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June 7, 2012

Gazette

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Everything Calvert County

Bike Patrols Allow Rapid Reaction Page 8

Photo By Corrin M. Howe


The Calvert Gazette

Also Inside

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Thursday, June 7, 2012

On T he Cover

County News

DFCs Megan Quinn, left, Eddie Bradely and Andre Mitchell are all bike patrol members for the Calvert Sheriff’s Office. Bradely was assigned to his cruiser this day.

6 Community 7 Business 8

Feature Story

9 Letters

county news

PNC Bank’s Warren Rice hands Kaithlyn Palada a plastic piggy bank as her prize for spinning the wheel during PNC’s Second Annual Taste of Duke Street last Friday in Prince Frederick.

10 Obits 12 Education 14 Entertainment 15 Games

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QBH St M County TImes Half Ad:Layout 1 3/1/11 3:28 PM Page 1 For $2, kids were treated to a train ride down a tree-lined lane during last weekend’s Children’s Day on the Farm at Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum.

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The Calvert Gazette

Thursday, June 7, 2012

North Beach Water Gets Clean Bill of Health By Guy Leonard Staff Writer A recent report from the Town of North Beach shows that levels of contaminants such as copper and fluoride and even barium are well below danger levels, though some of the test samples date back as far as nearly four years ago. According to the report, the state and federal government hold the town responsible for checking for certain contaminants “less than once per year because the concentrations of these contaminants do not change frequently,” the report states. Two chemicals that are a bi-product of water chlorination, haloacetic acids and potentially cancerous trihalomethanes, were found to be at 1.07 ppb (parts per billion) and 12.96 ppb, respectively. The maximum allowable levels of those chemicals is 60 ppb and 100 ppb. Copper was also found in the town’s water supply, the report states, but at a level of 0.3 ppb, much lower than what is known as the action level of 1.3 ppb. The action level is the point where the concentration of any contaminant calls for treatment of the water system due to the health problems it could cause if left unabated.

The copper likely came from corrosion of household plumbing pipes or even from natural deposits, the report states. Fluoride was found to be in the supply at 0.25 ppb in January of 2009 and again at 0.27 ppb in December of that same year but was well below the limit of 4 ppb, the report stated. Barium was also found in the same months at levels of 0.09 and 0.11 ppb with the maximum concentration allowable being 2 ppb, according to the report. The town’s testing also turned up chloroform in two separate samplings in September 2008 and December 2009 at 2.1 and 3.2 ppb respectively. Also found was bromodichloromethane at 0.9 and again at 1.2ppb for the same two time frames. None of those three chemicals are regulated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, though it does require the town to track the level of chloroform while it considers setting a limit on the contaminant. Councilman Ken Wilcox said that the question of whether the town should seek to get newer data from more frequent testing is worth looking into, but he is confident the town is doing what is required to ensure clean drinking water. “We’ve met all the requirements of the state,” Wilcox said. “We’re not anywhere near the levels that should cause a concern.

Two Killed in Motorcycle Crash By Guy Leonard Staff Writer Two people riding on a motorcycle on Route 4 on the St. Mary’s County side of the Thomas Johnson Bridge were killed Monday when the driver collided with the back of a vehicle he was following and both he and his passenger were ejected. St. Mary’s County Sheriff’s Office crash investigators are investigating the accident that claimed the lives of both Michael Allen Heller, 37, and Holly Hope Fullwood, 32, both of Lusby. Police say that both alcohol and speed are being investigated as possible causes of the collision that happened around 11:10 p.m. Monday. According to police, both Heller and Fullwood were traveling on Heller’s Harley Davidson motorcycle on Route 4 from Calvert County when they ran into the back of a Jeep Cherokee operated by Jacklyn Marie Cox, 21, of St. Leonard.

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Heller ran into the back of the Jeep despite applying brakes, police reported, and both were thrown from the motorcycle. The Jeep skidded sideways and a third vehicle that had been behind the two other vehicles, a 2003 Ford Taurus operated by Richard Kenneth Cornelius, 27, of Lusby, swerved to avoid hitting the motorcycle and instead collided with the Jeep. Heller was declared dead on the scene of the crash, and Fullwood was taken to St. Mary’s Hospital where she died from her injuries, police said. Cox and her passenger, Katelyn Ruth Wilt, 21, of Lusby, were both treated at the hospital and released. Cornelison was also treated and later released from St. Mary’s Hospital, police stated. Anyone who witnessed the crash is asked to call crash investigators at 301475-4200 at extension 9115. guyleonard@countytimes.net

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COUNTY NEWS


COUNTY NEWS

The Calvert Gazette

Thursday, June 7, 2012

4

Taste of Duke Street PNC’s Warren Rice hands Kaithlyn Palada a plastic piggy bank as her prize for spinning the wheel while her mother Julie looks on.

Calvert Can – Eat Right and Move More By Corrin M. Howe Staff Writer “We want our programs to be easy and accessible so that ‘Calvert Can Eat Right, Move More’ becomes part of our culture,” said Margaret Fowler, director of Community Wellness at Calvert Memorial Hospital. The hospital is the lead on the county-wide initiative to provide free and low cost programs to address weight management and fitness. The genesis behind the campaign to improve the general health trend of the county came from statistics that show Calvert residents are heavier and exercise less than in most other Maryland counties. Fowler is pleased with the quality and quantity of collaborating agencies, businesses and government offices within Calvert willing to tackle this issue. The Keep Well Center within the hospital offers resources such as Vitabot online meal planning, biometric testing, dietitians, Walk Off Weight (WOW) trials, health risk Auto Accidents assessments and Presidential Fitness Awards. Workers’ comp The Arc of Southern Maryland, a collaborating agency on the Calvert Can cam• Divorce/Separation paign, is offering its staff and clients yoga, wellness programs and health assessments. The Calvert Office on Aging provides a support group and resource referral to • Support/Custody people with chronic health conditions in the Living Well program. • Domestic Violence Parks and Recreation offers aquatic classes with specialized instruction for people • Criminal/Traffic with arthritis and adaptive fitness programs for individuals with disabilities. • DWI/MVA Hearings Other community partners include World Gym which is working with the program Power of Attorney Scan this “Times Code” and offering discounted memberships in order to “remove barriers to access fitness.” with your smart phone • Name Change • Adoption Calvert Can campaign is using Walk Off Weight with home schools where students • Wills • Guardianship walk down Prince Frederick Blvd on Wednesdays to receive physical education credits. Accepting: A health team is available to churches, such as Middleham St. Peters, Bethel and 99 Smallwood Dr. Waldorf, MD • 206 Washignton Ave. LaPlata, MD Our Lady Star of the Sea to encourage groups within the congregation to use available SERVING CHARLES • ST. MARY’S • PG • CALVERT (301) 932-7700 (301) 870-7111 resources within the county. Fowler said that the campaign has a number of ideas to add in the future to get residents moving. She would like to see signs with the Calvert Can logo placed every quarter of a mile in town centers and parks along walking paths. Then encourage citizens to “Count Your Quarters.” Ideally, when a family or couple drives to a town center to shop or eat, they will see the signs to remind them that they might not have exercised that day. Then they can walk a few “quarters” which will begin to add up over time. “Small steps make big changes. All you have to do is take the first step,” said Fowler. She gave an example of a young local woman who gave up one or two of her sugared caffeinated drinks everyday and started out spending 15 minutes on a treadmill. Then she increased it to 30. By the end of 12 weeks, she lost seven inches in her waist by changing only two behaviors. Working with local restaurants to place the Calvert Gary Simpson, Matt Laidley, Katie Facchina Can logo next to healthy choices is another idea in the 7480 Crain Highway • La Plata, MD 20646 planning. 301-934-8437 Plum Point Elementary School’s fourth and fifth graders held a competition to see which grade would earn the An Independent Agent Representing: April Hancock most Presidential Active Lifestyle Awards. The students ERIE INSURANCE GROUP PO Box 407 committed to 60 minutes of activities a day, at least five Standing: Dan Burris, Jake Kuntz, Bryans Road, days a week for six to eight weeks and to choose one Seated: Lisa Squires, MD 20616 healthy eating goal each week. Fowler would like to see Susan Ennis, Donna Burris 301-743-9000 the other schools start these “Presidential Walking Clubs.” The Presidential Active Lifestyle award is available for adults as well. Fowler said she would love to have a large enough number of participants to entice Michelle Obama to come to the county. To find out more about Calvert Can Eat Right, Move More, call 410-535-8233 or go to http://www.calverthospiLeonardtown, MD • Bus: (301) 475-3151 www.danburris.com tal.org/landing.cfm?id=95.

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The Calvert Gazette

Thursday, June 7, 2012

FOP President Calls for Pay Increases By Guy Leonard Staff Writer The president of the Calvert County group that represents local sheriff’s deputies says that neither deputies nor other county employees have received merit increases and that county elected leaders should find ways to make up the difference. “A merit step is not a pay raise, it is earned through longevity and a satisfactory job performance,” wrote Deputy Thomas Phelps, head of the FOP Lodge No. 109, in a letter to the Calvert Gazette. “Calvert County recently received another ‘AAA’ bond rating and has been cited as the 13th wealthiest county in the nation. “I understand being careful with fiscal matters, but I find it hard to believe there is no money to give the employees of Calvert County an earned merit step increase.” Phelps goes on to criticize the Board of County Commissioners for paying for projects like the construction of a new library and skate park renovations as less deserving choices for the spending of money that commissioners have still approved. “The excuse is given that there is no money,” Phelps wrote, noting that morale among county employees is low. “If this is truly the case, then where did the money come from for the aforementioned projects?”

Commissioner President Susan Shaw said money for the library came as a bonus in a deal that came from the county agreeing to sell bonds for the project. The Calvert Gazette ran an article previously stating that there was evidence that the county did not seek any other possible locations for that library project other than the old Woodburn’s grocery store in Solomons and may have paid a price than was higher than the market rate to secure the deal. Still, Shaw said that the county had to use its $6 million surplus to stabilize the budget; without it, elected leaders would have likely had to lay off county employees. Moreover the state has taken $10 million from the county over the last three years and it would take at least $1.3 million to reclassify employees – to ensure they are being paid at the proper level – and provide merit increase for them all. The only way to ensure merit increases could be carried forward each year, she said, in the current economic climate was to either increase the commercial and tourism tax base or raise taxes on residents. “County employees would be paying those same taxes,” Shaw said, adding that county projections show a deficit for next fiscal year. “It’s an impossible cycle to get into.” guyleonard@countytimes.net

COUNTY NEWS

Sign Committee Studies Regulations By Sarah Miller Staff Writer Tackling the signage regulations for town centers and the county is a big job, and the Sign Regulations and Review Ad-Hoc Committee had the first of a series of monthly meetings to make recommendations to the county and the state to make the regulations more user friendly. The group discussed breaking into smaller groups, an idea that was rejected in favor of studying different aspects on an alternating basis as a large group. The group also named Planning and Zoning Director Chuck Johnston their chairperson of the committee. Johnston said there is no set deadline for the recommendations to be made, but he doesn’t want the process to draw out too long. They also discussed the “Main Street” problem along Route 2/4. No signs are allowed along the state right of way, which poses a problem for establishments that cannot be seen from the road. The problem is only locals will know about some of the out of the way places that would benefit from a sign on Route 2/4. Any visitors through the area don’t know to stop, which keeps tourist money away from those establishments. The committee decided to ask a representative from the State Highway Administration to come out for discussions about signage along Route 2/4.

Chuck Johnston, left

They also discussed looking at regulations from other counties around the state with similar issues and how they have dealt with signage regulations. Another matter brought up was whether flags are considered signs, and whether they could be used as replacements for traditional signs. Some committee members expressed annoyance with political campaign signs that stay up full time when they can’t get anything for their own businesses. Johnston said campaign signs are governed by a different set of rules. For anybody interested in attending the next meeting, the committee will be at the Prince Frederick Library at 6:30 p.m. on June 19. sarahmiller@countytimes.net

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The Calvert Gazette

Calvert High School Class of 1970 is Turning The Big 6-0

Thursday, June 7, 2012

6

Children’s Day on the Farm

By Joyce Baki Contributing Writer

vert Fairgrounds for a party from 6 p.m. to midnight. Enjoy the evening visiting with your old classmates from more than 40 years ago. Catch up on what they have The year was 1970. Richard Nixon was president. been doing, their careers, what they do for fun, their travels, Gas was 36 cents per gallon. You could buy a house for their kids and grandkids. Enjoy a specially prepared din$26,000. Cool cars were the Chevrolet Chevelle and Ca- ner by Thompson’s Seafood. Rock to the sounds of our era maro, Pontiac GTO and Firebird, Dodge Charger and Chal- with our fellow classmate and DJ, Dale Cross. It will be an lenger, Plymouth Road Runner and the Ford Torino. And evening to enjoy, remember the good old days and renew of course, there was the Volkswagen Beetle. Our principal some old friendships. On display will be memories from our high school drove a Corvette. The 280 graduating seniors of Calvert High School had big plans for the future. Where have they days. Do you have any artifacts, pictures or items that could be included? all gone? The reunion will begin at 6 p.m. for light hors Many of the Calvert High School class of 1970 will turn the big 6-O this year, and it is time to celebrate! On d’ouerves and networking. Dinner will begin at 7 p.m. Cost Saturday June 30, join your former classmates at the Cal- is $35 per person. The event is BYOB and we ask that you drink responsibly. The Calvert High School Class of 1970 Reunion Committee needs help finding more of our classmates. There are many we cannot find. If you know the whereabouts of a former classmate, let us know. For more information on the reunion contact Debbie Jones Riley, 301-839-3824, dajriley1@ yahoo.com; Celeste Harris, 301-352-6809, caribedoll@aol.com, Marcia Monnett, 410-414-7252, 46924 Shangri-La Drive Lexington Park, MD 20653 mmlimberlost@chesapeake.net or Joyce Stinnett Baki, 410-326-9133, jbaki@comcast.net. Let me plan your next vacation! Find us on Facebook under Calvert High School Class of 1970. 301-863-9497 Marcie Vallandingham We are looking forward to seeing you SaturHome Office: 301-472-4552 marcie@coletravel.biz day, June 30, at the Calvert County Fairgrounds.

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Catelyn Jones, 5, and her brother, Caleb, 3, check out the cow outside the Maryland Department of Argiculture's display during Children's Day on the Farm at Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum.

For $2, kids were treated to a train ride down a tree-lined road of Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum.

Janet Dalton, left, Mary Oster and Cathy Kinzie work with wool to spin yarn. Dalton and Kinzie are a part of Calvert’s Spinners and Weaver’s group which meets the second Sunday in June from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. at Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum.

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The Calvert Gazette

Thursday, June 7, 2012

Educational Systems Credit Union Wins Awards

County First Bank Cuts Ribbon

Educational Systems Federal Credit Union has won two awards for excellence in marketing and communications in the annual Trailblazer Awards competition sponsored by the Maryland and District of Columbia Credit Union Association. At a ceremony held May 23, at the Sheraton Columbia, the association presented Educational Systems FCU with awards for best Annual Report and best Financial Literacy program for credit unions with assets between $200 million and $500 million. “Trailblazer Awards honor credit union staff and volunteers who exhibit creativity in marketing and communicating the benefits of their products, services, and activities,” said John Bratsakis, the association’s president and CEO. “We are thrilled to honor Educational Systems FCU and all of this year’s winners for the Mary Harris, Marketing Manager, Educational Systems Federal Credit Union receives award from Maryland and District excellence of their work.” of Columbia Credit Union Association President and Chief “The Trailblazer awards have become Executive Officer, John Bratsakis. the icing on the cake every spring,” said Vic Samuels, Vice President of Community Relations for Educational Systems FCU. “Our marketing department always looks forward to sharing their successes and to learning from some of the industry’s best marketers in the area.” A total of 33 Trailblazer Awards were presented to 17 credit unions in 11 different categories. For more information visit www.mddccua.org or www.esfcu.org.

On May 17, County First Bank in Prince Frederick celebrated their Open House and Ribbon Cutting Ceremony at their new location in the Prince Frederick Shopping Center at 36 S. Solomons Island Road. Pictured in the front IT’S TIMEIIIFOR row from left is Denise Sprouse, Megan Snell, Earl R. Gieseman - President & CEO, Kim Money - Manager, Rita Earnshaw, Carolyn Riggins, Bryan Harrison, Director Bill Higgs, Charles Bryer, and Kevin Frere.

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The Calvert Gazette

Thursday, June 7, 2012

8

STORY

Sheriff’s Bike Patrol Doesn’t Intend to be Invisible By Corrin M. Howe Staff Writer

Photo courtesy of the Calvert County Sheriff ’s Office.

Citizens of Calvert County are still surprised, 10 years later, to discover the Sheriff’s Office has an active bike patrol, according to 1st Sgt. Bill Soper. “Most people are only looking for two headlights,” said DFC. Eddie Bradley, who patrols in both a cruiser and on bike. DARE officer and bike patrol DFC Andre Mitchell said, “Just today a car almost ran a stop sign,” nearly colliding with the two officers. This happened despite the fact that he and his partner for the day, DFC Megan Quinn, were wearing their “bumble bee” uniforms. The top half of their shirt is a very bright yellow, and the rest of the uniform is black and white. “Last year, Soper and I rode right up and knocked on the car window of a guy lighting up heroin,” Mitchell said. Even though the Bike Patrol unit has been active in the county for a decade, the officers say they are regularly approached by residents surprised to learn about them. “We are still in the process of educating the public about our presence,” Quinn said. The bike patrol was assigned to the Stars and Stripes Festival at the Twin Beaches over Memorial Day weekend. Saturday, Mitchell and Quinn said they mostly interacted with residents and gave directions. “Kids love cops on bikes, it is something they can relate too,” Quinn said. “I love the interaction.” Soper said all bike patrol officers have other responsibilities within the sheriff’s office. He has found, and several of the 13-member team have also commented, that interact-

ing with the public is a highlight of the duty. “The (officers in) cruisers don’t have the advantage to talk to the general public while in their cars,” Soper said. The bike patrol provides increased response time during the County Fair, Artsfest at Annmarie Garden, Fourth of July fireworks events, and Tiki Bar opening in Solomons. These events, congested with people, reduce the accessibility of police cars or foot patrols. While on patrol, these tandem teams can be dispatch the same way as other police units. Quinn, who rode her bike instead of a cruiser Friday night of Memorial Day weekend, said she and her partner responded to a suspicious person, an alarm and a minor fender bender during the event. Her description of the evening proved Soper’s point. The bike patrol was dispatched to the car accident within a parking lot because a patrol car was unable to move through the traffic.

Photo by Corrin M. Howe DFCs Andre Mitchell, left, and Megan Quinn worked the bike patrol during the Twin Beaches Stars and Stripes Festival over Memorial Day weekend.

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Quinn is one of the newest members of the bike patrol. So far her experience has been that she’s “usually more of a presence” answering questions, giving directions, and deterring unlawful behaviors. The bike patrol is a seasonal unit, operating on weekends from April through September/October, and again from Thanksgiving through Christmas. Usually, they patrol in the county’s town centers and during large events. During the events the bike patrol may be called to help find missing children, follow up on a vender theft or direct traffic. Town center patrol is proactive policing. For example, they hope to deter vehicle break-ins during the Christmas shopping season. Other activities include disorderly conduct, theft and controlled dangerous substance violations. While on duty in the town centers, the officers routinely cross Route 4 in Dunkirk and Prince Frederick between the major shopping centers. In Solomons, Mitchell chuckled that they get a hard time about patrolling the boardwalk because bikes are not allowed on the boardwalk. On any given weekend, there will only be a couple teams assigned, not all town centers in the county will have a bike patrol. In order to be a member of the bike patrol, the officers receive a 40-hour block of instructional training, which includes riding skills. They continue to come together as a team to hone their skills and build their endurance. Several years ago bike patrol officers did a training day and took their bikes out on a 50-mile round trip from Great Falls Park into Washington, D.C. Other training includes navigating cones, which prepares them to ride through crowds. One noteworthy incident Soper recalls is when one year an intoxicated person at the Tiki Bar opening weekend took an unauthorized ride on an officer’s bike, which was quickly recovered. Quinn said, besides interacting with the public, she enjoys being a part of the bike patrol because it allows her to be outside. “It doesn’t even feel like I’m working,” she said of her days on her bike. corrin@somdpublishing.net

GREAT MILLS TRADING POST ANYTHING ASPHALT DRIVEWAYS • ROADS • MILLING 301-994-0300 LOCAL • 301-870-2289 DC

WWW.GREATMILLSTRADINGPOST.COM • Great Mills, MD


Thursday, June 7, 2012

The Times They Are a’Changing By Susan Shaw Calvert County Commissioner, 2nd District

Give Employees Proper Pay I am the President of the Calvert Fraternal Order of Police, and as such I represent the Calvert County Sheriff’s Deputies who are members. I was hired as a Calvert County Deputy in 2001, fulfilling a lifelong dream to serve the citizens of the place I am proud to call home, as do my brothers and sisters at the Sheriff’s Office. When hired, as is true with all Deputies, I was given a pay scale indicating merit steps for the first 19 years of employment. This has turned out to be a false promise. The personnel code states that employees SHALL receive a merit step each year with a satisfactory performance evaluation. The only other condition set forth is “subject to the availability of funds.” A merit step is not a pay raise, it is earned through longevity and a satisfactory job performance. Calvert County recently received another triple A bond rating and has been cited as the 13th wealthiest county in the Nation. I understand being careful with fiscal matters, but I find it hard to believe there is no money to give the employees of Calvert County an earned merit step increase. It is no secret that the United States is having difficult financial times, and if Calvert County were short on funds, I would not be writing this letter. However, in each of the past 2 years there has been an over 6 million dollar surplus at the end of each budget year. The County continues to spend on projects that would not be funded if we were truly short of money. The County has chosen to spend millions of dollars to renovate a former grocery store into a library. Consideration is being given to an $800,000 project to water grass at a local golf course. A skate park was just renovated at a cost of thousands of dollars. These are just a few examples of how our County is spending money. For 5 years the County has foregone merit steps for all employees. The excuse given is that there is no money. If this is truly the case, then where did the money come from for the aforementioned projects? By my calculations, a merit step for deputy sheriffs for one year would cost the county around $280,000. Is building a library so a citizen

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COMMISSIONER CORNER

The Calvert Gazette

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has to drive fewer miles worth forgoing steps for your employees? Is watering grass at a local golf course worth forgoing steps for your employees? Is having a renovated skate park worth forgoing steps for your county employees? My family, and the families of all our deputies, is living on the same income we were receiving 5 years ago, yet gasoline alone has doubled. Health care costs continue to rise. Groceries and the costs of daily life get higher every day. Many deputies must work secondary employment in order to make ends meet. This along with working night shifts, weekends, and holidays, means we spend many hours away from our families. When we chose this career path, we knew we wouldn’t be rich, and it would require long hours and time away from our families. However, we did believe we would be compensated according to the agreement we signed when we were hired. Morale among deputies, teachers, and county government employees is low. These are the very people that allow the Commissioners to speak about how great our County is and the reason many citizens choose to live in Calvert County. The county administrator just sent out an email to all county employees praising us for the work we do and for making Calvert County the best place on earth. Even with the low morale this email makes it evident that we continue to uphold our part of the contract we signed when we were hired. It is time Calvert County upheld its end of agreement that was made to its employees when they were hired. You cannot continue to balance a budget on the backs of employees. I ask all citizens to email, call or write a letter to the board of County Commissioners, as these are the people who we all voted in to represent the county employees and citizens. I respectfully implore the County Commissioners to approve a merit step for the 2012-2013 budget and to develop a plan for restoring all the back steps earned by and owed to County employees.

Times are changing so rapidly that it is hard to keep up. I know that generations before have said the same thing. We are experiencing this rapid change, though, in a way that I do not remember my parents or grandparents enduring. We talk about the computer age and the information age and how to manage data. My parents had to decide whether to use a crockpot or not. I remember giving them a crockpot for Christmas a generation ago. My mother said that they did not need it and returned it. After all, they could cook just fine without it. A year later, I noted that they had a crockpot and were using it. They had to see the utility of it and determine if they “needed” it. I find myself wondering about what I “need” and what our county “needs.” Even young adults find themselves in this position. A 25-year-old couple recently told me that they felt that they were getting behind on technology because they did not own smart phones. Another 33-year-old adult recently purchased his first smart phone because he “needed” to communicate on an equal basis with others with the technology. He went from cursing in frustration when he didn’t know how to make it complete a task, to whipping it out to check on the weather, driving directions, or some other instantly-available data. How quickly we come to rely on the new technology! Then we “need” it. A recent example from Economic Development involved a marketing seminar. One participant explained how hard it would be to market to her 20-something son and his wife, because they don’t read local newspapers, they shop on the Internet. They schedule deliveries of basic household items like TP from Amazon which arrive at their door on schedule. They listen to satellite radio. They don’t watch broadcast television channels. They don’t go to the bank and they don’t go to the Post Office. They lead an Internet-connected life. Meanwhile, another participant talked about how returning to traditional marketing methods, like this weekly newspaper, is working well for some businesses. I know that there is a significant, consistent readership from the compliments I get on this column when I am out and about. The County, by legal mandate, continues to advertise bids and public hearings in “a local newspaper of general circulation.” Yet, we also advertise and distribute our bids on eMarylandMarketplace.com. Thomas Phelps, President For example, a recent bid announcement in the Calvert County LeFOP Lodge #109 gal Notices section of the newspaper said that the County will accept sealed bids and “specifications may be downloaded on eMaryland Marketplace”. The County offers assistance in signing onto and using eMaryland Marketplace, which has many adPublisher Thomas McKay vantages over the old system. The old way vs. the new way is Associate Publisher Eric McKay juxtaposed in these examples. Editor Sean Rice The problem for me, as an individual, and for the County, Graphic Artist Angie Stalcup as an entity, is that we are constantly striving to hang on to the Office Manager Tobie Pulliam old, tried and true ways, as well as adopt and adapt to the new Advertising sales@somdpublishing.net realities, whether they be technological or financial, both at the Email info@somdpublishing.net same time. Do we “need” to pay for smart phones and I-pads? Phone 301-373-4125 Some departments “need” smart phones to work effectively. Staff Writers I do, as an individual, who pays for her own. Recently, there Guy Leonard Law Enforcement was a split vote by the Board of County Commissioners on Sarah Miller Government, Education whether to use a grant to buy iPads for Sheriff’s detectives. I Corrin Howe Community, Business ended up getting a lesson on how being able to send a search Staff Writer Carrie Munn warrant to a Judge from a detective’s or State’s Attorney’s iPad Contributing Writers in a car using specialty apps (applications) for law enforcement Joyce Baki facilitates arrests and seals cases. Keith McGuire Both personally, and as a County, we are being stretched Susan Shaw P. O. Box 250 . Hollywood, MD 20636 trying to do both the old and the new. For instance, I am trying Sherrod Sturrock to read all the local papers as they come out. I am also trying to keep up with articles on Internet news sites for Calvert The Calvert Gazette is a weekly newspaper providing news and information for the residents of CalCounty. I am trying to keep up with email and not lose any or vert County. The Calvert Gazette will be available on newsstands every Thursday. The paper is fail to respond. I was trying to stay current on FB. After all, published by Southern Maryland Publishing Company, which is responsible for the form, content, and I still have a lot of other responsibilities, and so does County policies of the newspaper. The Calvert Gazette does not espouse any political belief or endorse any government, and there is a limited amount of time, energy, and product or service in its news coverage. Articles and letters submitted for publication must be signed money. Trying to keep up with rapidly changing economic and may be edited for length or content. The Calvert Gazette is not responsible for any claims made times is a topic I will save for another day. by its advertisers.

Calvert Gazette


The Calvert Gazette

Mary Baker, 93 On Wednesday, May 30, 2012, Mary Edna Baker passed away at home in Myrtle Beach, SC. She was born Sept. 30, 1918, to Thomas F. and Dora (Crouch) Allred of Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Mary attended the R.J. Reynolds High School where she was the Valedictorian for the Class of 1938. In 1940, she attended training at the Gallingier Hospital, in Washington, D.C. to become a “Candy Striper” in the medical field. While in Washington, D.C., she met Marshall H. Baker whom she married on November 29, 1941. Marshall worked for the Army Map Service located in Montgomery, County, just outside of Washington, D.C., while Mary was a domestic engineer taking care of their growing family. After 24 years of marriage, Marshall passed away on Tuesday, April 13, 1965, leaving Mary with 5 children from the union; Harry Thomas, Beverly Ann, Paul Carlton, Richard Douglas, and Mary Elizabeth Baker. At that time, Mary needed to find work and was employed by the Hecht Co., then Duvall High School, and finally the Prince George’s Health Department in Maryland. Mary retired from the health department in 1985, but not from life, she continued to burn the candle at both ends. Mary enjoyed traveling, swimming, ceramics, helping to build an A-Frame (from scratch), playing cards, night-life, laughing, meeting, greeting and making many new friends. She loves all of her children, grandchildren and great grandchildren, always treating them equally and was always there to help them. She enjoyed life and lived it to the fullest. She was preceded in death by her parents and brothers; Thomas F. Allred, Jr. (Mutt) and Paul Allred. She leaves behind her children; Harry Baker (Yeda) of Upper Marlboro, MD, Beverly Anderson (Kenneth) of Myrtle

Beach, SC, Paul Baker of Huntingtown, MD, Richard Baker (Cindy) of Lakeland, FL. and Mary Galemore (Fred) of Chesapeake Beach, MD., thirteen grandchildren and seventeen great grandchildren. Family received friends on Monday, June 4, 2012 from 2 - 4 and 7 - 9 pm at Rausch Funeral Home, P.A., 8325 Mt. Harmony Lane, Owings, MD. A service and celebration of Mary’s life was held at 11:00 A.M. Tuesday, June 5, 2012 at Lower Marlboro United Methodist Church. Interment followed in the church cemetery.

Tina L. Dorman, 44 Tina L. Dorman, 44, of Lothian, MD passed away in Bentonville, VA. She was born August 30, 1967 in Washington, DC to Joseph Anthony and Linda Messina. Tina graduated from Northern High School in 1985. She attended Goucher College and graduated from Towson University in 1990. She married Robert Dorman in Lothian on May 29, 2010. Tina operated her own interior design company called Interior Ideas. She was preceded in death by her father Joseph Anthony Messina and a half brother Tony Glenn Messina. Surviving are her husband Bob of Lothian, MD, her mother and step father Linda Messina Copp and Harry Copp of Bentonville, VA, a son Brian Richard Osbourn of Huntingtown, MD, step son Matthew Collin Dorman of Lothian, MD, a half brother Michael Messina of Pennsylvania and half sister Karen Messina of College Park, MD. A visitation was held Saturday, June 2, 2012 with a Memorial Service and celebration of Tina’s life following. Memorial contributions may be made to American Cancer Society, 1041 Rt. 3 North, Gambrills, MD 21054.

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Eileen Graby Eileen Dorothy Smith-Graby, 89, of Lusby, MD passed away peacefully at her residence on May 31, 2012 with her family by her side. She was born Eileen Dorothy Heemstra Dec. 31, 1922 in Monroe, North Dakota to Albert and Pearl Heemstra. The family moved to Pine River, Minnesota. After graduating from Pine River High School, she joined the U.S. Navy to serve in WWII. She was stationed in New York City and attended Hunter College for her basic training and nursing. While stationed in N.Y. she met and married Ralph Smith, from Calvert County. They had five children, Kathleen Nowick, Darlene Dodson, Maxine Swontek, Douglas Smith, and Ralph Smith. Eileen later married Henry Graby. Eileen lived in Severna Park and worked as a nurse at Crownsville State hospital for 26 years before retiring. She was a Sunday school teacher at Severna Park Baptist Church for many years. Eileen later moved in with her son and daughter-in-law Douglas and Susan Smith, in Gambrills, Maryland. They eventually moved her back to Calvert County with them where she spent her last seven years. Eileen enjoyed her church, studying the Bible and was a substitute Sunday school teacher. She also loved reading, sewing, cooking, canning, playing practical jokes, and was a big fan of Jeopardy. She was also proud of having visited all 50 states, as well as the Netherlands and England. Eileen had five children, seven grandchildren, 10 great grandchildren and two great-great grandchildren. The family received friends on Wednesday, June 6, at the Rausch Funeral Home, P. A., 20 American Lane, Lusby, MD. Funeral services will be held on Thursday, June 7 at 10 a.m. in Southern Calvert Baptist Church, 12140 H. G. Trueman Road, Lusby, MD with Pastor Steve Fehrman officiating. Entombment will follow at Meadowridge Memorial Park, Elkridge, MD at 2 p.m. In lieu of flowers the family is requesting that donations be made to Calvert County Hospice, P.O. Box 838, 238 Merrimac Ct., Prince Frederick, Maryland 20678. Donations are encouraged on-line at www. calverthospice.org.

Donald Johnson, Jr., 22 Donald Washington Johnson, Jr., 22, of Huntingtown, MD passed away on May 27, 2012 at his residence. He was born Sept. 28, 1989, in Annapolis, MD to Brenda and Don-

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ald Johnson, Sr. He attended Calvert County Public Schools and graduated from Huntingtown High School. He had several jobs and was currently employed at IHOP in Prince Frederick, MD. Donald, who we all called Junior, was a young entrepreneur who loved to be creative with his artwork by creating drawings and making t-shirts which he sold to family members. Donald loved playing basketball. As a young kid he always loved playing the drums. He was a very kind and loving young man who always flashed that million dollar smile whenever he greeted you. Junior was a young man who knew and loved the Lord. He grew up in the church and was currently a member of Vineyard Deliverance Evangelistic Church in Mechanicsville, MD. He leaves to cherish his loving memories, his parents Brenda and Donald Johnson Sr.; three sisters, Devonia Johnson, Danielle Johnson and Jessica Johnson, grandparents, Arthur and Landous Creek; four uncles, Arthur Evans, Bobby (Gladys) Creek, Clifton (Paulette) Creek (god parents) and Steve (Nina) Creek; three aunts, Bertina (Jesse) Franklin (god parents) Paula Creek, Phyllis Offer; two god sisters, Sierra and Tyra Thompson; one very close friend Travon Spriggs; and a host of other aunts, uncles, cousins and close friends. Funeral service was held on Friday, June 1, 2012 at 11:00 AM at Dunkirk Baptist Church, Dunkirk, MD with Pastor G. Marvin Carter officiating. The interment was at Moses Cemetery, Lothian, MD. The pallbearers were Edwin Randall, Tarvae Barnett, Travon Spriggs, Andre Adams, Steve Agerbeek and Derrick Offer, Jr. The honorary pallbearers were Jessie Franklin, Jr., George Thomas, Eddie Stewart and Stanley Rawlings. Funeral arrangements provided by Sewell Funeral Home, Prince Frederick, MD.

Rita Kinkead, 85 Rita Grace Kinkead, 85, of Port Republic, Maryland passed away at her home on May 28, 2012. She was born on July 6, 1926 in McDowell County West Virginia to the late James R. and Elizabeth Murray Brown. Rita loved her family, gardening and being on the bay. Besides her parents she is predeceased by her husband Col. William W. Kinkead and 8 brothers and sisters. She was the beloved aunt of, James R. Brown of Mt. Juliet, TN, Susan B. Harmon of St. Leonard, MD, Mark L. Brown of Gainesville, VA, Sandra K. Brown of Prince Frederick, MD and Janice Darr of Fredericksburg, VA and of many great nieces and nephews. The family received friends at the


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The Calvert Gazette

Thursday, June 7, 2012

Rausch Funeral Home, 4405 Broomes Island Road, Port Republic, MD on Friday June 1, 2012. Interment services will be held at Arlington National Cemetery at a later date. Memorial contributions may be made to either the Humane Society or Calvert Hospice.

Evan Maynard, Jr., 67 Evan Preston Maynard, Jr., of North Beach, formerly of Edgewater, passed away on May 27, 2012 at home at the age of 67. He was born on December 19, 1944 in Raleigh County, West Virginia to Evan Preston, Sr. and Emma (Maycaster) Maynard. Evan grew up in Beckley and attended Mark Twain High School. In 1964 he married Mary Testerman. Evan’s work career was with C & P Telephone Company. During his 40 years in the Telecommunications Industry, he worked in every aspect of the telephone service. Evan enjoyed spending time in his garden and was always landscaping his yard. He was a big fan of the Washington Redskins and the West Virginia Mountaineers Basketball team. Although these were his hobbies, his family was first and foremost in his life! Evan was the beloved husband of the late Mary Maynard and the loving father of Evan P. Maynard, III and Andrea Daniels. He was the devoted grandfather of Evan P. Maynard, IV, Holly Daniels and Marialana Maynard. He is also survived by a soon to be great-grandson, Evan Preston Maynard, V. Evan was the brother of Barbara Sombati, Mary Minton, Julie Morris, the late Rose Shupe, Peggy Pollock and Richard Maynard. The family received friends at Lee Funeral Home Calvert, 8200 Jennifer Lane (Rt 4 & Fowler Road), Owings, MD 20736 on Friday, June 1, 2012 from 11 am to start of funeral service at 1 pm. Internment followed at Lakemont Memorial Gardens, in Davidsonville, Maryland.

thony C. Murillo of Lusby, MD and Barry D. Williams of Las Vegas, NV; brothers, Steven W. McGrath of Tulsa, OK, William B. McGrath of Hagerstown, MD and James L. McGrath of Lakeland, FL and two grandchildren, Lily and Ethan. A Memorial Service celebrating Jerry’s life was held on Thursday, May 31, at Rausch Funeral Home, P.A., 20 American Lane, Lusby, MD officiated by Charlie Bernhard. Interment will be private. The family request memorial contribution be made in Jerry’s memory to the Calvert Animal Welfare League, (C. A. W. L.), 1040 Prince Frederick Blvd., P. O. Box 1660, Prince Frederick, MD 20678 or online at www.cawlrescue.org.

Dorothy Monnett, 83 Dorothy H. Monnett, 83, of Prince Frederick, Maryland passed away on June 4, 2012 in Prince Frederick, Maryland. She was born on March 18, 1929 in Prince Frederick, Maryland to the late Earlie Luther and Hazel Stevens Hutchins. Dorothy retired from Calvert Memorial Hospital where she worked for many years as a Nurse’s Aide. She was a member of Trinity United Methodist Church and loved to tend to her flower gardens and working in the yard. After retirement, she should have changed her middle name to “GO”, because any time anyone called to go somewhere, she would go. Didn’t matter whether it was out to lunch with other retired hospital workers or shopping. During her illness she was visited by store clerks, greeters and waitresses who all grew to know and care for Dorothy after her many visits to their establishments. Beside her parents, she is predeceased by her husband Clarence E, Monnett, Jr. She was the beloved mother of Larry E.

Monnett of Richmond, Virginia, and Denise Y. Valentino of Chester, Virginia; grandmother of Mark A., Farrah R., and Taylor N. Valentino; great grandmother of Kiraya R. and Kyle W. Torres, and Isabella B. Naupari. She is also survived by her brothers and their wives, Earl H. Hutchins and his wife Anne of Prince Frederick, Maryland, Arnold L. Hutchins and his wife Julie of Florida, and Paul K. Hutchins and his wife Becky of Waldorf, Maryland. She is also survived by many nieces and nephews. The family will receive friends at the Rausch Funeral Home, P.A., 4405 Broomes Island Road, Port Republic, Maryland on Friday June 8, 2012 from 2-4 and 6-8 p.m. where services will be held on Saturday June 9, 2012 at 10 a.m. Interment will follow in Central Cemetery, Barstow, Maryland. Memorial contributions may be made to Calvert Hospice, P.O. Box 838, Prince Frederick, Maryland 20678.

Virginia O’Neill, 99 Virginia O’Neill, a 65-year resident of Calvert County, Maryland died on May 23 in her home at Scientists’ Cliffs on the Chesapeake Bay. She was 99 years and lived an extraordinary life, full of great adventure and wonderful memories. Born in Kansas City, Missouri on Sept. 24, 1912, her family moved to the Washington D.C. area in the late 1920s. She was well known in the county for her stained glass lamps and braided rugs, most being sold at the annual Scientists’ Cliffs Art & Craft Show. Many of the homes in Scientists’ Cliffs and throughout the county are decorated with her lamps and hanging stained glass pieces. This was a source of great pride to her. She was active in the local garden club and other organizations and was one of the founding members of American

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Jerry McGrath, 48 Gerald Robert “Jerry” McGrath, 48, of Dunkirk, MD formerly of Silver Spring, MD passed away suddenly on May 25, 2012 at his residence. He was born on August 2, 1963 in Washington, D.C. to Paul L. McGrath and the late Jean F. Lumsden McGrath. He was the beloved husband of Susan K. McGrath whom he married on August 4, 1995 in Orlando, FL. Jerry graduated from Kennedy High School in 1981 and from the Marine Mechanics Institute, Orlando, FL in 1995. In his spare time he enjoyed boating, fishing, hunting and was a member of the Titians Motorcycle Club. Jerry is survived by his father, Paul L. McGrath and his wife Phyllis J. McGrath of Sun City Center, FL; wife, Susan K. McGrath of Dunkirk, MD; sons, Gerald R. Hall of Brandywine, MD, An-

Chestnut Land Trust and loved the organization’s work to preserve the Parkers Creek Watershed. Virginia, affectionately known to the family as Mimi, is survived by her son Alan and his wife Barbara; daughter-in-law Marti; grandchildren Kevin, Ryan, Brent, Kim, and Stacey; and great grandchildren Sean, Kieran, Cameron, Breana, Chelsey, and Alyssa. She became a great-great grandmother with the recent birth of Hadley Davis, born to her great granddaughter, Alyssa in Mansfield, Texas. Virginia had a passion for conservation and the American West, and took almost annual pilgrimages west to visit the national parks and other protected landscapes. She loved nature and instilled this love to her twin sons Alan and Brian, who both spent distinguished careers in conservation, mostly with the National Park Service. One of the things that distinguished Virginia was her love of adventure and positive attitude. In her mind, there never was a bad day. She believed we are blessed to be alive and that one should fill their memory bank each and every day. She was a wonderful storyteller and loved to share her stories with friends and family. She had beautiful blue eyes and an infectious smile. Her family saw her as a wonderful role model for how to live on this planet of ours with grace and dignity. She was not only a living legacy to her family but to the community and all those who had the benefit to know her or to cross her path. She was a way-shower on how to live a full life of meaning and how humankind can live in harmony with each other and with the earth. She was a simple but great person. She was a demonstration that you don’t have to be a world leader to touch and positively influence thousands of people. The family will always remember her as one who brought a special “light” to the planet. She was clearly the grand Matriarch of the O’Neill family. An event to celebrate her life was held Saturday, June 2nd at 11:00 a.m. at the Scientists’ Cliffs Community Building. Those who wish to make a donation, please make one in her name to the American Chestnut Land Trust; P.O. Box 2363; Prince Frederick, MD 20678.

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The Calvert Gazette

Thursday, June 7, 2012

Congratulations 2012 Calvert High Graduates Graduation season is upon us, which means for many Southern Maryland high schoolers, one chapter is closing and another one is about to begin. Before diving into your next adventure, take a moment to recognize what you just accomplished. Graduating from high school is not to be taken lightly. Laura Theresa Arias Ashley Marie Armiger Forest Michael Aspinall Joshua Lawrence Atkinson William Redford Bailey Sarah Brittany Bamford Michael Mark Baranowski Emma Carley Barker Aislynn Marquise Barnes Christina Marie Bassett Tyler Lee Baumgarten Jessica Lynn Baxtrom Meghan Michaela Beall Arthur Robert Bennett III Michael Joseph Benson Sally May Berens Andrew Roy Beverly Nicholas Ricardo Beverly Jessica Alice Bonolis Aaron Keith Bowlan Stephen Ricardo Bowlan Amber Nicole Boyd Zachary Joseph Boyd Anthony Thomas Brady Christina Julia Brady Kyle Edward Brady Jacqueline Michelle Breidenbach Ne’Kita Alicia Brogden Stewart Matthew Brooks Jr. Darren Elijah Brown Keyonta Letiece Brown Johanna Victoria Buchanan John Reginald Concepicion Butler Jr Tonique Jernay Butler Aaron Joseph Bynum Devin Michael Cagle Lauren Tiffany Caldwell Tremayne Tavish Carey Amber Rose Carpenter Zachary Alexander Carson

It takes a lot of hard work and dedication. Whether your next step is college, armed forces or getting a full-time job, realize that you just managed to complete a huge project, and nothing is to stop you from moving on and conquering any challenge you come across.

Ryan Lawrence Catterton Shakira Louise Chapman Marcus Chase Jr. Stanton Elworth Chase Jr. Rachel Elizabeth Cloud Jessalyn Mallory Cockrell Shyniece Lashya Eloise Colbert Jeremy Thomas Colborn Kelly Anne Collins Zachary John Hall Collins Destiny Briannae Commodore Stephanie Danielle Compton Jacob Scott Cook Stephen Joseph Corcoran Stephen Joseph Corley Gabrielle Marie Cousino William Justin Craighead Markeisha Tynee Creek Ian Alexander Crosby Priscilla Marie Cupp Sheri Leanne Curtis Anna Elizabeth D’Agostino Caden Edward Dalrymple Viet Quoc Dang Aleyah Nicole Dawkins Megan Ann Dawson Jessica Lee Dembrow Jessica Nicole Denney Niki Renee DiMaggio Stefan Timothy Dobbs Connor Ryan Donnelly Whitney Diane Doremus Ryan Louis Drake Corinne Clare Dunn Christopher Allen Eiler Adam Fletcher El-Attar Jordan Alyssia Elford Maya Regina Eller Jesse Ray Engberg Caitlin Erin Evans Courtney Leigh Fansler

Interns Wanted The County Times and Calvert Gazette newspapers have internship opportunities available for local students year round who are looking to hone their journalism talents in writing or photography. Send an email to info@somdpublishing.net with information about your career goals attn: Sean Rice, editor.

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Thomas Albert Farey Christopher Ryan Farnese David Ian Fazekas Carl Leonard Fields Jr. Calvin Daniel Flanigan Caleb Joseph Fleshman Gregory Edward Foard Maranda Leigh Fordham David Brian Fortney Jr. Brooke Allison Foster Taylor Gene Frick Sean Everrett Frost Jeremy Michael Garner Ryan Michael Gebhardt Christian Matthew Gerber Raymond Louis Giannuzzi Kara Michelle Gibson Justin Michael Godin Davonta Antonie Goldring Kelsey Nicole Goodenough Jenna Marie Goodwin Christopher Shane Graham Talia Janess Graves Romand Fanez Gray Shalawn Myrea Gray Willie Talbott Gray Brandon Edward Green Cheyenne Marie Green Nicholas Andrew Gregory Andre Tayvon Gross Sharquette LaShay Gross Tyler Christian Grover Shelby Therese Hacker Douglas Robert Hall Lauren Ashley Hall Jacob William Hance Joshua Nicholas Hanna Donald Crippen Harmon III Ethan Pierce Harrell Michael Alexander Harrell Jerald Anthony Harris Jr. Kelsey Lee Hayden Raymond Joseph Hayes Jr. Miguel Angel Hernandez Deonta Dayvon Hill Savannah Rachel Hill Kristen Lynn Hillen Whitney Bryana Hiltpold Charles William Hinkle Rachel Michel Hoffman Kayla Nicole Holtzclaw Matthew Keegan Holzberger Samantha Marie Hoover Jerron Odyssey Hopkins Brandon James House Roger Anthony Humphreys Jeffrey Tyler Inglett Shannon Nicole Irby William Thomas Jacobs II Jordan Kyle Jafari Shawn Terrell Janey Claudia Marie Jewell Dae’shawn Jerome Johnson Griffith Ryan Johnson Paul Michael Johnson Marcus Leigh Jones Jr, Breonia Lee Jones Kathie Leigh Kelly Ashleigh Michelle Kidwell Byron Marquis King Bria Jasmine Lynn Knott Ethan Charles Kruder Nathaniel Richard Kruder

Good luck and congratulations graduates. The following is a list of graduating students from Calvert High School. Last week, the Calvert Gazette ran lists of graduates from every other public and private school in the county. Calvert High School officials declined to make their list available last week.

Makayla Nicole Ladd Georgann Marie Lafayette Anna Mae Lafontaine Elizabeth Jane LaGoy Christopher Andrew Lange David Charles Larsen II Marc William Lawton Tiara Nicole Lester Camille Devin Link Christopher Leonard Long Jr Rachel Liza Loube-Pearson Cory James Mack Antoine Mackall Cortez Nanze Mackall Connor Michael MacKnight Alexandra Renee MacWilliams Andrew Brenton MacWilliams Maria Yessenia Marquez Ochoa Amy Katherine Marshall Erik Nikolaus Martin Joseph Casey Martin Alyssa Chanell Mason Alyssa Marie Mathesius Dana Rebecca May Shannon Marie McCloskey Danielle Michaela McDonald Sarah Emily McDonald Jordan Taylor McDowell Shawn Ryan McElravy Jameson Kevin McHale Taylor Nicole McHenry Ajee’ Nyanda McLaughlin Christopher Paul Merkel Karoline Nicole Messer Joseph Alexander Messina Jesse Michael Metz Benjamin Lee Michael Andrew Jeremy Miller Christina Lee Miller Jordyn Christine Miller Braedyn Leigh Mims Amber Linette Moore Davena Renee Moore Jabari Rashad Moore Deontrae Montrell Morgan Trevor Antiwan Morsell Daniel John Nemie Christopher Ryan Nerem Lindsey Nicole Newman Corey Lee Nims Christina Elizabeth Nylander Robert Kyle Owen Schean Douglas Pappas Quanta Khiree Parker Tierra Nicole Parker Zachary Stone Pate Sierra Nikole Patterson Dylan Matthew Pauley Samantha Marie Peebles Leah Marie Penar Anthony Arthur Perez Jessica Lynn Phelps Sylvester Ryan Phillips III Brittany Ann Pitts Sierra Jane Pitts Garrett Jamison Pope Ronald Daniel Powell Jr. Shawn Lewis Proctor Jr. Russell Michael Raley Briana Nicole Rawlings Charles James Reading Chessa Victoria Reid Jessica Danielle Requilman

Alan David Ridgely Sophie Belle Ridgway Kaitlyn Diae Ring Amanda Lee Roberson Jade Marie Rolley Philipp Edwin Roy Jesse Reed Sanders Joseph Earl Saul Jalen Juwan Scayles Jacob Alexander Schraff Kirsten Suphorn Sellers Rodne’t Chivonte’ Sewell Norman Panilawon Shapira Amanda Nicole Shrawder Samantha Leigh Sickle Cody Tyler Sisco Jamie Alan Smith Thomas Edward Smith Jr. Tiana Marie Snyder Benjamin Scott Squires Lindsey Jordan Stanbery Isabella Marie Stevenson David Tyrone Stewart Jr. LaChelle Nadine Stewart Mikeeta Keona Stewart Anthony Michael-Lee Stout Leah Ruth Strauss Sarah Taylor Stuart Jessica Nichole Suchter Andrew Ray Sutherland Kyle Joseph Sutphin Jason Conan Svendsgaard Jacob Aaron Taylor Justine Mary Carin Tejada Megan Elizabeth Thacker Daniel Thomas Theis Randall Scott Thomas Randy Lee Thomas Jr. Kimberly Dawn Thompson Michelle Catherine Thrasher Luis Alberto Tirado-Garcia Jason Peter Tkaczuk Brandon Bunthan Touch Michael Anthony Trujillo Airial Nicolle Turner Chasity Nicole Tyson Cody James Vance Cody Rylan Voegtli Victoria Grace Voegtli Joshua Benjamin Walker Ashlee Nicole Wallen Tyrik D’Shawn Warren James Gerald Washington Jr. LaRose Jonese Washington Danielle Marie Watt Joy Havilah Weems Thomas James Welch Lloyd Owen Wenger III Brooke Carolyn Western Margaret Elizabeth Whitten Raven Jalain Wigenton Marcus Roderick Williams Kara Elizabeth Wilt Sebastian Xavier Windsor Shelby June Withers Courtney Paige Yates Cynthia Ann Yeatman James Parker Yost Patrick Nolan Young Taylor Ashley Youngblood Bryanna Mae Zent Julia Marie Zentgraft

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The Calvert Gazette

Thursday, June 7, 2012

Spotlight On

Calvert High Juniors Challenged to ‘Be The Change’ By Corrin M. Howe Staff Writer

Calvert High students dance to Lady Gaga's "Born This Way" during an assembly.

When Elizabeth Jane “E.J.” LaGoya’s friend’s brother died earlier this year, she decided something needed to change. Last week Calvert High School students, staff, teachers and others gathered for two assemblies to learn how they can “Be the Change” not only to stop using words to hurt people, but to bring about a “Braver, Kinder Calvert.” Susan Johnson, principal of CHS, told how LaGoya had approached her with an idea. This idea “spawned” into an “exceptional” performance. “The message is so very important and I hope you hear it,” Johnson said. LaGoya adapted principles from Lady Gaga’s “Born This Way” Foundation. After LaGoya found three songs to go with the message she wanted to bring to her fellow students, she enlisted the help of other students to present then. The school’s dance team incorporated students from the Functional Living Program and Kid’s with Autism to dance to Lady Gaga’s “Born This Way.” The audience of the first assembly responded to this number with a standing ovation and shouts of encouragement. Over the background music composed and performed by graduating senior, Donny Harmon, Andrea Kelson, a freshman, read the poem she wrote entitled “A Revolution,” “High school is a war zone. No one Senior Donny Harmon plays a musical piece during a slide show presentation.

feels safe,” she started. The piece said that fighting wasn’t funny and cussing wasn’t cool as it denounced the unkind behavior she had experienced or witnessed. “My question to you – ALL – of you is ‘What are you going to do about it?’” Austin Folkman, a junior, sang Mark Willis’s “Don’t Laugh At Me” depicting the painful stories behind the stereotypical situations in which people are taunted or ignored. One verse was about a homeless man, who had gone crazy when a driver crossed the yellow line and killed his wife and son. “Words hurt. Sometimes jokes are just offensive and rude. Think before you speak. Just like that song Austin sang, you don’t know that person’s situation,” said LaGoya. During both performances, the audience clapped along with Taylor Swift’s “Mean” sung by Jessica Huber, junior, and Kate Wilding, sophomore, with Ty Inglett accompanying on a “ganjo” and Harmon on guitar. LaGoya told the story of how Swift’s song was in response a critique of her performance with Stevie Nicks at the 52nd Grammy Awards. The assembly included information defining bullying, examples of those who overcame bullying and where kids can turn if they are bullied. Principal Johnson closed out the performance by saying, “When we toured the new high school we talked about setting expectations higher. We want to make a difference. As juniors, the seniors have challenged you to be the change.” corrin@somdpublishing.net

Board of Ed Seeks Citizen Advisory Committee Members The Calvert County Board of Education is accepting applications for its 2012-2013 Citizen Advisory Committee. 25 members are appointed annually. The committee meets monthly during the school year on the fourth Monday from 7 to 9 p.m. It conducts studies in areas of concern to the Board of Education, provides community insight into pending policies and Board decisions, and discusses a variety of issues affecting school system operations. Information about the committee, the 2012-13 meeting dates, and the application are available on the Calvert County Public Schools website at: www.calvertnet.k12.md.us/departments/administration/cac/cac.asp. Applicants must be residents of Calvert County and may not be full or part time employees of the school system. The Board appoints members through a process that ensures diverse representation; at least four citizens from each high school district will be appointed. The Board will begin appointing members in August 2012. Call Gail Bennett at 410535-7620 for more information.

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The Calvert Gazette

Thursday, June 7, 2012

14

The Calvert Gazette is always looking for more local talent to feature! To submit art or band information for our entertainment section, e-mail sarahmiller@countytimes.net.

Footlight Festival Features Theatrical Variety By Carrie Munn Staff Writer With four days left to catch the annual Footlight Festival at Three Notch Theatre, lovers of the arts can find a nice variety of performances featuring local thespians and authors. “Headquarters” is a one-act play penned by local author Peter E. Abresch. The humorous, yet touching tale of a man coming to the end of his life garnered accolades for outstanding original production at the 27th annual Maryland Community Theatre Festival in January and was also performed at the Eastern States

Photos by Carrie Munn Billy Borst as Roan in “Avaritia” confesses his sins with blood stained hands and dramatic shadow play.

“Avaritia’s” Diyari, played by Rebecca Raymond, explains how jealousy and greed spurred her to take another’s life as Shade, portrayed by Tessa Silvestro, looks on.

Catch the show, produced by Valarie Green tonight, Friday or Saturday at 8 p.m. and in its final showing Sunday, June 10 at 3:30 p.m. Tickets can be purchased by visiting www.newtowneplayers.org or at the door. The Newtowne Players’ next production, beginning in July, will be the adventurous tale of an orphan, “Annie”. It is produced by impact-leaving actress from the Footlight Festival, Tessa Silvestro. carriemunn@countytimes.net

Theater Association’s Original Works Festival in Pennsylvania in April. The play’s director, Bill Scarafia, said the two actors, Larry and Tessa Silvestro, improved with every production. At a press preview, the duo, as the dying man who lingers in his memories and the wise but snarky angel who nudges him through the process, are committed and convincing in their roles. Tessa Silvestro plays a darker character, “Shade”, in Mallory Green’s “Avaritia” directed by A. Gilligan, and plays it with an eerie conviction. This intense one-act, set in Hell, features minimal props and three characters from various eras who pour out their souls and struggle with the guilt of their own wrongdoings. The emotional and almost poetic deliveries of Billy Borst, Sara Meador and Rebecca Raymond reveal their darkest secrets and the state of suffering they

have found themselves in. Roger Cornish’s “Mental Reservations” is a witty one-act, with two characters trying to dance around truth during a casual conversation. J. Michael Green and Elizabeth Mears bring these powerplaying communicators to life under the direction of Robert Rausch. In “The Sure Thing” by David Ives, as directed by Marilyn Maxwell, a man and a woman meet and get chance after chance to get it right, thanks to a buzzer that resets the conversation after each faux pas. Susan Fischer, as Betty, and Craig Miller, as Bill, demonstrate a first date that can go a dozen different directions depending on one answer. It’s almost painful to watch them stumble through the awkwardness until the words all come out right and the spark is ignited in this quick-paced and funny one-act.

J. Michael Green ponders the slippery slope of truth during “Mental Reservations”.

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Thursday, June 7, 2012

ner

KiddKioer

The Calvert Gazette

CLUES ACROSS

1. A leavened rum cake 5. A coarse file 9. Saudi people 14. 6th Jewish month 15. Greek colony founded by Xenophanes 16. Storybook elephant 17. Imperative listen 18. Maple genus 19. Am. Standard Code for Info. Interchange 20. Podiatrist’s concern 23. South African peoples 24. Cantonese dialect 25. Buckles 28. 1st day in an equestrian competition 33. Israeli dance 34. Idaho capital 35. Small cavity in rock 36. Get up 38. Baseball official 39. Strike with fear 41. Opening 42. Whittles 44. Sumac genus 45. Sextains 47. A self-centered person 49. Point midway between E and SE

50. Grad 51. Pluto’s realm 55. Shelter (Scot.) 58. Cleansing agent 59. Those considered individually 62. Blighia sapida 63. Off-Broadway theater award 64. Burrowing marine mollusk 65. Brews 66. Companion animals 67. Helicopter (inf.)

CLUES DOWN

1. Humbug 2. Dentist’s group 3. Vomit 4. 25th state 5. Royal domains 6. Hollyhocks genus 7. Observed 8. 1/100 serbian dinar 9. Manual computing devices 10. Skin eruptions 11. Basics 12. Spoken in the Dali region of Yunnan 13. ___ Lanka

21. Once around a track 22. Grains for flour and whiskey 25. Extreme confusion and disorder 26. “Mr. Moto” actor Peter 27. Elaborate opera solos 28. Circular ceiling vaults 29. Tears 30. Woolly indris genus 31. Spiritual teachers 32. Eliminate from the body 34. Pabir 37. Parts of a TV series 40. Dolmen 43. Afresh 46. A bank employee 47. Runs away to marry 48. Voltaic (linguistic) 50. Expect or anticipate 52. Employee stock ownership plan 53. Any loose flowing garment 54. Roy Rogers’ wife 55. Founder of Babism 56. Decorate a cake with frosting 57. Supplement with difficulty 60. Hall of Famer ___ Ripken 61. Health Maintenance Org.

Last Week’s Puzzle Solutions


Thursday, June 7, 2012 16 The Calvert Gazette FAMILY OWNED • FAMILY OPERATED • FAMILY TRADITIONS

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SALES • SERVICE • PARTS • CHEVY RUNS DEEP

2012-06-07 Calvert Gazette  

2012-06-07 Calvert Gazette newspaper. Cover: Calvert Cops on Bicycles.

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