion we came out during our intro trying to make this big entrance and Bman, our guitarist climbed on top of his amp to jump off it for a big first chord. However at some point he had got his foot caught in his lead so when he jumped off he did a full on face plant in to the floor!!! It was fairly savage then, but funny to look back on now!

www.somojo.net/Dweeb

Jen: What is your latest album called? [dweeb]: ‘It Came From Outer Space!’ The artwork is all based around old skool B-movies, it looks pretty ace! The cheapest way to get hold of it is to buy it directly from our record label. Just click on the banner at the top of our myspace page: www.myspace.com/dweebmusic Jen: Do you have anything planned in the future for us to look forward to?

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Photography by

Ben Gebo www.bengebo.com When did you first pick up a camera and discover your love for creating images? When I first figured out that one slice of time can be captured visually. I have also used the camera as a shield or sorts. When I have a camera in my hands, I find it can make me seem a lot more inviting or a lot more lamented. Either I am fine with. How long have you been involved in the photographic industry? I consider my photography career starting at an early age. As far as making it as a career for myself, I’ve been doing it full time for about two years. What is your background/training? I think my training started when I was very young and wanted to freeze moments. You know, kind of like Zack Morris in Saved By The Bell. I did get my training at New England School of Photography. It’s a great school with a two year program that crams so much in. I wouldn’t have the confidence and structure that I have now, had I not attended a Technically heavy Photography School. Are you a full time or part time photographer? At the moment I have been shooting full time. Anytime I am not shooting for an assignment I am always trying to set up shoots to keep my motivation and skill top notch. Have you held any exhibitions? I haven’t had exhibitions of my work exclusively, but I had some images in a landscape series in a show for the Copley Society Art in Boston last May. I have also had numerous work shown at New England School of Photography.

Who have you photographed/worked for? As far as people, I shoot a lot of artists, business owners, also anyone I find visually interesting. For Architecture, I shoot a lot of commercial and residential space. Some recent clients have been AIGA, Emerge Spa & Salon, as well as interior and graphic designers. In October, I am going to England to shoot a portfolio for British Airways on “Modern London.” I’ll be there for roughly 10 days, shooting a lot of people and the architecture which shows London in a modern way. I have never been there, so I am trying to plan out my shoots with precision. What types of photography do you do? I shoot mainly Architectural and Portraiture. Which of these if you could, would you spend 100% of your time working on? That’s a tough one. I love architecture because I have a fascination with symmetry and form, but any image with a human in it automatically draws a viewers attention in a completely different way. We are all more relatable to the emotion that is any portrait, whether it be a candid photograph by Elliot Erwitt or a new studio portrait shot by Dan Winters. Is there a type or style of photography that you haven’t yet tried that interests you? All forms of photography fascinate me. I really have always been drawn to documentary and photojournalism. That is very little concept and almost all just documentation, but needs to be shot at the right second with as much creativity as you can put into it. It’s really just separating yourself from your subject. That limits control, although sometimes it’s good to have limitations. I find people can strive for more when they have less options. Somojo Magazine Sept 2009 | 33


What is the worst experience you’ve had on a shoot? Well every shoot there is something that goes wrong. Being a photographer, you have to know how to problem solve. The worst experience I’ve ever had on a shoot is when I lost faith in the project, yet had to continue to shoot it anyways. Doing anything you don’t want to do makes you lose motivation. But you know, it helps build character. What is the best experience you’ve had on a shoot? Knowing that every shot I am getting my client will love just as much as I do. When everyone walks away happy, that’s when you know you’ve had a good shoot. What is the hardest part of being a photographer in today’s business climate? We’re all shooting less and marketing more. You need money to keep up with the marketing, so it can seem like you’re chasing your own tail when your tail keeps getting shorter and shorter. I do look for the silver lining usually, so it’s important to stay motivated and know your budget. Do you work with digital, film or both? I shoot mainly digital, but when it’s possible, I like to shoot with my Mamiya 645E. Digital is great in so many ways, but film just has something to it. It’s got more purity. Does that sound right? I guess it’s like comparing a cassette to an mp3. Being that a lot of photographic imaging is now purely digital, do you think many photographers are slowly becoming digital artists or graphic designers and moving away from the traditional role of a photographer? That’s a question I ponder quite frequently. I feel that image compositing and using High Dynamic Range, stuff like that can change what it means to be a photographer. People like Gary Land and anyone who does heavy manipulation to an image to get their vision shown exactly how they want to, more power to them. It’s not changing what photography is based upon, which is your own unique vision of the world. It does take a different kind of brain to shoot fashion as opposed to someone documenting an electoral race or something. 34 | Somojo Magazine Sept 2009

Do you think that the advancement in digital cameras and technology has made your job easier? Absolutely, but there are drawbacks. The turnaround time is a lot easier, we can tether our cameras to a computer to see the exposure full size a second later, and the money you save purchasing CF cards compared to film is just ridiculous. The drawbacks are your client wanting to see your images right then and there and also they expect the turnaround just as quickly. I don’t like hearing, “You can just photoshop that, right?” I think it’s best to get it done right in camera every time, if possible. Are the internet and online photographic agencies good for the photographic industry and photographers or are there too many options for photographers to choose from? Agencies are a great asset to any photography business. The problem with agencies is that you’ll never be able to get an agent until you’re so busy with work that you don’t actually need one. You can be successful without an agent, but all the potential work you get is all your doing only. Do you think that most photographers are as knowledgeable as they could be about copyright law and image licensing? The smart ones are. People get their work stolen left and right. Not to mention clients trying to keep leases out on your images longer than they are supposed to be. It can be a boring thing to learn, but a very important thing. How do you promote your work? I do a lot a viral marketing on the internet as well as promotional cards to potential clients. The best way to get work is by making your current clients happy. There is a lot of power of people spreading the word. It can work against, though. Good news travels fast, bad news, even faster. Do you use any internet forums or social networks? Yes, all the big ones. Facebook, Myspace, various photography and designer websites. I also am all up in the blogging world.


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Lots of people recommend social networks for promoting small businesses. Is it something you have considered or do? Yes, and it has worked pretty good thus far. It all depends on how you use it. Some photographers just don’t know how to market online effectively, others are just better at doing it in other ways.

Given an unlimited budget, what would be on your photographic equipment shopping list? Hah, it would be a long one. I would fist buy a studio, then a complete ProPhoto lighting setup. I would also get numerous computers. Can purchasing a permanent assistant and technical team count?

Do you ever look at the work of other photographers to see how current techniques and image styles are changing and developing? Of course, I spend 2 hours every day looking at other people’s work to get influenced, to see what’s in and what’s going on. I don’t let it influence my style, because a fad is a fad. Right now, everything is very sharpened with a slightly desaturated color. I think if you believe in what you shoot, you’ll eventually get recognized for your own unique vision in a crowd of followers.

What do you think the future holds for professional photographers? Video. From everything that’s coming out now, that seems to be the wave of the future, really the wave of now. I’ll have to pay more attention to studying some of the film greats, not that I don’t already spend enough time doing that. But there will always be a place for photography in this world, I think.

Who is your favourite photographer? Tough one. My favorite Portrait photographer is probably Yousuf Karsh. Although Richard Avedon and Robert Frank are both two tremendous inspirations for me. My favorite Architectural photographer? Surprising, I don’t think I have one. What is your all time favourite photographic image? Any picture that I have missed because I didn’t have my camera on me. Which celebrity, actor or band would you most like to work with if the opportunity came along? I’d would probably say Stephen Malkmus is my main musician to shoot. I’m a huge Pavement fan. I think I would also really like to shoot Gary Oldman. What is your favourite piece of photographic kit you currently own? I think my tripod, besides my camera.

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Anything else you’d like to ad? Photography is supposed to be fun. Take pictures, regardless if you’re a pro or if you’ve got a camera phone. Everyone has something to say, maybe we’ll all have something to learn. Also, if you’d like to see any of my work, please check out www. bengebo.com. Thanks.


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www.somojo.net Bringing you some of the best independent and unsigned music live 24/7

Please check our website www.somojo.net for the latest show schedule. If you would like your music played on Somojo radio, just go to www.somojo.net, create an artists account and you can upload mp3s, videos, images, sell gig tickets and add your listed gigs to www.gigmemories.com.

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Somojo Magazine issue 4  
Somojo Magazine issue 4  

Interviews with The Toronto Drug Bust, Morning Lane, The Beat Rats, Triphazard, Radioboxer and photograpger Ben Gebo

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