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Welcome to the 2010-2011 edition of the North Carolina Pride Resource Guide and to the 26th Anniversary of the North Carolina Pride Parade & Festival. As you look through this guide during the year, remember our advertisers and sponsors. Every one of them has made a stand for equal rights for all in North Carolina. Spanning North Carolina, our annual NC Pride Celebration is the oldest and largest Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgendered event in North Carolina and its surrounding states. This guide is published for the year September 2010 through September 2011 and is distributed throughout the state four or more times a year. To support and advertise, please contact us via email at info@ncpride.org

Articles

City Guides

Two Gay Parents

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Asheville

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History of Pride

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Charlotte

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NCGL Film Festival

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International Marriage

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Towns of NC

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Prop 8 Ruling

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Wilmington

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Life is a Journey

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Asheville & NC Pride

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Where the mind is without fear

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Gold in them Hills

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NC Museum of Art

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When will I find Love?

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NC Travel Club

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Pride Weekend Tour

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Publisher and Editor Graphic Design Business Manager Sales

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Advertiser Listing

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Official Pride Hotels

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Sponsors

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John Short Joshua Smith Mike Dolan Fliss Rebel Fornea

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For some time now, Anti-gay marriage activists have argued vigorously that children need a mother and father. Now a new research study shows that kids do need two parents — but that gender doesn’t matter. The research, which also speaks to the issue of gay adoption, is summarized in the lead article of the new Journal of Marriage and Family. Scholars at USC and New York University looked at a range of existing studies ­— including research on gay and lesbian parents — finding that it’s ideal if a child is raised by two parents who are “responsible, committed, stable,” but that the gender doesn’t cause radical differences. Sociologist Timothy Biblarz of the USC College of Letters, Arts and Sciences says in a release about the study: “Significant policy decisions have been swayed by the misconception across party lines that children need both a mother and a father. Yet, there is almost no social science research to support this claim. One problem is that proponents of this view routinely ignore research on same-gender parents. The bottom line is that the science shows that children raised by two same-gender parents do as well on average as children raised by two different-gender parents. This is obviously inconsistent with the widespread claim that children must be raised by a mother and a father to do well.” Full scientific article available at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/fulltext/123248173/ HTMLSTART” Biblarz, T. J. and Stacey, J. (2010), How Does the Gender of Parents Matter?. Journal of Marriage and Family, 72: 3–22. doi: 10.1111/j.1741-3737.2009.00678.x

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History of NC Pride On the sunny afternoon of April 12, 1981, a murder occurred at the Little River north of Durham. Two young men destroyed the idyllic and tranquil surroundings by attacking a group of people they thought were gay. While several in the group sustained injuries‌ the thugs proceeded down the creek and attacked another victim who happened to be handicapped without use of his legs. He was insulted, beaten and drowned. When the murderers were brought to trial, there was great fear that the court system would let them off or lightly punish due to the gay aspects of the case. A group of local gay men and lesbians banded together for the first public demonstration for gay civil rights in NC at the Durham Court House during the trial in 1982. Although several gay people who testified at the trial lost their jobs because of discrimination, the main perpetrator was found guilty of murder. In the years that followed, the activists were surprised at the number of people who stood up and were counted. They realized that our small closeted community had crossed over a threshold. In 1986, the second public demonstration for gay and lesbian rights was held on the campus of Duke University. The event that started as a gathering soon turned into a march and every year for the next 14 years, the NC Pride March would travel to a major city of our state to demonstrate and demand equal justice. Each year it got larger as more and more of our GLBT citizens gathered the courage to walk down unfriendly streets and each year those streets became less threatening. It must be said that in the heart of most North Carolinians is a deep and abiding sense of fair play and justice. As the march went forward, slowly the attitudes of the past began to change. In Durham where the first march had taken place, there were now many openly gay and gay-friendly businesses. However in 2000, our Pride March faced a crisis when the organizers fell into chaos six weeks before the June march. After all the years of struggle and after all the marches in Asheville, Charlotte, Carrboro, Durham, Raleigh, Winston Salem and Greensboro, it looked as though in the very year of the millennium there would be no march in NC. As the disappointment traveled through the local Durham community, a small but dedicated band of 12 people united to save the march. It was held in 90 degree June weather and a faithful crowd of 2000 marched. In the aftermath, that committee reformed and began to revamp the concepts of our march to fit the new century. It was decided that it would be moved to the Fall to take advantage of the weather and it was also decided that the model of moving the parade had become too difficult to manage. The new model would be based on the idea of many county fairs and a single state fair. Our statewide NC Pride parade and festival would stay in the capital and support other smaller Pride events around the state. In a way, it is interesting to note that after 14 years of marching, our march/parade has come home. The real feeling at the event is one of a homecoming, where friends from all across the state see each other once a year. Using this model, our event has become the largest LGBT event in NC and the surrounding five states.

For listings of Clubs and Organizations across S e c t i o n ofSubSection history pride North Carolina, go to www.ncgaytravel.com

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History of The NC Gay & Lesbian Film Festival In 1995, NC Pride asked the newly restored Carolina Theatre under the direction Steve Martin, to show several gay films in conjunction with its march in Durham. When the theater decided to agree, all hell broke loose. In its infancy as a new non-profit, the theater had not established itself in the minds of the local community and a group of conservative ministers opposed the showings. After much ado, and a screening of the films by portions of the city council and the city attorney, the rainbow green light was given. This seed thus planted, germinated in the following year into the very first NC Gay and Lesbian Film Festival. Planned by Kelly Sanders and a small program committee and directed by Jim Carl, eight films were shown and several hundred tickets sold. Step by step under the watchful care of Mr. Carl, the theater staff and a devoted LGBT committee led by Chuck Wheeler, the event has now become the second largest gay and lesbian film festival in the Southeast, attracting thousands of patrons yearly. Since the beginning, the Festival has featured a diverse array of shorts, documentaries and feature films. This year over 300 filmmakers made submissions for the honor of being on the screen in NC. The Durham Convention and Visitors Bureau named the NCGLFF a Signature Event for Durham, its highest honor. NC Pride continues to support the film festival and operates its popular Pride CafÊ in one of the historic ballrooms in the theater during the festival. Each year patrons know that they are being exposed to a worldwide glimpse of today’s gay and lesbian life that helps bring our community together with over 70 entertaining and sophisticated films.

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c ommu n i t y sp on sor co mmu n it y sp o ns o r For listings of Clubs and Organizations across North Carolina, go to www.ncgaytravel.com

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Nations that grant same-sex marriage Argentina’s same-sex marriage vote this year made it the first country in Latin America to give gays and lesbians the full legal rights, responsibilities and protections that marriage brings to heterosexual couples. Despite an overwhelming Catholic population, Argentine opinion polls consistently showed that citizens supported gay marriage. Argentina now joins the ranks of a number of mostly European nations with similar laws that include many more rights than civil unions, including adopting children and inheriting wealth. Known for its progressive attitude, the Netherlands became the first nation to recognize same-sex marriages in 2001. Earlier this year, Iceland followed suit. Nations that grant full same sex marriage rights: Iceland, Argentina, Mexico, Canada, Spain, Belgium, Netherlands, Sweden, Portugal, South Africa and Norway. Locally we are so proud that North Carolina is the only state in the South that has not passed marriage discrimination into its constitution.

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Much ink will be spilled over the next few days — and, most likely, over the next few years — about the legal correctness of Judge Vaughn Walker’s Proposition 8 ruling. That ruling struck down the referendum passed in 2008 that stripped same-sex couples in California of their existing civil right to marry under state law.

I will leave the discussion of the technical legal issues to others. Instead, I want to focus on the theological correctness of Judge Walker’s ruling. Despite the angry protests of many anti-gay Christian groups, I believe that Judge Walker’s ruling is actually rooted in a profound theological truth articulated by St. Paul in Romans 13: “the one who loves another has fulfilled the law.” In other words, Judge Walker’s Proposition 8 ruling is theologically correct because it recognizes that same-sex marriage is all about love. The ruling notes that the plaintiffs in this lawsuit are in loving relationships. One couple, Kristin Perry and Sandra Stier, have been together for 10 years and are raising four children together. The other couple, Paul Katami and Jeffrey Zarrillo, have been together for nine years. Judge Walker describes the connection between same-sex marriage and love in several places. First, he notes that “marriage is widely regarded as the definitive expression of love and commitment in the United States.” Second, he notes that the “standardized measures” of love “do not

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differ depending on whether a couple is same-sex or opposite-sex.” Third, he notes that samesex love and intimacy are in fact “well-documented in human history.” By contrast, anti-gay religious opponents of same-sex marriage fail to recognize that samesex marriage is ultimately about love. Hiding behind their motherhood-and-apple-pie rhetoric that marriage between a man and a woman is the “bedrock of society”... or “civilization’s longstanding public policy” ... [ rhetoric of the Mormon and Catholic Church respectively ] these opponents have a bizarre theological obsession with needing to legitimize sexual pleasure through biological procreation alone. In my view, the obsession that anti-gay Christians have with the mechanics of sexual acts (that is, tab A can only be inserted into slot B) without any regard to the loving quality of the underlying relationships — whether homosexual or heterosexual — is profoundly wrong from a theological, ethical, and biblical perspective. For example, the Bible refers to same-sex acts six times. However, it refers to love nearly 800 times. What do you think is more important from God’s perspective? Ironically, the National Organization for Marriage (NOM) responded to Judge Walker’s ruling in a most uncharitable and unloving way. In its press release (which incorrectly described Judge Walker as a “Circuit Court Judge”), NOM accused the federal district court judge of conducting the trial in a “biased way,” and it called the plaintiffs’ lawyers, Ted Olson and David Boies “egomaniacal.” In a separate statement, NOM tried to distance itself from an individual who had attended a recent NOM marriage rally in Indianapolis and who held a sign with a picture of two nooses that quoted Leviticus 20:13 and implied that the “solution” for same-sex marriage was executing gay people. NOM also released a statement by Bishop Harry Jackson, the senior pastor of Hope Christian Church in Washington, D.C, who called the ruling a “travesty of justice.” Bishop Jackson said that Judge Walker’s comparison between racism and marriage was a “slur” and “particularly offensive” to those who “remember the reality of Jim Crow.” Sadly, however, Bishop Jackson failed to acknowledge the incredible pain and suffering experienced by numerous faithful lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) African Americans and other LGBT people of color who are rejected and treated as pariahs by their own pastors and religious leaders.

It is disturbing to me that antigay Christians so easily forget that love is at the very heart of the gospel message. The Bible tells us that God is love.

It is disturbing to me that anti-gay Christians so easily forget that love is at the very heart of the gospel message. The Bible tells us that God is love (1 John 4). Jesus teaches that the two great commandments are to love God with all of one’s heart, soul, and mind; and to love one’s neighbor as oneself (Matthew 22). Jesus gave his disciples a new commandment at the Last Supper: to love each other as Jesus loved them (John 15). According to St. Paul, the greatest virtue is love (1 Corinthians 13) and nothing will ever separate us from the love of God (Romans 8). And, as noted above, anyone who loves another person has fulfilled the law (Romans 13).

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Even St. Augustine of Hippo, who is not exactly known for his progressive views about sexual ethics, wrote in his seventh homily on the First Letter of St. John that dilige et quod vis fac, or “love, and do what you will.” In other words, love one another and you cannot do wrong in the sight of God.

We’ve experienced for better or for worse, for richer or for poorer. And yet, after nearly two decades together, we still can’t marry each other in the vast majority of states simply because one of us is not the “right” sex.

Same-sex marriage is all about love. Recently, my husband Michael and I celebrated 19 years together. We’ve lived through blizzards, earthquakes, and the 9/11 terrorist attacks in Manhattan. We’ve celebrated births of nieces and nephews, and we’ve mourned the deaths of family members. We’ve been through career changes, aging parents, and both economic joys and challenges. We’ve moved from one coast to another and back again. We’ve experienced for better or for worse, for richer or for poorer. And yet, after nearly two decades together, we still can’t marry each other in the vast majority of states simply because one of us is not the “right” sex.

As Judge Walker’s Proposition 8 ruling winds its way through the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit and ultimately the U.S. Supreme Court, there will be lots of debate about legal concepts like equal protection and the proper standards of judicial review. But for me, it all boils down to a simple theological truth expressed by St. Paul in 1 Corinthians 13: Love is the greatest virtue of all. In fact, love trumps even faith and hope! Or, for those who prefer the secular version, “Love conquers all.” And that’s why, beyond the shadow of a doubt, Judge Walker’s ruling is theologically correct. 2010 by Patrick S. Cheng. All rights reserved. This piece originally appeared in theHuffington Post and is reprinted with the permission of the author. For more information about the author, see http://www.patrickcheng.net Copyright ©

Life is a Journey You did not ask to be born, but you are here. You have weakn You have both because in life there is two of everything. With well as the willingness to lose. Within you is the heart to feel smallness to be arrogant. Within you is the way to face life as from it. In life there is sadness as well as joy, losing as well as standing, hunger as well as plenty, bad as well as good. I do no but to teach you… that life is a journey sometimes walked in li 32

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esses as well as strengths. in you is the will to win, as compassion as well as the well as the fear to turn away winning, falling as well as t say this to make you despair, ght and sometimes in shadow.

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Black Elk (1863-1950), holy man of the Oglala Lakota, written in 1932.

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Asheville and NC Pride Since the first NC Pride march in Asheville in 1992, this local mountain city has welcomed the GLBT community and made its art deco architecture a special destination. The slogan in 1992 was “Pride = Power”. It was direct and perfectly succinct. For the second march in 1998 the theme was much more of a tongue-twister and ranks as the longest NC pride theme in the last 26 years. The complete theme was: “Be You, Don’t Let Life be an Afterthought, Speak your truth, climb all mountains, soar higher, there are no limits. Live! Live! Live!” Our theme this year is: “One Heart, One World, One Pride” and we are proud to have Attorney Diane Walton represent Asheville as our Parade Marshall. c o mmu n it y sp o n so r

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For listings of Charlotte Clubs and Organizations, go to www.ncgaytravel.com

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Where the mind is without fear Where the mind is without fear and the head is held high Where knowledge is free Where the world has not been broken up into fragments By narrow domestic walls Where words come out from the depth of truth Where tireless striving stretches its arms towards perfection Where the clear stream of reason has not lost its way into the dreary desert sand of dead habit; Where the mind is led forward into ever-widening thought and action Into that heaven of freedom, let us awake. Zen master Koan

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For listings of High Point, Greensboro, & Winston Salem Clubs and Organizations, go to www.ncgaytravel.com


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For listings of Wilmington Clubs and Orgs, go to www.ncgaytravel.com

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Gold In Them Hills I know it doesn’t seem that way But maybe it’s the perfect day Even though the bills are piling And maybe Lady Luck ain’t smiling There’s gold in them hills There’s gold in them hills So don’t lose heart Give the day a chance to start Every now and then life says “Where do you think you’re going so fast” We’re apt to think it cruel but sometimes It’s a case of cruel to be kind And if we’d get up off our knees Why then we’d see the forest for the trees And we’d see the new sun rising Over the hills on the horizon There’s gold in them hills There’s gold in them hills So don’t lose faith Give the world a chance to say... A word or two, my friend There’s no telling how the day might end And we’ll never know until we see That there’s gold in them hills

There’s gold in them hills So don’t lose heart Give the day a chance to start There’s gold in them hills There’s gold in them hills

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Lyrics by Ron Sexsmith, singer and composer (performed on Queer as Folk 2002)

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Our new NC Museum of Art The North Carolina Museum of Art — the first major art museum collection in the country to be formed by state legislation and funding — is our state’s cultural gem. This year was the grand opening of a new 127,000 square-foot, light-filled art museum building designed by New York-based architects Thomas Phifer and Partners. The single-story structure, surrounded by sculpture gardens and beautiful pools, was created specifically to showcase the Museum’s outstanding permanent collection of more than 5,000 objects spanning antiquity to the present day. On the occasion of the expansion, the Museum has acquired more than 100 new works of art that encompass examples of historic and contemporary art from around the world and are installed in the Museum’s new building and the surrounding landscape that includes 30 sculptures by Auguste Rodin. NC Pride considers our museum a “must see” on every visit to the Capital City Raleigh and our festival weekend.

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When will I find love? Are you struggling to find true love or simply worried that you won’t? A lot of people have that worry. But the fact is love is not so rare a thing. For most of us who have trouble finding it, the problem is the barriers we are so good at putting up around ourselves. Some of those barriers are invisible to us and take a lot of work to uncover. Each barrier makes it hard for you to reach out to others and hard for a potential partner to get through. Those barriers can take a lot of forms.There’s the very popular “I’m not going to strike up a conversation with that stranger because I’ll say something stupid.” I’ll tell you, it’s better to risk saying stupid things than to spend your life longing for love. There are barriers that have to do with our “standards” about who we will accept, like only people with perfect bodies or 20 year olds or something like that. Those kinds of barriers may be unrealistic, depending on our characteristics, or they may just narrow the field so much that it limits our chances. Then there are small barriers, such as where you will look for someone, or how you will look for someone, or when you will look for someone. Not all barriers are “good” or “bad” but each one affects your chances of meeting someone who is able and willing to love you. Look for the barriers you may not be aware of. Tear down the ones you truly do not need. The easier it is to get to you the easier it is to fall in love with you. p a rt n er sp o n so r To advertise in next year’s Pride Guide, send an email to info@ncpride.org

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Advertising Agencies The Splinter Group 24 Antiques Market Imports 19 Replacements 44 The Persian Carpet 50 Thomas Englund Clocksmith 51 Whitehall at the Villa 51 Architects/Condominiums Center Studio Architecture 12 Art Galleries and Frames Ambleside Gallery 42 Cary Gallery of Artists 50 LabourLove Gallery 51 Penland Custom Frames 42 Old Sarum Gallery 45 Attorneys Coolidge Law Firm 23 Gailor Wallis & Hunt 22 Sharon Thompson Law Group 23 Walton Law Office 39 Auto Dealerships Capital Chrysler, Jeep, Dodge 2 Bars and Grills Carolina Brewery 53 Foothill Brewing 43 The Borough 53 Pinhook 14 Bookstores Downtown Books and News 38 Malaprops 38 White Rabbit 40 FlyLeaf Books 17 Business Organizations Charlotte Business Guild 40 Raleigh Business & Professional Network 51 Cable & Entertainment Medai Time Warner Cable back cover Carpets - Oriental The Persian Carpet 50 Catering Barbara Boney Caters 52 Madhatter Bakery 10 Nosh 9 Sugarland 34 Saladelia 10 Churches Pilgrim UCC Church 26

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Coffee Shops/Cafes Caffé Driade Madhatter Café and Bakery Malaprops Sugarland Convention/Visitors Bureaus Chapel Hill Orange County Durham Raleigh DJ Services/Music Stores Maydnew DJ & Event Planning OffBeat Music Event/Banquet Halls Studio B Casbah Eyewear Carrboro Family Vision Specs Financial Planning/Investments Triangle/Triad Financial Advisors Florists Flowers by Gary Flooring Accent Hardwood Flooring Furniture and Interiors Ambiente International Beyond Blue Interiors Gifts - Retail GC5 Vintage & Gifts Details Morgan Imports White Rabbit Grocery Stores/Gourmet Markets Food Lion A Southern Season Weaver Street Market Whole Foods Hair Salons M Andrew Design Funky Monkey Aveda Institute Hearing Aids Hamm Hearing Aid Center Hotels/Motels Palm Air Cottages Waterway Lodge Sheraton Four Points Charlotte King’s Daughters Inn Millennium Hotel Group

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Ice Cream Shoppes Sugarland Jewelry - Custom Goldsmiths Hamilton Hill Jewelers Jewelsmith Jewels That Dance Goldworks Chapel Hill Goldworks Gallery Asheville Landscaping/Garden Fixtures Fifth Season Market Imports Transplanted Garden Medical/Health Corporations BlueCross BlueShield of NC Glaxo Smith Kline Wake Med Mortgates/Banking SunTrust Mortgage Newspapers/Web News Qnotes NightClubs Casbah Club Cabaret Flex Legends Warehouse 29 Non-Profit Organizations Pflag - NC Charlotte Pride Band UNCG LGBTQ Student Association Novelties & Gifts - Adult Frisky Business ID Lubricants Optometrists / Eye Glasses Carrboro Family Vision Specs Pet Boarding Doggie Spa Photography Studios My Friend Teresa Photography Physicians - MD Anti Aging & Aesthetic Medical Center Carolina Center for Integrative Medicine Carolina Thermascan Michael Law - Plastic Surgery Psychologists/Psychotherapists Anne Boone Group for Psychotherapy

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Psychologists/Psychotherapists contd. Judith Powell 33 McKinney Counseling & Consulting 33 Mike Katz 33 Real Estate Jo Ellen Mason 18 Michael Sullivan 21 O’Brien & Associates Realty 20 Palm Air Realty Kure Beach 46 ReMax Team Concept 19 Shelter Real Estate 21 Tony Hall & Associates 22 Restaurants 501 Diner 52 Alivia’s 11 Blue Corn Café 9 Breadmen’s Café 17 Crook’s Corner 8 Dish 40 Elmo’s Diner 8 Empire Eats 8 Indochine 46 James Joyce 11 Mayfels 38 Margaret’s Cantina 8 Nosh 9 Pop’s 10 Rue Cler 10 Sadlack’s Heroes 9 Saladelia 10 Southern Rail 10 Sweet Potatoes 42 Toast 9 Watts Grocery 17 Spas/Skin and Laser Aria Skin and Laser Spa 25 Anti Aging & Aesthetic Medical Center 24 Blue Water Spa 25 Theaters & Stage Performances Carolina Theatre 13 Durham Performing Arts Center 63 Tattoo and Piercing Salons Conspiracy Ink 53 Travel Triangle Travel Service 60 Wine Bars West End Wine Bar 52 Videos Adult - Adult Stores Frisky Business 54

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Join the NC Pride Travel Club! NC Pride Travel Club is a Not for profit travel club for LGBT citizens and friends of NC, organized by the Pride Committee of NC. It is open to men and women of all ages. Its purpose is to create community, by forming travel groups to visit other Pride events and festivities around the country and the South. There are no fees or dues, but Club members can share travelogues, travel information & experiences, hospitality and friendship. If you are looking for the fun gay experiences, wishing to make new friendships, interested in traveling to LGBT destinations, wanting reassurance before your big trip, requiring that little push to get you started or even just daydreaming of far-flung shores, then join the NC Pride Travel Group. We work with a LGBT travel agent to make sure our trips are special and we also have the best rates.

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To join or just be on our mailing list send an email to ncgaytravel@yahoo.com

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NC Pride Weekend Tour “Art, Food, Music, Gardens & Pride” Since the 1970’s, Chapel Hill-Carrboro has celebrated equality and diversity by welcoming the GLBT community to this unique university town. Join us next September for the second annual NC Pride Weekend Tour Package. GLBT visitors and friends can indulge in art, antiques, gardens, gourmet events, and concerts before, during and after our annual NC Pride Parade and Festival. Enjoy the contemporary architecture and plush guest rooms of our host hotel as you and a select group of our community interested in the finer things will be guided to Chapel Hill’s incredible offering of art, antiques, food and music — and talk with nationally known experts in their respective fields. Have dinner with the new openly gay mayor of Chapel Hill and the openly gay Chief of Police of Carrboro, meet the owner of Southern Season gourmet emporium, attend a live concert of Chopin’s works on a 14 foot Steinway concert grand piano, dine in a 1920s railroad car, and stroll through the largest native plant garden in the Southeast.

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Official NC Pride Hotels The Triangle

Homewood Suites of Durham Sheraton Raleigh Hotel Sheraton Chapel Hill Hampton Inn of Cary Hampton Inn of Chapel Hill Holiday Inn of North Raleigh The King’s Daughters Inn Millennium Hotel Durham

919-474-9900 919-834-9900 919-968-4900 919-859-5559 919-968-3000 919-872-3500 919-354-7000 919-383-8575

Asheville

Hilton Homewood Suites of Asheville 828-252-5400 Hampton Inn Biltmore Square Asheville 828-667-2022

Charlotte

Sheraton Four Points Charlotte 704-522-0852 Hilton Charlotte City Center 704-377-1500

New Bern

Hilton New Bern Riverfront 252-638-3585

The Triad

O.Henry Hotel in Greensboro 336-854-2000 Holiday Inn Select in Winston Salem 336-767-9595 Clarion Greensboro Airport Hotel 336-315-1510

Wilmington

Hilton Riverside of Wilmington Waterway Lodge in Wrightsville Beach Palm Air Cottages Towne Place Suites of Wilmington

official nc pride hotels

910-763-5900 910-256-3771 866-458-5269 910-332-3326

See all hotels at www.ncgaytravel.com

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Sponsors Gold Sponsors Time Warner Capital Chrysler Jeep Dodge

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Duke Center for LGBT Life Durham Performing Arts Center

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12

44

Tim O’Brien

20

Suntrust

20

Shelter Real Estate

21

Whole Foods

47

Gailor Wallis Hunt

22

Food Lion

45

Sharon Thompson

23

Weaver Street Market

48

Triangle Financial Advisors

23

Triangle Travel Service

60

David Coolidge Law

23

Durham CVB

36

Blue Water Spa

25

Chapel Hill CVB

37

Carolina Center for Integrative Medicine 28

Raleigh CVB

37

M Andrew Design

35

Warehouse29

43

Frisky Business

54

Flex

55

ID Lube

54

Palm Air Realty

46

Partner Sponsors Replacements Ltd

Goldworks

Media Sponsors Q-Notes

15,39

White Rabbit Books

40

41

Independent Weekly

Hotel Sponsors

62

Hilton Homewood Suites

61

King’s Daughters Inn

58

Sheraton Raleigh Hotel

61

Millennium Hotel Group

59

Sheraton Chapel Hill

61

sponsors


g ol d sp on sor To advertise in next year’s Pride Guide, send an email to info@ncpride.org

63


g o ld s p o n so r

North Carolina Pride Guide 2011  

North Carolina’s Twenty-sixthth Annual Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Festival Celebrated in Raleigh, Durham & Chapel Hill

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