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Thursday, December 26, 2013

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The County Times

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Thursday, December 26, 2013

The County Times

Thursday December 26, 2013 20

“This is about providing meaningful, knowledge-based after school programs for our young people.” — Superintendent Michael J. Martirano on Foreign Language in Elementary Schools (FLES) 4 Local News 6 Cops & Courts 8 Business 10 Letters 12 Education 13 Sports 14 Feature Story 18 Obituaries 19 Wedding Announcements 20 Community 22 Book Review 23 Senior 23 History 24 Community Calendar 26 Entertainment 27 Entertainment Calendar 28 Classifieds 29 Business Directory 30 Games 31 Wanderings of an Aimless Mind 31 Health 31 Joyce to the World

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The County Times

Local

Thursday, December 26, 2013

4

Economic Commission Still Looking For Volunteers

News

By Guy Leonard Staff Writer

The county government renewed its call last week for volunteers to apply for membership in an economic development commission that would steer the implementation of plans to diversify the county’s economy. Robin Finnacom, director of the Department of Economic and Community Development, said there are three categories that must have applicants before the commission can begin its work because the federal funding mandates it. The three categories are higher education, minorities and labor. “Certain categories need to be filled from fields of expertise or demographics,” Finnacom said. “There have been well over

40 applications [from other fields.]” But the work of the commission to oversee the diversification of the local economy can only begin once the county comes up with a plan and that means months of discussions with consultants from various industries to find which ones the county can support successfully. The process includes focus groups and listening tours with elected officials, Finnacom said. “This will absolutely consume us for the next 12 to 16 months,” Finnacom said. “We need to get about the business of diversifying the economy instead of just talking out the need to diversify.” There have been no appointments to the economic steering commission, Finnacom said, and there has been no determination

about how many people will comprise it. “I think it will be a fairly large group,” she said. Bill Scarafia, CEO of the St. Mary’s County Chamber of Commerce, said the process would be a difficult one for business leaders locally because of the decades-long dependency on and the prosperity from the presence of the U.S. Navy and the defense technology industry. “The community has never seen the need to invest time or money in looking at our economic challenges because we didn’t face them,” Scarafia said. “This process should’ve been going on a long time but I’m not blaming anyone that it hasn’t.” One of the main challenges will be matching the county’s assets and resources to the right industries.

“There’s no way we can be a distribution center,” he said. “There’s only two ways in or out.” One key element will be to ensure that high technology jobs existed outside of the defense industry to highly trained workers stayed locally to bolster the economy. The new higher education building planned as a partnership with the University of Maryland that focuses on unmanned aerial systems was the prime example, Scarafia said. “With the bricks and the mortar we’ll be one the few places in the country to have it,” he said. guyleonard@countytimes.net

What’s in Store for Maryland?

Local Representatives Prepare for 2014 Legislative Session By Sarah Miller Staff Writer With approximately 2,500 bills introduced every year, “it’s tough to tell what will emerge as the big issues,” said Delegate Anthony J. O'Donnell (R-29C) of the upcoming 2014 Maryland General Assembly Legislative

Session, set to begin at 12 p.m. on Jan. 8. Coming into the session, O’Donnell said there are glaring concerns. “The implementation of Obamacare is a disease,” O’Donnell said, adding that the national and state exchanges are “in a shambles.” In addition to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (aka Obamacare), he said

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the current push to increase minimum wage should be handled delicately, a point Maryland State Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller, Jr. (D-27) agrees on. If the minimum wage is increased too much, it could have the adverse effect of decreasing available jobs, O’Donnell said. Small business owners operate on a tight budget and the more they have to pay their employees, the fewer employees they will hire, he said. Miller supports increasing minimum wage, but not to more than $10. He advocates an increase to between $8 and $8.50, similar to minimum wages in Delaware and Virginia. Maryland citizens continue to struggle to make ends meet, O’Donnell said, and instead of increasing minimum wage, which could cost jobs and possibly make the cost of living go even higher, he recommends studying tax breaks and methods of making living in Maryland more affordable. The cost of living in Maryland is due to its proximity to Washington, D.C., Miller said. When D.C.’s economy is doing well, Maryland residents benefit. Conversely, when D.C. is having a hard time, Maryland residents suffer from the pressures. O’Donnell is concerned with the growing drug abuse in the region. With the costs of healthcare and fuel continuing to increase, economic pressure will continue to rise. That does

not mean Maryland citizens will suffer, Miller said, adding he anticipates no tax increases during the 2014 legislative session. “I want to create a task force to look into the explosion of heroin and prescription drug use in Southern Maryland,” O’Donnell said. The topics covered during the legislative session vary widely, but Miller makes sure to keep up with legislation that affects education in Maryland. He supports a bill that would move the beginning of the school year to after Labor Day, which has been met with mixed reception. Teachers and school administrators view the topic with trepidation while students would be happy to go back to school later in the year, Miller said. Business owners would benefit from the change, especially in seasonal locations such as Ocean City he added. They could count on their summer help staying through the end of the summer instead of training a replacement to work for a matter of weeks. Every year, the legislative session comes down to the matter of the budget, which is on the increase again, O’Donnell said. He does not support an increased budget while Miller said a slight increase is the product of the rising costs of doing business. sarahmiller@countytimes.net

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5

Thursday, December 26, 2013

The County Times

Disaster Exercise Reveals Problems By Guy Leonard Staff Writer Back in October fire and rescue personnel responded to a simulated crash disaster at the county’s regional airport and an after action report showed there were some deficiencies in the response. But Robert Kelly, director of Public Safety and Technology, said the exercise brought out the problems so they could be corrected. “We’re very critical in the after action assessment,” Kelly told The County Times. The Oct. 28 meeting minutes of the Airport Advisory Committee, which oversees the operations at the airport alongside the county’s Department of Public Works and Transportation, showed that there needed to be a plan to react to a disaster for the local Civil Air Patrol detachment and that some of the fire and rescue workers did not have all of their vehicle access keys with them at the time. The report also showed there was a “lack in synergy between the fire department and the new county communication plan with the state police.” The minutes go on to say that the radio channel was not available but Kelly explained the channel had been available.

With the county’s change over to a next generation system subsequent bugs in the system came to light, such as a lack of coverage and certain channels not being available as advertised. But county information technology staff have been working over the past few weeks to eliminate gaps in coverage and the county government has started working on ways to get communications towers built more quickly to spread the coverage net. “The [communications] plan didn’t reflect that the state police could connect with the fire department on the clear (unencrypted) channel,” Kelly said. “The point of the exercise was to identify issues what would be in a real situation. “What it revealed was a training issue.” The exercise also revealed that MedStar St. Mary’s Hospital did not have access to listen to all of the emergency channels either but Kelly said that having access to all of the channels could distract staff at the hospital who needed to listen to only the calls that required medical services. Their access was limited to prevent distractions. “Those are conscious decisions begin made,” Kelly said. guyleonard@countytimes.net

Local

News

Civil Servants, Military Get Cost of Living Increase By Guy Leonard Staff Writer The Obama Administration has approved a one percent cost of living increase (COLA) in pay for federal employees and uniformed service personnel. The executive order signed by the president effectively ends a freeze on COLA increases for those in federal service. Actual salary rates for federal employees have been frozen for four years; the pay increase will take effect in January of 2014. House Minority Whip Steny Hoyer called the executive order a “modest but important step” for federal civil servants and military who deserve a pay raise. Hoyer claimed that federal employees have contributed significantly to deficit reduction through sequestration cuts and employee

furloughs this year to the tune of $114 billion. Recent congressional budget dealings, however, mean that military retirees will be losing some of their cost of living increases. One federal employee lamented that. “It’s kind of ironic military retirees are losing out on their COLAs down the road,” they said. “We appreciate it, but we think our active duty personnel and retirees deserve the same deal.” Most federal employees had enough savings to deal effectively with the furloughs and sequestration cuts, but some “were on the ragged edge” at the end of the year and could use what help they could get. “Some of them were really feeling the pinch,” they said. guyleonard@countytimes.net


The County Times

Cops & Courts Police: Reckless Driving Leads to Child Neglect Charge By Guy Leonard Staff Writer Concerned drivers flashing their headlights tipped off a sheriff’s deputy to a reckless driver, police alleged, who nearly hit several other cars as he traveled down Route 235 in Hollywood Dec. 22. When police stopped Donald Sheldon Strickland, 34, they say they found a halfdressed child in the back of his green minivan — he told police it was his son — and also what they said were two pills of prescription narcotics stowed in his wallet as well as a 12-inch knife, an ax and a metal plowing disc stored loose where his young boy was located. There was no child seat in the vehicle, according to charging documents; Strickland told police his child must have taken his clothes off while he was inside the vehicle. Strickland told police that his tires were bad and that his allegedly erratic driving had been exacerbated by wet roadways. Police said he passed a field sobriety test

and was authorized to drive but only under the condition that his vehicle be equipped with an ignition interlock device; the night of the incident Strickland’s van did not have such a device installed, police said. During a search of Strickland, after he had been pulled over in the Wildewood Shopping Center parking lot, police said they found a syringe in his waistband filled with a clear liquid residue and appeared to have been used, charging documents stated. During the stop police reported that they had handcuffed Strickland and put him in a patrol car “for his safety and for officer safety.” Strickland was eventually taken to the county’s adult detention center were he was briefly incarcerated before being released, according to on-line court records. He faces charges of neglect of a minor, reckless endangerment, possession of a controlled dangerous substance and drug paraphernalia.

Thursday, December 26, 2013

6

Four Firefighters Injured in Fire Truck Accident

guyleonard@countytimes.net

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By Guy Leonard Staff Writer Four firefighters were hurt in a vehicle accident early Monday morning as their Bay District Volunteer Fire Department apparatus crashed and rolled over near the intersection of Flat Iron Road and Drayden Road in Valley Lee. Sheriff’s office deputies and fire service personnel are investigating the accident and an independent investigator will also be looking at the facts of the incident, said Bay District Fire Chief Robert Wahrenbrock. “They were responding to a house fire in Valley Lee, they had just come from a house fire in Lexington Park,” Wahrenbrock said. “Basically… the vehicle flipped four-and-a-half times.” There will be a full safety review among all Bay District firefighters, Wahrenbrock said. “When something like this happens we have a full safety stand down for all of our people,” he said. Wahrenbrock said the exact cause of the crash was unknown but that the driver of the apparatus, Tommy Fairfax, was ejected from the vehicle. The remaining three firefighters on board sustained minor injuries, Wahrenbrock said, with one being trapped for a time. All four were transported to hospitals for treatment, the fire chief said, but have since been released. The four were lucky to be alive, Wahrenbrock said. “That driver, I can’t tell you how lucky he was,” he said. “They were all up walking and talking afterwards.” Wahrenbrock said it was unknown whether the driver was wearing his seatbelt at the time. Keith Fairfax, past president of Bay District, said his nephew was recovering. “It was just a guardian angel and being very lucky,” he said of his nephew’s coming through the crash. The apparatus was paid off and insured, Wahrenbrock said, but it was highly unlikely it would see service again after the rollover. “We’re still not going to put it back out on the street,” the fire chief said. guyleonard@countytimes.net


7

Thursday, December 26, 2013

The County Times

SHERIFF’S BLOTTER

Cops & Courts

The following information is compiled directly from publicly released police reports.

On Dec. 19 Delante Anthony Moore, 31, of Lexington Park, was charged with possession of an alcoholic beverage/open container on the property of Lex’s apartments by Deputy Beishline of the Lexington Park COPs Unit. On Dec. 19 Lity Gean Thompson Jr., 40, of Lexington Park, was charged with possession of an alcoholic beverage I the parking lot of a retail establishment by Deputy Beishline of the Lexington Park COPs Unit. On Dec. 19 William Joseph Robrecht, 55, of Lexington Park, was charged with possession of an alcoholic beverage where prohibited in the parking lot of St. Mary’s Square by Deputy Beishline of the Lexington Park COPs Unit. On Dec. 19 Deputy Wesner responded to the St. Mary’s County Detention Center for a fight between two inmates. Deputy Wesner’s investigation revealed on December 18th suspect Devon Christian Johnson, 28, of Lexington Park, grabbed another inmate’s left arm and attempted to strike the inmate in the face with his fist. Johnson was charged with 2nd Degree Assault DOC Employee (inmate). On Dec. 19 Deputy First Class Boyer responded to the area of Sycamore Hollow Drive in California, for the report of a suspicious vehicle parked on the street with the headlights turned off. DFC Boyer made contact with Patrick John Eagan, 18, of Chaptico, who was seated in the driver’s seat and detected an odor of marijuana. A quantity of suspected marijuana was recovered from Eagan’s jacket pocket. Eagan was placed under arrest and transported to the St. Mary’s County Detention Center. He was charged with Possession Controlled Dangerous Substance – Marijuana Less Than 10 Grams and Possession Paraphernalia. On Dec. 19 Deputy Tirpak responded to a residence in Lexington Park for a reported domestic disturbance. The victim alleged suspect Martell D’angelo Morgan, 26, of Lexington Park, struck the victim in the left side of the face with his hand during an argument. A roommate attempted

to intervene at which time Morgan charged the roommate with a baseball bat. Morgan was restrained until deputies arrived and he was placed under arrest. Morgan was transported to the St. Mary’s County Detention Center and charged with 2 counts of 2nd Degree Assault. On Dec. 22 Deputy First Class Rogers responded to the Walmart in California for a trespassing complaint. An employee observed Kaitlyn Deloris Fraley, 18, of California, on the property after she had been served a notice not to trespass in September 2012. Fraley was charged by Criminal Citation with Trespass Private Property. On Dec. 21 Justin Earl Asquith, 21, of Lusby, was charged with Purchasing Tobacco for a minor by Criminal Citation after he purchased cigars for several juveniles. He was charged by Deputy C. Shomper. On Dec. 22 at approximately 12:35 a.m., the Emergency Communications Center (ECC) received several 9 1 1 calls from citizens traveling southbound on Three Notch Road in the area of Hollywood reporting a minivan operating in a reckless manner. Deputy Flerlage observed the vehicle and conducted a traffic stop. The driver, identified as Donald Sheldon Strickland, 34, of Great Mills, was operating the vehicle without the required Interlock Device and exhibited signs of intoxication. Strickland’s 2 year old child was partially clothed standing in the back of the vehicle surrounded by a knife and other implements. During a pat down search of Strickland a syringe containing clear liquid fell from his waistband. Strickland was placed under arrest and a search of the vehicle was completed at which time 2 suspected Suboxone packets were found inside Strickland’s wallet. Strickland was transported to the St. Mary’s County Detention Center and charged with Negligent Driving, Reckless Driving, Failing to Secure a Child Under 8 in safety seat, driving a vehicle in violation of a restricted License, Child Neglect, Reckless Endangerment, Possession Controlled Dangerous Substance – Not Marijuana, and Possession Paraphernalia.

On Dec. 22 Deputy Lance responded to a residence in Lexington Park for a reported assault. The victim alleged suspect Jeffery Fritz Alvers, 40, of Lexington Park, pushed the victim to the floor, kicked, and attempted to strangle the victim with his hands. Deputy Lance observed fresh evidence of injury on the victim’s neck. Alvers was placed under arrest and transported to the St. Mary’s County Detention Center. He was charged with 2nd Degree Assault. On Dec. 21 Deputy First Class Rogers responded to a residence in Tall Timbers, for a domestic assault in progress. The victim alleged suspect Michele Anne Elburn, 44, of Tall Timbers, struck the victim in the back with her fist and scratched the victim’s forearm during an argument. DFC Rogers observed fresh evidence of injury on the victim and Elburn was placed under arrest. She was transported to the St. Mary’s County Detention Center and charged with 2nd Degree Assault. On Dec. 21 Deputy First Class White responded to a residence in Avenue, for a reported domestic disturbance. The victim alleged suspect Brent Alan Colyer, 34, of Avenue, pushed the victim into the bathroom wall and repeated pushed the victim onto the bed after every time the victim attempted to get up. DFC White observed fresh evidence of injury on the victim and the suspect was placed under arrest. Colyer was transported to the St. Mary’s County Detention Center and charged with 2nd Degree Assault. On Dec. 20 loss prevention personnel at the Belk Department Store located in California, observed a male subject enter the store, select two bottles of cologne and conceal them in his clothing. He then exited the store and was confronted by loss prevention. He discarded the merchandise and fled on foot. Deputies arrived in the area and located the suspect, identified as Bryant Mitchell Richardson, 24, of Lexington Park. Richardson was charged with Theft Under $1,000.00 by Criminal Citation.

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Thursday, December 26, 2013

8

Get A Card – Help A Hero At Mission BBQ This Holiday Season

MISSION BBQ Donates 10% of Holiday Gift Card Sales to Wounded Warrior Project Tis’ the season to be giving at MISSION BBQ. The fast casual restaurant known for its traditional American BBQ and dedication to honoring uniformed American Heroes, today announced its holiday gift card campaign. For every holiday gift card purchased through New Year’s Day, MISSION BBQ will donate 10% of the total dollar amount to the Wounded Warrior Project. “The holiday season is a time of giving, and we are honored to give back to the Wounded Warrior Project through the Get a Card – Help a Hero gift card program,” says MISSION BBQ co-owner Bill Kraus. “While most businesses offer a discount for shoppers after spending a certain amount, we offer customers a chance to give a great gift while at the same time supporting the Wounded Warrior Project.” The MISSION BBQ reloadable gift cards can be purchased in any dollar amount and are available at all five MISSION BBQ locations including Glen Burnie, Perry Hall, Canton and California, Maryland and York, Pennsylvania. It is the perfect stocking stuffer for the BBQ lover in your life. Lucky gift card recipients can enjoy MISSION BBQ favorites such as Texas Inspired Beef Brisket; Jalapeño and Cheese Sausage; and the bestselling North Carolina Pulled Pork Sandwich topped high with Cool Slaw and accompanied by an array of homemade secret sauces. Favorite made-from-scratch side servings include Maggie’s Mac-N-Cheese; Baked Beans & Brisket; and Green Beans & Bacon. Desserts include an assortment of homemade Southern seasonal sweets.

About Mission BBQ: MISSION BBQ first opened its doors on September 11, 2011, on the tenth anniversary of the day that changed the world forever. Owners Bill Kraus and Steve Newton opened the restaurant with a mission to give back to American Heroes, who protect, serve and save. They traveled across the country, from Texas to Kansas City, to the Carolinas and St. Louis to master America’s greatest contribution to culinary arts: BBQ! A few favorite menu items include Bay-BBack Ribs; North Carolina Pulled Pork; and Jalapeno and Cheese Sausage. Each MISSION BBQ location supports and donates proceeds to numerous military charities including the Wounded Warrior Project, USO, Toys for Tots and the Honor Flight Network, as well as the many local police, fire and first responder charities in each of their communities. Every day, at exactly 12 noon, the entire restaurant halts to honor our country by saluting the flag, standing at attention and singing our National Anthem. MISSION BBQ offers customized catering for parties of all sizes, small and large, and has an authentic deuce and half military truck outfitted with a fully operational smoker that can roll in and feed your army. For more information about MISSION BBQ, please visit http://mission-bbq. com/. Follow Mission BBQ’s latest news at https://twitter.com/MissionBBQ and https://www.facebook.com/ missionbbqtheamericanway.


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The County Times

Thursday, December 26, 2013

Business Profile

Lightfoot Massage: Relaxation, Aromatherapy at Leonardtown Wharf

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By Kay Poiro Staff Writer Audrey Lightfoot graduated from Old Dominion with a degree in Psychology, but it wasn’t until an epiphany years later that she decided to pursue a massage therapy as a career. “I literally woke up one morning and said, ‘I’m going to look into massage therapy’,” Audrey says. “As soon as I did, I realized that I’d found my calling.” Today, Audrey is a licensed massage therapist, certified aromatherapist and owner of Lightfoot Massage in Leonardtown. Lightfoot massage opened its current location- just steps from Leonardtown Wharf- in September 2013. Her studio in the renovated Victorian near the wharf is ideal for conducting workshops, as well as making the organic candles, bath salts and other products for which Lightfoot Massage is known. Audrey uses organic, all-natural oils for the various services. One of Lightfoot Massage’s more popular services is the traditional, 60 minute massage. However, rather than offer clients a standard massage like deep tissue or Swedish, Audrey prefers to listen to the client’s specific needs. “When clients visit, I first ask them what’s going on with their bodies and how they feel emotionally. Then, I adjust the modality of the massage accordingly,” she says. She has also incorporated light stretching into the massage session for those seeking relief before or after strenuous exercise. She goes on to say, “Most people who

Photo by Kay Poiro

come to me are experiencing some level of discomfort. The massage compliments their regular health regimen.” Audrey emphasizes the health benefits of her profession, saying that she’s not out to convince people who don’t ‘buy’ the healing properties of massage or aromatherapy. “Massage and aromatherapy reduce anxiety, tension, boosts the immune system and can help alleviate insomnia.” After becoming a certified aromatherapist in the summer of 2013, Audrey expanded Lightfoot Massage’s service offerings to include aromatherapy. “Aromatherapy intensifies the massage and the clients love it,” she says. “Different oils add different elements to the massage.” Audrey notes that the oils do more than just smell good. Many of them can be blended for medicinal purposes to help reduce pain, inflammation, among other ailments. “If I can give you a cream or a pillow spray to help you sleep, that is definitely a good thing,” she says. Starting in January 2014, Audrey plans to host workshops featuring different essential oils and products at least once a month. For Valentine’s Day, she will be offering a special workshop featuring the rose essential oil. Lightfoot Massage is located at 22530 Washington St., Leonardtown Wharf. For more information about Lightfoot Massage, visit www.lightfootmassage.com or call 301-247-8093 for an appointment. kaypoiro@countytimes.net

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The County Times

Letters to the

President Roosevelt’s ‘Promises’ On Social Security This letter is in response to Tom Wolf’s letter in the Dec. 19 issue of the County Times. I think we have a difference of semantics over the details. When I referred to President Roosevelt’s ‘promises’ on Social Security I was referring to the political ‘sales pitch’ given to the American people to increase popular support for the Social Security program. Obviously it was not ‘locked in’ in the original law. Congress also has the power to change any part of the U.S. Code so later changes modifying the law did the job of invalidating the original promises as I pointed out. Mr. Wolf states that the operation of the Social Security trust fund has not changed since 1935. I never said it did. I said the funds were moved to the General Operating Fund and spent, only to be replaced by Congressional IOUs. As we recently saw with our dysfunctional Congress, when they can’t reach an agreement on spending and debt reduction they do nothing and we reach the debt ceiling. If that situation had not been resolved, all Social Security checks of any kind would have stopped. If the Social Security trust fund had had it’s funds remain intact, it would have continued to make payouts regardless of the debt ceiling! We have an excellent example of these Democratic falsehoods with our current President. President Obama ‘sold’ the (UN)Affordable Health Care Act with promises of “For those of you with current health insurance policies, nothing will change.” In truth millions have seen increased premiums and cancelled policies. Despite having the same amount of time that it took this country to go from Pearl Harbor until the end of World War II to set up the computer programs required to educate, register, and run this program the results have been and continue to be abysmal. One might question the accuracy of Democrat Nancy Pelosi’s comment that, “Once we pass the law, we can find out what is in it.” It seems the whole “Change” thing was just a ploy to increase the rate of creeping Socialism. We may not agree on interpretation, but I would hope we can agree on these facts. Glenn Weder Hollywood, Md.

Notice of Public Hearing The Leonardtown Mayor and Town Council will hold a public hearing on January 13, 2014 at 4:15 p.m. in the Town Office, located at 41660 Courthouse Dr., Leonardtown, MD. The purpose of the hearing is to present for public review and comment, changes to the Leonardtown Zoning Ordinance and the Sign Ordinance relative to Ordinance No. 158-163. Copies of the proposed changes are available for review at the Town Office. All interested parties are encouraged to attend or to submit written comments by 4:00 p.m. on January 13, 2014 to the Commissioners of Leonardtown, POB 1, Leonardtown, MD 20650. Special accommodations will be made for persons with disabilities upon request. By Authority: Laschelle E. McKay, Town Administrator.

12/26/2013

The testimony of Capt. Ben Shevchuk before the Planning Commission left a lot of questions unanswered. He said the Navy wants to expand the buffer for the AICUZ due to potential aircraft accidents which would reduce development opportunities in Lexington Park. A stone’s throw from gate 2 is a large commissary and exchange which are Navy operated big box stores. Nearby the Navy has built over a million square feet of office space for the Naval Air Systems Command and there are restaurants, hundreds of housing units, millions of square feet of office space, recreation facilities, and other commercial type buildings unrelated to aircraft operations. To further confuse things, the Navy wants to build even more office space on government owned land under its enhanced use lease project. Why are these Navy owned facilities AICUZ compatible but not the same type buildings in Lexington Park? Does the Navy have one set of guidelines for itself and a more restrictive set for commercial development nearby? Do they expect airplane crashes to occur only outside the gate? Why? For decades Lexington Park was the commercial center for St. Mary’s County. Businesses like the Hub, Dietz shoes, NAVAIR Grill, Kings 5 & 10 and many others were the only places to shop or eat for miles around and all were located just outside what is now Gate 2. Lexington Manor was built by the Navy and later sold

intact as a housing development to private interests. Only later did this development become AICUZ incompatible. What has changed to make these businesses and homes AICUZ incompatible? Frank Knox School was also removed as AICUZ incompatible yet the Navy uses it as a school. If a school is incompatible, why is it still a school? The Navy is the big local employer and it makes sense to have people live and shop near where they work instead of the promoting the congestion and Waldorf type sprawl we are seeing. Growth should be focused around Lexington Park and not creeping up Route 235 and Route 4. The Navy will do what is best for the Navy and if they need more land they will take it with eminent domain authority as did with the 6,400 acres they already have. They could also buy easements on individual properties. The Planning Commission and Board of County Commissioners need to do what is best for Lexington Park and Saint Mary’s County unless good reasons are provided to do otherwise. So far these reasons have not been forthcoming. Robert Willey California, Md.

Our County’s Secret Angels There are many secret angels in our county and they come in all shapes and sizes. I was on a secret mission and was greatly aided by Mike Swartz of Mikes Bikes. He was so kind in his matter of fact way helping accomplish a secret Christmas Mission. He was extremely generous working within our limited budget. While I was there he was accepting food donations from Commission Morgan. Collecting food is something that is second nature to Mike and seems to be executed effortlessly. He is an expert at this effort since he has been doing the food collection for years. He was able to talk a great deal of “politics” in a short amount of time, Changing St. Mary’s County with collaborative solutions all suggested to Todd Morgan,

for the improvement to St. Mary’s County. During this time of year we need to applaud these “Secret Angels” who go about their good works with aplomb. We need to thank them because they are such a vital part of our community. This year I have noted that during the most challenging economic times we have startling generosity. Today this most unlikely angel wore a stocking cap, bike pants, and sported a beard. He gave the gift of time, talent and money that will make a difference in the lives of children and he has yet to complete all of his deliveries! Lila Ridgell Hofmeister Principal, St. Michael’s Catholic School

A Common Purpose Charles County Right to Life thanks the purchasers of wreaths for the Cheltenham Veterans Cemetery to participate in the Wreaths Across America Project on Saturday Dec. 14. We also thank The County Times for printing our letter "Honoring Veterans at Christmas" in its Nov. 21 edition. Charles County Right to Life took part in the ceremony to honor veterans for their service to our country and to remember them at Christmas. We have also come to realize that we have something in common with them. It certainly isn’t the dangers, hardships, separations from families, etc. that they faced while serving in the military, but pro-lifers and

veterans do have a common purpose. When the veterans were in the military, their main purpose was to protect the lives of people. The main purpose of prolife groups is to protect the lives of helpless innocent babies in the womb. Not everyone can join the military, police, etc. to protect lives, but everyone can join or support the pro-life cause and help to end the War on Babies. A good place to start might be attending the annual March for Life on Jan. 22, 2014 in Washington D. C. and other cities. Robert Boudreaux Waldorf, Md.

James Manning McKay - Founder

Eric McKay -Associate Publisher..................................ericmckay@countytimes.net

P.O. Box 250 Hollywood, Maryland 20636 News, Advertising, Circulation, Classifieds: 301-373-4125

www.countytimes.net

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Questions Remain Unanswered By Shevchuk

Editor

Legal Notice

Thursday, December 26, 2013

Contributing Writers:

Angie Stalcup - Editorial Production Manager...........angiestalcup@countytimes.net

Kimberly Alston

Guy Leonard - Reporter - Government, Crime...............guyleonard@countytimes.net

Laura Joyce

Tobie Pulliam - Office Manager..............................tobiepulliam@countytimes.net

Ron Guy Debra Meszaros

KayPoiro-Reporter-Business, Education, Entertainment..........kaypoiro@countytimes.net

Shelby Oppermann

KaseyRussell- Graphic Designer.......................................kaseyrussell@countytimes.net

Terri Schlichenmeyer

Sarah Miller- Reporter - Community..............................sarahmiller @countytimes.net Sales Representatives......................................................................sales@countytimes.net

Linda Reno Doug Watson


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The County Times

Thursday, December 26, 2013

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The County Times

Thursday, December 26, 2013

12

Education Foreign Language in Elementary School Coming to SMCPS By Kay Poiro Staff Writer St. Mary’s County Council of PTAs, in conjunction with St. Mary’s Public Schools (SMCPS) and Big Learning, will offer elementary school foreign language courses in an after-school program starting in the spring of 2014. Foreign Language in Elementary Schools (FLES) will initially be offered at five county elementary schools in 2014 with plans to eventually expand to the rest of the elementary schools. Wendy Tarr, a former middle and high school French teacher and current SMCPS World Language Supervisor, says foreign language instruction at the elementary school level has been something the school system has been planning for years. Speaking about the new FLES program, Superin-

tendent Martirano told The County Times, “This is about providing meaningful, knowledge-based after school programs for our young people.” For now, FLES will only be offered at Banneker, Dynard, Evergreen Leonardtown, Lettie Marshall Dent and Ridge Elementary schools. French will be offered, depending on level of interest, as an intro class for grades K-1 and a beginner class for grades K-5. French and Spanish will be offered to the upper grades. Surveys were done at each school and schools with the highest interest were chosen to participate in the program’s first year. Tarr says that the long-term plan is to expand FLES to the other elementary schools following successful implementation of the program at the six pilot schools. Classes will be taught using games, songs, drama, drills, dialogues, maps and culturally related activities. Cost for the class is approximately $150 for once a week,

one-hour after school class for 12 weeks. The St. Mary’s County Council PTA is currently looking for native or near-native French or Spanish speakers to serve as paid teachers for upcoming classes. Applicants need not be certified language teachers. However, they must pass an SMCPS background check prior to teaching. A verbal interview may be conduced to verify teacher’s language proficiency. Interested teachers should contact Wendy Tarr at wmtarr@smcps.org. Tarr also says they’re also taking applications from those interested in teaching German, Chinese and Italian for future offerings. “We are all thrilled to be started FLES and look forward to eventually expanding to our other elementary schools,” she says. kaypoiro@countytimes.net

Calvert Sheriff’s Office Explorer Program Offers Positive Influence for Southern Maryland Teens By Sarah Miller Staff Writer From Shop with a Cop to the upcoming Polar Bear Plunge in North Beach, the Calvert County Sheriff’s Office (CCSO) is offering youth between the ages of 14 and 21 opportunities to connect with their communities in a safe and positive way through the Explorer Program. The new year promises to be one of growth for the CCSO Explorer Program, said Deputy Brittany Schafer. They have been seeing a steadily increasing number of students from all over Southern Maryland involved and attending meetings regularly. Schafer and First Deputy Vaughn Evans coordinate the group, which currently meets at the sheriff’s office in Prince Fredrick. If the group grows any more, Schafer anticipates appealing to local schools, churches or community centers for a larger space to hold meetings. The explorers are planning to attend a competition in July, Schafer said. Before going to competition, they will be conducting a variety of fundraisers, including parking cars at community events, to help pay for the cost of the competition. The competi-

tion includes conducting mock traffic stops, investigating a crime scene and searching a person, a vehicle or a building. During the year, Explorers learn about topics covered in police academy, Schafer said. She and Evans create lesson plans to prepare students for the academy, but the program is not only open to students hoping to build a career in law enforcement. Students are introduced to the States Attorney Laura Martin, local judges and even business owners. Even if an explorer chooses not to enter law enforcement, they come out of the program knowing how to conduct themselves around police, Schafer said. “I don’t see what they don’t get out of it,” Schafer said. Through the activities the explorers participate in during the year, they get a sense of self-confidence, learn teamwork skills and how to respect others. Students are required to keep their grades above a 2.0 in school, which teaches them the value of studying to achieve academic excellence. The Explorer Program is open to anyone, Schafer said. Participants must have their parents permission to join, but they accept applications from students all over the tri-county area. Members are encouraged to

Photo courtesy of Brittany Schafer

bring their friends and students who think the Explorer Program sounds interesting are encouraged to attend the meetings. Meetings are held the first and third Wednesday at the Sheriff’s Office, located at 30 Church

28th Annual Christmas Doll & Train Exhibit

St. Clement's Island Museum

St, Prince Frederick, from 6 to 8 p.m. For more information, visit www.facebook.com/CcsoExplorersPost91. sarahmiller@countytimes.net

Piney Point Lighthouse Holiday Exhibit

Piney Point Lighthouse Museum & Historic Park

38370 Point Breeze Rd Colton's Point, MD 20626 301-769-2222

44720 Lighthouse Rd Piney Point, MD 20674 301-994-1471

Enjoy "A Maryland Christmas" with vintage dolls, toys, and miniature trains. Learn about interesting facts and folklore of Maryland! Museum store open for shopping!

Come "Home for Christmas" and see a nostalgic look at Christmases long ago. Keeper's quarters filled with holiday eras and vintage items. Play the scavenger game!

Dec. 5 to 20 (Wed - Sun) 12 noon to 4 pm • Dec. 21 to 31(Open daily) 10 am to 4 pm Closed Christmas Eve & Christmas Day • FREE OPEN HOUSE DECEMBER 14!

Dec. 7, 8, 14, 15 (12 noon to 4 pm) Dec. 21 to 31 (Open daily) 10 am to 4 pm

Closed Christmas Eve & Christmas Day FREE OPEN HOUSE DECEMBER 15!

St. Mary’s County Museum Division of Recreation and Parks - St. Mary���s County Board of Commissioners


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Thursday, December 26, 2013

The County Times

Sports

A View From The

Bleachers Rediscovering A Gem

By Ronald N. Guy Jr. Contributing Writer A faithful reader noticed my conspicuous silence. Was it that obvious? Truth is, I have been avoiding this. I don’t know if it was conscious or subconscious, but my dear ‘Skins, the burgundy and gold clad Sons of Washington, have never been so glaringly absent from this column for so long. On the conscious side of the decision tree, I mostly keep the biweekly “views” from my mythical bleachers positive and inspiring – and Washington, D.C. professional football hasn’t flirted with either of those lately. On the subconscious side, I just didn’t feel like talking about the ‘Skins. They became the pile of dirty laundry in the corner, the stack of mail on the table and hairball in the drain. I just didn’t want to deal with it. Frankly, my wasted Sunday afternoons with the football team turned circus act were enough. Contemplating, extracting and delivering a story from the mushroom cloud forming over FedEx Field was simply energy this downtrodden sportswriter didn’t possess. Even at the height of my issue-avoidance, I knew this article would come. I spend too much time thinking about this franchise to ignore them for an entire NFL season. Don’t worry; I’m still going to avoid the obvious. My momma didn’t name me Ebenezer. This article isn’t a manifesto about Griffins, Shanahanagans and Snyder of Landover (and no, I’m not referring to mythical beasts, misspelling a word for mischief or making an inaccurate geographical reference to a pretzel maker). The holiday season is not the time for such depressing nonsense. Instead, I’m rolling back the clock and revisiting ‘Skins history. Is there any choice? It’s the only decent thing remaining with the franchise that majors in disappointment. December 10th, high noon: I was, probably like you, neck deep in my 9 to 5. Shuffling between meetings, I flipped on ESPN980 (92.7 FM) and discovered the calm eye in Hurricane ‘Skins. The Sports Fix, a daily show hosted by Kevin Sheehan and Thom Loverro, booked two hours with ‘Skins Hall of Fame quarterback Sonny Jurgensen. Work permitted catching only a few snippets live, but I caught the entirety of the piece via the station’s on-line audio vault (bless you, internet). Jurgensen, 79, has been D.C. icon for decades and a significant sports presence for my entire life. Still, this interview lacked any redundancy. Jurgy discussed his years at Duke, his time with the Philadelphia Eagles, the trade that brought him to Washington and his notorious carousing and disdain for curfews. He talked about being in attendance at Wilt Chamberlain’s 100-point game (he played on an Eagles barnstorming basketball team that was the warm-up act for the Philadelphia Warriors), playing for Vince Lombardi and his relationship with George Allen and Billy Kilmer. The retrospective ended with Jurgensen’s media career, a rich, four decade long run that has included gameday broadcasts with Sam Huff, working with sportscasters George Michael and Glenn Brenner (the best I’ve ever seen) and an interview with fellow ‘Skins Hall of Fame quarterback Sammy Baugh. It was riveting. I could have listened to Jurgy for hours. The interview, and all the accompanying nostalgia, was the tonic my weary ‘Skins soul needed after another lost season. The stories were old but the experience was brand new. And in that way, it reminded me of one of the best aspects of the holiday season. Strip away the lights, the red-suited superstar and the disturbing commercialism and ‘tis still very much is, at its essence, the season for pausing our dizzying routines, re-grouping personally and re-energizing relationships that fall victim to time, the great constraint, throughout the year. Those two hours listening to Jurgy were like spending an afternoon with Grandpa Football. I laughed, learned a few things and recalled some of the best times in my life. It felt like a phone call to an old friend, a long walk with a son or daughter or catching up with extended family – all things this time of year makes possible. Warmest wishes to you and yours. May you find your equivalent of a chat with Sonny Jurgensen – whatever that may be - this holiday season. Send comments to rguyjoon@yahoo.com

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The County Times

Thursday, December 26, 2013

14

Feature Story

COPS Unit Shakes Things Up in Lexington Park By Guy Leonard Staff Writer For the past four months six deputies assigned to police Lexington Park have made a big impact on nuisance crimes that have made businesses suffer in the aging community for years, say economic development officials and property owners. For the first time in a long time businesses are seeing their customer base coming back without having to avoid drunks and vagrants, they say. “I don’t know where they go but they don’t come here,” said Christina Brooks, lease administrator for Millison Management, which owns Millison Plaza in the park and many other properties with commercial establishments. She said that before the COPS Unit started its operations customers in Millison Plaza and its other properties were often besieged by the homeless and panhandlers looking for handouts. “You’d be hit up three or four times for money,” Brooks said. “But in the last few months they’ve really gotten a handle on it.”

Photos By Frank Marquart

Sgt. Clay Safford, leader of the sheriff’s office COPS Unit, said when they first began their new mission the first thing they did was take a survey of business owners to find out what their major problems were. Loitering, public drinking and drunkenness, panhandling and trespassing were at the top of the list and that’s where his officers started, Safford said. It started with issuing trespass notices as a warning to offenders, he said, and if they returned it meant arrest, court trial and a fine of about $100. Drinking in public is illegal in St. Mary’s County and the other nuisance crimes had crippled commerce in the park. “Businesses told us because of these problems they couldn’t get the customer base they once had,” Safford said. His officers take pictures of those they give trespass notices to, he said, so that patrol officers who are not part of his unit who respond to continued complaints can easily identify suspects. “It’s important that you track this and know who you’re dealing with,” Safford said. But the problems didn’t just congregate at businesses but there were serious crimes occurring at the Lexington Park library after hours, he said, that was all


15

Thursday, December 26, 2013

caught on surveillance footage. Aside from enforcement actions in the parking lot there, just turning off the library’s wireless internet connection when it closed helped ensure the parking lot was not attractive in the evening hours, he said. “It went from having prostitution in the parking lot, drug deals going down and people pulling guns on each other… to not happening anymore,” Safford said. “People were just hanging out and using the WiFi.” Aside from cleaning up nuisance crimes they have also responded to other more serious criminal incidents as well as conducted foot patrols that took three deputies on a five-mile hike through business districts and neighborhoods contacting property owners and talking to residents. The purpose was two-fold, Safford said, since it helped to bolster community confidence in police but it also gave notice to criminal elements that police were active in neighborhoods. It had a chilling effect on their activities, Safford said. “They see us and they start sending out text messages and the word gets around,” he said. “They start to think ‘Maybe we shouldn’t break into that house.’” Mountain bike patrols have also been effective Safford said, since deputies have greater mobility than on foot but the lack of a car makes them less noticeable to the criminal element. “Every time they’ve gone out on bike patrols they’ve gotten a drug arrest,” he said of the three forays on bikes. Since starting back on Aug. 19 Safford and his five deputies have investigated 92 criminal offenses, made

The County Times

131 criminal arrests, conducted 814 traffic stops and handed out 23 alcohol citations through Nov. 30. The amount of trouble public consumers of alcohol now experience has made it difficult to do so conveniently, Safford said, so much so that the number of such citations is actually diminishing. “A lot of people are figuring out it’s not worth it to drink in public,” he said. The deputies are now working on strengthening their ties to the community by visiting both George Washington Carver and Lexington Park elementary

Feature Story

schools to talk to students and they also attend community and business association meetings. The whole point is to be seen, Safford said. “You have to get out of your cruiser,” he said. “The goal is to gain their trust… to help them clean up their own neighborhoods. “That’s the investment.” guyleonard@countytimes.net

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The County Times

Thursday, December 26, 2013

Handcrafted Items & Gifts Produced by Local Fiber Farmers & Artisans

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Thursday, December 26, 2013

The County Times

Friday, January 3rd, 2014 5PM to 8PM Make Leonardtown “Your Place” Every First Friday!

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leonardtown FitneSS and nUtrition On Route 5 (Next to Food Lion) Making a healthy lifestyle change for the New Year? Ring 2014 in right by making informed decisions that involve shifting your Wellness focus from quantity to quality. Stop by on First Friday and learn how to make more mindful choices about food and exercise, and choices for a better lifestyle.

north end Gallery 41652 Fenwick Street Opening Reception for Inspirations from Summerseat Sanctuary. Meet and greet with Board Members from Patuxent Tidewater Land Trust, Summerseat and North End Gallery. Come learn why preserving open space in SOMD is so important. Light refreshments. the Good earth, natUral FoodS 41675 Park Ave Wishing you a happy and healthy New Year! Enjoy New Year surprises and free samples in the Good Earth Kitchen with Whitney.

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Port oF leonardtown winery 23190 Newtowne Neck Road Enjoy live music from Gretchen and Randy RIchie while you thaw away the winter in our cozy tasting room. Enjoy a glass of our award winning wines! $5 wine tastings, includes 6 wines and a souvenir glass.

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Established in 2013, Bellarus Boutique is a Womens Contemporary Retail Boutique that sells Apparel, Jewelry and Accessories.

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facebook.com/bellarusmd twitter.com/bellarusmd 41665 Fenwick Street Unit 15 • Leonardtown, MD 20650

Jonathan Nordstrom will be signing and reading his children’s book, Sometimes Sleep on First Friday from 5-7 PM


The County Times

Obituaries Joseph Roy Guyther, 93 Dr. Joseph Roy Guyther, MD, 93, passed away Dec. 18, at his long time residence in Mechanicsville, Md. Born July 31, 1920, in Mechanicsville, he was the son of the late Roy and Helena Robrecht Guyther. He was predeceased by three brothers; William, Jack, and Oliver; and one sister, Mary Ann. Dr. Guyther graduated from Charlotte Hall Military Academy in 1937 with honors, and continued his college education at the University of Maryland College Park as a pre-med student and then at the School of Medicine at the University of Maryland in Baltimore, for his doctorate, graduating on Dec. 23, 1943. He served his internship at Mercy Hospital in Baltimore. He was predeceased by his wife, Elizabeth “Liddy” Tyrie Guyther , whom he married on Dec. 27, 1943. They were married for 69 years. He is survived by his two children, Kathlyn Tyrie Guyther Logan of Kennebunk, Maine, and Joseph Roy, Jr. and wife Rose Ellen of Abell; four grandchildren, Deirdre Elizabeth Logan and husband Adam Berinsky of Cambridge, MA, John Scott Logan and wife Carrie of Yarmouth, Maine, Dana Finnacom Guyther and fiancé Shelley Robinson of Baltimore, and Blake Finnacom Guyther and wife Kathleen of North Potomac. He is also survived by six great grandchildren, Benjamin and Lila Berinsky, Selwyn and Everett Logan, and Nicholas and Abigail Guyther.

Thursday, December 26, 2013

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The County Times runs complimentary obituaries as submitted by funeral homes and readers. We run them in the order we receive them. Any submissions that come to news@countytimes.net after noon on Tuesdays may run in the following week’s edition. In Mar. 1946, he entered the U.S. Army Medical Corp and served for two years in North Carolina at Moore General Hospital and at Fort George G. Meade near Baltimore. He was discharged early as a Captain to begin a medical practice in St. Mary’s County which was started on Jan. 1, 1948. As a family physician, he started his practice in the Village of Mechanicsvile and continued there until Aug. 1, 1990. During his practice, Dr. Guyther was active both locally and nationally belonging to many medical organizations, such as the American Academy of Family Physicians and the Med-Chi Council. He served as the President of the Med-Chi in 1982. He also taught full-time at the University of Maryland’s School of Medicine Department of Family Practice in Baltimore in 1972. He was instrumental in the establishment of the St. Mary’s Nursing Center in Leonardtown, Md. He was awarded as the Family Doctor of the Year in 1979 given by the American Academy of Family Physicians and was recognized by First Lady Rosalyn Carter at the White House. He delivered over 1900 babies at St. Mary’s Hospital. Among his many interests, he was a member of the St. Mary’s County Historical Society, Southern Maryland Society, Charlotte Hall School Board of Trustees, and St. Vincent DePaul Society. During his retirement he wrote eight books finishing his last one in September 2013. The family received friends for Dr. Guyther’s Life Celebration on Friday, Dec. 20, from 4 to 8 p.m,. at Brinsfield Funeral Home, with prayers recited at 7 p.m. A Mass of Christian Burial was celebrated Saturday,

“Caring is Our Business”

FOR OVER 50 YEARS, THE COUNTY’S MOST TRUSTED SOURCE FOR QUALITY

Granite & Bronze Monuments & Engraving

December 21, at 11 a.m. at Immaculate Conception Church in Mechanicsville by Reverend Michael Tietjen. Interment will follow at St. Mary’s Queen of Peace Cemetery in Helen, Md. The family thanks Always There Companion Care and their staff for providing Dr. Guyther their devoted attention and care. Memorial contributions may be made to the St. Vincent DePaul Society c/o Immaculate Conception Church, P.O. Box 166, Mechanicsville, Md. 20659. Condolences to the family may be made at www.brinsfieldfuneral.com. Arrangements by the Brinsfield Funeral Home, P.A., Leonardtown, Md.

Jennifer “Jen” Christine Long, 43 Jennifer “Jen” Christine Long, 43, passed away in Alexandra, Va., on Dec. 18. She was born in Washington D.C. on Nov. 24, 1970. She spent most of her childhood and early teen years in Springfield, Virginia where she developed a fondness for animals - especially dogs and horses.  She moved to Southern Maryland in 1986 and attended St. Mary’s Ryken High School graduating in 1988. Jennifer graduated from Wheeling Jesuit College and, subsequently received her MBA from the University of Maryland, University College. Jen was a consultant for JCL Consulting.  Throughout her life Jennifer endeared herself to her many friends throughout Southern Maryland and Northern Virginia. She also enjoyed training and attending to her dogs while occasionally riding horses. Jennifer developed an acute sensitivity and understanding for almost all animals. She was constantly looking for ways to help and rescue animals of all sorts. In addition to her many friends, Jennifer leaves her family members.   Jen is survived by her parents Ceil Astin Whitney and Maurice Ignatius Long, Jr, siblings;  Marisa Daley of Great Falls, Va., Megan Long of Falls Church, Va., and her niece, and 2 nephews’.   The family received friends on Sunday, Dec. 22, from 2 to 5 p.m., in the MattingleyGardiner Funeral Home Leonardtown, Md.  A Funeral Service was held on Monday, Dec. 23, at 10 a.m., in the Mattingley-Gardiner Funeral Home Leonardtown, Md., with Father Robert Howard officating. Interment will be private. In lieu of flowers, please make a donation in Jennifer’s name to the St. Mary’s Animal Welfare League P.O. Box 1232 Leonardtown, Md.  20650. Arrangements provided by the Mattingley-Gardiner Funeral Home, P.A.

Charles Edward Musco Jr, 67 Charles Edward “Charlie” Musco, Jr., USAF (Ret.), 67 of Lexington Park, Md. died Dec. 16, at his residence surrounded by his loving family. Born Aug. 29, 1946 in Piqua, Ohio, he was the son of the late Charles Edward Musco, Sr. and Evelyn Sawyer Musco. Charlie graduated Piqua Central High School in 1964. Charlie attended Ohio State University from 1964-1965. Charlie played football and his major was Pre Dental. He proudly served his country in the United States Air Force from 1965 to his retirement in 1986. After retiring from the Air Force he started a career as an Electronic Technician II at Lockheed Martin, where he has been a dedicated employee for the past 27 years. In 1995, he earned his FCC License Element 1 & 3. On Jan. 16, 2001, he married his beloved wife, Sheila M. Musco. Together they celebrated 17 wonderful years together and married for 12 years. Charlie loved life and always lived it to the fullest. He enjoyed travelling spontaneously. He loved old school and gospel music. He was a sports fan of the Baltimore Ravens, North Carolina Panthers and Washington Nationals. He also enjoyed watching NASCAR races, cheering on Jimmy Johnson and Matt Kensieth. He was an amateur photograph and took many still shots. He was an avid builder of model airplane and helicopters. He also enjoyed reading and was known as a “grill master.” However, his greatest love was for his family. He loved to spend time with his wife, children and grandchildren. In addition to his wife, Charlie is survived by his children, John Musco (Juanita) of Greenville, S.C., Dana Young of Greenville, S.C., Kimberly Hamilton of Greenville, S.C., Mary Ann Harris of Fayetteville, N.C., Janet Burton (Chris) of Greenville, S.C., Takisha Smith (Troy) of Lexington Park, Md., Reggie Barnhill of Lexington Park, Md., and Tyrone Rogers (Felicia) of Lexington Park, Md,; his sister, Constance L. Montague of Dewitt, Mich.; 23 grandchildren; and 11 great grandchildren.  Family received friends for Charlie’s Life Celebration on Saturday, Dec. 21, from 2 to 5 p.m., with a service of remembrance at 4 p.m. at the Brinsfield Funeral Home, P.A. A Graveside Service will be held at a later date at Arlington National Cemetery. Memorial contributions may be made to the American Cancer Center, P.O. Box 1032, Lexington Park, MD 20653 or Hospice of St. Mary’s, P.O. Box 625, Leonardtown, Md. 20650. Condolences to the family may be made at http://www.brinsfieldfuneral.com/ Arrangements by the Brinsfield Funeral Home, P.A., Leonardtown, Md.

Doris E Hammett 10/3/1924 - 12/25/2008

26325 Point Lookout Road • Leonardtown, MD 20650

Mom, it's been five years but it seems like yesterday we were all together at Robin's house celebrating something. We miss you terribly and think of you every day. We know you watch out for all of us and keep us safe. Hug Daddy for us and make him hug you back from us.

thecharlesmemorialgardens.com

Love, Anthony, Robin, Frannie, Darlene, Mike, Terry and George

Pet Cremation, Cemetery and Memorials

Charles Memorial Gardens, Inc. Perpetual Care Cemetery

301-475-8060


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Thursday, December 26, 2013

The County Times

Announcin

Issued Marriage Applications for November 2013 NovEmbEr 1, 2013 Nathan Allen Finamore 24 Hughesville, Md Kristi Marie Kiider 25 Waldorf, Md

Maynard Carl McRae, Jr., 58 Knoxville, Tn James Russell Danforth 64 Knoxville, Tn

NovEmbEr 6, 2013

Sharon Johnson Cahaly 59 Gilbert, Sc Vanessa Ellen Collier 52 Gilbert, Sc

Robet Michael Lashley 24 Lexington Park, Md Jamie Rebecca Amos 23 Lexington Park, Md

Craig Matthew Moran 42 Great Mills, Md Helena Alicia Cora 46 Great Mills, Md

NovEmbEr 7, 2013

NovEmbEr 4, 2013 Martina Lynn Patterson 28 Great Mills, Md John Sermen Greenwell, Jr., 34 Great Mills, Md Tina Marie Tippett 25 Lexington Park, Md Douglas Bernard Mason, Jr., 30 Lexington Park, Md Ulrike Ingeburg Hall 65 Lexington Park, Md Dieter Wolfgang Neufert 72 Steinback, Germany Stephanie Sheryl Lin 23 Great Mills, Md Shane Christopher Brockway 38 Great Mills, Md Mark Wayne Rangel-Silcox 22 Lexington Park, Md Brianna Marie Dailey 22 Lexington Park, Md

NovEmbEr 5, 2013 Tyrone Deangelo Dove 21 Lexington Park, Md Sheena Renee Ferrall 29 Lexington Park, Md

Danica Lee Williams 24 Lexington Park, Md Joseph Brandon Sutliff 25 Lexington Park, Md

NovEmbEr 8, 2013 Kiara Lenese Gibson 24 Lexington Park, Md Oceola Mariz Rivera 23 Humble, Tx

NovEmbEr 12, 2013 Harvey Stauffer Martin 76 Bainbridge, Oh Sally Stauffer Brubacher 63 Mechanicsville, Md

NovEmbEr 13, 2013 David Lee Fox 44 Great Mills, Md Theresa Ann Nestor 44 Great Mills, Md

James Warren Burroughs 73 Mechanicsville, Md Mary Germaine Geary 70 Mechanicsville, Md

Maria Josefa Yongco 32 Lexington Park, Md Ryan Misena Ner 34 Rancho Santa Margarita, Ca

NovEmbEr 18, 2013

NovEmbEr 22, 2013

Faye Alice Burner 58 Asheville, Nc Wendy Rae Myers 69 Asheville, Nc

Victoria Jeannine Guffey 22 Windsor, Va Ica Nicole Reynolds 19 Windsor, Va

John Gibbons Guy Jr., 48 Leonardtown, Md Vicki Ann Anderson 48 Leonardtown, Md Tempest Dillian Reid 27 Norfolk, Va Malika Lee Chaun Versi Smith 22 Norfolk, Va

NovEmbEr 19, 2013 Tiffany Edna Ann Grooms 32 Hollywood, Md Jeremee Owen Cromwell 35 Hollywood, Md

NovEmbEr 20, 2013 Kristen Rene Mendenhall 22 Great Mills, Md Kyler Chase Kane 23 Lexington Park, Md

Jeffrey James Norman 28 Mechanicsville, Md Jennifer Weyand 28 Mechanicsville, Md

Richard Allen Sorrells Jr., 25 California, Md Cassandra Dawn Mackermna 22 California, Md

NovEmbEr 15, 2013

NovEmbEr 21, 2013

Heather Deanne Buckler 25 Mechanicsville, Md William Daniel Raley Sr., 25 Mechanicsville, Md

Paulo Cesar Viana 29 Moon Township, Pa Alex Eugene Hart 22 Moon Township, Pa

Michelle Kay Black 45 Lexington Park, Md Michael Allen Smith 46 Lexington Park, Md

NovEmbEr 25, 2013 Judy Lynne Untiedt 55 Tuscon, Az Catherine Marie O’Brien 59 Tuscon, Az Rhawnie Katherina Strawser 29 Bushwood, Md James Edward Norris 25 Bushwood, Md Lauren Elizabeth Mackenzie 26 Mechanicsville, Md Theodore Wade Wilkins, Jr., 27 Charlotte Hall, Md

NovEmbEr 27, 2013 Karl Joseph Ellwein 52 Lexington Park, Md Nancy Ann Aingworth 56 Lexington Park, Md

Call The County Times to Place an Engagement Announcement - It’s Free!

301-373-4125


The County Times

In Our Community

Thursday, December 26, 2013

The Wonder of Winter a Shimmering Success

The 26th Annual St. Mary’s Hospital Foundation Gala held in November at the Hollywood Social Hall, raised more than $220,000, after expenses, for healthcare scholarships, as well as for capital projects and equipment. This year’s theme was The Wonder of Winter. Entering the social hall was like stepping into a serene winter scene complete with a shimmering dusting of snowflakes and tree branches that glistened with delicate crystals. “The overwhelming success of the Gala is the result of a tremendous amount of support from our community. We appreciate the contributions made by numerous local businesses, individuals and our hospital community. Without their support, the Gala would not be the success that it is year after year,” said Helen Wernecke, 2013 Gala chairperson. Several of Southern Maryland’s most prominent businesses, medical professionals and local organizations sponsored the evening’s festivities, which featured delicious fare from Design Cuisine - the premier caterer in Washington, DC, Virginia and Maryland. Music was provided

by Nocturne. Thanks and appreciation goes to all of our sponsors for the event. The Foundation and MedStar St. Mary’s are especially grateful to Whitten Laser Eye for support as the 2013 Gala’s Presenting Sponsor. Premiere sponsors were AMARYLLIS, inc. Floral + Event Design, Associates in Radiation Medicine and Shah Associates, M.D., LLC. Diamond Sponsors included AMEWAS; Cherry Cove Land Development; MedStar Health; MEP, Your Partner in Emergency Care; W.M. Davis, Inc.; and Christine R. Wray & John Felicitas. More than 600 guests were charmed by the beauty of winter as they entered into one of Southern Maryland’s most premier events sponsored by the Foundation. Captivating guests was an enchanting scene set by graphic design students at the Dr. James A. Forrest Career and Technology Center under the direction of Casey Paige Pfeiff. Tree branches that reached great heights decorated the social hall along with delicately fallen crystals and sparkling mounds of snow created by AMARYLLIS, inc. Floral + Event

Design. Recognition and thanks also go to the following for their support: Jan & Tom Barnes; Family & Friends of Gala Committee Members; Compass Pointe Real Estate Development; Bubby Knott, Flat Iron Farm; MedStar St. Mary’s Hospital Plant Operations; Patuxent River NAS Color Guard; and The Right Mix. Attendees purchased chances that put them in the running for a chance to win an exquisite seven-inch diamond tennis bracelet of 18k white gold. The four carat total weight diamond resembling stunning clusters of snowflakes was graciously donated by Blair’s Jewelry and Gifts. Congratulations go to Mindy and Stu Ashton, our lucky winners. To date, the Foundation’s scholarship program has made awards to more than 100 local students pursuing education in nursing and allied health, ensuring a qualified healthcare workforce today and for the future. Funds raised by the Foundation also provide support for capital expansion projects and equipment.

Annual Christmas Party Gets a Visit From Santa and Frosty

Ben Brown thinks about what he wants Santa to bring.

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Kevin Detwiler, left, Frosty, JW St. Clair, Patrick Johnson

Santa and Frosty the Snowman stop by for a visit at the annual Christmas party co-sponsored by the Commission for Persons with Disabilities, Helpful Hooves Special Friends Program and PALS at The Center for Life Enrichment. The party was held at the Loffler Senior Center on Dec. 13 and included dinner and dancing for over 85 attendees.

PET OF THE WEEK My name is Ellington. I am very beautiful and a very sweet girl. Besides being unusual because I am a unique being, I am unusual because I have one green eye and one blue eye. I am a sweet, loving little girl who needs a home. Do you have it in your heart to share yours with me? I was born in the summer of 09. I am also so called "a special needs" kitty and will need medication and regular teeth cleaning. The dental cleanings cost roughly $135 every 9 months. My medicine costs $90 for a 5 month supply. Because of my problem, no one has wanted to adopt me. Do you think you would have it in your heart to take care of me and love me? For more information on my special needs, please contact my foster mom Connie at 301-475-5059 or Diane at diane@feralcatrescuemd.org. If you'd like to adopt me, you could fill out an application at www.feralcatrescuemd.org and email it to her at diane@feralcatrescuemd.org. I hope you will pick me. I will love you always, Ellington

Ledo Pizza to Donate $2,500 to St. Mary’s Hospital

By Kay Poiro Staff Writer Ledo’s Pizza in Leonardtown will donate $2,500 toward cancer charities at St. Mary’s Hospital. The money was raised through their pink pizza box promotion for Breast Cancer Awareness month. During the month of October, Ledo’s Pizza stores in Maryland and Virginia delivered their large pizzas in pink boxes to raise money for cancer awareness. A portion of the proceeds from each pink box sold went toward cancer charities. A total of $10,000 was raised and split between four hospitals in Maryland and Virginia. Cole Western of Ledo’s Pizza in Leonardtown said his restaurant chose St. Mary’s Hospital because it was a local hospital where they know their money could be put to good use. “That amount of money may not mean much to a larger hospital, but it could make a difference at St. Mary’s Hospital,” he says. A date for the presentation of the donation had not been set as of press time. kaypoiro@countytimes.net


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Thursday, December 26, 2013

The County Times

In Our Community

Christmas Through the Ages

Bringing Home the Bacon By Kimberly Alston Contributing Writer

By Kimberly Alston Contributing Writer The Piney Point Lighthouse Museum and Historic Park is holding their annual holiday exhibit. This year’s theme of “Home for Christmas” shows Christmas through the ages as the keeper’s quarters show what the rooms might have looked like as the decades went on. Each room has different toys, decorations and other items depicting the times. The exhibit also features a scavenger hunt with each clue giving families more facts about Christmas in the past. Each year, the Piney Point Lighthouse chooses a different theme for the holidays and each year there is something new to be discovered about the past. The lighthouse store has unique items to offer as many of the items cannot be found anywhere else. There are also different books, jewelry, clothing and decorations that are unique to the lighthouse that are available for purchase at the store. For the Holiday Exhibit, admission is $7 for adults, $3.50 for senior citizens, military and students ages six to 18. Children ages five and under are free. The Museum is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. from Thursday, Dec. 26 to Tuesday, Dec. 31. The Piney Point Lighthouse, Museum & Historic Park is located at 44720 Lighthouse Road in Piney Point. Call the museum at 301-994-1471 for more information or go on line to www.stmarysmd.com/recreate/museums.

The Mechanicsville Moose Lodge is holding their next turkey shoot on Sunday, Dec. 29. The Turkey Shoot has been held weekly at the lodge from October through March for over 20 years. Contrary to what may be believed, a turkey shoot does not actually involve shooting at turkeys. For these events, participants take shots at square shooting targets, with the most accurate shot winning the designated prize according to the round. There are several different meat rounds each week where winners of the rounds receive prizes such as bacon or steak. There are also prize rounds where selections of items are put up for winners. Finally, there is a money round at the end of the event where the winner receives however much was collected in the pot for that day. Once a year, the lodge also runs a Kid’s Shot where children 15 and under compete in the Turkey Shoot for prizes in the form of gift cards and the like. On other days anyone is welcome to compete over the age of 18 and those under age can compete with the completion of a hunter’s safety course and parent’s permission. During the event at least four volunteers from the lodge are in attendance to help run and maintain the shoot. The cost of the event is $60 per person. On a given weekend, the lodge will receive anywhere from 15 to 25 shooters. All the money raised from the events goes to charitable causes such as Shop with a Cop and Hospice events. Sign up for the event begins at 12 p.m. on Sunday afternoons and first round shots begin at about 12:30 p.m. At the end of the year, the names of everyone who has participated in the event are placed in a barrel and whoever’s name is drawn wins half of a pig. For more information, call Chairman Jimmy Suite at 240-417-5767 kimberlyalston@countytimes.net

kimberlyalston@countytimes.net

We wish you a Merry Christmas …. We wish you a Merry Christmas … We wish you a Merry Christmas …

…And a Happy New Year!

With glad tidings to you and your kin at the holiday season. We appreciate your patronage and look forward to seeing you again, next year!

SOMD Publishing

The County Times and Calvert Gazette 43251 Rescue Lane • P.O. Box 250 • Hollywood, MD 301-373-4125 • www.countytimes.net


The County Times

In Our Community

Thursday, December 26, 2013

22

w e i v e R k o o B

LIBRARY ITEMS “Santiago Free movies being shown at libraries

Each library will show a free family movie on Friday, Dec. 27, at 2 p.m. Snacks will be provided. Charlotte Hall branch will show the sequel to the 2010 animated picture featuring Gru who in this movie is recruited by the Anti-Villain League to help deal with a powerful new super criminal. The movie to be shown at Leonardtown branch is about a crop dusting plane that has a fear of heights but lives his dream of competing in a famous around-the-world aerial race. Lexington Park branch will show the movie in which two kids find and play a magical board game, releasing a man trapped for decades and a host of dangers.

the Dreamer in Land Among the Stars”

by Ricky Martin, illustrated by Patricia Castelao

Winter-spring storytimes begin

The winter-spring storytime session begins Jan. 2 and runs through the end of April. Storytimes are offered at each branch for babies through preschoolers. The days and times are posted on the library’s website and also at the branches. The winter/spring brochures are available.

Mobile Career Center visits set

The Maryland JobSource Mobile Career Center will be at Charlotte Hall branch on Jan. 2 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. and at the Leonardtown branch on Jan. 14 from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Job seekers can register with the Maryland Workforce Exchange and receive assistance with their job related needs.

Basic computer and downloading eBooks classes offered

Basic computer classes which include introduction to computers, Windows, internet and email will be offered at Lexington Park branch on Wednesdays at 2 p.m. starting Jan. 8. Registration is required. Adults can attend a class on downloading and checking out eBooks using Kindle (Fire) on Jan. 6 or using the Overdrive App on Jan. 13. Both will be held at Leonardtown branch and begin at 2 p.m. Registration is required. Library card holders can download free eBooks, audio books and even magazines from the library’s website. Customers needing help can stop by any branch for assistance.

Mike Batson Photography

Freelance Photographers

Events Weddings Family Portraits 301-938-3692 mikebatsonphotography@hotmail.com https://www.facebook.com/mikebatsonphotography

c.2013, Penguin Celebra $17.99 / $19.99 Canada • 32 pages By Terri Schlichenmeyer OW contributor Someday, you’re going to be something big. You’ll be very famous – of that, you’re absolutely certain. Lots of people will want your autograph, photographers will scream for your picture, you’ll be onstage every night and everyone will clap for you. It’s going to happen. It will. All it’s going to take, perhaps, is a bit of practice - or maybe, as you’ll see in the new book “Santiago the Dreamer in Land Among the Stars” by Ricky Martin, illustrated by Patricia Castelao, you might just need to sleep on your idea for a night… From the time he was just a tiny boy, Santiago wanted to be a star. He wanted to sing onstage, and maybe act. He wanted everybody to applaud for him. He wanted to see his name in lights. So when auditions were held for the annual school play, he decided to try out for a part. But when he got there, another boy was auditioning and that kid was good. So when it was Santiago’s turn to perform, he felt very nervous. Everyone laughed at him, and he was embarrassed. That night, Santiago was sad when he told his father that he didn’t get the part in the play. But his father wasn’t worried. “Never give up,” Papa said. “And no matter what you choose, always reach for the moon!” Santiago fell asleep, thinking about what his father said. That night, his dreams took him to some interesting places…

He dreamed that he was a teacher, helping kids and inspiring them. Then he was a pilot in a “big jet,” flying across the sky. He was a doctor, then an astronaut, then a famous dinosaur hunter, and a world-class baseball home-run hitter. And then the best part of the whole night: Santiago dreamed that he was onstage, in front of a big crowd that was happy to see him! It was all so amazing that he decided to practice the things he loved doing. He practiced dancing every chance he got. He sang at home and at school, inside and outside. He practiced so much that when something unexpected happened, Santiago the Dreamer had his eyes wide open! Looking for a little encouragement for a little one? This book may be just right – or it may not. I liked “Santiago the Dreamer in Land Among the Stars.” Author Ricky Martin offers his readers a feel-good story, and artist Patricia Castelao adds some of the most appealing illustrations I’ve seen in a good long while. The problem, I fear, is that the ending of the book – which seemed like it was lifted off a motivational poster – might be lost on fans of picture books. Will your 3-to6-year-old will grasp the meaning here? Would an older child consider a picture book to be too babyish? Still, I keep looking at the illustrations and this story and I can’t not recommend this book. Kids with imagination and vision might like it just fine. For them, “Santiago the Dreamer in Land among the Stars” could be big.


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The County Times

Thursday, December 26, 2013

St. Mary’s Department of Aging

Programs and Activities

SENIOR LIVING ‘Rearview Mirror’ Duo Singers On Monday, January 13, from 10 a.m. to noon, enjoy a variety of songs and music from vocalist, Iris Hirsch and vocalist/guitarist Glenn Bullion, who will perform a blend of some of the most popular music from the 50s, 60s, and 70s at the Northern Senior Activity Center. Take a look and travel back in time to enjoy the ‘Easy Listening Lounge’ performance series which showcases local artists in a social and casual atmosphere. For the show, request your favorites from a song list which will be provided. Deadline for purchasing $4 show admission tickets is Thursday January 9. A pork roast lunch will be served after the performance, reservations are required and lunch contributions are made separately. Deadline for lunch reservations is Friday, January 10 at noon. The cost of lunch is a donation for seniors 60 and older; $6 for those under 60. Tickets will not be held at the door. Call 301475-4002, ext. 1001 for more information. Pitch Card Party Tournament The next Pitch Card Party Tournament begins soon; sign-up at the Northern Senior Activity Center by Friday, December 27. Stop by the front desk or call 301-475-4002, ext. 1001 to register. The tournament begins on Monday, January 6, at 12:30 p.m. and continues for five weeks; check at the center for dates. Cost is $10 per person to register, which goes towards cash prizes awarded at the end of the tournament. Senior Activity Center Inclement Weather Policy When the weather is questionable, please telephone the senior activity center that you are planning to attend to check for weather related schedule changes. Follow the voice mail prompts to access a message regarding the schedule of that particular senior activity center. The Department of Aging & Human Services does not follow the school system’s closing.

Massage and Reflexology Therapy Available at Loffler Loffler Senior Activity Center has an experienced massage and reflexology therapist available 3 days a week. If you are interested in scheduling an appointment call 301-7375670 ext. 1658 for more information. Fee. Living Well with Chronic Disease Start the New Year off with the best gift you can give yourself- improved well-being. Loffler Senior Activity Center is conducting a 6 week workshop on how to manage your chronic condition. The class will meet at the center on Thursdays, Jan. 2 – Feb. 6. This is an evidence-based program developed by Stanford University to help people with chronic conditions take charge of their life by developing self-management skills, including dealing with depression and fatigue, pain management, working with health care providers and more. If you have a chronic condition and are serious about improving the way you feel, this is the workshop for you. There is no charge for taking this class, however, a commitment to regular attendance is needed for good results. For more information or to sign up, call 301737-5670, ext. 1658. Tai Chi for Arthritis: The Core Movements The Arthritis Foundation Tai Chi Program developed by Dr. Paul Lam, uses gentle Sun-style Tai Chi routines that are safe, easy to learn and suitable for every fitness level. The Tai Chi program helps reduce stress, increases balance, flexibility and improves your overall mind body and spirit. During this six week program held at the Garvey Senior Activity Center on Fridays, Jan. 10 – Feb. 14 from 9:30 – 10:30 a.m, participants will learn warm-up and cool-down exercises, six basic core movements and direction changes to add challenge. Advance sign up is required; there is no fee. To sign up or for more information, call 301-475-4200, ext. 1050.

Pickleball Pickleball is the up and coming sport in the United States for older adults. The game has grown in popularity in St. Mary’s County over the past year and offers a great way to exercise while having fun. Equipment is available for use. Games are held at the Leonard Hall Recreation Center in Leonardtown on Wednesdays, Jan. 8 – Feb. 26 from noon – 2 p.m. The cost per player is $32.00 payable in advance at the Garvey Senior Activity Center. Advance sign up is required. Register early because space is limited. For more information, call 301475-4200, ext. 1050. AARP Smart Driver Course In January of 2014 AARP will launch their new and improved AARP Smart Driver™ Course, the nation’s largest driving refresher course. A lot has changed since AARP Driver Safety first began as “55 Alive.” The roads have changed, cars and the technology inside them have changed, even the people behind the wheel have changed. As drivers, if we don’t keep up with those changes we put others and ourselves at risk. As a result of evidence-based research findings, the course has been adjusted to include a focus on areas where older drivers could benefit from additional training, including: roundabouts, pavement markings, stop-sign compliance, red-light running and safety issues such as speeding, seatbelt and turn-signal use. The class will be held at the Garvey Senior Activity Center on Tuesday, Jan. 21 from 9 a.m. – 2 p.m. The cost is $15.00 for AARP members, $20.00 for nonmembers, payable to AARP. Members must show their membership card to get the member rate. Advance sign up is required. Call 301-475-4200, ext. 1050.

Loffler Senior Activity Center 301-737-5670, ext. 1652; Garvey Senior Activity Center, 301-475-4200, ext. 1050 Northern Senior Activity Center, 301-475-4002, ext. 1001 Visit the Department of Aging’s website at www.stmarysmd.com/aging for the most up-to date information.

Drafts During the Civil War By Linda Reno Contributing Writer John William Posey (1835-1919*), son of Harrison Posey, Jr. and Eleanor Jane Turner, married Judith (aka Julia) Dyson (1832-1905) in St. Mary’s County December 19, 1855. At the time of the 1860 census they were living at Allen’s Fresh in Charles County where John was teaching school. In October 1862 men were being drafted to serve in the Union army. John was one of them and he wanted no part of it. Apparently his wife felt the same way. The following article appeared in newspapers in Virginia, Alabama, Georgia and South Carolina: “By the arrival of a gentleman yesterday, we have narrated to us much that is interesting concerning the enforcement of the draft in the lower secession counties of Maryland. As an instance of the feeling of resistance to the draft, even among the women, he relates the shooting of John Hawkins, a Yankee enrolling officer, of Charles County, by Mrs. John Posey, whose husband was included among the drafted, but who was notified in time to escape. Hawkins who is a resident of the county, and a worthless fellow, rode up to the house and entered, without explaining the object of his visit. Finding Mr. Posey not at home, he left, saying to Mrs. Posey as he mounted his horse that he had ‘come to enroll her husband in the Lincoln army.’

A Journey Through Time The

Chronicle

‘You came to enroll my husband did you’, said the intrepid woman, and stepping back she lifted a double-barrel shot gun from behind the door, and fired one charge at him, the shot taking effect in his side and leg. Stung by the pain, Hawkins threw himself forward on his horse exposing his seat of honor, which being construed as an additional insult, she let fly the other barrel, peppering him and causing his horse to run away, carrying him from the scene.” In the event some of you may have only been taught revisionist history, I should like to point out that resistance to being drafted into the Union army or serving at all was not confined to the South. Union soldiers were told for the first two years of the war that they were fighting to preserve the Union. When the “Emancipation Proclamation” was issued almost 250,000 Union soldiers immediately deserted. There were draft riots all over the North. Black soldiers, more often than not, got the short end of the stick. Too often they were used as “cannon fodder” to absorb the casualties the North did not want white Northern soldiers to suffer. Supposedly at the Battle of Ocean Pond (Olustee), Florida, Confederate officers reported that the Black Union soldiers were placed on the battlefield where they would absorb the worst casualties and when Union forces retreated they left the dead and wounded Black soldiers on the field and took only the dead and wounded white Union soldiers. *John’s obituary said he had attended Charlotte Hall School and had taught for 40 years. John and Julia are buried in the Bethel Methodist Church Cemetery at Budd’s Creek.


The County Times

Thursday, December 26, 2013

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To submit your event listing to go in our Community Calendar, please email news@countytimes.net with the listing details by 12 p.m. on the Tuesday prior to our Thursday publication.

December All Month Long St. Clement’s Island Museum Presents 28th Christmas Doll and Train Exhibit Department of Recreation and Parks, Colton’s Point The St. Clement’s Island Museum in Colton’s Point, MD will present the 28th Annual Christmas Doll & Train Exhibit, beginning December 1, for a month-long exhibition. The museum will come alive with antique and collectible dolls, toys and working miniature trains in a holiday setting sure to delight children from one to 101. The theme this year celebrates “A Maryland Christmas,” and incorporates Maryland facts and folklore, Maryland railroads and Chesapeake Bay related displays. Maryland-themed activities for kids will be available in the c. 1820 Little Red Schoolhouse. This exhibit is made possible by the members of the Southern Maryland and Black-eyed Susan Doll Clubs and Maggie and Anthony Hammett. Visitors will also enjoy browsing through the Crab Claw Museum Store, which features a myriad of unique gifts, children’s books and toys, clothing, jewelry, Maryland flags and scarves, lighthouses, souvenirs and even pre-lit crab pot Christmas trees, perfect for your home, yard, boat, or pier. All museum store proceeds benefit museum programs, projects and exhibits. Become a museum member and receive a 10% discount any time you shop throughout the year! The exhibit will be open December 1 to December 20, Wednesday through Sunday, 12 noon to 4 p.m. The extended holiday schedule includes December 21 to December 31, open daily 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Closed Christmas Eve and Christmas Day. Admission is $3 per adult, $2 for seniors and military, $1.50 for children 6 to 18 and kids 5 and under are free. The museum will present an open house on Saturday, December 8 and admission is free for everyone. The St. Clement’s Island Museum is managed by the Museum Division of St. Mary’s County Department of Recreation and Parks and the St. Mary’s County Board of County Commissioners. It is located at the end of Route 242 in Colton’s Point. Please call the Museum Division offices at 301-769-2222 for more information or log on to the website at www. stmarysmd.com/recreate/museums.

Thursday, Dec. 26 28th Annual Christmas Doll and Train Exhibit St. Clement’s Island Museum, 10 a.m. Got out-of-town guests? Bring them here! Join us for a holiday tradition at the St. Clement’s Island Museum! The 28th Annual Christmas Doll & Train Exhibit captures the wonder of childhood and the magic of the holidays with an array of antique dolls, toys, and working miniature trains in a festive holiday setting. This year’s theme “A Maryland Christmas” will offer interesting facts and folklore of Maryland through colorful displays and decorations. The Southern Maryland and Black-eyed Susan Doll Clubs and Maggie and Anthony Hammett have graciously donated their collections to make this exhibit possible with very unique and interesting items. Don’t miss the children’s activity inside the Little Red Schoolhouse! The Crab Claw Museum Store offers an array of unique gift items for everyone on your gift-giving list! Don’t miss our Maryland scarves and other new Maryland-themed items! Check out the totes, lighthouse items, cookbooks, clothing, home decor, jewelry, kid’s pirate items, and more! Buy your crab pot Christmas trees here along with decorative crabs, oysters, and shell garlands! Proceeds benefit the museums so shop where your dollars make a difference! Admission: $3 adults, $2 senior citizens & military, $1.50 children 6 - 18, kids 5 and under are FREE! Make sure your holidays are complete with a visit to the St. Clement’s Island Museum. Call the museum at 301-769-2222 for more information or log on to the website at www.stmarysmd.com/recreate/ museums. Presented by the St. Mary’s County Museum Division of Recreation and Parks and the St. Mary’s County Board of Commissioners. Piney Point Lighthouse Holiday Exhibit Piney Point Lighthouse, Museum and Historic Park, 10 a.m.

Relive the holiday magic and memories of childhood at the Piney Point Lighthouse, Museum & Historic Park! The “Home for Christmas” theme embraces Christmases past as each room of the lighthouse keeper’s quarters depicts a past eras with nostalgic toys, decorations and items of the day. This step back in time will delight parents and children of all ages. A scavenger hunt activity will lead you through the exhibit and provide interesting facts of interest. The Lighthouse Lens Museum Store is brimming with holiday decorations and crab pot Christmas trees, lighthouse and nautical gifts and souvenirs, clothing, jewelry, books, home décor and more! Many unique items not found anywhere. Shop local and shop where your dollars make a difference. All proceeds benefit museum programs, projects and exhibits. Admission: $7 adults, $3.50 senior citizens, military, and students 6 to 18, and children 5 and under are free. Admission includes a guided tour of the museum and historic campus. Call the museum at 301-994-1471 for more information or go on line to www.stmarysmd.com/ recreate/museums. Presented by the St. Mary’s County Museum Division of Recreation and Parks and the St. Mary’s County Board of Commissioners.

Friday, Dec. 27 28th Annual Christmas Doll and Train Exhibit St. Clement’s Island Museum, 10 a.m. Got out-of-town guests? Bring them here! Join us for a holiday tradition at the St. Clement’s Island Museum! The 28th Annual Christmas Doll & Train Exhibit captures the wonder of childhood and the magic of the holidays with an array of antique dolls, toys, and working miniature trains in a festive holiday setting. This year’s theme “A Maryland Christmas” will offer interesting facts and folklore of Maryland through colorful displays and decorations. The Southern Maryland and Black-eyed Susan Doll Clubs and Maggie and Anthony Hammett have graciously donated their collections to make this exhibit possible with very unique and interesting items. Don’t miss the children’s activity inside the Little Red Schoolhouse! The Crab Claw Museum Store offers an array of unique gift items for everyone on your gift-giving list! Don’t miss our Maryland scarves and other new Maryland-themed items! Check out the totes, lighthouse items, cookbooks, clothing, home decor, jewelry, kid’s pirate items, and more! Buy your crab pot Christmas trees here along with decorative crabs, oysters, and shell garlands! Proceeds benefit the museums so shop where your dollars make a difference! Admission: $3 adults, $2 senior citizens & military, $1.50 children 6 - 18, kids 5 and under are FREE! Make sure your holidays are complete with a visit to the St. Clement’s Island Museum. Call the museum at 301-769-2222 for more information or log on to the website at www.stmarysmd.com/recreate/ museums. Presented by the St. Mary’s County Museum Division of Recreation and Parks and the St. Mary’s County Board of Commissioners. Piney Point Lighthouse Holiday Exhibit Piney Point Lighthouse, Museum and Historic Park, 10 a.m. Relive the holiday magic and memories of childhood at the Piney Point Lighthouse, Museum & Historic Park! The “Home for Christmas” theme embraces Christmases past as each room of the lighthouse keeper’s quarters depicts a past eras with nostalgic toys, decorations and items of the day. This step back in time will delight parents and children of all ages. A scavenger hunt activity will lead you through the exhibit and provide interesting facts of interest. The Lighthouse Lens Museum Store is brimming with holiday decorations and crab pot Christmas trees, lighthouse and nautical gifts and souvenirs, clothing, jewelry, books, home décor and more! Many unique items not found anywhere. Shop local and shop where your dollars make a difference. All proceeds benefit museum programs, projects and exhibits. Admission: $7 adults, $3.50 senior citizens, military, and students 6 to 18, and children 5 and under are free. Admission includes a guided tour of the museum and historic campus.

Call the museum at 301-994-1471 for more information or go on line to www.stmarysmd.com/ recreate/museums. Presented by the St. Mary’s County Museum Division of Recreation and Parks and the St. Mary’s County Board of Commissioners. FRA Branch 93 Texas Hold Em 2171 Three Notch Rd., Lexington Park, 7 p.m. Located just South of PAX River Gate 2 on Rt 235 $50.00 Buy In/$5,000 in chips Optional 50/50 Raffle gets an extra $1,000 in chips Optional $5.00 Bounty chips will be available Blinds start at $25.00/$50.00 with 20 minute rounds Contact Terry Heineman 240-298-3293 or FRA 301-863-8292

Saturday, Dec. 28 28th Annual Christmas Doll and Train Exhibit St. Clement’s Island Museum, 10 a.m. Got out-of-town guests? Bring them here! Join us for a holiday tradition at the St. Clement’s Island Museum! The 28th Annual Christmas Doll & Train Exhibit captures the wonder of childhood and the magic of the holidays with an array of antique dolls, toys, and working miniature trains in a festive holiday setting. This year’s theme “A Maryland Christmas” will offer interesting facts and folklore of Maryland through colorful displays and decorations. The Southern Maryland and Black-eyed Susan Doll Clubs and Maggie and Anthony Hammett have graciously donated their collections to make this exhibit possible with very unique and interesting items. Don’t miss the children’s activity inside the Little Red Schoolhouse! The Crab Claw Museum Store offers an array of unique gift items for everyone on your gift-giving list! Don’t miss our Maryland scarves and other new Maryland-themed items! Check out the totes, lighthouse items, cookbooks, clothing, home decor, jewelry, kid’s pirate items, and more! Buy your crab pot Christmas trees here along with decorative crabs, oysters, and shell garlands! Proceeds benefit the museums so shop where your dollars make a difference! Admission: $3 adults, $2 senior citizens & military, $1.50 children 6 - 18, kids 5 and under are FREE! Make sure your holidays are complete with a visit to the St. Clement’s Island Museum. Call the museum at 301-769-2222 for more information or log on to the website at www.stmarysmd.com/recreate/ museums. Presented by the St. Mary’s County Museum Division of Recreation and Parks and the St. Mary’s County Board of Commissioners. Piney Point Lighthouse Holiday Exhibit Piney Point Lighthouse, Museum and Historic Park, 10 a.m. Relive the holiday magic and memories of childhood at the Piney Point Lighthouse, Museum & Historic Park! The “Home for Christmas” theme embraces Christmases past as each room of the lighthouse keeper’s quarters depicts a past eras with nostalgic toys, decorations and items of the day. This step back in time will delight parents and children of all ages. A scavenger hunt activity will lead you through the exhibit and provide interesting facts of interest. The Lighthouse Lens Museum Store is brimming with holiday decorations and crab pot Christmas trees, lighthouse and nautical gifts and souvenirs, clothing, jewelry, books, home décor and more! Many unique items not found anywhere. Shop local and shop where your dollars make a difference. All proceeds benefit museum programs, projects and exhibits. Admission: $7 adults, $3.50 senior citizens, military, and students 6 to 18, and children 5 and under are free. Admission includes a guided tour of the museum and historic campus. Call the museum at 301-994-1471 for more information or go on line to www.stmarysmd.com/ recreate/museums. Presented by the St. Mary’s County Museum Division of Recreation and Parks and the St. Mary’s County Board of Commissioners. Bingo Mother Catherine Spalding School 38833 Chaptico Rd., Mechanicsville, 5 p.m. SATURDAY NIGHT BINGO!

Doors open at 5p.m. Early Birds start at 6:30 p.m. Regular Games start at 7 p.m. $10 admission (includes one regular book). Progressive Money Ball! Door prizes. Concessions: Weekly specials along with regulars Pizza, Cheeseburgers and Hamburgers,Hotdogs and French Fries. Pull Tabs 500.00 dollar payouts with some having multiple winners. Dabems, Big Show Downlines, Starballs and others. $50 Early Birds,$100 Regular Games. Specials Guaranteed 150 Quick ie 100 Bonanza 54# OR LESS 500 Consolation 100 Jackpot in 54 numbers or less $1000 (Progressive - $100 added each week). Consolation $500. Winner Take All Special. We are located on Route 238 (Chaptico Road) just one mile off of Route 5. Call 301-884-3165 for more information. Visit our website www.mothercatherine.org for Jackpot updates and other information. FRA Branch 93 Texas Hold Em 2171 Three Notch Rd., Lexington Park, 7 p.m. Located just South of PAX River Gate 2 on Rt 235 $50.00 Buy In/$5,000 in chips Optional 50/50 Raffle gets an extra $1,000 in chips Optional $5.00 Bounty chips will be available Blinds start at $25.00/$50.00 with 20 minute rounds Contact Terry Heineman 240-298-3293 or FRA 301-863-8292

Sunday, Dec. 29 28th Annual Christmas Doll and Train Exhibit St. Clement’s Island Museum, 10 a.m. Got out-of-town guests? Bring them here! Join us for a holiday tradition at the St. Clement’s Island Museum! The 28th Annual Christmas Doll & Train Exhibit captures the wonder of childhood and the magic of the holidays with an array of antique dolls, toys, and working miniature trains in a festive holiday setting. This year’s theme “A Maryland Christmas” will offer interesting facts and folklore of Maryland through colorful displays and decorations. The Southern Maryland and Black-eyed Susan Doll Clubs and Maggie and Anthony Hammett have graciously donated their collections to make this exhibit possible with very unique and interesting items. Don’t miss the children’s activity inside the Little Red Schoolhouse! The Crab Claw Museum Store offers an array of unique gift items for everyone on your gift-giving list! Don’t miss our Maryland scarves and other new Maryland-themed items! Check out the totes, lighthouse items, cookbooks, clothing, home decor, jewelry, kid’s pirate items, and more! Buy your crab pot Christmas trees here along with decorative crabs, oysters, and shell garlands! Proceeds benefit the museums so shop where your dollars make a difference! Admission: $3 adults, $2 senior citizens & military, $1.50 children 6 - 18, kids 5 and under are FREE! Make sure your holidays are complete with a visit to the St. Clement’s Island Museum. Call the museum at 301-769-2222 for more information or log on to the website at www.stmarysmd.com/recreate/ museums. Presented by the St. Mary’s County Museum Division of Recreation and Parks and the St. Mary’s County Board of Commissioners. Piney Point Lighthouse Holiday Exhibit Piney Point Lighthouse, Museum and Historic Park, 10 a.m. Relive the holiday magic and memories of childhood at the Piney Point Lighthouse, Museum & Historic Park! The “Home for Christmas” theme embraces Christmases past as each room of the lighthouse keeper’s quarters depicts a past eras with nostalgic toys, decorations and items of the day. This step back in time will delight parents and children of all ages. A scavenger hunt activity will lead you through the exhibit and provide interesting facts of interest. The Lighthouse Lens Museum Store is brimming with holiday decorations and crab pot Christmas trees, lighthouse and nautical gifts and souvenirs, clothing, jewelry, books, home décor and more! Many unique items not found anywhere. Shop local and shop where your dollars make a difference. All proceeds benefit museum programs, projects and


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The County Times

Thursday, December 26, 2013

exhibits. Admission: $7 adults, $3.50 senior citizens, military, and students 6 to 18, and children 5 and under are free. Admission includes a guided tour of the museum and historic campus. Call the museum at 301-994-1471 for more information or go on line to www.stmarysmd.com/ recreate/museums. Presented by the St. Mary’s County Museum Division of Recreation and Parks and the St. Mary’s County Board of Commissioners.

Monday, Dec. 30 28th Annual Christmas Doll and Train Exhibit St. Clement’s Island Museum, 10 a.m. Got out-of-town guests? Bring them here! Join us for a holiday tradition at the St. Clement’s Island Museum! The 28th Annual Christmas Doll & Train Exhibit captures the wonder of childhood and the magic of the holidays with an array of antique dolls, toys, and working miniature trains in a festive holiday setting. This year’s theme “A Maryland Christmas” will offer interesting facts and folklore of Maryland through colorful displays and decorations. The Southern Maryland and Black-eyed Susan Doll Clubs and Maggie and Anthony Hammett have graciously donated their collections to make this exhibit possible with very unique and interesting items. Don’t miss the children’s activity inside the Little Red Schoolhouse! The Crab Claw Museum Store offers an array of unique gift items for everyone on your gift-giving list! Don’t miss our Maryland scarves and other new Maryland-themed items! Check out the totes, lighthouse items, cookbooks, clothing, home decor, jewelry, kid’s pirate items, and more! Buy your crab pot Christmas trees here along with decorative crabs, oysters, and shell garlands! Proceeds benefit the museums so shop where your dollars make a difference! Admission: $3 adults, $2 senior citizens & military, $1.50 children 6 - 18, kids 5 and under are FREE!

Make sure your holidays are complete with a visit to the St. Clement’s Island Museum. Call the museum at 301-769-2222 for more information or log on to the website at www.stmarysmd.com/recreate/ museums. Presented by the St. Mary’s County Museum Division of Recreation and Parks and the St. Mary’s County Board of Commissioners. Piney Point Lighthouse Holiday Exhibit Piney Point Lighthouse, Museum and Historic Park, 10 a.m. Relive the holiday magic and memories of childhood at the Piney Point Lighthouse, Museum & Historic Park! The “Home for Christmas” theme embraces Christmases past as each room of the lighthouse keeper’s quarters depicts a past eras with nostalgic toys, decorations and items of the day. This step back in time will delight parents and children of all ages. A scavenger hunt activity will lead you through the exhibit and provide interesting facts of interest. The Lighthouse Lens Museum Store is brimming with holiday decorations and crab pot Christmas trees, lighthouse and nautical gifts and souvenirs, clothing, jewelry, books, home décor and more! Many unique items not found anywhere. Shop local and shop where your dollars make a difference. All proceeds benefit museum programs, projects and exhibits. Admission: $7 adults, $3.50 senior citizens, military, and students 6 to 18, and children 5 and under are free. Admission includes a guided tour of the museum and historic campus. Call the museum at 301-994-1471 for more information or go on line to www.stmarysmd.com/ recreate/museums. Presented by the St. Mary’s County Museum Division of Recreation and Parks and the St. Mary’s County Board of Commissioners. Emotional Peace E.A. Beacon of Hope Recovery and Wellness Center, 6

p.m.

Weekly meetings of Emotions Anonymous, a mutual aid 12 step program for those desiring emotional wellness, are starting at Beacon of Hope Recovery and Wellness Center. Emotions Anonymous (E.A.) meetings are open to anyone who has the desire to be emotionally well. People attend Emotions Anonymous meetings for various reasons, among them feelings related to depression, anxiety, relationship problems, and other difficulties. The only requirement for membership is a desire for serenity and peace of mind. Over 900 meetings are held weekly in 26 different countries. Emotions Anonymous meetings are mutual aid/selfhelp meetings and are not counseling groups. Meetings are held each Monday at 6 p.m. Beacon of Hope Recovery and Wellness Center of Walden is located at 21800 N. Shangri La Drive, Lexington Park, in Millison Plaza (behind Family Dollar.) For more information, please contact Laura at 301-997-1300 x 804 or at beacon@waldensierra.org. You may also visit www.emotionsanonymous.org for more information about E.A.

Tuesday, Dec. 31 Jennifer Cooper & GrooveSpan Back Creek Bistro, 14415 Dowell Rd, Solomons, 8 p.m. to 1 a.m. www.backcreekbistro.com  410-326-9900 Get your groove on for New Year’s Eve at The Back Creek Bistro!  Complete with four-course dinner, live music and dancing, late-night hors d’oeuvres, champagne, party favors, and door prizes!  Make your reservations now for the 2nd Seating (7:30) and ring in your best new year ever with GrooveSpan and Back Creek Bistro!  Contact Richard at 410326-9900  or reservations@backcreekbistro.com.  Piney Point Lighthouse Holiday Exhibit Piney Point Lighthouse, Museum and Historic Park,

10 a.m. Relive the holiday magic and memories of childhood at the Piney Point Lighthouse, Museum & Historic Park! The “Home for Christmas” theme embraces Christmases past as each room of the lighthouse keeper’s quarters depicts a past eras with nostalgic toys, decorations and items of the day. This step back in time will delight parents and children of all ages. A scavenger hunt activity will lead you through the exhibit and provide interesting facts of interest. The Lighthouse Lens Museum Store is brimming with holiday decorations and crab pot Christmas trees, lighthouse and nautical gifts and souvenirs, clothing, jewelry, books, home décor and more! Many unique items not found anywhere. Shop local and shop where your dollars make a difference. All proceeds benefit museum programs, projects and exhibits. Admission: $7 adults, $3.50 senior citizens, military, and students 6 to 18, and children 5 and under are free. Admission includes a guided tour of the museum and historic campus. Call the museum at 301-994-1471 for more information or go on line to www.stmarysmd.com/ recreate/museums. Presented by the St. Mary’s County Museum Division of Recreation and Parks and the St. Mary’s County Board of Commissioners. Benefit 7th Dst Vol R/S Aux New Years Eve Dinner & Dance Bowles Farm A-Maze-N Place, 22880 Bud’s Creek Rd, Clements, 7 p.m. Dinner 7 to 8 p.m. Steamship Round, Fried Oysters, Fried Chicken  Dance 9 p.m.to 1 a.m. LIVE BAND “Strictly Business” BYOB Must be 21 to attend  50/50 Raffle Door Prizes $100 per Couple $50 Singles 301-769-2659 for tickets

From my Backyard to our Bay A St. Mary’s County Resident’s Guide to Improving Our Environment and Drinking Water

From My Backyard to Our Bay was first developed by the Baltimore County Soil Conservation District. From there, the booklet was given to each of the Soil Conservation Districts in the Chesapeake Bay watershed area for customization. If the 17.5 million residents who live in the watershed area of the Chesapeake Bay read this booklet, and took to heart its suggestions and best practices, the Chesapeake Bay would see a dramatic increase in health. Obtain a FREE copy of the booklet by going to the St. Mary’s River Watershed Association, smrwa.org and downloading it. The booklet is available at Wentworth Nursery in Charlotte Hall; Chicken Scratch in Park Hall; The Greenery in Hollywood; Good Earth Natural Food; and the St. Mary’s Soil Conservation District in Leonardtown. Join your local watershed association and make a difference for Our Bay!

smrwa.org

Forest Stewardship Forest land is important to the overall health of the Chesapeake Bay. Forests provide several layers, from the canopy to the forest floor, that act as filters, improve water quality, reduce sedimentation, remove nutrients, and regulate stream flow during storms. Maryland’s 2.5 million acres of forest, most of it privately owned, cover approximately 42% of its land area. St. Mary’s County’s land area is about 50% forested, and has more than 400 miles of shoreline. Wooded buffers along these shorelines are critical to improving Bay health. Acre for acre, forested lands produced the least amount of runoff and pollution. The County occupies a forest transitional zone, where the dominant tree species vary from oak/ hickory to tulip poplar to sweet gum/red maple and loblolly pine. Forests can be harvested on a sustainable basis for materials, including structural lumber, crates, shelving and furniture, flooring, mulch, and pulp for paper. Forests can, in most cases, provide these products while

Plant a Tree

County residents with questions about woodland stewardship and management, as well as timber harvesting, should contact a certified forester. The State of Maryland maintains a database of private Licensed Professional Foresters (LPFs), who work cooperatively with

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also maintaining and even enhancing wildlife habitat, recreational activities, and soil conservation. Timber harvests are closely monitored by a partnership of agencies, including St. Mary’s Soil Conservation District and St. Mary’s County Department of Land Use and Growth Management.

Go to trees.maryland.gov for information on planting trees. There is a Recommended Tree List for the program Marylanders Plant Trees. There is a $25.00 coupon on the website for purchasing a tree. However, the tree must be on the eligible list of trees. There are 14 small trees, or 29 large trees on the list that is updated periodically.

From

the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) Forest Service to assist landowners with implementation of timber harvests. Lists of LPFs can be found at the DNR Web site below. Where to get help with… FOREST STEWARDSHIP QUESTIONS • Maryland Dept. of Natural Resources, dnr.maryland.gov/forests/

This is the twenty-eighth in a series of articles that Mary Ann Scott (scottmaryann9@gmail.com) has adapted from From My Backyard to Our Bay in the hopes of increasing awareness of the powerful booklet that could do so much to help the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries. Look for the next article in next week’s County Times!

Bay-Wise landscapes minimize negative impacts on our waterways by using smarter lawn management techniques and gardening practices. The University of Maryland Extension Master Gardener Bay-Wise program in St. Mary’s County offers hands-on help with managing your landscape by providing information, a site visit, and landscape certifications. Our yardstick checklist is easy to understand and follow, and our team of trained Master Gardeners can help guide you through it while offering suggestions to improve both the appearance and sustainability of your landscape.

Call Now & Schedule a Visit!

301-475-4120 extension.umd.edu/baywise

Start a Movement in Your Neighborhood…Be the First to be Certified Bay-Wise!


The County Times

Entertainment

New Year Countdown Begins By Kimberly Alston Contributing Writer Stumped for ideas on how to start off the New Year right? There are several events taking place in Southern Maryland on New Year’s Eve to help ease your mind. Ruddy Duck Brewery & Grill will be hosting a black and gold themed New Year’s Eve Party. There is no need to make a reservation, come celebrate at the Ruddy Duck until 1 a.m. Featuring a live DJ at 9 p.m., large dance floor, full menu and specialty gourmet items. For more information, call 410-394-3825 or visit www. ruddyduckbrewery.com In Chesapeake Beach, the American Legion Post 206 is holding their New Year’s Eve party. For $45 and beginning at 7 p.m., the legion starts the night off with hors d’oeuvers, an open bar and dancing. When the clock strikes midnight, they start the year off with a toast and wrap it off with breakfast. For more information, call 301-8556466 or visit www.ALpost206.org For those persons 21 and over, the 7th district Volunteer Rescue Squad Auxiliary is holding a New Year’s Eve dinner and dance at the Bowles Farm A-Maze-N Place, complete with fried oysters, chicken, and live band, “Strictly Business”. The event is BYOB and tickets are $50 per person. To purchase tickets, call 301-769-2659. If games are more appealing, the American Legion Unit 82 will be hosting New Year’s Eve bingo with a $1,000 jackpot. The event beings at 9 p.m. and doors open at 7:30 p.m. There is a $45 cash admission charge which can be paid at the legion any day between 12 and 8 p.m. until the deadline of Dec. 28. Chef’s American Bistro in California will be open to New Year’s Eve festivities from 8:30 p.m. until after midnight. They will also feature a DJ in the barroom. Dinner for the night is $76 per person. Call 301-862-0380 to find out more. Calvert Advanced Life Support will be holding a New Year’s Eve dance at the North Beach Volunteer Fire Department from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. to benefit the all-volunteer EMS service. There is a $35 fee, which includes appetizers. The event is BYOB. For more information, call 410-257-5694. The Lord Calvert Bowling Alley in Huntingtown will be hosting their Rock-N-Bowl New Year’s Eve party from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. as their way of offering a safe place for teens and some fun for adults as well. The $20 fee includes shoes and bowling. The bar will offer special drinks as well. Call 410-535-3560 for more information. kimberlyalston@countytimes.net

Thursday, December 26, 2013

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The County Times

Thursday, December 26, 2013

n O g Goin

Peaceful Living

IN A QUIET SETTING, EXCELLENT SCHOOLS

In Entertainment

Thursday, Dec. 26

$150.00 Deposit With This Ad!

Monday, Dec. 30

Karaoke

Karaoke

Toot’s Bar (23971 Mervell Dean Rd., Hollywood) 8:30 p.m.

Applebees (4100 NW Crain Highway, Bowie) 9 p.m.

301-862-5307

Tuesday, Dec. 31

DJ Mango

Toot’s Bar (23971 Mervell Dean Rd., Hollywood) 8:30 p.m.

Lee Travers and Friends

Friday, Dec. 27

The Westlawn Inn (9200 Chesapeake Avenue, North Beach) 7:30 p.m.

13 month with 1st FULL month FREE / 25 month with first 2 FULL months FREE!

15 Strings

Karaoke With DJ Tommy T and Friends

DB McMillan’s (23415 Three Notch Rd., California) 8p.m.

Morris Point Restaurant (38869 Morris Point Rd, Abell) 6 p.m. Jennifer Cooper & GrooveSpan

Back Creek Bistro (14415 Dowell Rd, Solomons) 8 p.m. to 1 a.m

Fast Eddie and Crew

Toot’s Bar (23971 Mervell Dean Rd., Hollywood) 8:30 p.m.

QUIET SAFE CONVENIENT

Saturday, Jan. 4 Redwine Jazz Trio

Saturday, Dec. 28

Westlawn Inn (9200 Chesapeake Ave., North Beach) 7:30 to 10 p.m.

Kappa Danielson and Paul Larson 

The Westlawn Inn (9200 Chesapeake Avenue, North Beach) 7:30 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 29

The County Times is always looking for more local talent to feature! To submit art or band information for our entertainment section, e-mail info@somdpublishing.net. Please submit calendar listings by 12 p.m. on the Tuesday prior to our Thursday publication.

The Winstons

Toot’s Bar (23971 Mervell Dean Rd., Hollywood) 8:30 p.m.

Owned and Operated by

Call For More Information: Bella Bailey, Marketing & Leasing MGR.

301-737-0737

23314 Surrey Way • California, Maryland 20619 Fax: 301-737-0853 • leasing@apartmentsofwildewood.com

Hollywood Graphics And Screen Printing ng i r e f Of W O N • Business T-Shirts • Custom T-Shirts • Banners • Stickers • Graphics/Logos • Vehicle Lettering • ATV & MX Decals

hgx@hollywoodgrafx.com

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301-769-1177


The County Times

Thursday, December 26, 2013

CLASSIFIEDS Placing An Ad

Email your ad to: sales@countytimes.net or Call: 301-373-4125 or Fax: 301-373-4128. Liner Ads (No artwork or special type) Charged by the line with the 4 line minimum. Display Ads (Ads with artwork, logos, or special type) Charged by the inch with the 2 inch minimum. All private party ads must be paid before ad is run.

Real Estate for Sale 2.8 secluded acres overlooking a pond. Hardwood floors. Fireplace in family room is great place to spend the holidays. The kitchen has many stainless upgrades and over looks the family room. Separate dining room and living room. Large master with a room that could be used for an office. Large detached 3 car garage/shop w/ 800+ sq ft overhead storage. Hot tub and large back deck. Price: $439,000. Call 240-561-2144.

Real Estate Rentals Rambler for Rent in Mechanicsville: Freshly painted clean home, country kitchen, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, hardwood floors. Non smoking home, no pets, no section 8 please. Please call Janette at (301) 884-3853. Rent: $1,250.

Publication Days

The County Times is published each Thursday. Deadlines are Wednesday at 12 noon Office hours are: Monday thru Friday 8am - 4pm

Apartment Rentals Large 2BDRM apartment with sep kitchen and living room area. 20mins from Waldorf and Lexington Park. Electric included with monthly rent. Pets are allowed, no yard access. Price: $1200. Call 301-399-0413 or email bbmangel36@gmail.com. Prince Frederick, Maryland (Calvert County). Nice room in private home with 2 closets and storage area. Less than 1 mile to all shopping, and CSM. Public transportation across the street. Includes utilities, AC, WIFI, and cable. Available immediately. Call Rick 443968-4727. Rent: $600.00

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Important Information

The County Times will not be held responsible for any ads omitted for any reason. The Ccounty Times reserves the right to edit or reject any classified ad not meeting the standards of The County Times. It is your responsiblity to check the ad on its first publication and call us if a mistake is found. We will correct your ad only if notified after the first day of the first publication ran.

Employment

Employment

Looking for a auto detailer with mechanical skills. Primary job will be detailing automobiles. Some mechanical experience will be required for heavy times. If interested please e-mail algar34@gmail.com or fax resume to 301-737-4206 or call 301-737-6400.

Large organization located in Piney Point, MD has a full time Laborer position open. Duties include – cutting grass, trimming hedges and trees, cleaning the shop, maintaining equipment, helping with the flowerbeds, mulching, and assisting the maintenance department when needed on base and other school properties. We offer an excellent benefits package. Compensation is $7.50/hour. Please send resume via email to mszepesi@seafarers. org or fax at (301) 702-6060. Qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, disability, or status as a protected veteran. Salary can be adjusted at employers discretion based on experience, skill, ability, seniority, and/or education.

Chesapeake Neurology Associates has a full-time position available for a RN/ LPN. Experience preferred. Candidate must possess current Maryland Licensure. Strong writing skills necessary. Act as a liaison between patient and MD/ CRNP in meeting patient needs between office visits. Additional responsibilities discussed during interview. Paid holidays, health benefits package, and flexible schedule. No phone calls accepted. Faxed resumes only to (410) 535-6030 or email

TEL: 301-373-4125 • FAX: 301-373-4128 • sales@countytimes.net

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Everything Calvert County


29

Thursday, December 26, 2013

Business

The County Times

Directory Phone 301-884-5900 1-800 524-2381

Phone 301-934-4680 Fax 301-884-0398

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TEL: 301-373-4125 • FAX: 301-373-4128 • bizdirect@countytimes.net


The County Times

Thursday, December 26, 2013

Games

51. Epic body of poetry 53. Weight unit 55. A mild oath 56. More infrequent 58. One point N of due W 59. More rational 60. Exclamation of surprise 61. Manual soil tiller 64. 24th state 65. Surveyor 67. About ground 69. Something beyond doubt 70. Add herbs or spices CLUES DOWN 1. Shelves 2. Max. medical unit 3. Religious orders 4. Blocks 5. Volcanic mountain in Japan 6. Close again 7. Clemens hero 8. ___-Jima 9. Rendered hog fat 10. Ocean ebbs 11. Spielberg blockbuster 12. Grade reducing 13. Shirk

15. Treats with contempt 18. Single Lens Reflex (abbr.) 21. Integer 24. Photographers 26. Lair 27. Female sibling 30. Supported a structure 32. German socialist August 35. Angeles, Alomos or Lobos 37. Ripe tomato color 38. Indefinite small number 39. Wind River Res. peoples 42. A baglike structure 43. Flying mammal 46. In poor taste 47. Hosts film festival 49. Evansville Hockey team 50. Ohio tire town 52. Popeye cartoonist 54. Resource Based Economy (abbr.) 55. Hates, Scot. 57. Evaluate 59. Porzana carolina 62. Decay 63. Own (Scottish) 66. Atomic #29 68. Santa says X3

Last Week’s Puzzle Solutions

e i d d i K Kor

ner

CLUES ACROSS 1. Lawyer disqualification 7. Filled in harbor 13. Die 14. Expected 16. As in 17. Squares puzzle 19. Of I 20. Small depressions 22. Cambridgeshire Cathedral 23. Layout and furnishings 25. Sandhill crane genus 26. Challenges 28. A widow’s self-immolation 29. Earth System Model (abbr.) 30. Sound unit 31. A teasing remark 33. Surrounded by 34. Distinctive elegance 36. Imperturbable 38. Gulf of, in the Aegean 40. Ice mountains 41. Rubs out 43. German writer Weber 44. Tub 45. Digital audiotape 47. UC Berkeley 48. Actress Farrow

30


31

Thursday, December 26, 2013

Wanderings of anAimless

d

Min

“No Christmas Day-After Blues Here”

By Shelby Oppermann Contributing Writer

Merry Christmas Week everyone! I hope all of you are enjoying this week of family togetherness and traditions. Or maybe you are still in bed on the day after Christmas – hoping to not surface until sometime in Spring. I’m sure many of you will have a few Christmas’ like we do: As our blended family gets larger it seems that everyone has so many more places to go with less time at each stop. But the point is to make that special block of time as meaningful as you can. I would be interested to find out what some of you readers do when faced with dwindling time with each family group. We usually have our grown children with their families come over for Christmas morning breakfast. I make lots of French Toast for everyone – and Tidbit. We open the presents and then off to other homes they go. Couples have always had to spend time with each other’s families, but now that time gets split into many more houses. My sons loved it when they were little – they had presents everywhere we went. Today we are not going to stay in bed or lounge lazily around the house like we do some years. We will be taking some of the grandkids on a little holiday fun tour either today or tomorrow. The St. Clement’s Island Museum will be a nice start for the day. The museum’s train and doll exhibit open Wednesdays thru Fridays 12 – 4 until December 31st is a neat way to extend some of Christmas’ magic. I love to watch the trains, and see how much time and care has been put into the scenery. Who hasn’t looked at a toy train exhibit and not wished they were able to be a part of the scene. The towns look so perfect and clean – you feel like you could walk right in some of the tiny shop doors, or be waiting at the station with bags in hand off to parts unknown. That would be the neatest thing to have in your basement. The doll exhibit at the museum is lovely. When you look through the old-time window to see the dolls it reminds me of how the big department stores in D.C. used to have those wonderful window displays. Our grandson Logan set up our train set under the tree, but the trains won’t stay on the track very well because of the folds of the tree skirt. As I was watching him carefully work on the tracks and train, I thought that maybe we could cut out a plywood base for the set, and then start adding all the grass and trees, etc. But where would all the presents go? We will have to move the set as it is I guess. We are also hoping to go to Annmarie Gardens in the evening to see the amazing Garden in Lights (open nightly from 6 – 9 p.m. until January 5th). If you haven’t been yet you should make every effort to go. Since you walk through the beautiful paths, you can take your time with each lighted scene or figure. I can’t wait to see the kids eyes light up. The excitement will still be in their eyes when we walk inside to see all of the artist-created ornaments for sale. I can’t wait to see those myself. Maybe either tomorrow or one night next week we will also do our annual visit to Bubby Knott’s lovingly made Christmas light display and other attractions on his farm. Thank goodness there are so many wonderful people that go all out to bring enjoyment to so many others. I can’t imagine the amount of hours involved – but I am awed and grateful. Please take time out if you can during this time before the New Year and all that is ahead of us to enjoy what is already right here in front of us. To each new day’s adventure, Shelby Please send your comments or ideas to: shelbys.wanderings@yahoo.com or find me on facebook: Shelby Oppermann

The County Times

Bringing Back The Simple Things In Life By Debra Meszaros CSN www.MXSportsNutrition.com

of high intensity exercise that can magically balance weight and provide optimal health.

With the holidays upon us, there may be no better time than now, to take a close look at a few simple steps to create a healthier, happier you for 2014. Now if you think you’re about to read information about a new diet product or diet plan, I’m sorry to disappoint you. I believe there may be many of you reading this that have vowed to loose weight in the past on New Years Eve, but where unsuccessful at reaching your goal. By now you might believe me that calorie counting has almost nothing to do with loosing weight permanently. Perhaps you’d like to consider the following simple ideas to improving your health and happiness.

Weighing in your mental and emotional health The mental and emotional aspects of your life cannot be overlooked. These components are some of the root causes behind every physical disease and dysfunction. Keeping a positive attitude and reducing and managing stress are steps to a healthier, happier you. Simple walks, singing in the shower, candlelight dinners, and gazing into the fireplace, are some examples of simple, basic activities to build mental and emotional well being.

What is the top age accelerator? Reducing the caloric intake of grain carbohydrates, whole grain or not, all other forms of sugar, including honey, and especially fructose; this will help to regulate your insulin and leptin levels. This is a key factor in slowing down the aging process. Replacing the carbohydrates and sugars in your diet with quality fat, is the first step in the anti-aging strategy, and allows your body to begin to adjust itself to its ideal weight. Quality fats are those from olive oil, coconut oil, pastured organic butter, flax oil, avocado, animal-based omega 3 fats, and nuts. These fats are completely different then body fat. Quality fats play a key role in your metabolism; a deficiency can slow down metabolism. It may be possible to control cholesterol levels just by reducing grain carbohydrates and sugars, and incorporating coconut oil into the diet. The focal of the diet should be as much raw food as possible, meaning more than 50% of your dietary intake. Easy! You do not have to cook! Examples of good unprocessed foods are: organic vegetables, sprouts, raw dairy, nuts, and seeds. Naturally fermented foods are also a great addition to the diet and very helpful to your immune system. Recommended protein intake should be less than half a gram per pound of lean body mass. It is the balancing of these food groups, together with some form

Peaceful, restful sleep Here again, it is the not just quantity of sleep, but the quality that weighs into your well being. Working with the natural sleep cycle and body clock helps to build a routine that is beneficial to your health. Sleep patterns within the body are in 90 minute intervals, so calculating the time to go to bed and time to rise is part of the equation. This means six, seven and a half, or nine hours of sleep are within natural sleep patterns. Waking up in between cycles can leave you feeling unrested. If your mind races at bedtime, try journaling the days events right before bedtime. Build a routine of going to bed and rising at the same time every day. Keep it natural Lastly, avoid as many chemicals, toxins, and pollutants as possible. Avoid preservatives in food, color additives, sulfides, nitrates, and drugs. Remember the closer to the natural ways of nature we live, the healthier we can be. ©2013 Debra Meszaros MXSportsNutrition.com. All rights reserved; no duplication without permission. DISCLAIMER: When you read through the diet and lifestyle information, you must know that everything within it is for informational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for advice from your physician or other health care professional. I am making no attempt to prescribe any medical treatment. You should not use the information here for diagnosis or treatment of any health problem or for prescription of any medication or other treatment. The products and the claims made about specific products have not been evaluated by the United States Food and Drug Administration and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent disease. You should consult with a healthcare professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem. Confirm the safety of any supplements with your M.D., N.D. or pharmacist (healthcare professional). Some information given is solely an opinion, thought and or conclusion based on experiences, trials, tests, assessments or other available sources of information. I do not make any guarantees or promises with regard to results. I may discuss substances that have not been subject to double blind clinical studies or FDA approval or regulation. You assume the responsibility for the decision to take any natural remedy. You and only you are responsible if you choose to do anything with the information you have read. You do so at your own risk. I encourage you to make your own health decisions based upon your research and in partnership with a qualified health care professional.

On a Scale of One to Mom Laura Joyce Contributing Writer With the boys home from college for the holidays, my empty nest has filled right back up. Already I’m back in the old routine: each morning I come downstairs to find more cups, plates and electronic devices than they could possibly have needed. Each night my quiet house echoes with…let’s say exuberantly shut doors, sometimes as late as 2 a.m. Throughout the day, shirts, socks and random pairs of pants appear on the family room floor (though I’m pleased to report that the boys always seem to be fully clothed). In light of this return to barely-controlled chaos, when the boys announced plans to head to Annapolis on Saturday to catch a movie, I was relieved: it would give me some space to clean and bake for Christmas, and to run several errands. About an hour after they left the house, however, I realized that my car keys—not my car, just my keys—were missing. I called Prince Firstly and asked him if my car keys were planning to enjoy the movie. After a drawn-out silence, during which Chris considered the implications of what I was asking, and then asked around as to the contents of everyone pockets, I was informed that my keys were, in fact, in Annapolis. I freely admit it: I was annoyed. I stomped around the house for a moment, made a few empty threats of severe bodily harm to the taker-of-the-keys, and I may have muttered, “I’ll see if I can find the back-up key, although I doubt it” (though by this time I was holding it in my hand). It wouldn’t hurt to keep everyone worried that I was stranded, keyless, and getting madder by the moment. It wasn’t my finest moment; sue me. On the other hand, I didn’t raise my voice. I also didn’t say anything to require a deposit in the curse jar, with its range of charges from 25 cents for quaint, largely inoffensive words to a dollar for a heartfelt ‘shut up!’ That one has always been a pet peeve of mine: I don’t believe that people who love each other should ever say it, and mean it.

Later, the boys told me what happened after Chris and I got off the phone. Apparently the car was silent for a moment, as everyone sat, lost in his own thoughts about me at home, stewing over my keyless state. Then, Timmy spoke up. “How mad is she,” he asked, “On a scale of one to mom?” Now, I’ve never claimed to be without a temper: there’s a reason for that swear jar, and I’m it. On the other hand, I’m not the type to nurse anger. I can’t imagine administering the ‘silent treatment,’ and I’ve never met a grudge worth holding. When I get mad, it spikes like a quick fever and then I let it go: it’s fast and then forgotten. Having the boys be away, and now back home, gives me a different perspective, a clearer view of who they’re becoming. It’s strange and lovely, my new awareness that the boys have this shared perception of me—even if it is ‘on a scale of one to mom’. Their perception is the result of our relationships, but it isn’t defined by me, as things once were when they were younger. I suppose that happens for all of us, as our children grow up and form independent views based on their experiences, both at home and in the larger world. I can see that they have a shared language all their own that describes their experience as my children. It makes me smile: that they can laugh about my flaws and foibles in a way that is kind and understanding pleases me to no end. These are the kind of people I had always hoped to raise: humorous, generous and forgiving, able to roll with the minor ups and downs—not to mention the major ones—in life. For the next week or two, I’ll do my best to ignore the front door banging shut in the wee hours, and in the mornings, I’ll pick up the dishes and gather the clothes strewn around the family room. Soon they’ll all return to their college lives, and it’ll be quiet and neat again around here. There won’t be so much to get mad about—it’s odd, but I’m already thinking what a shame that is. I love hearing from you; feel free to contact me at thewordtech@md.metrocast.net if you have comments or questions about the column.


CONVERT

YOUR

The County Times

Thursday, December 26, 2013

TANK TO TANKLESS!

32

Call us today for a free estimate on converting your hot water system to a more efficient tankless system. Mention our ad and receive a $500.00 discount on the unit and installation. STEP 4

STEP 2

STEP 1

A hot water tap is turned on.

Cold water enters the heater & the flow sensor detects the water flow.

STEP 3

The computer automatically ignites the burner.

Water circulates through the heat exchanger. The burner heats the water to the designated temperature.

HOW DOES A TANKLESS WORK? The obvious difference between a tank and a tankless is its size. Not only will you gain significant space, but you’ll also get endless hot water with a tankless. Noritz tankless water heaters last longer than traditional tank water heaters and are backed up with a 12-year warranty.

STEP 5

With a tankless, you won’t be using hot water that is stored in a tank that can accumulate scale and rust over time. Noritz units allow you to set the temperature you want.

The Noritz tankless water heater provides an endless stream of hot water. When the tap is turned off, the unit shuts off.

SPACE SAVING CALCULATION A traditional tank-type water heater takes up to 13 ft2 of space. If 1 ft2 is worth $200, that’s $2,600 (13 ft2 x $200) worth of space you could be saving at Noritz. * Installation must conform with local codes, or in the absence of local codes, the National Fuel Gas Code, ANSI Z223. 1/NFPA 54.

Taylor Gas Company, Inc

21541 Great Mills Road Lexington Park, MD 20653 (301) 862-1000 or 1-855-764-(4GAS) 4427


2013-12-26 The County Times