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“[Preserving rural land] would do more for the bay than anything from the whiz kids up in Annapolis.”

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Joe Anderson, left, and Richard Holden of SMRWA’s Board of Directors present “relentless river advocate” Bernie Fowler, center, with a photo-journal in honor of his lifetime of service to improving water quality in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed.

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Thursday, May 24, 2012

ews Bar Association Gets Behind Densford By Guy Leonard Staff Writer The Maryland State Bar Association (MSBA), comprised of attorneys and judges from around the state, has thrown its support behind sitting Judge David Densford’s bid for election this year. Densford, appointed earlier this year by Gov. Martin O’Malley to fill a Circuit Court vacancy, faces Assistant State’s Attorney Joseph Stanalonis in the general election in November. “MSBA has consistently endorsed the retention and selection of sitting judges for Circuit Courts in Maryland,” a statement from the group read. “These sitting judges have been found to be qualified by a judicial nominating commission and were selected by the governor of the state. These esteemed members of the bench have earned the confidence, respect and support of the bar.” Patrick Tandy, director of communications for MSBA, said it has been the policy of the group for about the past 30 years to support judges nominated by committees and confirmed by the governor and not by popular election. “We support the merit selection

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of judges, they’ve been properly vetted,” said Tandy. “Elections throw that into turmoil and politicize the judiciary … It forces sitting judges to become campaigning politicians.” The county’s own bar association has also opposed contested elections for judges. Stanalonis said he was not made aware of the association’s recent decision — he is a member of the association — nor was he aware of any hearing where all 24,000 members had the opportunity to voice their opinions. Essentially the organization was Judge David Densford just restating its policy, he said. “They’ve endorsed the selection process except for the election portion of the process,” Stanalonis said, adding the position of the association was essentially to deny citizens the right to vote for their

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judges. “We’re supposed to support the constitution,” Stanalonis said. “It’s a shame.” Densford said the association’s governing board made the decision to support him and that it was not simply a continuation of their stated policy. “They ran it by their governing board… comprised of lawyers from large and small law firms and government from around the state,” Densford said. “If they had been impressed with him [Stanalonis] this wouldn’t have happened. “They did not have to take this up. I did not ask them to.” Densford said the association’s opposition to contested elections had nothing to do with the race at hand. “It does not change what voters here have to do, it does not change the fact that I’m happy to be in an election,” Densford said. guyleonard@countytimes.net

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Thursday, May 24, 2012

ews Bohanan: Tax Hikes Will Cut Deficit By Guy Leonard Staff Writer One of the county’s top delegates on the state legislature’s spending affordability committee said the recent tax hikes, passed during special session, will cut the state’s structural deficit of $500 million in half. Next year, Del. John Bohanan said, the state should be able to eliminate the structural deficit. Bohanan made the announcement at a town hall meeting at the Lexington Park library Tuesday evening. Bohanan said while the tax increases were unpopular — they target single filers who make $100,000 and those filing jointly earning at least $150,000 — they had the affect of raising $250 million in much-needed revenue. He said he understood the tax increases will affect a substantial number of residents in St. Mary’s County. “About 14 percent of our residents get impacted by this tax increase,” Bohanan said. Political observers say that any effort to eliminate the deficit would take another tax increase at the state level. “This is far from over,” said Chris Summer, president of the Maryland Public Policy Institute. “In good times they couldn’t support the size of government they had.” Summers’ group, which has opposed the tax increases and criticized the state’s spending practices in general, said he also did not believe that increases would bring in the $250 million originally thought. He also disputed the $500 million figure of the state’s structural deficit; he said it was closer to $1.3 billion. Summers thinks this means the structural deficit is here to stay. “It’s not going to happen,” Summers said of getting rid

Del. John Bohanan

of the deficit next year. “They still have structural deficits forecast out for about $1 billion.” Summers reiterated the fact that the budget, despite touted cuts from Gov. Martin O’Malley’s administration, actually increased by $700 million even before the tax in-

creases were passed. “Only in Maryland do you have a doomsday budget that has increases,” Summers said. guyleonard@countytimes.net

Commissioners Hold Tight on Budget Cuts By Guy Leonard Staff Writer As the Board of County Commissioners comes to the end of the budget cycle for fiscal year 2013, a tense debate broke out Monday concerning whether or not to restore funding, either some or all, to non-county agencies that provide community service. In the end, commissioners could not come to agreement on which groups to fund or by how much and left the situation as it is: with a total of about $100,000 cut from community non-profits. Both Commissioner President Francis Jack Russell and Commissioner Todd Morgan pushed to have funding completely restored to last year’s levels, but the effort eventually failed. Commissioner Dan Morris (R-Mechanicsville) started the debate when he pressed for restoring funding to Catholic Charities to the tune of about $10,000, while also advocating for an extra $2,000 to the St. Mary’s Caring soup kitchen in Lexington Park. He said that it was his and others’ Christian duty to make such considerations. “I want to feed the poor and the hungry and they do that,” Morris said.

He also said that since Catholic Charities helped homeless women and children, they were deserving of restored funding, which drew questions from Commissioner Larry Jarboe (R-Golden Beach). “Then how do you differentiate between Leah’s House and Catholic Charities?” Jarboe asked. Leah’s House has long sought county funding, but has yet to receive any. Morris argued since Catholic Charities has been funded by the county in the past, it should still be considered. “That’s what separates Catholic Charities from Leah’s House or anyone else,” Morris said. Commissioner Cindy Jones (R-Valley Lee) said the commissioner board was venturing into tenuous territory by having to decide which charities were worthy of assistance and which were not, using taxpayer dollars. She said citizens are the ones who ultimately decide which ones to support in their communities with their own dollars. “I don’t think I have the right to make that decision,” Jones stated. guyleonard@countytimes.net

Top Row: Carolyn Quade, Shirley Mattingly and Barbara Livingston. Bottom Row: Betty West, Steve Mattingly and Alice Kingsley


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Thursday, May 24, 2012

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ews Fowler’s Fight for Clean Water Featured at ‘A River Affair’ By Carrie Munn Staff Writer Members of the St. Mary’s River Watershed Association (SMRWA) and guests enjoyed the beauty of the waters they work to protect during “A River Affair” at Woodlawn in Ridge on Sunday. Foods prepared by chefs Michael and Lisa Kelley and served by Canard’s Catering , combined with award-winning Slack Wines created a delightful outdoor ambiance. The perfect setting to honor Bernie Fowler, a man the organization called a “relentless river advocate.” Joe Anderson, SMRWA president, introduced Fowler as “the Grand Master of the Chesapeake, our friend and my hero.” “You see, Bernie invented the wadein and there are damn few rivers in Maryland that haven’t felt his loving touch as he walked slowly into the water in his white sneakers, overalls and straw hat, holding the hands of thousands of people young and old. He’s done that for us ever since the beginning of Riverfest,” Anderson said. “I’m convinced, after all these years, that rivers get a little cleaner just by the fact that he does this. I’m sure the St. Mary’s has.

He brings attention to what each and every one of us must do to restore our rivers and the Bay and I think, at last, people are listening.” Anderson, along with local watershed supporter and professional photographer Richard Holden, presented Fowler with a photographic journal of the beauty of the St. Mary’s River, telling him, “Long may your impact be felt, dear friend.” Fowler called his decades of work, fighting for improved water quality, “a labor of love.” The 88-year-old former state senator recalled the abundant aquatic life that, during the Great Depression, kept Marylanders from facing starvation and a woman from his hometown of Broomes Island that would catch 25 dozen soft-shell crabs in a day and sell them for a penny apiece. By the late-‘60s, early ‘70s, Fowler said the water quality had started to suffer. In the roles of Calvert County commissioner and Maryland senator, he made water quality a priority and continued to raise awareness through what has now become his iconic wade-ins. “We’re beginning to turn the corner and I think I see a little light at the end of the tunnel. I am, quite frankly optimistic,

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Photos by Carrie Munn Joe Anderson, left, and Richard Holden of SMRWA’s Board of Directors present “relentless river advocate” Bernie Fowler, center, with a photo-journal in honor of his lifetime of service to improving water quality in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed.

but I may not be around to see it happen. I won’t be disappointed, however, because I think the plan is in place and as long as we have people like Joe Anderson and his friends, I’ll always have hope,” Fowler said. He said the future lies in the younger generation being educated about their environment now more than ever. “When I look in the eyes of the young people, I’d be a coward and a cop-out if I didn’t continue to fight,” Fowler said, echoing Winston Churchill with, “Never give up. Never, never, never give up.” The event also offered a silent auction featuring local art and hand-made objects, tickets to the Strathmore, spa and dining certificates, as well as a cooler full of fresh oysters courtesy of the nonprofit’s executive director Bob Lewis. Former county commissioner Dan Raley went a mile-aminute with a live auction as well, earning over $2,300 for future projects supporting the restoration and preservation of the St. Mary’s River and the communities within its watershed drainage area. In total, Lewis reported, $32,314 was raised at the event and will help the SMRWA continue Shucking local, float-grown oysters, Frank Taylor and Mark Turklay offered some cooking tips to taste-testers. Under the tent, Richard Pelz of Circle C its work. Oyster Ranch at St. Jerome’s Creek provides information on oyster floats and tax-deductible options for contributing to the restoration effort while benefiting from fresh oysters.

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The Board of County Commissioners agreed Tuesday to lift fines for businesses and other entities who post temporary signs advertising their services or causes in public right of ways, at least until the county’s land use department can come up with a solution that prevents their proliferation but still allows for more business advertising. In recent weeks, the county has cracked down on temporary signs. Businesses and organizations are allowed to use them for a maximum of 60 days per year, per business, but businesses have complained about the enforcement. County Administrator John Savich said once land use officials come back to the commissioner table with ideas on how to ameliorate the issue, elected leaders could try to find “a middle way.” “We’ll continue to communicate with businesses who are in violation, but we won’t go to fines,” Savich said. “Things are in limbo right now.” Land use director Phil Shire said text amendments to the zoning ordinance would probably have to precede any altering of the sign rules, but any new changes would likely be challenged no matter what planners do. Some 87 retail establishments were contacted during the sign enforcement effort over complaints that their extra advertising was becoming an eyesore.

But the problem, Shire said, is that tracking just which business have come to their 60 day limit and which had not is extremely difficult. “They’re an enforcement nightmare sometimes,” Shire said. “It’s a vicious cycle of tracking them.” Prior boards have had to deal with political sign issues, with the previous board acquiescing to an American Civil Liberties Union opinion in 2009 that restrictions imposed on political or campaign signage was unconstitutional. The old rules stated that campaign signs could be posted a maximum of 45 days before an election and had to be taken down no more than 15 days after. Those signs can now be posted in perpetuity on private property due to First Amendment protections. guyleonard@countytimes.net

County Can’t Meet Bay Cleanup Goals By Guy Leonard Staff Writer County planning staff told the Board of County Commissioners Tuesday that they have finalized a plan that tries to meet the state and federal government’s pollution diet milestones for the Chesapeake Bay watershed, but the county simply does not have all the resources to do everything required to meet this year’s goals. Specifically the county cannot commit to the interim goals for cleaning up septic system pollution because of the lack of time and funding for wastewater treatment upgrades, a staff report said. Phil Shire, director of the Department of Land Use and Growth Management, said an itemized spreadsheet of projects the county both could and could not support to meet the cleanup goals showed the difficulty of the endeavor. “It describes our inability to meet the 2012 goals. It’s just an unattainable goal in such a short period of time,” he said. Staff reports show that the funds to address cleaning up the septic loads simply do not exist. Septic system retrofits, connecting homes on septic systems to a public sewer system and an expansion of sewer capacity in general were all factors conspiring to make the costs simply too high. “The least expensive combination is well over $176 million and the costs to in-

dividual sewer service customers and to individual on-site sewage disposal systems (OSDS) is unaffordable, will be politically difficult to fund through cost sharing among all OSDS owners, and beyond any ability of the county to fund without significant funding assistance from state or federal resources,” the staff narrative reads. An example of what the county has committed to for reduction of nitrogen and phosphorous going into the watershed includes enhanced nutrient removal upgrades to the Marlay-Taylor Wastewater Treatment plant. That price tag alone comes in at about $36 million, the staff reports state. Putting in public sewer in the Charlotte Hall and New Market areas could cost as much as $5.3 million, the report stated, and similar upgrades in the Hollywood town center could cost almost $1.8 million. Commissioners agreed to take at least one more week to look at the draft plan before allowing county planning staff to submit it to the state Department of the Environment. Commissioner Dan Morris said that all of the “hundreds of millions of dollars” the state wants the county to spend on the effort could be better spent buying up rural land and keeping it pristine. “That would do more for the bay than anything from the whiz kids up in Annapolis,” Morris said. “You can’t beat mother nature.” guyleonard@countytimes.net


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Thursday, May 24, 2012

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ews

Audit Claims Calvert BOE Vice Chair Acted Inappropriately By Guy Leonard Staff Writer The decisions of Calvert Board of Education vice chair William Chambers, while acting as the top manager at the Show Place Arena in Upper Marlboro, have been scrutinized and found to be highly questionable in an audit report from the Maryland National Capital Park and Planning Commission.

William Chambers

Chambers retired from the management position at the arena abruptly last year after 32 years with the organization. According to the audit, Chambers authorized as much as $40,000 over a six-year period to be used to benefit many charitable and nonprofit groups, but none more than the United Way of Calvert County at $9,276. That organization is under the leadership of Chambers’ wife, Kelly Chambers. The report outlined these numbers as evidence of “improper and excessive hospitality expenditures.” One instance found by auditors showed that the arena incurred hospitality expenses for a staff members’ family party to celebrate a high school graduation, “which is obviously an improper expenditure.” The report went on to say the costs were reimbursed during the investigation but the incident “nevertheless suggests a dangerous sense of personal entitlement.” That incident did not detail those involved but the audit immediately follows up by chiding Chambers directly for his management decisions. “Similarly, although we have no doubt that the work of the United Way of Calvert County is laudable, the president and CEO of this organization is the spouse of the former Show Place manager who authorized the hospitality expenditures as indicated above for that group,” the audit reads. “According to the documents we reviewed, the orga-

nization has rented the Show Place Arena for several years to hold an annual fundraising gala, and the revenue generated for these events is about $11,000 in recent years. “Apparently, the facility manager would routinely provide an open bar during part of these events without charge, costing the facility an average of $1,300 per year for the seven years included.” Chambers said that the arrangement with the Calvert United Way was “100 percent above board” and that rate structures and fees charged to any entity were approved by the park and planning commission. He said that during the investigation he was never allowed to see any of the findings until they were released to the public. “I served honorably for 32 years … everything was above board,” Chambers said. “I would stand by the decisions made in advertising and marketing.” Chambers said that the arena grew to become a venue that had between $25 million to $30 million in economic impact for Prince George’s and surrounding counties. “It started out as a real white elephant and turned into a real economic engine,” Chambers said. The United Way also received Bowie Baysox tickets, according to staff e-mails reviewed by auditors, “for the stated purpose of rewarding the staff of the facility manager’s spouse.” This was often accomplished by a process of “bundling” in expenses that personally benefited arena staff with those that were deemed legitimate advertising packages, some of which may not have been improper, the audit stated. Still much of this was accomplished because of a lack of oversight, the audit stated. Some of these advertising transactions, however, were questionable at best, the report stated. These included “valuable tickets” for sporting, social and political events that were intentionally bundled into payments for advertising packages. Sometimes these tickets found their way into the hands of arena staff’s family members, the report stated. Staff also “coached third parties into composing invoice language and terms in ways that effectively concealed the true nature of advertising payments — bundling valuable tickets, golf apparel and undocumented travel expenses under advertising sponsorship.” This coaching of third parties also extended to concealing the true nature of advertising payments that actually covered open bars, booze cruises, memberships and charitable donations, the audit showed. The audit was first sparked by an employee whistleblower who made allegations of policy violations at the arena back in July 2011. The Maryland National Capital

the investigation because of “the CELEBRATION potential for undue influence and threats resulting in impaired indePLANNING GUIDE pendence — all originating outside

Park and Planning Commission’s Internal Audit Division (IAD) then began an investigation. Eventually six members of the arena staff were placed on paid administrative leave, three promptly retired. By September of last year, however, IAD reported to their superiors that it intended to terminate

of the Commission.” The threats were not specified in the report, but the audit revealed that there were efforts by arena employees to deliberately hinder the investigation by deleting related

e-mails. Officials at park and planning then hired the law firm of Akin Gump Strauss Hauer and Feld LLP to take up the work were IAD had left off. Their investigation finished in January of this year. guyleonard@countytimes.net

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25th National Cancer Survivors’ Day Picnic on June 3 from 1 to 4:30 p.m. on the hospital grounds and you’re invited. Published by the National Cancer Survivors Day Foundation, Inc.

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Come learn how surviving cancer is an attitude about life and living each day to the fullest. You’ll find our community’s event filled with joy, camaraderie, hope, and love as we honor cancer survivors. We will also recognize the contributions of their families, friends and healthcare providers. Good Southern Maryland cooking will be available for all! For more information call 301-475-6070.


The County Times

Thursday, May 24, 2012

STATE NEWS

10

News Analysis

Special Sessions Give Taste of Full-Time Legislature By Len Lazarick MarylandReporter.com Last week’s special session and another that seems likely to be called in mid-summer gave us all a taste how a full-time legislature might feel. It feels lousy. In his often provocative blog, St. Mary’s College Professor Todd Eberly suggested last month that a full-time legislature might be just what the doctor ordered. Says Eberly: “Studies show that full-time legislatures spend more time responding to constituent demands and are more responsive to constituents. Full-time legislatures are more prone to enact governmental reforms, especially with regard to personnel. Full-time legislatures demonstrate more efficient legislating (as opposed to what we just witnessed) and a greater willingness to enact more complex measures.” Unfortunately, Eberly does not cite the studies showing that a round-the-year legislature does a better job. The states that make lawmaking full-time don’t really seem more wise or productive, despite higher pay and bigger staffs. According to a chart from the National Conference of State Legislatures, these states include California, Michigan, New York and Pennsylvania, and those with an almost full-time legislature: Illinois, Florida, Ohio, Massachusetts, New Jersey and Wisconsin.

Full-time doesn’t equal better

Some people have taken to calling Maryland “California East,” but we’ll take Maryland’s budget problems over Sacramento’s $16 billion deficit any day. In March, the New

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York Times reported, Albany had “one of the smoothest state budget negotiations at the Capitol in years,” passing the budget TWO DAYS before the start of the fiscal year. It was “the first time the Legislature had approved a state spending plan with more than 24 hours to spare since 1983,” said the Times. In Illinois, lawmakers appear to pass the budget in plenty of time – but it still leaves the state comptroller unable to pay at least $4 billion Illinois owes vendors and contractors, and the state continues to float bonds to pay employee pensions, a desperate measure. In New Jersey, Chris Christie, the in-your-face Republican governor, says the legislature “raised taxes and fees 115 times in eight years” before he took over. New Jersey taxes have Maryland’s beat by a mile. Overall, the record of full-time legislatures is not impressive. It appears that whether legislatures are large or small, have big staffs or tiny, 60-day sessions or yearround marathons, they operate on the basis of deadlines. As deadlines near, activity becomes frantic, political pressure mounts, deals get made and things get done – or undone, as the case may be. Senate President Mike Miller now says he wants the Senate to consider a rule that the budget must be passed 10 days before end of session. Apparently, a Senate rule would be more effective than the very clear budget deadlines set in the state Constitution.

Lights, cameras, debate

Debates often take much longer in the Senate, where the senators talk longer and it requires a super majority to

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get them to shut up. But the debate on the final vote in the House on Wednesday took almost three hours. At least 23 of the 43 Republicans in the House got up to speak in an animated and vigorous discussion. Del. Mike McDermott of the Lower Shore boomed so loud that Speaker Michael Busch counseled him to use his “inside voice.” It was a far cry from Tuesday’s desultory debate on the preliminary vote on the same bills, in which the Republicans seemed to be going through the motions. The difference on Wednesday, observed one Democratic leader, was the eight TV cameras lined up on the right side of the chamber; they stayed mostly for the whole debate. At Tuesday’s late afternoon session, there was only one camera. Another unusual aspect of Wednesday’s debate was how often the Republicans quoted a letter from Democratic Comptroller Peter Franchot — seven times by one person’s count. The letter called the tax hikes “the wrong approach at the wrong time.” It tallied up multiple tax increases from the last five years, and related that to the decline in weekly earnings for Marylanders, many of them “underemployed.” The long, detailed letter was perfect fodder for the Republican arguments. Franchot has consistently and clearly shored up his credentials as the fiscal conservative among the potential Democratic candidates for governor. But he’s not winning allies among Democratic leaders or most of his former colleagues in the House. Len@MarylandReporter.com

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Thursday, May 24, 2012

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Info Share on The Square • Summertime Raffle Begins • GeeZer Performs Live Stop by our designated First Friday businesses during June and July to participate in our Summertime Raffle. Tickets on sale June 1st. You could win a variety of gifts from LBA businesses and a gorgeous hand-crafted coffee display table built by artisan carpenter Rob Seltzer of Herring Creek Furniture. This month various Leonardtown Business Association Members (not directly located in town center) will be on the Square sharing their resources, services and products with our community. Don’t miss this unique Info Share on the Square! SCULPTURE - OILS WATERCOLORS - JEWELRY PHOTOGRAPHY AND MUCH MORE! WATCH ARTISTS CREATE PURCHASE ART - TAKE A CLASS

T 301 475 5775

22660 WASHINGTON ST. 2ND FLOOR. LEONARDTOWN, MD 20650

Breton House Antiques

22795 Washington Street, Leonardtown Open 10-5 Wed. - Sat. Sundays 11-4 Also by appointment, 301-690-2074 Open late for First Fridays of the month

SOMD Winner of • Best Restaurant • Best Fine Dining Restaurant • Best Dessert

Classic Country French Dining in a casual, relaxing atmosphere. • Piano every Friday and Saturday night • Jazz cabaret/dancing on special evenings • 3-course prix-fixe dinner menu $23.95 available until 6 pm daily and all night on Wednesdays! • $8 lunch & beverage special daily • Sunday brunch á la carte items • “Le Salon” (private room) available

Creative Custom Framing & Art

Hours:

Tuesday ~ Friday: 10 a.m. ~ 5 p.m. Saturday: 10 a.m. ~ 2 p.m.

301-904-2532 MD Antiques Center ~ Bldg. 2 ~ 26005 Point Lookout Rd ~Leonardtown, MD 20650

BELLA MUSIC SCHOOL- 41635 Fenwick Street. Meet the owner of Bella Music and learn about their music programs during the Info Share on The Square. BIG LARRY’S COMIC BOOK CAFE- 22745 Washington Street. This month ... Live music with Fractal Folk from 6PM to 9PM on the sidewalk. Nathan’s All Beef Hot Dogs are 1/2 price. Try one of 40 delicious flavors of Hershey’s Premium Ice Cream or maybe a 100% Fruit Smoothie! EAT, DRINK, AND BE SUPER this First Friday! BREWING GROUNDS- 41658 Fenwick Street. Live music and 10% discount on food and beverage purchases. CAFE DES ARTISTES- 41655 Fenwick Street. Live Music and Dinner Specials Leonardtown’s original neighborhood bistro with French Country Charm, a casual and friendly atmosphere, fine food and excellent service. Creative, comforting dishes are Classic French with an American flair and pair perfectly with the great variety of wines from Leonardtown to France, and al fresco dining available on our quaint patio sidewalk! CRAFT GUILD SHOP- 26005 Point Lookout Road (next to Maryland Antiques Center) June’s guest artist is Sandra Christensen of Clinton, MD. She specializes in colored pencil drawings of landmark structures in SOMD, including lighthouses of the Chesapeake Bay, many places of worship and local schools. Her drawings have been exhibited in many art SOMD locations. Stop by their table at the Info Share on the Square. The Craft Guild Shop is a co-op of diverse and dedicated local artisans and hand-crafters. We

offer traditional and contemporary crafts. Many of these items are oneof-a-kind. Various classes offered. Call 301-997-1644 or visit www. craftguildshop.com. Hope you join us for First Friday. FENWICK STREET USED BOOKS and MUSIC- 41655A Fenwick StreetCome meet author Robert Long, who will be signing copies of his book Valor in a Border StateConfederate Soldiers of St. Mary’s County, MD. 5:00 to 7:30 PM. Click here for more info. Raffle Tickets sold here. FUZZY FARMERS MARKET – 22696 Washington Street. Indulge yourself with goat’s milk soap, unique jewelry, handmade item and luxurious scarves and shawls. Then fill your home with hand painted accents as well as fabulous textiles and pottery. You’ll see how we upcycle discarded objects into fabulous and fun bags, jewelry and more. Visit us to find out what our cooperative of local women artists and farmers are dreaming up and creating next! Raffle Tickets sold here. GOOD EARTH NATURAL FOODS- 41675 Park Ave. Stop by in June to try some energizing samples with Judi from EBoost and Green Foods. Learn abou their benefits and visit eboost.com and greenfoods.com. Also Whitney will be available to make her popular, Organic Fruit Smoothies. Come on by for a Happy and Healthy First Friday! KEVIN’S CORNER KAFE- 41565 Park Avenue. This month Kevin’s features a special kids menu and First Friday Dinner Special. Enjoy homemade desserts and fresh seafood. Call 301-997-1260.

First Friday is made possible by these businesses and other LBA members: Bella Music School Big Larry’s Comic Book Café Brewing Grounds Café des Artistes Craft Guild Shop Colleen’s Dream College of Southern Maryland Crazy for Ewe Fenwick Street Used Books and Music Fuzzy Farmer’s Market Good Earth Natural Foods The Shops of Maryland Antiques Center Creekside Gallery Kevin’s Corner Kafé Leonardtown Arts Center Leonardtown Galleria

Leonardtown Grill Lynn’s Café and Catering Montparnasse Gallery and Gifts North End Gallery Oga’s Asian Cuisine Olde Town Pub Olde Towne Stitchery On A Roll Port of Leonardtown Winery Rustic River Bar and Grill Quality Street Kitchens Shelby’s Creative Framing St. Mary’s Macaroni Kid The Farmer’s Daughter Cupcakes The Front Porch Treadles Studio Ye Olde Towne Café

301-475-8040 Fax: 301-475-8658

LEONARDTOWN ARTS CENTERCourt Square BLDG, 2nd floor, 22660 Washington St. Presents Joseph “Longman” Norris for your listening pleasure! The art center is a lively addition to the Leonardtown arts scene. Come visit local artists in their studios working on their craft. Painters, sculptors, jewelers and more. Our gallery is full of wonderful works in several mediums. NANNY-ON-CALL- 41620 Courthouse Drive. Learn about Nanny on Call’s unique service for parents during the Info Share on the Square. Call 1-800-475-2071 NORTH END GALLERY- 41652 Fenwick Street. The summer season starts with an All Member show titled “Life Along the Chesapeake,” running through July 1. Join us for our First Friday Reception from 5PM to 8PM. Karen Vaughn is our featured artist in the Mulberry Room, displaying her art in a solo presentation titled, “Karen Vaughn in the Mulberry Room.” North End Gallery offers unique gifts from 32 of Southern Maryland’s best artists and artisans. Treat yourself or someone you love to a hand made treasure from your community. Raffle Tickets sold here. OLDE TOWN PUB- Washington Street. Relax after work, meet with friends, or come watch the big game on our giant 60-inch plasma TV. We offer 14 beers on tap, your favorite mixed drinks using only premium spirits, and popular wines. In addition, we have tasty appetizers and great meals for the entire family. Our traditional décor offers a welcoming atmosphere whether you’re celebrating a big event or winding down after a day at work. We look forward to serving you at the most popular nightspot in Southern Maryland. OLDE TOWNE STITCHERY41610 Fenwick Street (next to Towne Florist). Stop by the shop and enjoy our demonstrations and light refreshments. Our goal is to assist you in making the quilt of your dreams. We offer classes from beginner to advanced and even kids sewing and quilting classes. We stock fabric, books, patterns and notions from many companies as well as selling finished quilts, bags and table runners. Our staff works hard to offer suggestions when asked, encouragement when needed, and friendly service at all times.

PORT OF LEONARDTOWN WINERY- off Route 5 at 23190 Newtowne Neck Road. You’ll love Live Music from 5:30PM to 8:30PM by Rusty on the Right (Rusty Williams and Dylan Galvin). No cover. Raffle Tickets sold here. Drop by anytime between on First Fridays between noon and 9PM for wine tastings of our award winning wines. Artist Toni Wolf ’s work is on display and for sale. Local wine, art and local music make for a great evening! For more information and instant updates, see our website or like us on Facebook. Call 301-690-2191. QUALITY STREET KITCHENS41675 Fenwick Street. Tastings and specials! Learn about our tasty culinary classes and items for your kitchen. Hope to see you on the 1st. ST. MARY’S MACARONI KID Enjoy the gorgeous weather with fun colorful crafts. You’ll find us on the Square during the Info Share. St. Mary’s Macaroni Kid is a free weekly e-newsletter and website offering all the kid and family friendly events in the county. www.stmarys.macaronikid.com

(301) 997-1700

ST. MARY’S RYKEN HIGH SCHOOL - Learn about wonderful summer camp programs and admissions for the 2012-2013 school year during the Info Share on the Square.

Rt 5 Leonardtown • In The Breton Bay Shopping Center

THE FRONT PORCH- 22770 Washington Street. An intimate restaurant featuring creative American Cuisine. Set within the Sterling House, we offer casual dining in a cozy atmosphere. The menu includes a broad selection of starters, soups, sandwiches, salads, and entrees. We offer daily specials, feature seasonal ingredients, local produce, and boast an ever changing dessert menu. The “back room” at The Front Porch showcases over 40 varieties of wine, while our bar presents Specialty Drinks, Boutique Beer, along with traditional cocktails.

North End Gallery

YE OLDE TOWNE CAFE- 22865 Washington Street. Cool off on the sidewalk with a snow cone. Summertime favorite flavors on sale in June, the perfect treat while listening to the hometown “G” band on the Square. Enjoy Home Cooking with a freshly made dessert at a reasonable price. Family friendly every day!

301.475.3130 www.northendgallery.org

in Historic Leonardtown, MD Monday-Saturday 10-5 First Fridays 10-8, Sunday 12-4

MONDAY TO FRIDAY 9:30 TO 7 SAT. 9:30 TO 5 SUN. 12 TO 5

leonardtownfirstfridays.com

COMIC BOOKS, GAMES AND STUFF Ice Cream Sundaes Smoothies Gamer Grub Hot/Cold Drinks Overstuffed Subs Hot Dogs and Sausages 22745 Washington St Leonardtown, MD 20650

41658 Fenwick St. Leonardtown, MD 20650

Menu featuring classic southern dishes, seafood, steaks, brick oven pizzas & calzones and more by Chef Rick

Open 7 Days A Week


To The Editor

The County Times

Thursday, May 24, 2012

12

Spend The Money! Most scholars will tell you that the single most divisive issue in the history of American politics has been government spending. I have spent a lot of time studying this issue at the federal level, but it is not confined to the halls of Congress. It is also the most divisive issue in state and local governments. This fact rings very true within the Maryland state government and the St. Mary’s County government. Lawmakers in Annapolis just wrapped up a special session in which they briefly debated and passed a socalled “doomsday budget.” The very, very conservativeleaning Maryland-based think tank, the Maryland Public Policy Institute (MPPI), has bashed just about everything the Democratic-controlled legislature and Democratic governor have ever accomplished. Its recent analyses on last week’s special session are no exception and have left me with more questions than answers. More importantly, these analyses speak to the notion of how polarizing the issue of government spending can be. One of the articles I am referring to was posted to the MPPI’s website, but was originally published in The Examiner. The article notes that Maryland already has higher tax rates than Virginia and the District of Columbia, and the tax hike on high-income earners which was passed

last week will contribute to that trend. Okay, I get that. Conservatives are too stubborn to accept the fact that taxes sometimes need to be raised to pay for things. Rather than raise taxes, these people wish to take a butcher knife to state programs. The fact is that the Democratic-controlled government in Annapolis raised revenue on households earning more than $150,000 per year in taxable income (according to MPPI, about 14 percent of Marylanders). At the same time, it cut some of the budget. In other words, Republicans got lower spending in return for higher taxes. So the Maryland state legislature compromised?! However, conservatives are still complaining. My world view is this: Money makes the world go round. Things cost money! It does not take an economist to tell you that. Sometimes I think the Right loses sight of this notion. Why did Maryland raise taxes? Maybe the standard of living increased … Maybe the population increased and more roads, schools, and bridges need to be built … Are such realities so hard to fathom? We are seeing this confusing drama unfold right before our eyes at the local level in St. Mary’s County as well. The Republican-dominated Board of County Commissioners is obsessed with saving money; so much so that

they are sitting on a $30 million surplus to be used for a “rainy day.” Spend the money! The county needs it! Anyone who has driven down Great Mills Road for the past 10 years knows that the county is not composed merely of high-income earners who work in the defense industry. Our county is economically polarized, and the gap is widening. Spend the money! At a local political meeting this week, one of the main speakers explained how three of the four Republican commissioners (the lone exception being Todd Morgan) support the cuts made some of the county’s nonprofit organizations. According to the well-informed speaker, the three commissioners in support of this plan argue that nonprofit organizations should be competing with each other so the county can save money. I am guessing this implies allowing one organization to put another one out of business. Nonprofits should not compete for the same cohort of people in need. The government should help these organizations do the fantastic work they do by financially supporting them. Spend the money! Calvin Brien California, MD

Marilyn Crosby Has My Vote I have known at large board of education candidate Marilyn Crosby for 16 years as a friend, special educational teacher, a parent and a Board of Education member. Marilyn and I first met at Piney Point Elementary School, where I currently teach. We taught both regular and special

education students in an inclusive setting which required meeting the needs of both groups. We co-taught in my classroom for a portion of the school day, and then she taught in other classrooms the remainder of the day. As a special education teacher, she had a caseload that at times was located

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P.O. Box 250 • Hollywood, Maryland 20636 News, Advertising, Circulation, Classifieds: 301-373-4125

in four different classrooms, which she in turn worked and planned with these teachers as well. As a dedicated teacher, Marilyn spent countless hours planning lessons with me as she did with other teachers she worked with throughout the day. Marilyn did whatever it took to advance our students in their current grade level, as well as to prepare them for the next grade level. Marilyn and I both knew that even though we worked together as a team to help our students, it was such a daunting task given that the classroom sizes were so large. We knew in order to meet the needs of our students’; it was imperative that class sizes be smaller. Marilyn was always speaking at forums to stress the importance of lower class sizes. She did extensive research to back up her arguments. Marilyn also wrote letters to the editor on a regular basis to persuade the general population of the value of low class sizes. Before we were using technology to the extent we are to date, with the assistance of a parent, Marilyn started the county’s first computer club. She led our school’s computer club to a first place finish in the SMECO computer bowl. Her club won the first national bowl held in St. Mary’s County. Marilyn also helped a parent develop a website. When Piney Point was renovated, the principal, Mr. Lawyer made sure each teacher had a new comput-

er on their desks. As older computers were fazed out of the media center and replaced with newer models (not brand new ones), Marilyn used her ingenuity to have a parent repair these older computers and install them in other teachers’ rooms for students to use. Marilyn, herself, had six computer hookups in her classroom that she shared with another special education teacher. Marilyn knew that children needed more than one pathway for learning. The above are just a few of her many accomplishments. Currently, she fought to keep the paraeducators. As a kindergarten teacher, I personal thank her for this because it would be mighty difficult for me to do my job without my paraeducator! Marilyn, who has a granddaughter in kindergarten, knew paraeducators are an absolute necessity. After all, brain development occurs in these very early years. Marilyn is a leader and encourages everyone to work together for the future of our children. She thinks parents, grandparents, and community input are all crucial for the good of our children. When you vote Nov. 6, vote for teaching experience, leadership, and a love for all children. Vote for Marilyn! Cindy L. Wilson St. Mary’s City, MD

James Manning McKay - Founder Eric McKay -Associate Publisher..................................ericmckay@countytimes.net Tobie Pulliam - Office Manager..............................tobiepulliam@countytimes.net Sean Rice - Editor....................................................................seanrice@countytimes.net Angie Stalcup - Graphic Artist.......................................angiestalcup@countytimes.net Sarah Miller- Reporter - Community..............................sarahmiller @countytimes.net Guy Leonard - Reporter - Government, Crime...............guyleonard@countytimes.net CarrieMunn-Reporter-Education, Entertainment.........carriemunn@countytimes.net Sales Representatives......................................................................sales@countytimes.net


13

Thursday, May 24, 2012

The County Times

To The Editor

Ignorance Should Not Be Glorified Whenever I read The County Times, it is with dubious delight that I sometimes discover another insipid missive by that local luminary of Lilliputian legacy, J.P. Cusick. The problem is that I never know if I’m reading the editorial section or the funny pages when the aerosol artist-come-historian decides to wax boorishly on the topics of history and slavery. I should like to respond to Mr. Cusick’s May 10 letter, “Slavery Should Not Be Glorified.” He illustrates yet again why his perennial bid for elective office remains soundly relegated to the litter box of political history – primarily because he does not know American or Southern history. In his vapid editorial, Mr. Cusick takes issue with the recently published book, “Valor in a Border State” by author Robert Long. It seems slavery-obsessed Mr. Cusick was struck apoplectic by the word “Valor.” The aptly named book is a well-researched and thoroughly engaging compendium of St. Mary’s County Marylander’s who served in the Confederate armed forces. In the interest of full disclosure, Mr. Long is not only a scholarly researcher whose exceptional knowledge of Maryland and the South is one to which few can lay claim, he is also a friend of mine whom I admire for his devotion to the presentation of true history. Based upon Mr. Cusick’s editorial, though, it is obvious to even the most casual reader that, as in his political career and familial duties, he never got past the preface. Usually the concept known as the “book report” requires that one read the entire book before drawing conclusions. Somehow, Mr. Cusick employed an osmotic process with Mr. Long’s book containing the biographies of numerous St. Mary’s County Confederates and extrapolated a tome whose subjects fought to preserve slavery. Having read about one-quarter of the same book, I have yet to find a reference to slavery. Instead, I have learned about local men of valor who fought in defense of their homes and the very real concept of “state’s rights.” Not that he will read them any more than he read Mr. Long’s book, but I would refer the history-challenged Mr. Cusick to two books, “Myths of American Slavery” by Walter Kennedy and “When In the Course of Human Events” by Charles Adams. Mr. Kennedy highlights founding father and anti-slavery activist, St. George Tucker who noted,

“… the very foundation of civil liberty is based upon the right of self-government. The acknowledged right of the people to alter or abolish their government is an insurmountable obstacle to the abuse of civil liberties by the government.” Mr. Adams details the reason so many men fought for the Confederacy, “Defense – repelling foreign invaders – was the primary motive for these soldiers …” These books faithfully address the issues culminating in that terrible and internecine war and the many myths, readily digested by Mr. Cusick, that continue to pollute the true history of the war 150 years later. Mr. Cusick’s persistent and fallacious attacks bring to mind that Biblical proverb about repeated displays of foolishness (Proverbs 26:11), “As a dog returneth to his vomit, so a fool returneth to his folly.” Like the proverbial canine, Mr. Cusick continues to devour and regurgitate the lies and myths to which he slavishly clings. English author Charles Dickens, who condemned the institution of slavery, was an objective and astute observer of the conflict between the North and South. Among his numerous and contemporary commentaries about the war and its causes observed, “The Northern onslaught upon slavery was no more than a piece of specious humbug designed to conceal its desire for economic control of the Southern states.” For the men of St. Mary’s County highlighted in Mr. Long’s book, it took immense institutional fortitude and personal valor to fight at the risk of life and limb for the ideals in which they believed. The idea that 98% of Southerners who owned no slaves would fight for the right to do so of 2% who did own slaves truly is “specious humbug.” But, then again, fighting for one’s beliefs hardly compares to the valor required to abrogate one’s financial and paternal responsibility for one’s progeny and then subsequently protest society’s requirement that one meet that responsibility by spray painting public buildings. Unfortunately for Mr. Cusick, Michelangelo he’ll never be; and Charles Dickens he certainly is not. Jay Barringer, Maryland Division Commander Sons of Confederate Veterans Eldersburg, MD

Special Session is Self-Inflicted Wound on Job Growth Maryland Business for Responsive Government characterized the conclusion of the special session as yet another self-inflicted wound on the state's business climate. The outcome of this special session, enabling the state to collect $264 million in additional revenues, comes mostly through increases in the individual income tax. New tax brackets and reduced exemptions will hit those with annual incomes of $100,000 or greater and comes on the heels of such legendary ill-conceived tax policies including the 2007 tech-tax and its replacement - the millionaire's tax. “This latest self-inflicted wound on our business climate could have been avoided if our state government lived within its means, “ said MBRG President Kimberly M. Burns. ”Instead, our top elected officials chose the politically expedient route of continuing government spending at record levels and avoiding the difficult choices required of a fiscally-responsible approach to governing.” Over 80,000 businesses filed S-corporation tax returns in Maryland in 2010, according to the state comptroller's office. Income from S-Corporations, LLCs, and sole proprietorships are taxed at personal income rates. Many businesses will simply reduce employment levels or reduce costs elsewhere. Robert Bauman, President of Trusted Systems, Inc. in Carroll County, and a member of MBRG, said businesses will adjust to tax increases in any number of ways including layoffs, pay cuts, raising prices or identifying other cost-saving measures. “Many people don't realize that with this increase in the individual income tax, you are essentially taxing businesses at higher levels as well,” said Bauman. “It's foolish to think that won't impact hiring and stunt private sector job growth.”

Legal Notice THE COMMISSIONERS OF LEONARDTOWN NOTICE OF BUDGET HEARING The Commissioners of Leonardtown will hold a public hearing on Monday June 11, 2012 at 4:15 p.m. at the Town office at 41660 Courthouse Drive, Leonardtown, MD. The purpose of the hearing will be to receive comments on the Recommended Budget for Fiscal Year 2013. Copies of the recommended budget will be available June 4 online at http://leonardtown.somd.com or at the Town Office between 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. The public is invited to attend or send written comments by 4:00 p.m. on June 11, 2012 to:

5-24-12

The Commissioners of Leonardtown P.O. Box 1 Leonardtown, MD 20650

How to Lie about Guest Editorial Tax Increases By Gabriel J. Michael Maryland Public Policy Institute Maryland’s three day special session ended on Wednesday of this week, as the Democrat-controlled legislature agreed to a package of tax increases projected to raise about $250 million. In spite of virtually unanimous opposition from Republicans and several Democrats breaking ranks, the tax increases could not be stopped. As a result, 14% of those filing taxes in Maryland – that is, 300,000 people or families – will be facing a combined state and local average tax increase of $579. In Montgomery, Baltimore, and Talbot counties, the average increase is more than $700. To those of us who have been following politics, none of this is surprising. Unable to rein in spending and live within the means of current revenues, Democrats, after tripping over themselves in haste to raise taxes during the regular session, called for an extra inning and managed to finally accomplish what they had sought all along. And just as the regular session involved deceptive framing of a $700 million budgetary increase as “Doomsday,” the special session involved deceptive framing about the impact of the income tax increases that were passed. Len Lazarick at MarylandReporter.com writes that House Majority Leader Kumar Barve countered Republican opposition to the tax increase by noting that it amounted to just $6.25 a week for a married couple making $250,000 a year, and that he and his wife would be paying just $4.88 a week. A small price to pay, surely, and one he indicated he was willing to pay. Setting aside the issue of whether his willingness to pay is really relevant (I would think that what matters are the other 299,999 citizens whose taxes will be increased), I want to point out how misleading such statements are. In 1954, Darrell Huff published the now-classic primer How to Lie with Statistics. In it, he reveals the uses and abuses of statistics, including graphical presentation of information. Of course, verbal presentation of information is no less immune to such misrepresentation. By dividing out the impact of the income tax increase across 52 weeks, the delegate is able to make it sound like less than it really is. This is the same tactic used by gut-wrenching charity advertisements and late-night infomercials alike. You’ve heard it before: “For only a dollar a day...” or “for just four easy payments of $19.95...” The trouble is, a dollar a day is $365 dollars a year, and four easy payments of $20 is $80, and $6.25 a week is $325 a year. (Tellingly, the delegate does not explain the discrepancy between his own estimate and the $579 figure reported by the non-partisan Department of Legislative Services.) A $500, $600, or $700 increase is not insignificant, and to claim otherwise bespeaks either dishonesty or a lack of understanding about the financial realities facing Maryland families. Verbal misrepresentation (which is itself really only a euphemism for “lying”) has abounded this year in Annapolis. It’s what allows some legislators to claim they aren’t raising taxes, they’re just “repealing” tax cuts enacted 15 years ago in 1997. It’s what allows others to claim they are only raising taxes on the “rich” or those earning “six figure salaries” when in fact, a working husband and wife each earning $75,000 will now face higher taxes. As long as we’re picking units of measurement based on what sounds most favorable to us, here’s a good one: Q: What was the total cost of raising taxes in a special session? A: $20,000 a day. Gabriel J. Michael is a Senior Fellow with the Maryland Public Policy Institute.


Spotlight On

The County Times

Thursday, May 24, 2012

14

Laughlin Elected as EASMC President By Carrie Munn Staff Writer The Education Association of St. Mary’s County (EASMC) has elected Anna M. Laughlin to serve as its next president. Laughlin will take office on July 10 to serve for a 2-year term. An active member of the National Education Association her entire career, Laughlin said serving as EASMC president has been a goal of hers for many years. Laughlin has been in St. Mary’s County Public Schools for 24 of the 33 years she has been teaching. She currently teaches sixth grade social studies at Leonardtown Middle School and, for the last six

years, has been the faculty advisor for the school’s theater program. The president-elect said she is very excited about her new position, but added she will be sad to leave Leonardtown Middle, where she has “enjoyed the camaraderie of some of the most talented and dedicated teachers, not to mention a great administrative staff.” “I’m anxious to get started,” Laughlin said. Local education issues Laughlin is looking forward to tackling include: membership losses due cut backs and lack of support from the Board of County Commissioners; improving compensation for all Board of Education employees; and es-

tablishing a stronger community presence for the association. She told The County Times that funding and working conditions are her hot button topics, adding while many members would prefer the educators’ bargaining unit to be less politically active, upcoming elections will be a major focus. “Everything we do is decided by an elected official, so we cannot afford to sit back and be quiet,” she said. It matters greatly to us who is at the helm.” carriemunn@countytimes.net

Ryken Receives Reaccreditation from Middle States

After a rigorous self-study and objective evaluation by a team of visiting educators, St. Mary's Ryken has earned reaccreditation with the Middle States Association Commissions on Elementary and Secondary Schools, a press release states. The association characterizes an accredited school as one devoted to a mission, knows itself, keeps its promises, accepts objective evaluation, is self-correcting, is student oriented, plans for its future, examines performance, and participates in the responsibilities of the academic profession. According to the Middle States Commission, “accreditation is the affirmation that a school provides a quality of education that the community has a right to expect and the education world endorses. Accreditation is a means of showing confidence in a school's performance.” St. Mary’s Ryken began the process for reaccreditation in September 2010. The Middle States Commission was established in 1887 to set standards for American education. Accreditation is granted for a period of seven years. Visit www.smrhs.org/middlestates for details on the process. St. Mary’s Ryken is a Catholic, coeducational, college preparatory school community operated under the Xaverian Brothers’ sponsorship dedicated to academic excellence and individualized student growth. Each year, approximately 99 percent of graduates go on to college. Students come from many different counties across the region including Anne Arundel, Calvert, Charles, King George, Prince George’s and St. Mary’s counties.

Anna M. Laughlin

Tech Kids Summer Youth Program St. Mary’s County Public Schools is sponsoring a Tech Kids Summer Youth Enrichment Program for students ages 8 – 15, at the Dr. James A. Forrest Career and Technology Center in Leonardtown. The goal of this program is to provide fun, enriching, hands on opportunities for students. Due to budget constraints, the program will be a Monday through Thursday four-day program, a press release states Supervision will be provided from 12 to 1 p.m. for those students enrolled in two sessions per day. Students may bring a bag lunch. Course descriptions and applications can be found online or downloaded by visiting the St. Mary’s County Public Schools website, www. smcps.org. Under “Students/Parents,” find “Popular Links,” then click on “Summer Activities,” and finally select the Tech Kids program of your choice. Students may choose from these programs: “Cold Steel/Cooler Projects,” “Doctor Who?,” “Fun With Culinary Arts,” “Lights/Camera/Action,” “Newsmakers,” “Open Wide/Look Inside,” “Fire Safety,” and “Spark The Imagination Of A Young Designer.” Tuition for all programs is $75 per session. In addition to the tuition, some of the programs may also charge a materials fee. A hard copy of the Medical Release Form must be completed and returned to Ms. Samantha Nelson, St. Mary’s County Public Schools, 23160 Moakley Street, Leonardtown, Maryland 20650. Students will need to provide their own transportation to the Dr. James A. Forrest Career and Technology Center which is located across from the St. Mary’s County Fairgrounds, between Leonardtown Middle School and Leonardtown High School. Confirmation letters will be sent the week prior to the camp opening with reminders for students. If you have any questions, call Ms. Selph at 301-475-0242, ext. 127 or e-mail her at mjselph@ smcps.org.


15

Thursday, May 24, 2012

The County Times

Spotlight On

Helpful Hooves Experience Goes Beyond Petting Horses By Carrie Munn Staff Writer

“We’ve been doing this for about 10 years now,” St. Clair told The County Times. She said the gathering of “special friends” Last Wednesday, 57 St. Mary’s County Public Schools began back when her son J.W. turned 16. Cespecial education students visited St. Clair Farm for a day rebral palsey had limited him to what types of Photos by Sherri St. Clair filled with gentle horses, racing turtles and camaraderie. things he could participate in and St. Clair said SMCPS special education students, regardless of their disability, enjoy an old-fashSherri St. Clair, along with husband Joe and a hand- she worried that his social life would become ioned wagon ride around the St. Clair’s Avenue farm. ful of volunteers, operate Helpful Hooves Inc., a non-profit obsolete after high school, so she kept it going, home and their farm for this annual trip, he said, more acspecializing in equine therapy and relationship building for and growing, over the past decade. young adults with physical and mental disabilities, at their “The students and special ed teachers seem to really tivities are becoming available for students with disabilities. The public school students are just one of several Avenue farm. enjoy it,” she said, adding that her husband Joe offers a wagon ride accessible to every student, even those that are groups that participate in Helpful Hooves’ monthly theme wheelchair-bound. Turtle races are also a popular activity parties, dances and picnics. Individuals from the Center for Life Enrichment’s Peer each year, she said. Rocco Aiello, the county’s adaptive physical educa- Activities and Living Skills (PALS) Program and visitors from New Horizons Camp and Camp tion coordinator, said the field trip gives Inspire also derive great benefit from the disabled and able-bodied students from outings, where they feed the St. Clair’s all three high schools a chance to come togentle, older horses and enjoy inclusive gether and experience life enriching activiactivities and making friends. A group of ties. He explained that this year, students special needs adults aged 18 to 50, called were given more responsibility for forming “Special Friends, gather once a month at teams and choosing activities and games. the farm. Activities like this help students imSt. Clair also does volunteer work prove the proficiency of their motor skills with Special Olympics of St. Mary’s along with giving them a chance for peerCounty, since J.W. has been an athlete. to-peer socialization, Aiello said, adding “We enjoy providing a way for evthat integration of special education stueryone to build relationships, stay condents into recreation and leisure programs nected and share experiences,” St. Clair to maintain their hard-earned skills is said, adding Helpful Hooves Inc. offers becoming an important component of his job. Options for many of these kids haven’t Helpful Hooves Inc. provides a year- summer programs and welcomes anyone round connection for “special friends” interested to call 301-769-4447. been available in the past, but thanks to The St. Clair’s gentle horses come right up to the fence for some at- people in the county like Sherri St. Clair, of various ages through monthly, themed meetings, like this Cinco de tention. Here students enjoy the therapeutic effects during a field trip carriemunn@countytimes.net who so graciously willing to open up their Mayo celebration earlier in May. May 16.

Board of Ed Appoints Diversity Specialist With the St. Mary’s County branch of the NAACP reminding local school officials that discrepancy in the graduation rates for African-American males continues to be a problem and the diversity of the student population remains underrepresented by the schools’ workforce, the position of a Diversity/Equity Specialist was established. In an earlier interview, NAACP’s Education Committee Chair Janice Walthour told The County Times she hoped the creation of this position would enable bigger strides to be made toward equalizing the achievement gap. “This person will need to be somewhat of a maverick,” Walthour said, adding that to make adequate progress, community involvement and parent outreach will be critical. The superintendent announced Dr. Charna Lacey was appointed to fill the role at a board meeting May 9 and she will begin work on this Tuesday. “Dr. Charna Lacey will be a wonderful addition to our staff, bringing a solid commitment to promoting equality and diversity and a strong focus on multicultural education within the St. Mary’s County Public School System,” Superintendent Michael Martirano said in a statement. Lacey currently serves as Instructional Specialist for Minority Achievement and Multicultural Education with Charles County Public Schools, previously taught at Bladensburg High School and holds an Educational Doctorate from Morgan State University.

Hundreds Graduate from Forrest Center

Photos by Jennifer Stotler Above: St. Mary’s County Schools Superintendent Michael Martirano gives closing remarks during the graduation ceremony on Wednesday. Left: Leonardtown High School junior, Kalie Stotler, receives her certificate in hospitality and tourism from Forrest Tech Center Principal Theo Cramer.


for the love of

Money

The County Times

Thursday, May 24, 2012

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LSM Celebrates Wilson Parran By Carrie Munn Staff Writer Leadership Southern Maryland (LSM) welcomed guests to the grounds of Sotterley Plantation on Thursday to honor Wilson H. Parran with its inaugural Heritage Award. “We wanted to create an award that really honors one person from our region that has mastered that leadership, service and mentoring that is so important, someone who really represents those qualities.” LSM Executive Director Karen Holcomb told the Calvert Gazette. This year’s president of the organization’s board of directors, and the first LSM graduate to take on the role, Susan Vogel, told guests the annual Hertiage Award will use the acronym LSM- leadership, service, mentoring- and select a recipient that exemplifies one of those traits at the regional level. Vogel likened LSM to oyster cultivation and Parran, a life-long Calvert County resident and leader, received a polished pearl in a crystal shell as well as his plaque for Excellence in Leadership. Parran, LSM Class of 2009, said his travel throughout the region and the state as a Calvert County Commissioner and member of the local and state school boards, seeing different perspectives, made him real-

LSM’s recently-graduated 35-member Class of 2012

Leadership Southern Maryland’s board of directors’ president Susan Vogel presents the group’s inaugural Heritage Award to Wilson H. Parran, honoring his excellence in leadership which has impacted the region.

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ize “how blessed we are to have our strong Southern Maryland region.” “Thank all of you out there, because we now have a group of 138 people that have gone through LSM, and all of you have not only significantly contributed to your community before that point but I know you’ll continue to contribute in the future,” he said. “Wilson was definitely the example, the very perfect first person to receive this award,” Holcomb stated, adding it was gratifying that Parran, even after completing Leadership Maryland, joined LSM, making a statement about how important it is to have that regional platform of communication and cooperation.

Photo by Carrie Munn

“In reality, we share common issues across these three counties and we share the ability to make to make a difference as well,” Holcomb said. The Class of 2012’s 35 graduates became LSM’s fourth graduating class earlier in May. After their completion of the ninemonth tuition-based program where local issues are at the forefront, Holcomb said, “We are confident these individuals will apply their LSM experience in positive and dynamic ways to benefit the region.” For more information on Leadership Southern Maryland, visit www.leadsomd. org. carriemunn@countytimes.net


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The County Times

Thursday, May 24, 2012

Prosecutors Hope High Court Will Settle DNA Issue By Guy Leonard Staff Writer Local prosecutors expect state Attorney General Douglas Gansler to take the issue of collecting criminal suspects’ DNA to the U.S. Supreme Court after Maryland’s own Court of Appeals announced Friday it would not reconsider its verdict that states taking and cataloguing suspects’ DNA who have not yet been convicted is unconstitutional. “I’m not surprised, I think it will go to the Supreme Court,” said Calvert County State’s Attorney Laura Martin. “We’re all going to be watching that case.” Martin said there are more than 20 states which allow DNA collection from suspects charged with violent crimes and taking away that tool from law enforcement hampers their efforts to link suspects with other unsolved cases. The Court of Appeals decision brought a halt to such collection last month with widespread protests not only from prosecutors but from police departments as well. Martin said she believes the nation’s High Court would bring down the

state’s ruling. She said she did not see any difference between taking DNA samples and the established practice of taking fingerprints. “It won’t be the first time the Supreme Court has overturned a Court of Appeals decision,” Martin said. The case that led to the courts decision, King v. State, involved a man from Wicomico County arrested on charges of first- and second-degree assault. When DNA taken from Alonzo King on those initial charges, without conviction, was used to link him to a 2003 sexual assault it eventually resulted in his being convicted of rape and sentenced to life in prison. But a majority of the court ruled that “an arrestee’s expectation of privacy to be free from warrantless, suspicionless searches of his/her biological material outweighed, on the facts of this case, the government’s purported interest in using a second method to identify King, when, in actuality, the obtention of the biological material was intended by the state to be used for general investigatory purposes.”

Crime&

Punishment Serial Police Impersonator Arrested

The dissenting judges stated the majority of the court erred in “overinflating” the arrestee’s expectation of privacy in the case. St. Mary’s State’s Attorney Richard Fritz said a Supreme Court decision would settle once and for all the debate between the states that allowed the collection of DNA and those that banned it on a Fourth Amendment protections basis. “It’s something the Supreme Court should take up. There’s a split of authority and it does involve a constitutional issue.” “The question is whether it’s [taking a swab from someone’s mouth] invasive or non-invasive,” Fritz said, noting that strip searches being a requirement for entrance into prison was accepted by the courts while a simple sampling had caused so much controversy. “But you can’t put a swab in someone’s mouth?” Fritz asked. “How is it invasive?” “It’s no more invasive than what you have to go through to get on an airplane.” guyleonard@countytimes.net

Philip H. Dorsey III Attorney at Law

In April 2012, detectives from the Bureau of Criminal Investigations initiated an investigation regarding information that a subject had been involved in a relationship with a female residing in Mechanicsville, and had identified himself as a Baltimore County Police detective throughout the relationship, police alleged. A joint investigation by St. Mary’s County BCI and Baltimore County Police Department resulted in the subject being subsequently identified as Donald J. Church, 31, of Dundalk. Church had used multiple aliases in the past, police said. During the investigation, it was determined Church had identified himself as a Baltimore County Police detective in St. Mary’s and Charles counties and had been observed wearing police style clothing with police logos emblazoned on the back and sleeves including a police badge and credentials, police alleged. Church was also observed wearing a concealed handgun and holster, police stated. The Baltimore County Police Department verified Church was not employed by their agency, had been arrested several times for similar offenses and was currently on probation after a conviction for impersonating a police official. On May 15, Church was located at his residence and placed under arrest without incident. A search of his residence resulted in the recovery of several police related items. Church was charged with impersonating a police officer, wear, carry and transport of a handgun and incarcerated in the St. Mary’s County Detention Center under a $7,500 bond.

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The County Times

Sharon Chase, 59 Sharon Yvette (Fenwick) Chase or "Mickey", as she was fondly called by her family, 59 of District Heights, MD., (formerly of Chaptico, MD), departed this earthly life to ascend into glory on Sunday, May 13, 2012, surrounded by her loving family. Born December 18, 1952 in Leonardtown, MD., she was the fourth child born to the late Harry “Buck” P. Fenwick and the late Edna E. Fenwick (Dent). Mickey attended public schools in St. Mary’s County. She married George P. Chase, Jr. in March 1978, and has two daughters: Sherri L. Young and Tonya L. Chase. She worked at Regency Nursing Facility in Forestville, MD. Mickey was currently working as the Resident Manager at Spanish Village Apartments, and was one of the most well respected resident managers that they could have ever had. Mickey was quite the comedian; you could count on her to make a not so bad situation into something humorous. She enjoyed gambling. There wasn’t a slot machine that wasn’t her friend, or a family friendly card game that she wasn’t coming out a winner. Traveling with her family was special to her; Rehoboth Beach, visiting family in North Carolina, and enjoying a Thanksgiving cruise to the Bahamas. Her favorite time was the weekend spent with her granddaughter and husband, adventuring to many shopping centers, restaurants, and parks. There was nothing that gave her more pleasure than shopping for and spoiling her granddaughter Sheridan. Mickey was fun-loving and always willing to give a helping hand to anyone whether it was sharing one of her wonderful home cooked meals or just being there to listen when it mattered the most. Mickey leaves fond memories in hearts of many, including her loving and devoted husband George P. Chase, Jr.; daughters Sherri L. Young, Tonya L. Chase, and a beautiful granddaughter Sheridan L. Young. Four brothers, Harry P. Fenwick, Jr. (Pat) of District Heights, MD; James V. Fenwick (Diane) of Lusby, MD, Paul A. Fenwick (Lisa) of Bushwood, MD; Chris O. Fenwick of Lexington Park, MD; five sisters, Mary “Susie” A. Somerville (Woodley) of Hollywood, MD; Diane M. Fenwick of Hollywood, MD; Dorothy L. Fenwick of District Heights, MD; Terri L. Fenwick of District Heights, MD; Toni F. Blackwell (Tim) of Lexington Park,

MD; and a host of nieces, nephews, cousins and friends. Mickey was preceded in death by her parents and one brother James “Sonnyboy” E. Dent. Family and friends gathered for visitation until Mass of Christian Burial Wednesday, May 23, 2012 at St. Joseph’s Catholic Church, Morganza, MD. Interment immediately followed at Sacred Heart Church Cemetery, Bushwood, MD. Arrangements by Briscoe-Tonic Funeral Home.

Vincent Dickens, 75 Vincent George Dickens, 75, of Lexington Park, MD, also known to others as “Pipe or Vince”, quietly entered into eternal rest on May 15, 2012. Vincent was born on June 26, 1936, to the late James O. Dickens and Viola M. (Greene) Dickens in St. Georges Island, MD. He was the third oldest of eleven brothers and sisters. Vincent received his education at Cardinal Gibbons High School in Ridge, MD. He was a member of St. Georges Catholic Church until his illness began in December 2011. He served in the U.S. Navy from 1956 to 1965. After his honorable discharge from the Navy, he was employed with Local Union 657 in Washington, DC, Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant and Patuxent River Naval Air Station until his retirement. In his past time Vincent enjoyed listening to gospel music, and watching the Redskins and the Baltimore Orioles. Vincent leaves to cherish his memories one son, Stanley J. Robinson; four sisters, Cecelia Young (Joseph), Mary Stewart (George), Elaine Frederick and Elizabeth Barnes; four brothers, Ernest Dickens (Frances), James Dickens (Annette), Paul Dickens and Francis Dickens. He is also survived by a friend of many years Darlene McDowney, and her five children Kirsten (Pebbles) McDowney, Robert Lee McDowney, Corey McDowney, Damien (Shortstop) Bonds, Eric Bonds, and her two grandchildren Kemya (Moochie) Rhodes and KeAndre Gant. He is also survived by a host of nieces, nephews, and cousins. He is preceded in death by his parents, two brothers, Joseph and Russell Dickens; and his paternal grandparents, Henry and

38576 Brett Way • Mechanicsville, Maryland 20659

Thursday, May 24, 2012

Bessie Dickens, who raised him. Family and friends will unite on Friday, May 25, 2012 for visitation at 10 a.m. until Mass of Christian Burial at 11 a.m. at St. George's Catholic Church, 19199 St. George's Church Road, Valley Lee, MD. Interment following in the church cemetery. Arrangements by Briscoe-Tonic Funeral Home, Mechanicsville, MD

George Gross, 42 George “Derrick” Gross, 42, of Upper Marlboro, MD., peacefully departed this life on Friday, May 18, 2012. Visitation will be on Saturday, May 26, 2012 from 10 a.m. until time of Mass Christian Burial at 11 a.m. at Saint Mary's Bryantown Catholic Church, 13715 Notre Dame Pl, Bryantown, MD 20617. Interment will follow in the Church Cemetery. Arrangements by Briscoe-Tonic Funeral Home, Waldorf, MD

Emanuel Guy, Sr., 83 Emanuel Greenwell “Sugar” Guy, Sr., 83, of Leonardtown, MD., passed away at his residence surrounded by his loving family on May 14, 2012. Born on November 2, 1928 he was the son of the late Rosalie Virginia Clarke Guy, and James Warren Guy, Sr. Mr. Guy was the loving husband of Brenda Jean (Jarboe) Guy for 26 years whom he married on November 23, 1985 in Holy Face Catholic Church Great Mills, MD. Mr. Guy is survived by his children: Ginny Quade (Frank), Debbie Burroughs (Jimbo), Robin Lawrence (George), Lisa M. Guy, and Manny Guy, Jr., Step children: Michael Cullison, Christine Cullison, Joseph Cullison, 20 grandchildren, and 24 great grandchildren. Emanuel is also survived by his siblings: Rosemary Keener, Frankie Guy (Sally) Patsy Downs, and Peggy Goddard. He is preceded in death by his son Dennis (Buttons) Guy and siblings: Tippie Guy, Phyllis Smith, Bucky Clarke, Jackie Magill, Bucky Guy, Neary Guy, Aloysius Guy, Shine Guy, Jean Wilble and Doll Johnson. Sugar worked in Washington for several years for the Architect of the Capital. as well as working around the county doing carpentry and brick laying until his retirement. Sugar was a lifelong resident of St. Mary’s County he enjoyed camping with family and friends, watching the Atlanta Braves, and attending or watching Nascar Races on TV. The best times were spent with children, grandchildren and great grandchildren. The family received friends on Wednesday, May 16, 2012 with prayers recited in the Mattingley-Gardiner Funeral Home Leonardtown, MD. A Mass of Christian burial was celebrated on Thursday, May 17, 2012 in St. John’s Catholic Church Hollywood, MD with Fr. Raymond Schmidt officiating. Interment followed in the church cemetery. Pallbearers were: George Lawrence, James Burroughs, Ricky Wathen, Jamie Guy, Bradley Guy, and Jason Long. Honorary Pallbearers were: Frank Quade, Michael Cullison, Steve Dixon, and Reggie Tarlton, In lieu of flowers memorial contributions may be made to St. John’s Revitalization Fund 43950 St. John’s Road Hollywood, MD 20636, and or Hospice of St. Mary’s P.O. Box 625 Leonardtown, MD 20650.

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Paula Hebb, 55 Paula Marie Hebb departed this life on Wednesday, May 16, 2012, at Specialty Hospital in Washington, D.C. She was born on September 5, 1956 to the late Thomas Leroy Hebb and Margaret Briscoe Hebb in Washington, D.C. She was the second of five children born to this union and was loved dearly by her parents. Paula was an extremely outgoing child, who loved hanging out with her family and friends. Her smile would light up the room and she loved making people laugh. Paula graduated from Anacostia High School and attended the University of the District of Columbia. She worked at the Smithsonian Institute and later at the U.S. Postal Service for more than 30 years, until she retired in 2011. As a young child, Paula was involved in Karate and joined the community softball team. She later joined an acrobatic team, the Flying Nesbitts, which appeared as an opening act for various R&B groups and other social events around the D.C. area. While attending Sousa Jr. High School, Paula, her sister, and a group of friends decided to dance to the song “Shaft” in the school’s talent show. The group enlisted the help of a community dance instructor, who immediately advised the group that Paula should be the lead dancer as “Shaft”, because of her personality. They entered the talent show and came in first place. The audience came alive to her performance and she became known as “Shaft” around school. We all teased her about it for years! Paula was very protective over her family and had a heart for those who were unable to defend themselves. The family use to joke with Paula, that she could beat us up whenever she pleased, but no one else could touch us. She would show her big smile, for which she was known, and say, “you got that right!” Also, anyone who knew Paula knew that she lived to play Bingo. Her love for Bingo was another running joke in the family. She would laugh at us and say, “yeah, ya’ll can laugh while I’m counting my money too,” which was an understatement, because she did very well at winning in Bingo! Paula leaves to cherish her memory, her loving son, Michael S. Gallion, Jr. (Jennifer), her grandchildren, Michael III, Mariah, Tynia, Malique, Marcel, Martinus, Monyae, Maciah, Manny and Michaela; sister, Deborah; brothers, Thomas “Petie”, Jr., Charles “Brian”, Sr. (Wanda) , Kevin (Mia); nephews, Thomas “Putt” (Edwina), Charles “BJ”, Jr., Elliott (deceased); nieces, Makeeta (Steve), Nikia, Kaya (Kyle), Tania, Tiffany and Breanna; great-nieces and nephews, Thomas, Ravyn, Stephen, Lauryn, Kira, Charlie, Kyle, Jr., Kori Lynne; and a host of aunts, uncles, cousins, and friends. She is preceded in death by her mother and father, Thomas Leroy and Margaret Briscoe Hebb. Family and friends will unite for visitation on Thursday, May 24 from 10 a.m. until time of service at 11 a.m. at Briscoe-Tonic Funeral Home, 38576 Brett Way, Mechanicsville, MD. Interment following at St. Francis Xavier Cemetery. Compton, MD. Arrangements by Briscoe-Tonic Funeral Home, Waldorf, MD


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Thursday, May 24, 2012

The County Times

Glynnis Schmidt, 37

Sandra Raley-Tippett, 57

Glynnis Erin Schmidt, 37, of Lexington Park, MD., passed away on May 16, 2012 surrounded by family, after a 5-year battle with Breast Cancer. Born on September 6, 1974 in Philadelphia, PA, she was the daughter of William E. Starke III, and Jane (Jean) Starke of Erdenheim, PA. Growing up in Erdenheim, PA, she graduated from Springfield Township High School Montgomery County and received her Bachelors of Science from Shippensburg University where she became an active member of Circle K, the college division of Kiwanis International. She married Bruce Walter Schmidt of Oreland, PA on September 2, 2000. Bruce was hired by the Department of Defense at Patuxent River Naval Air Station in 1999 and Glynnis worked as an Administrative Assistant for St. Mary’s College. In 2001, Glynnis began work for the Maryland Department of Health in St. Mary’s County Water and Sewer Division, as an Environmental Sanitarian. Her work brought her very close to many members of the community. Glynnis’ life was dedicated to serving others. She was an active member of the Kiwanis International and served as the student advisor for both the Circle K and Key Club kids of St. Mary’s County. She served as the Director of the St. Mary’s county Kiwanis International Club from 2007 – 2009. Glynnis received countless awards and accommodations for her service to the community, including the St. Mary’s Community Awareness Award, Kiwanian of the Year, Outstanding Kiwanis Advisor Award, the Stewart A. Mendelssohn Kiwanis Advisor Award (the highest award that an advisor can earn) and the Maryland State Department of Education Certificate of recognition for outstanding service. She was an active member and volunteer in the helps team of South Point Church of Leonardtown, MD. Glynnis was also an avid softball enthusiast throughout her life. She played on several teams, including the Springfield High School Girls Softball Team and on several St. Mary’s County Woman’s Softball teams. In addition to her parents, Glynnis is also survived by her husband, Bruce Schmidt and their son Aaron James Schmidt of Lexington Park; sisters, Murray Lee Manley (Stephen) of Warminster, PA; and Jessica Ellen Genca (Adam) of Erdenheim, PA; daughter-in-law of Norlaine and Michael Romano of Ambler, PA; sister-in-law to Diane Schmidt-Otto of Ambler, PA and nieces Amanda and Megan Otto, Abigail Manley and her nephews Eric Otto and Agostino (Gus) Genca. Family will receive friends for Glynnis’ Life Celebration on Thursday, May 24, 2012 from 3 to 5 p.m. at the Brinsfield Funeral Home, 22955 Hollywood Road, Leonardtown, MD. A memorial service will follow at 5 p.m. by Pastor Matt Hall. Interment will occur at a later date in George Washington Memorial Park in Plymouth, PA. In lieu of flowers, it was Glynnis’ wish that contributions in her memory be made to a college fund for her son. Condolences to the family may be made at www.brinsfieldfuneral.com. Arrangements by the Brinsfield Funeral Home, P.A., Leonardtown, MD.

Sandra (Sandie) Elaine Raley-Tippett, 57, of Hollywood, MD, passed away peacefully on May 19th, 2012 at home on Clarke’s Landing Road, Hollywood, MD with her loving family beside her after a intense battle with double hit NonHodgkin’s Lymphoma. Sandie was born May 06th, 1955 in Washington DC; she was the daughter of Marie B. Raley (Burch) of Hollywood, MD. She was predeceased in death by her father Ralph I. Raley, as well as her stepfather F. Elliott Burch, Sr., and her stepdaughter, Denise Nicholson. She is survived by her husband Joseph Albert Tippett, brother Garry M. Raley Sr. (Jeanne) of Callaway, MD and stepdaughter Karen Casamento (Steve) of King George, VA. Sandie loved spending time with her husband Joe, with whom she shared many interests such as dogs, fishing, little league baseball spectator, cards, dancing as well as being the Business Manager of Joe Tippett Construction. Joe and Sandie traveled frequently in recent years to their retirement get-a-way spot in Warsaw, VA. Sandie retired from her career as a DOD employee after 37 years in January 2011. Her last position was with OSD’s Defense Acquisition University, Mid-Atlantic Region where she served as their Director of Operations. Prior to that, she worked for the Navy for 30 years in support of various programs and positions, primarily for the Naval Air Systems Command and Naval Air Warfare Center. Of particular note was the 18 years as Project Coordinator, Resources Manager, and Class Desk Analyst for the V-22 Osprey Program. She also served as the United States Navy Test Pilot School Budget Officer/Manager along with analyst positions in support of the Base Housing Office Naval Air Test Center, Systems Engineering Test Directorate and Naval Air Station, Public Works. Sandie received the Dept of the Navy "Meritorious Civilian Service Award" and “Superior Civil Service Award”, along with numerous other awards, coins, and accommodations over her federal government career (including one as “Miss Public Works”). Additionally, she served as the Secretary/Treasurer of the Southern Maryland Coon Hunters’ Association for 25 plus years, as well as United Kennel Club (UKC) Bench Show Judge. Sandie enjoyed playing softball in the St. Mary’s County Softball League (Bill Cairns Pontiac, Tippett’s Texaco (Uncle Clem’s Girls), American Legion, and Take-It Easy Ranch) where she was once a player on the Maryland State Champion Team in 1979 (Take-It-EasyRanch) as well as two county Championship titles (American Legion & Take-It-EasyRanch). She also was a player/member and Secretary/Treasurer of the Monday Night Duckpin Bowling League (Thrift Oil Company). Sandie also enjoyed and played league volleyball as well (Tippett’s Texaco). The family received friends on Tuesday, May 22, 2012 with prayers recited in the Mattingley-Gardiner Funeral Home Leonardtown, MD. A Funeral Service was held on Wednesday, May 23, 2012 in Mount Zion United Methodist Church Mechanicsville, MD with Pastor Ann Strickler officiating. Memorial contributions may be made in memory of Sandie Raley-Tippett to Hollywood Vol. Rescue Squad, P.O. Box 79, Hollywood, MD 20636, St. Mary’s Hospital Cancer Care and Infusion Services P.O. Box 527 Leonardtown, MD 20650, and/or Hospice of St. Mary’s P.O. Box 625 Leonardtown, MD 20650.

Our Angel in Heaven, Gone but will never be forgotten. Rest in Peace. Love, The Mason Family

In Loving Memory of

William Leo Morgan Sr. May 20, 1922 – Oct. 5, 1983 Not a day goes by that we don’t think of you and how much we miss you so Daddy! Hope you are having a wonderful birthday celebration in heaven!

We love you, Your Loving Children

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The County Times

Thursday, May 24, 2012

20

STORY

Route 5 Improvements Will Exist Only on Paper For Now By Guy Leonard Staff Writer The State Highway Administration (SHA) will start its planning study this year for improvements to sections of Route 5 in Leonardtown between Hollywood and Newtown Neck roads, but officials say real improvements will have to wait until the state can come up with the money to actually do the work. One elected official said no one really knows when that will be. In the meantime, residents and town officials are anxiously awaiting the first step in the process as traffic on that stretch of road grows steadily worsens. “In the middle of the day you can’t hardly get through there,” said Del. John Wood (D-Dist.29A) “The real question is how much is it going to cost. Right now nobody has the answer to that.” Planning for the road widening between Route 245 and Route 243 was to begin back in 2007, said Leonardtown Town Administrator Laschelle McKay, but that fell by the wayside when the economy soured and state revenues for road maintenance began to dry up. McKay said the project is critical for the town’s growth and traffic safety. “It’s the No. 2 transportation priority for the town and the county,” McKay said. “They want everything lined up so when the money is available they

can go to engineering.” Despite repeated warnings that there is currently no money in the state’s budget to undertake the improvements, that has not stopped residents from calling the town offices asking when the work will begin, especially since the State Highway Administration sent out fliers notifying residents the planning study is about to commence. They will get their chance to voice their concerns and opinions at a public hearing June 28 at Leonardtown High School, following an open house and a formal presentation of some of the alternatives. Point Lookout Road is currently a four-lane roadway at the proposed project site with 11-foot travel lanes, but there are only two left turn lanes provided along the road at Route 243 and 245. Also, the sidewalks, which are found mainly between Abell and Moakley streets, are not compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act. Moreover, the road has no areas for bicycle use in the project portion, according to the state highway office. The lack of left turn lanes means the many commuters and motorists who use it everyday cause continual traffic jams when they attempt to turn into several of the businesses along the way. “It’s certainly a safety concern of everyone’s,” McKay said. McKay said left turn lanes would help alleviate

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Thursday, May 24, 2012

The County Times STORY

Photo By Frank Marquart

the many rear-end collisions that occur as a result of the many drivers lining up to turn into the bank or other businesses. She said that the town’s cooperation with the highway office hit a snag when they attempted to find smaller scale, lower cost alternatives to the main project. One option was to construct left turn lanes on Route 5 at the intersections of Moakley and Abell streets, but that idea failed. “The project was going to be so costly they tabled it,” she said. McKay said there are also plans to bring a connector road from the Leonard’s Grant community on Route 245 and extend it into the planned Clark’s Rest project that would eventually abut the east side of Route 5. This would provide connectivity for many town residents without having to use Route 5 and reducing traffic congestion there, she said. The SHA has four main alternatives under consideration for the project area. One option includes “spot improvements” such as adding and extending turn lanes as well as improving traffic signal timing. Adding bicycle lanes is also included this option, as is consolidating entrances to businesses along the project corridor. Another option would include many of these improvements to intersections but also install a two-way, center left-turn lane along the length of the corridor with two travel lanes in each direction. The outside travel lanes would include 7-foot wide lanes for bicycles and buggies like the kind used by the Amish and Mennonite communities.

Sidewalks measuring five feet in width would also be included in that second option. A third option would add a permanent, landscaped median with turn lanes at necessary intersections along corridor. No twoway center lane would be included, SHA documents show. Other modifications include only widening the road where streams are not nearby or even changing the right-in/rightout intersection at Leonardtown Shopping Center to a signaled intersection with double left-turn lanes onto northbound Route 5. The right turn from Route 243 onto Merchants Lane and the left from Merchants Lane would be prohibited. Jeremy Beck, the SHA project leader, said the first step of the project will be to ascertain the environmental impacts of the project and then, after the public hearing process, they hope to have preferred alternatives ready by this fall. Location and design approvals could begin by the spring of next year, he said. Beck said, however, that funding for even final design or acquiring right-of-ways for the project does not exist. “We’re in the planning stages,” Beck said. “For now this project is only funded for planning.” Beck said that the road is critical to current traffic flow, but improvements are also important simply because of the projected increase in vehicles by 2030. By then, planners believe there will be 51,000 vehicles a day on Route 5 in the next 17 years, effectively doubling the amount traveling there now. guyleonard@countytimes.net


Community

The County Times

Thursday, May 24, 2012

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Pax River Boat Race Roaring Back for Another Season Solomons Island will be back in the national spotlight this September when the Solomons Offshore Grand Prix returns for its third year. The roar of the Miss Geico turbine engines will once again echo along the banks of the Patuxent River as sleek, powerful race boats tear across a three-mile course with speeds topping 170 m.p.h., a press release states. Crowd favorites like the Time Bandit, sponsored by Captains Andy and Jonathan Hillstrand, stars of the reality show “Deadliest Catch” on The Discovery Channel, and Super Cat World Champion - Team Amsoil #77 are expected to return as well. To share all the exciting news and updates, Solomons Offshore Grand Prix has launched its newly redesigned website: www.SolomonsRace.com. Fans will be able to access a wide range of information from schedules and news updates to photos, downloadable maps of the race village, and more. The site includes a countdown clock to the start of race day as well as videos of previous year’s races. Race fans will also be able to follow race updates on Facebook, Twitter, or through the website’s RSS feed. As race director Mike Yowaiski stated, “Our race is a firstclass event and we wanted a website that reflects that. This will allow racing enthusiasts around the world to follow the events at Solomons Island.” The Solomons Offshore Grand Prix attracts race fans from all over the mid-Atlantic region. Offshore Powerboat Racing is one of the fastest growing spectator motorsports in the world. On race day, crowds in excess of 15,000 will visit the island. Over the course of the three-day event, total

visitors are estimated between 25,000 and 30,000. The excitement begins Friday morning, Sept. 14 with the arrival of the boats at the dry pit area beneath the Gov. Thomas Johnson bridge in Solomons. Race testing will take place Saturday, with the 1st race to begin at noon on Sun-

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day, Sept. 16. Additional events will include a charity golf tournament, poker run, and the Solomons VFD block party -”End of Summer Bash”. For all the details on these events, visit the website: www.solomonsrace.com.

National ‘Click It or Ticket’ Campaign Underway A reminder to all who travel on the roads in Southern Maryland; the St. Mary’s County Sheriff’s Office in cooperation with other local enforcement agencies is participating in the National Click It or Ticket seatbelt enforcement mobilization through June 3, a sheriff’s office press release states. Click It or Ticket is an education and enforcement campaign designed to bring awareness to the advantages of using occupant restraints and child safety seats. Maryland Law requires: • Every driver and front seat passenger next to the door must wear a seat belt, regardless of their age; • Everyone under the age of 16 must wear a seat belt, regardless of where they are sitting in the vehicle; • Children are to use booster seats until they reach age 8, a weight of 65 pounds or a height of 4'9", whichever comes first; and, • Children under the age of 16 may not ride in an unenclosed bed of a pickup truck. Sheriff’s Deputies and Maryland State Troopers will use enforcement measures for those who choose to violate Maryland law by not wearing a seatbelt. The St. Mary’s County Sheriff’s Office will partner with the Charles and Calvert County Sheriff’s Offices, and the Maryland State Police and conduct day and evening seatbelt checkpoints throughout the campaign. “Every year motors and passenger, who have not buckled up, die in motor vehicle crashes. These traffic deaths can be prevented if motorists simply buckle up,” Sheriff Timothy Cameron said in a statement. “The St. Mary’s County Sheriff’s Office strongly supports prevention, education and enforcement of Maryland’s seatbelt and child safety seat laws, not only during the Click It or Ticket campaign, but year round. Please buckle up and encourage your loved ones to do the same.”


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Thursday, May 24, 2012

The County Times

Community Concert Season Kicks Off This Weekend

Good seats are still available for Bret Michaels, pop culture icon and lead singer of the band Poison, performing live the Calvert Marine Museum’s (CMM) PNC Waterside Pavilion on Sunday. Michaels will play his own hits as well as many Poison favorites. Special guests include local band One Louder performing 80’s rock covers. Also appearing will be regional favorite Driven Livid, a CMM press release states. Tickets to see these three bands are $50 for premium seats and $40 for reserved; additional service fees apply. Tickets may be purchased by phone at 1-800-787-9454, in person at Prince Frederick Ford/Dodge, or online at www.calvertmarinemuseum.com. As a rock and reality TV star, businessman, philanthropist, and father, Bret Michaels does more jobs in a single day than most do in an entire lifetime. Best known for hits like “Nothing But a Good Time,” “Talk Dirty to Me” and his #1 single and

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80’s Rock anthem, “Every Rose Has It’s Thorn,” his current solo tour “Get Your Rock On” is selling out venues across the country. His reality TV Series “Rock of Love” is one of the most successful shows in VH1’s history and Michaels emerged as the winning contestant on Donald Trump’s “Celebrity Apprentice.” Bret Michaels is an advocate and spokesman for diabetes and supports an array of other charities and causes. Proceeds from the summer concert series support the education and preservation efforts of the Calvert Marine Museum. Show time is 7:30 p.m. and gates open at 6 p.m. with music, food, and drinks available on site. Chairs and coolers are not permitted. For additional information and to purchase tickets, please visit the museum’s website at www.calvertmarinemuseum. com. To reach a staff person, please call 410-326-2042 x 16, 17, or 18.

Children Explore Interests at CSM Summer Camps In the carefree days of summer, kids and teens attending College of Southern Maryland camps will be exploring their interests in writing poetry, building Lego robots, engineering and building bridges, zoology and entomology, computer illustration and art—while having fun and making new friends. “In stringent and structured classrooms, teachers don’t always have the luxury of offering topics that are outside of their curriculum and students don’t always have opportunities to linger on subjects that interest them. That’s why summer vacation is so important,” CSM Youth Program Coordinator John Terlesky said Learning how to prepare healthy meals—with friends—is one of the camps offered in a press release. “We try to design our sum- new through CSM’s Kids’ and Teen College. Classes mer programs so that there will be something begin June 18. for everyone, whether the student is interested in space, animals, computers or art, the subjects can be explored at the student’s pace.” Kids’ and Teen College camps run June 18 through Aug. 16 at CSM’s La Plata, Leonardtown and Prince Frederick campuses. Classes are full days 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. or half days from 8:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. or 1 to 4:30 p.m. Kids’ College programs are for children ages 5-10 years old; Teen College programs are for 11- to 17-year-olds. Programs include arts and crafts, music and theater, engineering and information technology, languages and literature, math and game strategies, sports and athletics, and science. For information and schedule of classes, visit www.csmd.edu/KidsCollege.

Calendar for St. Mary’s County

• LEGO Films and Animation for Kids. 8:30 a.m. to 12 p.m., June 18-22, College of Southern Maryland, Building A, 22950 Hollywood Road, Leonardtown. Part of the College of Southern Maryland’s Kids’ College, LEGO Films and Animation for Kids allows children ages 8-10 to create a short film using their favorite LEGOs or action figures. Whether students want to recreate a scene from “Star Wars” or create their own world, they can bring their ideas to the big screen. Films will be password-protected on a secure website to share with friends and family. $159. 301-934-7634, kmcdonald1@csmd. edu, www.csmd.edu/KidsCollege. • Acting for Teens. 8:30 a.m. to 12 p.m., June 18-22, College of Southern Maryland, Leonardtown. Part of the College of Southern Maryland’s Teen College, Acting for Teens helps students develop a solid acting technique while having fun in the process. Students will discover what it is like to work on stage, learn the fundamentals of acting and experience the thrill of improvisation in a supportive and energetic environment. $99. 301-934-7634, kmcdonald1@csmd.edu, www.csmd.edu/KidsCollege.

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The County Times

Thursday, May 24, 2012

Community

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Local Teen Crowned 2012 Miss Maryland Teen Samantha Leigh Marshall, age 18, of California, was crowned the Miss American Coed 2012 Miss Maryland Teen at the multi-state competition held in Dulles, VA, on April 21–22. She received a cash award, trophy, flowers, sash, and tiara as she was crowned the Miss American Coed (MAC) 2012 Miss Maryland Teen. Contestants were scored in escorted formal wear, personal introduction, and personal interviews with each of the judges. Marshall will represent Maryland at the 29th annual National Pageant in Florida and Disney World during the week of Thanksgiving 2012. She will compete for the National Pageant title of Miss American Teen and thousands of dollars in cash awards, prizes, and scholarships. In addition to the overall pageant, she will have the opportunity to compete in the National Talent, Speech, Academic Achievement, Community Service, Photogenic, Personality, Most Promising Model, Best Actress, and National Cover Girl and Hostess Contests. Since 1983, millions of dollars in cash awards and prizes have been presented to outstanding girls at state and national competitions. Miss American Coed (MAC) Pageants, Inc., annually holds state pageants for the purpose of recognizing and rewarding outstanding young women between the ages of 3 and 22 for their past and present accomplishments and to encourage them to set and achieve high goals for the future. The MAC Pageant is not like other typical “walk across the stage” beauty pageants where only appearance mat-

ters, a press release states. Contestants’ appearance is important, but no more so than their unique personality, ability to get along with others, and achievements. The pageant helps each girl develop poise, selfconfidence and the ability to express herself. MAC Pageants encourage and reinforce the confidence and natural beauty that is within each girl. At the multi-state pageant, Marshall also competed in the optional talent contest against contestants age 13-22 from Maryland, Virginia, Washington D.C. and Delaware. She performed a tap dance routine to a the song “Moves Like Jagger” by Maroon 5. The routine was choreographed by Justin Myles. Marshall was selected as a Top 5 finalist in the talent competition. Marshall attends Holy Face Catholic Church, where she is an altar server. She is a member of the Senior Show Troupe at Gracie’s Guys and Gals Dance Studio in Hollywood and is currently enrolled in several Senior Show Troupe classes, including tap, hip hop, jazz, ballet, and modern/ contemporary dance. She works part-time at Texas Roadhouse as a waitress. She is an honor roll student and senior at Great Mills High School. She is a dual-concurrent enrollment student at the College of Southern Maryland and attends classes at the Leonardtown campus. She will graduate from Great Mills High School in June 2012 and continue her education at the College of Southern Maryland. To contact Marshall for requests for appearances at community events, please e-mail her at MAC2012MDTeen@verizon. net.

Leonardtown’s Class of ‘57 Reunion A reunion of the first graduating class from Leonardtown High School, which is now Leonardtown Elementary, will be held at Lenny’s Restaurant on Wednesday, June 30 from 6 to 10 p.m. If you’re a member of this class and have not been contacted yet, wish to attend or get more information, call Ron Thompson at 301-373-4754 or contact him via email at Lanor1@md.metrocast.net.

CAT OF THE WEEK My name is Skittles. I was taken in by Feral Cat Rescue and a family is fostering me. They have an older foster kitty named Sunkist. I look just like him so my family has been calling me Mini Me. I love my big brother Sunkist. We are fully vetted. We even have a microchip. I cost $125 and if you want to adopt Sunkist so I can have a pal, Feral Cat Rescue will let him come with me for free. He is 4 years old and is a bit shy but once he gets to know you, he is very loving. He loves me and grooms me and makes me feel safe when I have to go to Petco to be shown. I hope I find a home soon. If you would like to adopt me or both of us, please fill out an application at www.feralcatrescuemd.org and email it to moonandhunt@ hotmail.com Thanks so much. Love you forever and ever, Skittles


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The County Times

Thursday, May 24, 2012

Summerstock to Present “The Wizard of Oz” This year’s Summerstock Musical performance will be “The Wizard of Oz” by L. Frank Baum, the county’s Department of Recreation and Parks announced this week. The production will be held at Great Mills High School on Friday, July 20 through Sunday, July 22, and Thursday, July 26 through Sunday, July 29. Sunday evening shows begin at 5 p.m. with all other evening shows beginning at 7 p.m. There will also be a matinee on Saturday, July 28 at 1 p.m. Ticket prices are $14 for adults, $12 for se-

nior citizens 60 years and older and $6 for children 10 and under. Matinee prices are $10 for adults, $8 for senior citizens 60 years and older and $4 for children 10 and under. Ticket sales will begin at 8 a.m. on June 4 for online purchases www.stmarysmd.com/recreate or walk in purchases at the Recreation & Parks main office in Leonardtown. Patrons purchasing their tickets online must print their tickets and bring to the show for admittance. Online ticket purchases are highly encouraged due to the possibility of shows selling out and must be purchased no later than 10 p.m. the day before the show. Doors to the school will open one hour before each performance for ticket sales and patrons will enter the auditorium for general seating 30 minutes before each show time. Cash only will be accepted for ticket sales at the door. Please call 301-4754200 ext. 1800 for more information.

JROTC Cadets Recognized

The Southern Maryland Chapter of the Military Officers Association of America (MOAA) recognized the recipients of the MOAA JROTC Award at a luncheon on May 19. This award is presented annually to a cadet in each JROTC Unit who is in good academic standing and demonstrates exceptional potential for military leadership. Pictured above is CDR Tony Blankenship USN (Ret), the President of the Southern Maryland Chapter, MOAA, with CAPT J.P. Kelly, Naval Science Instructor, Great Mills High School; Cadet James Stanley, III, Great Mills High School; Cadet Christopher Collins, Leonardtown High School; Cadet R.J. Nimmerrichter, Chopticon High School; and Col. R.B. Torgerson, Air Force Science Instructor, Chopticon High School.

‘Friends’ Donates to Libraries

Louise Snell, President of Friends of St. Mary’s County Library, presented a donation of $15,000 each to Leonardtown Library Branch Manager Marylee Russell, left, Lexington Park Library Branch Manager Mary Anne Bowman, and Charlotte Hall Library Branch Manager Neil Derksen. The generous donations were made possible by the successful book sales conducted by the Friends and will allow the libraries to purchase extras not covered by the budget.

Community 2012 Farmers’ Market Guide Released

The 2012 So. Maryland, So Good Farmers' Market Guide lists 29 Southern Maryland Farmers' Markets located in Anne Arundel, Calvert, Charles, Prince George's and St. Mary's counties and other markets in the Washington metro area and Virginia that feature Southern Maryland farm vendors. The free, full color guide contains market hours of operation, directions, contact details and a handy harvesting chart. Also listed are market websites that often feature information on farm vendors, produce updates and even great recipe ideas. Many farmers' market vendors are now authorized to accept FMNP (WIC and Senior) and FVC coupons and some accept SNAP for fresh fruits and vegetables; for details on how and where to access these benefit programs in Southern Maryland visit the SMADC website at www.smadc.com. The Farmers' Market Guide is one of many resources created by SMADC in support of regional agriculture to assist local farm-based businesses in their continued growth and commercial viability. A related effort is the upcoming state-wide Buy Local Challenge Week (July 21 - 29). Marylanders pledge to include local products (produce, eggs meat, fruit, wine, etc.) in their meals for one week. Visit the Buy Local Challenge website at www.buy-local-challenge. com for details on how to take the pledge and find information about this year's "Take the Challenge with Friends" competition. The Farmers' Market Guide is available while stocks last at Southern Maryland farmers' markets and regional public libraries, or call (301) 274-1922 for a list of pick-up sites. View or download the guide at www.somarylandsogood.com or www.smadc.com.


The County Times

Thursday, May 24 • Women’s Bible Study at Sixty-Six Beans Sixty-Six Beans (29948 Three Notch Road, Charlotte Hall) – 10:30 a.m. Every second and fourth Thursday, the women of Encounter Christian Center meet for their Bible study. They welcome you to join them as they study God’s word. To RSVP, or find more events at Sixty-Six Beans, visit the Facebook event page at www.facebook.com/66beans/ events.

Friday, May 25 • Open Mic Night Christ Church Parish Hall (37497 Zach Fowler Road, Chaptico) – 7 p.m. The Southern Maryland Traditional Music and Dance Home Spun Coffee House will sponsor an Open Mic night. This is a great event with many varieties of music and lots of friendship, so if you haven’t been to an SMTMD event before, this is a great time to start! The doors open at 7 p.m., and the music starts at 7:30 p.m.. Admission is $5, and performers are admitted free. Light refreshments will be provided. For more information, or to sign up to perform, contact John Garner at carthagena@wildblue. net or 301-904-4987. Visit www.smtmd. org for directions and more information.

Saturday, May 26

en Heroes.” The Festival kicks off on Saturday, at 10 a.m. with an Opening Ceremony at Veterans’ Memorial Park and music by the U.S. Naval Academy Brass Quintet. Mayor Bruce Wahl will welcome guests and present guest speaker Major General James A. Adkins, the Adjutant General, Maryland. Saturday and Sunday, visit the North East Community Center (NECC) filled with non-profit organizations whose mission is to assist military personnel and their families. There will also be children’s activities at the NECC as well as Kellam’s Field to include carnival games, bowling, and entertain for all ages. Also on Saturday and Sunday you can see displays and demonstrations of military, fire and rescue equipment at the North Beach Volunteer Fire Department (NBVFD). The Railway Museum will also display photographs of WWI and WWII military personnel relaxing at the beach. All activities from 11 a.m. – 5 p.m. Saturday evening the NBVFD will be home to our own USO type show performed by local community theatre group, The Twin Beach Players. See Bob Hope, Bing Crosby, The Andrew Sisters, and a few surprises. This is the only event associated with a fee - adult only tickets are $30 each and can be purchased in advance at Chesapeake Beach Water Park and beach at North Beach discounts to all military personnel all weekend.

Sunday, May 27

• Pax River Raiders Walk Up Registration Wal-Mart (45485 Miramar Way, California) – 10 a.m. Walk-Up Registration for Fall Tackle Football and Fall Cheerleading, including the 2012 Southern Maryland Youth Contact Camp and Cheerleading Camp held at Ryken High School. Online Registration is available at www. paxriverraiders.org. • First Annual Chesapeake Beach Stars and Stripes Festival Town of Chesapeake Beach – 10 a.m. May 26- 29 The Town of Chesapeake Beach, Maryland is proud to announce the First Annual Three-Day Memorial Day Festival titled “Chesapeake Beach Stars and Stripes Festival Honoring Our Fall-

• Elk’s “Big Game” No Limit Texas Hold ‘Em Tournament St. Mary’s County Elk’s Lodge (45779 Fire Department Lane, Lexington Park) – 2 p.m. Buy-in is $100 for $10,000 in chips. Top ten percent of places paid. Arrive by 1:45 p.m. and receive an extra $1,000 chip. Game starts promptly at 2 p.m. A $10 add-on gets you an additional $2,000 in chips and your name in a 50/50 drawing for the money accumulated in the add-on pool. Blinds start at $25/$50 and progress from there every 25 minutes Side are games available. Food and beverage available for purchase. Please enter through the side of the building. For more information, call Linda Hill 240-925-5697.

The St. Mary’s Republican Central Committee (RCC)

The St. Mary’s Republican Central Committee (RCC) is seeking candidates to fill 2 open positions on the committee. Candidates must be registered Republicans, a minimum of 18 years of age, and residents of St. Mary’s County. Please submit cover letter and resume to Chairman Mary Burke Russell by June 5 at maryell23@aol.com Qualified candidates will be contacted for an interview.

Authority T. Haynie, Treasurer

P.O. Box 1406

Leonardtown, MD 20650

www.stmarysgop.com

Facebook:stmarysrepublicanparty

Thursday, May 24, 2012

Monday, May 28 • No Limit Texan Hold ‘Em Bounty Tournament St. Mary’s County Elk’s Lodge (45779 Fire Department Lane, Lexington Park) – 7 p.m. Part of the Leaderboard Challenge Spring-Summer Season. Anyone can join or play at any time at no cost other than buy-in to each tournament. No need to be part of the points system, people can just play to win. Buy-in is $25 for $3,000 in chips Blinds start at $25/$50 and progress from there every 20 minutes People can earn points for every tournament they participate in. Those accumulating the most points will receive a free roll to the $100 Leaderboard Challenge Tournament scheduled for August. The number of players receiving the free roll will be determined by the amount of money that accumulates in the pool at the end of the season. Last season 20 people received a free roll from the Monday session. Side games are available. Food and beverage will be available for purchase. Please enter through the side of the building. For more information, call the lodge at 301863-7800 or Linda at 240-925-5697.

Tuesday, May 29 • Zumba Fitness Hollywood Volunteer Rescue Squad (23469 Rescue Lane, Hollywood) – 5:45 p.m. Hollywood Volunteer Rescue Squad Fundraiser Zumba Fitness Classes. Every Tuesday and Thursday from 5:45-6:45 p.m. The cost is $7 per class or $25 for five classes. For information call 301-757-2336.

Wednesday, May 30 • “Slavery at Jefferson’s Monticello: An Insider’s View” Sotterley Plantation (44300 Sotterley Lane, Hollywood) – 7 p.m. Sotterley Plantation is pleased to welcome Elizabeth Chew, Ph.D. and Rex Ellis, Ph.D. for the 2012 Speaker Series at Sotterley for “Slavery at Jefferson’s Monticello: An Insider’s View.” The Speaker series is an important community outreach, this series is yet another way that this National Historic Landmark fulfills its mission of serving as an

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educational resource and cultural venue while it seeks to preserve, research, and interpret the plantation’s diverse cultures and environments throughout history. Because of the ongoing generosity of The Boeing Company, dedicated to promoting education and the arts within the Southern Maryland community, the Speaker Series at Sotterley is free to the public. Due to limited seating, advanced reservations are required. Call 301-3732280 for reservations. • Men’s Bible Study Sixty-Six Beans Coffee Lounge (29948 Three Notch Road, Charlotte Hall) – 7 p.m. Every week the men of Encounter Christian Center meet for their weekly Bible study. They welcome you to join them as they study God’s word. To RSVP or find more events at Sixty-Six Beans, visit www.facebook. com/66beans/events.

Thursday, May 31 • SoMD Parents of Amazing Anaphylactic Children Meeting Lexington Park Library Meeting Room A (21677 F.D.R. Boulevard, Lexington Park) – 6:30 p.m. The Southern Maryland Parents of Amazing Anaphylactic Children, a local food allergy support group. For more information, contact Beth at paakofsomd@gmail.com or visit facebook.com/paakofsomd or meetup.com/ paakofsomd. • Free Beginner Line Dance Lessons Hotel Charles (15100 Burnt Store Road, Hughesville) – 7 p.m. The Boot Scooters of Southern Maryland offer FREE beginner Line Dance Lessons every Wednesday night from 7-7:30 p.m. Guests may stay and watch, or even participate in, the more advanced practice session that follows the beginner lessons. Anyone interested in obtaining more information about these lessons can contact the Boot Scooters of Southern Maryland website at www.bootscootersofsomd.blogspot. com.

Friday, June 1 • First Friday with Robert Long Fenwick Street Used Books and Music (41655A Fenwick Street Leonardtown, Maryland) – 5 p.m.

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The County Times

Thursday, May 24, 2012

Come meet author Robert Long, who will be signing copies of his book “Valor in a Border State- Confederate Soldiers of St. Mary’s County.” “Valor in a Border State” is a 10 year compilation of biographies, amazing stories, photos and maybe even a little folklore of the brave soldiers of St. Mary’s County, Maryland who gave up everything to cast thier lot with the newly formed Confederate States of America. In 1860, unimaginable choices had to be made by our great grandfathers. The choice of state vs. country, North vs. South, to enlist or to remain neutral, ideals vs. beliefs. One could only guess at the choices we would have made had we been living in St. Mary’s County, Maryland during the Civil War. This book brings to life some of the men of St. Mary’s, their stories, their struggles and their lives. The shaping of a new nation or the reshaping of an old one squarely rested upon their shoulders. About the author: Rob Long was born in Leonardtown, Maryland in 1969. He now resides in Lusby, Maryland with his wife Karrie and their three children Emily, Madison and Shayne. He has worked as a mechanic and mechanical planner at Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant for 22 years. Robert enjoys being a husband, father, Civil War re-enactor, local historian, Lt. Commander of the Captain Vincent Camalier Camp 1359 Sons of Confederate Veterans, author and Master Mason. Copies of the book are $25 and available at Fenwick Street Used Books and Music. • First Friday a North End Gallery North End Gallery (41652 Fenwick Street, Leonardtown) – 5 p.m. The North End Gallery starts the summer season with an All Member show titled “Life Along the Chesapeake.” The show will run from May 29 until July 1. The First Friday event will be June 1 from 5 until 8 p.m. Along with the All-Member show, Karen Vaughn will be the featured artist in the Mulberry Room displaying her art in a solo presentation titled “ Karen Vaughn in the Mulberry Room.” For more information, call 301-475-3130 or visit www. northendgallery.org.

Saturday, June 2 • Mother Catherine Spalding First Annual Car Show Mother Catherine Spalding School (38833 Chaptico Road, Helen) – 8 a.m. Rain Date: June 3 Dash plaques to the first 100 cars and trophies for the top 20. There will be a DJ, vendors, food and drink, kid’s games, door prizes, and a 50/50 raffle. Show hours are 8 am – 3 pm. Registration will be until 12 p.m. The registration fee is $20 at the gate. Pre-registration is $15. Pre-registration forms must be received by May 26 and can be found at www.mothercatherine.org/CarShowFlyer.pdf. The vendor fee is $25. For more information, contact Mark Muir at 301-769-3282. All proceeds benefit Mother Catherine Spalding School. • Just Like Joshua Second Annual Yard Sale Cord’s Cabinetry Parking Lot (39770 Three Notch Road, Charlotte Hall) – 1 p.m. All tables will be setup outside. This event is open to the public. For more information, call 301-399-9285, e-mail JustLikeJoshua@hotmail.com or visit www.facebook.com/JustLikeJoshua. Vendor space must be reserved ahead of time Suggested Donations are $10 for one table and $15 for two tables. Set up begins at 7 a.m. All proceeds go to the Juse Like Joshua Scholarship Fund. This provides financial assistance for medically necessary expenses for special needs children living in Calvert, Charles, and St. Mary’s counties. Just Like Joshua is a support network for special needs children and the people who love them.

Sunday, June 3 • Annual Celebration of Cancer Survivors St. Mary’s Hospital (25500 Point Lookout Road, Leonardtown) – 1 p.m. MedStar St. Mary’s Hospital’s Cancer Survivors’ Day Picnic is taking place on the hospital grounds. Now in its 25th year, the picnic is a community event filled with joy, camaraderie, hope, compassion and love as cancer survi-

vors and their families are honored for their strength and courage. The afternoon event will feature good Southern Maryland cooking, entertainment and inspirational speakers. The National Cancer Survivors’ Day Foundation defines a survivor as anyone living with a history of cancer – from the moment of diagnosis through the remainder of life. Survivors not only include patients, but also their families, friends and coworkers. For more information on the National Cancer Survivors’ Day Picnic call 301-475-6070. • Vendor Quarter Auction with the Fun Bunch 2nd District Volunteer Fire Department and Rescue Squad - (45245 Drayden Road Valley Lee) – 1 p.m. Admission is $3 per person, which includes a door prize ticket and one paddle. Additional paddles are $3 each. Bids are one to four quarters per paddle. Doors open at 1 p.m. for viewing and the auction starts at 2 p.m. Possible vendors include Dove Chocolate Discoveries, Scentsy, Lia Sophia, Pampered Chef, Lilley Pad, Mary Kay and Fan Gear Jerseys. There will be a 50/50 raffle and refreshments for sale. For more information, call 301-994-9924. • Leonardtown Criterium Bicycle Races Leonardtown Square – 8 a.m. Exciting USCF bicycle races on the streets in downtown Leonardtown with professional cyclists. Spectators welcome! Sponsored by the Patuxent Velo Bicycle Racing Club. For more information, call 240-925-4806.

Saturday, June 9 • Karsyn’s Karnival Cove Point Park (750 Cove Point Road, Lusby) – 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. Erin Sloan and her husband organized Karsyn’s Karnival to raise the community’s awareness and understanding of Down syndrome. Last year, 79 local high school students from Calvert and St. Mary’s counties volunteered on the day of the carnival and more than 40 local businesses contributed to the event. For more information, contact Erin Sloan ersloan@verizon.net.

Tuesday, June 19

• Rally For the Cure Cedar Point Golf Course – 7:45 a.m. Cedar Point Ladies Golf Association (CPLGA) is hosting a Rally for the Cure Honoring our oldest member and a Breast Cancer survivor, Lois O’Connell. A $75 per entry fee covers cart and greens fees, lunch, prizes, goody bag and more! Captain’s Choice Scramble: bring your foursome or we can pair you up! Prizes for winning team(s), Longest Drive, Longest Putt, Closest to the Pin, and Cluster Putt contest and more. Registration and Continental Breakfast by CPLGA is from 7:45 - 8:30 a.m. Cluster Putt Contest is at 8:45 a.m. and shotgun Start is at 9 a.m. To register, mail a check made out to CPLGA to: Shirl Vatter, CPLGA Chairman/Rally Ambassador, 26377 Hillendale Road, Hollywood MD 20636. Email names of the team members and if Base access is needed to shirleyvatter@yahoo.com. Checks must be received by June 11. Wear pink!

Wednesday, June 6

Sunday, June 23

• “Inception” screening Prince Frederick Library (850 Costley Way, Prince Frederick) – 6 p.m. Advanced technology enters the human mind through dream invasion, a process called inception, and a thief is given his final chance at redemption which involves executing his toughest assignment. The film is rated PG-13. Lights go down at 6 p.m. and the film will be followed by a short discussion. Light refreshments will be served. For more information call Robyn Truslow at 410-535-0291 or 301-855-1862.

• “Come Back Home Family and Friends Day St. Mark UAME Church (45685 Happyland Road, Valley Lee) – 11 a.m. Come celebrate family and friends day with the officers and members of St. Mark and St. Luke UAME Churches. There will be vendors, praise, dancing, face painting, game, food and lots of fun for everyone. Carryouts will be available. For more information, call Claulette Jordan at 240-298-9053, Marsha Blackwell at 240-256-5392 or Ellen and Joe Jordan at 301-994-1450.

Are you traveling over the weekend? Do you have to work on Sunday morning?

Annual Memorial Day Antique and Collectable Auction Monday, May 28 at 9 a.m.

Chesapeake Auction House

St. Leonard, MD 20685 • 410-586-1161 • chesapeakeauctionhouse.com

Beginning on the first Sunday in June, a weekly Sunday evening Mass will be celebrated

at 6:00 p.m.

St. Joseph’s Catholic Church (301) 475-3293

29119 Point Lookout Road • Morganza, Maryland 20660


The County Times

Thursday, May 24, 2012

28

Power Lineup Performs for Fundraiser By Sarah Miller Staff Writer It was a capacity crowd at the Ruddy Duck as band after band took the stage during a recent Cystic Fibrosis fundraiser. Ruddy Duck co-owner Michael Kelley said May 16 was “pretty unique” among the fundraisers the restaurant typically helps with. Most of the time, he said, the restaurant donates five percent of the total sales, or the entire profit from certain items. In this case, they donated the money, but this was the first time there was such a large musical lineup during the event as well. The evening’s lineup consisted of The Sam Grow Band, The Piranhas, Jukebox Thieves and Hydra Fx. Kelley said these are bands who don’t often share a stage, but they came together for the fundraiser. He said between the capacity crowd and the money raised, the benefit was a “big success.” Team Delta Member Katie Howeth, with the Leonardtown branch of the Great Strides walk, said the group has been together since last year and the Ruddy Duck event was a fundraiser for this year’s walk. She said there are 10 members on the team, all of whom worked to make the fundraiser a success. She said the final amount raised at the Ruddy Duck was $2,026.89. In total, the group raised more than $3,600 for the walk last Saturday, which marked the second year for both Team Delta and Leonardtown’s Great Strides Walk.

The Jukebox Thieves kick off the night.

Howeth said planning for the Ruddy Duck evening started a couple months ago and between bands donating their time and vendors donating raffle items, “it all kind of fell into place.” Fourteen raffle items were donated from places such as Papa Johns, Tastefully Simple, Sports Clips and Celebrity Nails, in addition to private donations of wine and handmade jewelry and even guitar lessons. Sam Grow Band drummer Joe Barrick said they were contacted by Justin Myles of The Piranhas to come out and play during the fundraiser. He said they were interested the moment they heard the pitch. “Any chance we have to give back to the community, we love to be part of that,” he said. He said there is a network of bands all over Southern Maryland and anytime there’s a chance to help a good cause raise money, “everyone’s all over that.” “You can’t ask for a better location than Southern Maryland,” Barrick said. He said the Sam Grow Band plays several shows per week, but they still make sure to play at two or three charity events every month. Myles said Howeth is a friend of the band and approached them first to be the evening’s entertainment. “Somewhere along the line we said ‘why don’t we blow it out of the water’,” Myles said. He said the Piranhas began calling around to other bands, asking them to donate an hour of their time for the

Photos by Sarah Miller

fundraiser. “No one hesitated,” he said. “They said ‘yes, absolutely’.” He said the fundraiser was a team effort, with everyone pitching in to make it a hit. Howeth said the evening was such a success that the Ruddy Duck has already agreed to do another one in the future. Howeth said they hope to hold a Ruddy Duck fundraiser every six months, along with other fundraisers throughout the year. She said the group is “still trying to get into the groove of

The Piranhas Dylan Galvin tunes up.

things,” but they hope to begin fundraising and planning earlier for the next walk. sarahmiller@countytimes.net


29

The County Times

Thursday, May 24, 2012

n O g Goin

What’s

The County Times is always looking for more local talent to feature! To submit art or band information for our entertainment section, e-mail carriemunn@countytimes.net. Thursday, May 24 Live Music: “Rusty in the Middle” Toot’s Bar (23971 Mervell Dean Road, Hollywood) – 8:30 p.m. Live Music: “No Green JellyBeanz” Vera’s White Sands Beach Club (1200 White Sands Drive, Lusby) – 7 p.m. Live Music: “Jennifer Cooper & Carl Reichelt” Stoney’s Seafood House (14575 Solomons Island Rd. South, Solomons) – 5 p.m.

Friday, May 25 Live Music: “Joe Martone Band” Sea Breeze Restaurant & Crab House (27130 S. Sandgates Rd., Mechanicsville) – 8 p.m. Live Music: “No Pants Dance” Vera’s White Sands Beach Club (1200 White Sands Drive, Lusby) – 8:30 p.m. Live Music: “ Jennifer Cooper, Carl Reichelt & Alex Dean” Running Hare Vineyard (150 Adelina Road, Prince Frederick) – 6 p.m. Live Music: “Dylan & Rusty” Ruddy Duck Brewery (13200 Dowell Road, Dowell) – 8 p.m. Live Music: “Country Memories Band” St. Mary’s Landing (29935 Three Notch Road, Charlotte Hall) – 7 p.m. Live Music: “R & R Train” Dennis Point Marina (46555 Dennis Point Way, Drayden) – 6:30 p.m. Live Music: “Three Days of Rain”

In Entertainment

Toot’s Bar (23971 Mervell Dean Road, Hollywood) – 8:30 p.m.

White Sands Drive, Lusby) – 9:30 p.m.

Live Music: “A Day Off Earth” OCI Pub (45413 Lighthouse Road, Piney Point) – 8 p.m.

Live Music: “Too Many Mikes” The Green Turtle (98 Solomons Island Rd., South
Prince Frederick) – 9 p.m.

Karaoke with DJ Coach Scheible’s Restaurant (48342 Wynne Rd., Ridge) – 9 p.m.

Live Music: “Miles From Clever” Cryer’s Back Road Inn (22094 Newtowne Neck Road, Leonardtown) – 8 p.m.

Saturday, May 26 Live Music: “The Anthony Ryan Band” Toot’s Bar (23971 Mervell Dean Road, Hollywood) – 8:30 p.m. Live Music: “Facedown” Sea Breeze Restaurant & Crab House (27130 S. Sandgates Rd., Mechanicsville) – 8 p.m. Downtown Tunes Summer Concert Series: “Jennifer Cooper & Groovespan” Leonardtown Square Mainstage (Downtown Leonardtown) – 6 p.m. Live Music: “Bluegrass Gospel Express” Leonardtown Church of the Nazarene (340 Washington Street, Leonardtown)– 7 p.m. Live Music: “A Day Off Earth” Rustic River Bar and Grill (40874 Merchants Lane, Leonardtown) – 8 p.m. First Bikini Contest & Live Music: “The Sam Grow Band” Vera’s White Sands Beach Club (1200 White Sands Drive, Lusby) – 3 p.m. Live Music: “The Fuzz” Vera’s White Sands Beach Club (1200

Live Music: “Three Notch Country” Anderson’s Bar (23945 Colton Point Road, Clements) – 8:30 p.m. Live Music: “Shuckin’ Country” Tall Timbers Marina (18521 Herring Creek Road, Tall Timbers) - 7 p.m.

Sunday, May 27 Live Music: “The Three Amigos” Morris Point Restaurant (38869 Morris Point Rd., Abell) – 5 p.m. Live Music: “Patty Reese” Vera’s White Sands Beach Club (1200 White Sands Drive, Lusby) – 3 p.m. Live Music: “The New Romance” Vera’s White Sands Beach Club (1200 White Sands Drive, Lusby) – 9:30 p.m. Live Music: The 25th Hour Band” Tall Timbers Marina (18521 Herring Creek Road, Tall Timbers) – 4 p.m. Live Music: “Three Day Ride” Sea Breeze Restaurant & Crab House (27130 S. Sandgates Rd., Mechanicsville) – 6 p.m. Live Music: “The Piranhas” Toot’s Bar (23971 Mervell Dean Road, Hollywood) – 3 p.m.

Live Music: “Don’t Call Me Shirley” Toot’s Bar (23971 Mervell Dean Road, Hollywood) – 8:30 p.m. Live Music: “Bret Michaels” Calvert Marine Museum (14200 Solomons Island Rd., Solomons) – 6 p.m.

Monday, May 28 Open Mic Night Rustic River Bar and Grill (40874 Merchants Lane, Leonardtown) – 5 p.m. Live Music: “Slow Jim” Vera’s White Sands Beach Club (1200 White Sands Drive, Lusby) – 3 p.m.

Tuesday, May 29 Open Mic Night Ruddy Duck Brewery (13200 Dowell Road, Dowell) – 6:30 p.m. Live Music: “Fair Warning” DB McMillan’s (23415 Three Notch Road, California) – 5 p.m. Trivia with Cash Prizes Rustic River Bar and Grill (40874 Merchants Lane, Leonardtown) – 6:30 p.m.

Wednesday, May 30 Live Music: “Mason Sebastian” DB McMillan’s (23415 Three Notch Road, California) – 5 p.m. Auditions for New Direction Theater’s “The Murder Room” Southern Community Center (20 Appeal Lane, Lusby) – 7 p.m.

The Piranhas are BACK at the Duck! Saturday, June 2nd 8-12 no cover

Specialty Cocktails, Shooters, and Jello Shots!

GET RUDDY!

410-FYI-DUCK

www.RuddyDuckBrewery.com

SOLOMONS, MARYLAND

Dowell Rd and Route 4


Newsmakers

The County Times

Thursday, May 24, 2012

30

Advocates: ‘Ban Stupid People, Not Dogs’ Court Decision a Death Blow for ‘Pit Bulls’

By Carrie Munn Staff Writer So what’s the problem with pit bulls and pit-mixes? Many say nothing at all and are voicing their opposition to a recent ruling made by the Maryland Court of Appeals. That decision, modifying the common law in the state, singles out pits or pit-mixes as “inherently dangerous” and means not only the owner but also the landlord can be held “strictly liable” in the event of a dog bite. The impact at the local level has been immediate, said co-owner of The Well Pet Clinic in Lexington Park and avid animal advocate Kathy Delozier. “Pit bulls or any dog that resembles a pit bull are being unfairly targeted because of this action.” Just recently, she said, a woman called upset after coming home to find a notice from her landlord saying her beloved pit-mix had to go or she could face eviction. “It’s hard enough now for the rescues and shelters to adopt these dogs and this decision is basically a death sentence,” Delozier told The County Times. She explained how with pit bulls banned in Prince George’s County and the Anne Arundel County shelters already put-

ting them down due to overcrowding, coupled with the near impossibility of adopting them, more and more of these dogs would begin surfacing in Southern Maryland. The Animal Relief Fund’s volunteers at the St. Mary’s County Animal Fair were busy sharing accurate information Photo by Carrie Munn about the breed they and well-trained pit bulls Kari and Inara serve as amsay has received an Adorable bassa-dogs for Pinups for Pitbulls, Inc., a non-profit that produces unjustified bad wrap. a calendar with a pin-up girl and a pit puppy for each month. Delozier’s daughter Volunteer Rachel Richards said the group’s goal is changing perIrma, who fosters ception about the breed and working to battle ill-informed breedseveral special needs specific legislation that affects these “sweet, smart” dogs. pit and pit-mixes, donned a shirt that read ‘Ban Stupid People, Not Dogs’. Tom Newcomer said he and his wife Sherry have been long-time volunteers with rescues and had fostered countless dogs. He said they had heard from tenants that landlords were acting swiftly to enforce this new

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Photo courtesy of Animal Relief Fund Vanna, a two and a half month old pit bull terrier mix up for adoption through the Animal Relief Fund, is just one of dozens of “pit bulls” and pit-mixes looking for a loving home in Southern Maryland.

regulation, giving as little as 24 hours for the dogs to leave the premises. “This new pit [specific] thing is going to cause a real problem. Faced with the possibility of losing their home, many will end up just dumping the dogs on the streets,” he said. Sherry called the court’s ruling “ridiculous” and said she called all the local legislators – state Sen. Roy Dyson, U.S. Sen. Barbara Mikulski and Congressman Steny Hoyer- to tell them so. “We’re really trying to do whatever we can to raise awareness about this issue and the many, many problems it’s likely to bring,” she said. Kevin Cox of All Shepherd Rescue, also at the animal fair last week, said German Shepherds are another breed that has and continues to face breed discrimination. By his side was a hardly-vicious adoptable dog named Cash, a pit bull-shepherd-boxer mix. Well aware of the recent ruling, Cox said, “It’s not a common sense decision that was made by these judges if you ask me.” “It’s a trend in this nation of people not holding other people accountable for their actions and instead placing the full blame on the animals,” he said, adding the majority of reported dog bites across the country are caused by small breeds, like the dachsund. This humanizing of the dogs leads to mis-

Photo by Carrie Munn Eli and Brandon Munn spent some time with the affectionate and well-trained “Cash”, a pit bullGerman shepherd-boxer mix, at the SMAWL Animal Fair last week. Kevin Cox, behind, said the Court of Appeal’s ruling “was not a common sense decision.”

conceptions about particular breeds and the unfortunate reality of them having less of a chance to make it out of the shelter or rescue to become the loving family pet they can be, he explained. The 4-3 ruling by the Court of Appeals to modify the existing common law stemmed from a 2007 attack on a Towson boy, where the 89-year-old landlord is now being held responsible along with the dog’s owners. Judges Greene, Harrell and Barbera filed a dissenting opinion, citing the flaws with such breed-specific legislation, particularly the fact that “pit bull” is actually a generalized term for multiple breeds (American Staffordshire Terrier, Staffordshire Bull Terrier and American Pit Bull Terrier) and such canines are often misidentified. “It appears that the media has demonized pit bulls as gruesome fighting dogs and has not revealed the long history of pit bulls as family dogs with passive behaviors,” the statement of dissent states, later adding that other factors – completely unrelated to breed- like training, socialization and reproductive status, affect a dog’s tendency toward aggression. Activists lobbied to draw attention to the ruling in Annapolis prior to the legislative special session to no avail. Petitions have been started and advocates continue to voice their concern over what this will mean for the many pit bulls and pit mixes filling up shelters in flux, as landlords take it upon themselves to enforce such breed discrimination for fear of being held financially liable. Kevin Earl from the Tri-County Animal Shelter estimated that a third of the dogs housed there currently are pit bulls or mixes. “If there ever was a day at the shelter where we had some empty cages, that would be great day, but I’ve been there for five years and it hasn’t happened yet.” carriemunn@countytimes.net


31

The County Times

Thursday, May 24, 2012

Business

Deadlines for Classifieds are Tuesday at 12 pm.

Directory Phone 301-884-5900 1-800 524-2381

Phone 301-934-4680 Fax 301-884-0398

Cross & Wood

AssoCiAtes, inC. Serving The Great Southern Maryland Counties since 1994 Employer/Employee

Primary Resource Consultants Group & Individual Health, Dental, Vision, AFLAC, Life, Long Term Care, Short & Long Term Disability, Employer & Employee Benefits Planning

12685 Amberleigh Lane La Plata, MD 20646

Heating & Air Conditioning

23415 Three Notch Road California Maryland

“THE HEAT PUMP PEOPLE” 30457 Potomac Way Charlotte Hall, MD 20622 Phone: 301-884-5011

www.dbmcmillans.com Entertainment All Day

Est. 1982

snheatingac.com

Lic #12999

For All Your Real Estate Needs.

Addie McBride

Cell: 301-481-6767 Home: 301-737-1669 www.addiemcbride.com addiemcbride@verizon.net

Helping Good People Find Good Homes.

Franzen Realtors, Inc.

www.franzenrealtors.com

22316 Three Notch Rd. Lexington Park, MD 20653 Office: 1-800-848-6092 • Office: 301-862-2222 • Fax Office: 301-862-1060

301-737-0777

23415 Three Notch Rd. • Suite #2033A • California, MD 20619

Large house with room to run. Very large bedrooms,3 custom fireplaces,Fully finished basement with storage room, 2.5 car garage, circular driveway, fishing pond,country store and a daycare 1/4 mile away! Easy commute to PAX RIVER NAS and Washington DC/ VA.For further info. please call 240-299-1255 before 8pm.Thank You! Price: $562,000

Beautiful Home for Rent in the Charlotte Hall area: 3300 sq ft split foyer, a/c 4 bdrms, 2.5 bath, liv rm, din rm, kitchen, office, family room, storage room, library, laundry rm w/wa/dryer. Large fenced yard. Hardwood floors throughout 2nd floor. Pets considered... Tile throughout 1st floor. $1850 per month plus utilities. First month and Security deposit…Call 704 654-2748. Or sgsmith@ iglide.net Available June 15th.

Employment Team & Solo Drivers.

Immediate positions available! 48 CPM split for teams. 35 CPM for solo drivers. Drop & hook available. No touch freight. Weekly pay + insurance. CDL-A w/1 year OTR req’d. Food grade tank carrier.

800-877-2430 www.indianrivertransport.com

Concrete Wall Laborer. Immediate Opening Available. Must be at least 18 years of age. Drivers License and Own Vehicle is a must ! Should be in excellent physical condition and able to carry out jobs such as heavy lifting, carrying wall panels, and performing other jobs when needed such as cutting grass, weed eating, and cleaning vehicles. Previous employment or Personal References Preferred.

Yard Sales

OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK

Monday - Friday: 10 am - 7 pm Saturday: 10 am - 4 pm • Sunday: 11 am - 4 pm

Real Estate

Lexington Park-Clean 3 Bedroom Single Family Home with Central Air Condtioning -Patuxent Homes-Upgraded Kitchen, fenced yard with large deck out back for relaxing and entertaining- Quiet Location with good neighbors- $1300 per month 301-737-7854.

Pub & Grill

318 Days Till St. Patrick’s Day

Classifieds

Real Estate Rentals

28231 Three Notch Rd, #101 Mechanicsville, MD 20659

301-866-0777

To Place a Classified Ad, please email your ad to: classifieds@countytimes.net or Call: 301-3734125 or Fax: 301-373-4128 for a price quote. Office hours are: Monday thru Friday 8am - 4pm. The County Times is published each Thursday.

Prime Rib • Seafood • Sunday Brunch Banquet & Meeting Facilities 23418 Three Notch Road • California, MD 20619 www.lennys.net

Yard sale at the Sunderland Park ‘n Ride (next to All Saint’s church on the corner of Rt 2 and Rt 4) on Saturday, May 26th. 7:30 am - 12 pm . Come check it out!

MULTI FAMILY YARD SALE

42745 Redgate Farm Lane Leonardtown Saturday May 26th from 7 a.m. - 12 noon Shoes, clothes, purses, jewelry, pictures, kitchen stuff and much much more!!

Important

The County Times will not be held responsible for any ads omitted for any reason. The County Times reserves the right to edit or reject any classified ad not meeting the standards of The County Times. It is your responsiblity to check the ad on its first publication and call us if a mistake is found. We will correct your ad only if notified after the first day the first publication ran.


The County Times

ner

KiddKioer

CLUES ACROSS

1. Traditional baby carriage 5. A fencing sword 9. Titan mother of Helios 10. S.E. Asian penninsula 12. A stretch of shallow waer 13. Pea, bean or lentil 16. African antelope 17. Recording of different songs 18. __ contendere, plead no contest 19. Diving bell inventor 20. Egg cells 21. Cumulus rain cloud 26. Cry of sorrow 30. 23 ______: go away 31. Supreme Allied Commander Europe 36. Enroll as a student 40. Furnished sleeping quarters 41. ___ Sandhurst 42. Swedish rock group 45. Bouquet of flowers 46. Suspect to be false 48. In the middle of 49. Give shelter to 51. Lace edging of small

32

Thursday, May 24, 2012

22. Addams Family cousin 23. 3rd tone of the scale 24. Pear variety 25. Two-toed sloth 27. -__, denotes past 28. Alaskan town 29. The family bufonidae 32. Centilitre 33. Earl’s jurisdiction 34. Extreme 35. Show a response 37. Touchdown 38. Rhenium 39. Potato state 40. Utter incoherent words 42. Pitressin 43. A tropical constrictor 44. A baby’s belch 45. Nervous little mongrel dogs 47. Papuan monetary unit 48. Musical Instrument Digital Interface 50. Corpuscle count (abbr.) 51. Bluegrass genus 53. Common Canadian phrase 54. Physicians designation

loops 52. Cadet 54. Device for data over phone lines 55. Being considered individually 56. Raised speaking platform

CLUES DOWN

1. A type of plug 2. Comprehend written words 3. Feel ill 4. 1/1000 of an ampere 5. Dorothy’s auntie 6. Chum 7. Greek colony founded by Xenophanes 8. Philly football team 9. Sensory brain parts 11. Marysville, CA college 12. Language spoken in Bratislava 14. Wet, sticky earth 15. Emergency Medical Service 16. a.k.a. Alkenols 21. Sodium

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Thursday, May 24, 2012

The County Times

Hair-Raising Facts About Lack of Exercise If you are a woman and don’t exercise enough – or at all - you are literally making yourself sick. This is the conclusion of a new study

released recently by Oregon State University, indicating that inactive women are at a higher risk for developing metabolic syndrome, a group of medical con-

ditions including high cholesterol, high blood pressure, and excessive belly fat. “Even taken separately, each of these conditions can be dangerous to your health,” says Josef Brandenburg, a personal trainer at The Body You Want in Washington, DC. “Combine them, and your risk for type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke increases.” Should you be worried? It all depends on your level of activity. The study found that women average only about 18 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous daily exercise, far below the recommended minimum of 30 minutes a day. The reasons for lack of physical activity among women range from busy work schedules and family obligations to – incredibly enough – vanity. In an interview with the New York Times last year, U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Regina M. Benjamin noted that because they don’t want to mess up their hair, some women avoid physical activity altogether. “Anyone who doesn’t want to work out will always find a convenient excuse,” Brandenburg says. “But the bottom line is this: hair – or any other reason – should not stand in the way of your health.” If you need even more compelling reasons to work out – other than the ones cited above – how is this: numerous studies have shown that women who exercise at moderate to vigorous levels for three or more hours per week reduce their risk of developing breast cancer by 30 to 40 percent. And if you are a man, don’t think

you’re off the hook. Even though this particular study focused on women, many men also skimp on exercise. According to a 2011 report by Centers of Disease Control and Prevention, fewer than two in 10 Americans get the recommended levels of physical activity, and more than a quarter of U.S. adults of both genders don’t exercise at all. “While this recent research mentions the risk of metabolic syndrome in women, let’s not forget that inactive lifestyle can be dangerous for men and women alike,” Brandenburg points out. “For both, it ups the risk of obesity, heart disease, several forms of cancers, diabetes, and stroke – all of which can lead to early death.” If a busy schedule – not hair – is the reason why you don’t exercise, Brandenburg suggests the following time-saving tips: • Plan your sessions early in the morning, before your schedule gets too busy. You’ll be energized for all your day’s activities and won’t have to worry about fitting in a workout later, when things get too hectic. • Focus on time-saving but highly effective exercises like interval training, which typically lasts 15 to 20 minutes per session. Ask your trainer to create intervals that are best suited to your needs. Josef Brandenburg is a certified fitness expert (ACE, NASM, NCEP, CHEK, FMS and FMS II) with 11 years of experience in the fitness industry. Brandenburg can be reached at josef@thebodyyouwant.com or 202-615-3220.

Truth About Obesity May Be Hard to Swallow Before you dig into that greasy burger and fries, think about this: fat from this high-calorie meal can reach your waistline within just three hours. And if you continue to eat excessively, the fat will travel to your hips, buttocks and thighs, where it will live for a long time. That’s the finding of a new study from University of Oxford in England, and it should certainly sound an alarm in our country as well because one-third of American adults are obese, which means they are 20 percent or more above their normal weight. And Maryland is certainly part of this trend. According to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 27.1% of our state’s residents are obese, putting themselves at an increased risk of heart disease, several types of cancer, stroke, diabetes, and other serious conditions. “Perhaps if more people realized how quickly that caloric meal is transformed into fat, they’d be more careful about what they eat,” Shannon Wallace, Jr., CPT, 368 Athletics & 368 Bootcamps in Frederick, said in a press release. This newest research is even more worrisome because it comes on the heels of a report released earlier

this month by CDC, which predicts that if we don’t start shaping up, 42 percent of the U.S. population – well over 100 million people - will be obese by the year 2030. “The only good thing about these statistics is that, hopefully, they will act as a wake-up call and get more people to take action,” Wallace said. If you do decide to start shedding the extra pounds, you may be tempted to try one of those “revolutionary” diet pills or other gimmicks you see advertised. They promise a “quick” and “easy” weight loss while you eat all your favorite foods and don’t spend even a minute exercising. “Be careful about crash diets that are promoted as miraculous. If they sound too good to be true, they probably are,” Wallace cautions. “In fact, some of the pills and other products that curb your appetite can have serious side effects. Remember: it’s not a matter of losing weight quickly but, rather, safely and gradually.” Here are his suggestions for safe and effective weight loss and maintenance: • It’s not just about dieting, but changing your mindset about weight loss. “The reason so many people re-gain all the weight they lose – and then some – is because they don’t think of this process as a lifetime com-

mitment,” Wallace says. “You have to work at it every day. Say to yourself: ‘I want to be healthy,’ and not just ‘I want to be thin.’” • Forget hunger games. “Losing weight doesn’t require you to go hungry,” Wallace points out. “In fact, if you starve yourself, you are more likely to binge afterwards, adding even more pounds. Instead, focus on eating a balanced, calorie-reduced diet that includes lean protein, plenty of fruits and vegetables, healthy fats and some whole grains and low-fat dairy. • Exercise. Regular physical activity will not only speed up your metabolism and help you lose (and maintain) weight, but, if you choose the right kind of training, you will continue burning fat and calories hours after your workout is finished. He recommends two such exercises: strength training and interval training. “If you do both regularly combined with a sensible diet, you will see amazing results. This is one of the reasons that boot camps are so popular,” Wallace says. Shannon Wallace, Jr., is owner and trainer at 368 Athletics & 368 Bootcamps. Wallace, a well credentialed coach with many years of experience in the fitness industry, can be reached at swallace@368athletics.com.


The County Times

Thursday, May 24, 2012

A Journey Through Time The

By Linda Reno Contributing Writer Richard Barnes, younger son of Abraham Barnes and his second wife, Elizabeth Rousby was born about 1746. As the children of a wealthy planter, he his brother John were undoubtedly educated by private tutors and would receive additional education in England. In the case of the Barnes boys, rather than just send the boys, their father went to England with them where they lived between 1761 and1764. John Barnes was established in business by his father in 1764, but failed. When Abraham Barnes made his will in 1773 he said “Contrary to my expectations, he

Chronicle

[John] has carelessly lost and sunk all I gave him and is more in debt than I am able to pay...but above all, he has robbed me of my happiness and peace of mind at a time of life when I expected to be free from any disturbance or anxiety…he cannot, with any reason, expect any further favor or indulgence from me. Therefore, I give all to my son, Richard Barnes.” John Barnes died, unmarried in Washington County, Maryland in 1800. Lt. Richard Barnes (later Colonel) was placed in charge of all military activities in St. Mary’s County during the Revolutionary War and also loaned money for the war effort. He never married to the dismay of many young maidens. One wrote a letter to her sister saying “The first thing I did was to engage Dick Barnes in conversation, that we might admire his sweet pretty mouth, for when he speaks I never saw so beautiful a mouth in my life…I assure you I’ve tried all the ways I could think of to catch him but it is all in vain and I would have you try what you can do. I am sure if you ever get acquainted with him you will be in love.” Neither sister was successful. Prior to his death in 1804, Richard Barnes made

three wills in all making monetary devises to the children of his half sister, Mary King Barnes (she died in 1770) and Thomson Mason. He devised all of his real estate to his nephew John Thomson Mason, during his life. “After his death, it is devised to his son, Abraham Mason, on the condition he changes his name to Abraham Barnes.” His “personal servant” James was given his freedom upon Richard’s death and an annual annuity of 60 pounds currency money during his life. Then to “all of my poor slaves whose melancholy situation I have long deplored, their freedom five years after my death. They must behave themselves well. Any of them found guilty of improper conduct before a single magistrate may be sold as slaves. They are to take the surname of Barnes. They are to take care of their old, their young, and their infirm… My Executor, if he thinks proper, is to provide them with money, stock, or credit to enable them to live as tenants” Most all were freed except those over the age of 45 (according to a Maryland law then in effect).

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The County Times

Thursday, May 24, 2012

Wanderings

By Shelby Oppermann Contributing Writer

of an Aimless Mind

I suppose you can tell I was a child of the 60’s and 70’s. Somewhere in the back of my mind is a voice saying, “Do not wear white before Memorial Day”. The voice is actually my Mother’s voice. You might hear a similar voice in your head about various rules of etiquette. I don’t remember ever asking why. I would have probably been told, “Because I said so.” Did I ever wear white? Can’t remember wearing much white, or my Mother for that matter. The only white shoes I remember wearing were for my late Baptism in 1969, and Sacrament of Confirmation in 1976.

I was looking back at my Confirmation Class pamphlet and there were over 120 kids who were confirmed besides me at St. John’s in Clinton. Are there still that many confirmed at one time today? Maybe there are more. What I remember most were my mid-70’s borrowed skirt, white sandals, and the…ugh, pantyhose. There are tons of articles about the wearing of white and Memorial Day. The amount of Google searches rises dramatically with this question each year. So I must not be the only one out there wondering about this question. When I think of white shoes I always think back to the church events listed above and to all the jokes about Pat Boone’s white buck shoes.

Book Review

“In One Person” by John Irving

c.2012, Simon & Schuster $28.00 / $34.95 Canada 429 pages By Terri Schlichenmeyer Contributing Writer When you look back over your life, you notice things that make you say, “Yes. That makes sense.” You always wondered why you love certain foods, adore cozy smells, or have a way with words – until you learn that your mother loved those foods, your grandfather wore that scent, and your father was a writer once. Billy Abbott sometimes wondered why he was drawn to certain people and not to others. But in the new novel “In One Person” by John Irving, everything falls into place when he discovers truths about his family. It was almost fitting, really, that Billy’s stepfather, Richard, introduced Billy to Miss Frost, the librarian. Richard thought he was ushering Billy into the riches of the library in First Sister, Vermont. Richard thought he was doing something positive for the 13-year-old but the well-meaning introduction was inadvertently apt: Billy had had a mad crush on Richard and upon meeting Miss Frost, he crushed on her, too. They were his first two “crushes on the wrong people.” Billy wasn’t sure why, but his aunt and grandmother sneered when they spoke of Miss Frost. Grandpa Harry seemed to like her; maybe it was because he had an eye for the feminine. He was, after all, First Sister’s bestknown actor, beloved for playing female parts in the community theatre. Aside from Miss Frost, Billy was oddly crazy about Kittredge, his school’s best wrestler. Kittredge could be cruel, but Billy wondered what it

might be like to receive one of Kittredge’s wrestling holds. He also thought often about Mrs. Hadley, his best friend’s mother, imagining her in a training bra. As the years passed and Billy fell in and out of love with both men and women, he was careful in bed but not in his heart. He lost so many of his friends and former lovers to AIDS; so many that he nearly lost track. But one person kept track of Billy throughout his entire life. It was the one person who held the key to a memory that, for Billy, made so much sense… Though it’s easy to slip into, and though the narrator of this story quickly becomes a friend, “In One Person” is a long book to read. Author John Irving’s Billy is a storyteller, moving throughout his almost-70 years of remembrances of loves and losses, repeating, revealing, and admitting that he’s getting ahead of himself. Despite that the dialogue is sometimes cumbersome, it’s also appealing because Irving writes the way people talk. And talk his characters do: Billy is observant and funny, sometimes disturbing, often achingly sweet, and possessing a wit you’ll start to crave and heartbreak he doesn’t hide. Yes, this book felt long at times, but Irving’s Billy makes you stick around for every single page. Much like other John Irving novels, “In One Person” is not a book you’ll want to race through. It demands your time and attention, but you won’t be sorry giving either. If you’re up for a book like that, reading it just makes sense.

I thought he always looked great on the old TV shows like Dinah Shore, and Mike Douglas. What was wrong with white shoes? While reading all these articles, I found a few good reasons for this rule of etiquette. The simplest one was about wearing white because it was cooler and lighter in weight. That would make the most sense. I sometimes wonder though if wearing or switching furniture fabrics to white was an advertising ploy invented somewhere along the line. Buying an extra wardrobe of white would therefore be necessitated. Another reason given is that Navy dress changed from Dress Blues to Dress Whites for summer. Also a very understandable reason. I found a Naval Sea Cadet website which describes proper wearing of Summer White Shirts, and Summer White Pants versus Summer Dress Shirts. It sounds like a lot of work with all the ironing and crease and patch placement, but it probably makes life easier knowing you don’t have to choose something new to wear each day. I’ve thought about getting one style of shirt for work before. That would save a few minutes every day. The last reason given the most was that white was chosen by wealthier people and gave a look of leisure and ease. Working people wore dark suits – well except Ben

Memorial Day Thoughts

Matlock, TV lawyer, who loved his summer weight, light –colored suits year round. But the wearing of white question is really trivial compared to the real meaning of Memorial Day to those who have served or had loved ones who have served or are serving our country. What started out known as Decoration Day after The Civil War for the commemoration of the loss of Union soldier’s lives, gradually evolved into a day to memorialize not only those who died in war, but deceased relatives. Most Memorial Day celebrations have been held in May, but for at least a few years after The Civil War, separate remembrance days were held in the North, South, and by Freedmen, who are said to have held the first Memorial Day observance in Charleston, South Carolina on May 1st, 1865 (Wikipedia). I choose to light a candle to remember those in my family who have served in the military, and we, of course either have or attend the obligatory cookout. May your Memorial Day be filled with good memories from the past and new memories forged from the present. To each new day’s adventure, Shelby Please send your comments or ideas to: shelbys.wanderings@yahoo.com

Buy Your Favorite Graduate A Graduation Day Block! To be placed in the May 31st publication.

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The County Times

Thursday, May 24, 2012

36

Seeing the Glass Half-Full

SENIOR LIVING

St. Mary’s Department of Aging Programs and Activities

American Heart Association Walking Club Kick Off Event In celebration of National Senior Health and Fitness Day, the Garvey Senior Activity Center will hold an American Heart Association Walking Club organizational meeting on Wednesday, May 30 at 10:00 a.m. At this kick off event, the group will discuss motivations and set goals, name the club, hash out the logistical details, and of course, go for a walk! Every registered participant will receive a free pedometer for keeping track of steps taken throughout the day. Sign up in advance by calling 301.475.4200, ext. 1050. ‘Down Home & Denim’ line dance party On Wednesday, June 13, from 10:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m., a ‘Down Home & Denim’ line dance party will kick off at the Northern Senior Activity Center. Come comfortable in “no fuss’” all American attire with blue jeans, cowboy hats and bandannas. There will be a DJ with an instructor to break down a few dances for those who would like to learn. Bring a friend for a good ole time and meet other line dance enthusiasts. Suggested donation of $6 includes a cheeseburger lunch, event favors and other giveaways;

tickets on sale at the Northern Senior Activity Center while supplies last. For more information call 301-4754002 ext. 1002. Basket Class to Begin June 11 A class for making a hanging willow basket will be offered at Loffler Senior Activity Center beginning Monday, June 11 at 2 p.m. The class will continue for the following two Mondays (June 18 & 25) in order to give you a chance to finish your product. Cost for the class is $30 and includes instruction and all materials needed to finish your basket. Payment can be made directly to the instructor on the first day of the class. To sign up or for more information call 301.737.5670 ext. 1658 Mah Jong Starting at Loffler A group is forming at Loffler Senior Activity Center to play Mah Jong twice a month. Play will take place the first and third Thursday of each month at 1:30 p.m., beginning June 7. If you have some experience with this game and would like to play call 301.737.5670 ext. 1658. At this time, the group will not be able to instruct inexperienced players, but if enough interest is expressed in learning how to play a class can be arranged.

Loffler Senior Activity Center 301-737-5670, ext. 1652; Garvey Senior Activity Center, 301-475-4200, ext. 1050 Northern Senior Activity Center, 301-475-4002, ext. 1001; Ridge Nutrition Site, 301-475-4200, ext. 1050. Visit the Department of Aging’s website at www.stmarysmd.com/aging for the most up-to date information.

By Mark Underwood For most people, the carefree days of childhood were filled with good times with friends and family free from excess worry and stress. But as people grow up, most trade the innocence of childhood for worries about finances, their family’s health, job security, politics, the economy and environment, and their children’s future. Still, a pervasive sense of optimism guides, protects and inspires all of us. Some scientists would even go so far as to say that human beings are hardwired for hope. By definition we are planners. We have savings accounts, we service our cars before winter, we plan vacations, and we buy green bananas. Planning is a form of cognitive time travel. We forecast how we’re going to feel about something by planning ahead. How can we live a healthier lifestyle? What do we need to do to save for retirement? How can we free up more time to do more of the things we want to do? All of these things require the ability to imagine the future by painting a rosy picture in our minds. A positive attitude has long been linked to better mental health, but in the last few years, a person’s optimistic nature has also shown to be beneficial for a person’s physical health. Did you know heart disease patients are more apt to survive a heart attack or heart surgery if they have a positive outlook on life? Researchers at Duke University Medical Center surveyed over 2,800 heart disease patients regarding how optimistic they felt about their illness. They were asked if they thought they would successfully recover and then be able to return to their regular daily life. The researchers followed the patients for 15 years after which 1,637 had died. The majority (885) of the patients had passed away from heart disease. But there was encouraging news, too. The patients who had an optimistic outlook were 30 percent less likely to die during the 15-year period. Duke University researchers also found that pessimism was linked to poorer health– which factored similar patients with severe heart disease, age, income, gender and support from family and friends. The study concluded that a patient’s optimistic outlook has a direct correlation not only on the outcome of their disease but also how successfully they will transition from being a heart disease patient to returning home and having a productive daily routine. But there’s a small wrinkle in the optimism studies and that is this: Tali Sharot, Ph.D., a neuropsychologist at University College London, has said that when the brain foresees the future as being better than the past, it’s called “The Optimism Bias.” That was the basis for a new study which found that the brain sometimes is overly optimistic. Like the song lyrics, “Don’t worry, be happy” the study suggests the brain often picks and chooses which optimistic message to listen to. For example, even though people know the divorce rate is 50 percent; they don’t feel they will be one of the unfortunate statistics. Or, they see an ad campaign that says smoking can cause severe health problems, but their brain ignores the message. Instead, the brain sends out a message that says that smoking can certainly cause health problems, but those problems are more apt to be linked to other smokers. What should we take away from this study in our everyday life? A combination of optimism and realism may be the smartest combination of all. Envisioning a better tomorrow relies partly on the hippocampus, the part of the brain that is crucial to memory. Science has confirmed that as human beings we are programmed to be hopeful, but it’s also important to be realistic. So plan ahead, work hard and enjoy the world around you. Live life to the fullest with a combination of optimism and realism, and chances are you’ll reap the rewards of better health. Buy green bananas to enjoy in the future, but keep an umbrella in your car, just in case the weather unpredictably changes.

Mark Underwood is a neuroscience researcher, president and co-founder of Quincy Bioscience (quincybioscience.com), a biotech company located in Madison, Wisconsin focused on the discovery and development of medicines to treat age related memory loss and the diseases of aging. Mark is also a contributor to the “Brain Health Guide” which highlights the research at Quincy Bioscience and offers practical tips to help keep health brain function in aging. More articles and tips for healthy aging can be found at www. TheGoodNewsAboutAging.com.

Assessing Your Abilities as an Aging Driver When a person first earns a driver's license, they've earned more than just the right to legally operate an automobile. To many drivers, a driver's license is symbolic of freedom and self-sufficiency. The significance of a driver's license never truly dissipates, which makes it difficult for aging men and women to address their abilities as a driver and whether or not they can still safely share the road with other motorists. Though many drivers can safely stay behind the wheel well into their golden years, others begin to recognize their skills are starting to diminish as they approach senior citizen status. For those who want help gauging their abilities as a driver, some self-examination can help. Assess your eyesight Healthy eyes are essential to being a safe driver, and drivers can assess their eyesight in a number of ways. In addition to visiting an eye doctor for an eye examination, drivers should look for signs that they're having difficulty with driving. If signs and street markings aren't so easy to read anymore, you might need a new prescription for eyeglasses. When the glare of headlights at night makes it difficult to see, your driver's seat might need to be adjusted or you might want to consider antiglare eyeglasses that make it easier to see at night.

Assess your comfort level Safe drivers are also comfortable drivers. To assess your comfort level as a driver, ask yourself the following questions before getting back behind the wheel. * Is it troublesome to look over your shoulder and change lanes? * Has steering become difficult? * Has your reaction time when switching from the gas pedal to the brake pedal decreased? If you can answer "yes" to any of the questions above, then it could be that you're beginning to lose strength, coordination and/or flexibility, which can make it more difficult to operate a motor vehicle. Answering "yes" doesn't mean you have to give up your driver's license. In fact, your doctor might be able to prescribe therapies or medicines or suggest a fitness regimen that can make it easier for you to comfortably drive a car. In addition, if you're having trouble steering or operating a motor vehicle in any way, you might just want to find a vehicle that's easier to drive, such as one with an automatic transmission that has power steering and brakes. When assessing your comfort level, also examine your mental state while driving. If other drivers make you uncom-

fortable or traffic signs are confusing, this can make it difficult to safely operate an automobile. Such feelings when driving could also be a side effect of a particular medication, so discuss the issue with your doctor to see if that's the case and if there are any alternatives. Honestly address loved ones' concerns Aging drivers are often the last to notice if their abilities behind the wheel are starting to diminish. Loved ones are often put in the position of talking to aging drivers about their abilities, and this can cause friction. If loved ones have expressed concern about your abilities as a driver, honestly address these concerns, even if it's initially hurtful or embarrassing to do so. Your loved ones are sharing their feelings out of genuine concern for your well-being, so don't look at it as an assault on your self-sufficiency. Some organizations, including the AARP and AAA, offer driving classes for mature drivers to help them more adequately handle the challenges aging drivers might face. Aging drivers face obstacles they may or may not be prepared for. When such challenges arise, that doesn't necessarily mean it's time to stop driving entirely. Instead, honestly weigh a host of factors before deciding if it's still safe for you to be behind the wheel.


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Thursday, May 24, 2012

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The County Times

Bowie Wins, Demolishes Car, In Wild Last Lap at Potomac By Doug Watson Contributing Writer “Did we win?” Were the words from Brandywine’s Ben Bowie as he walked to Potomac speedways victory lane. Bowie, the defending limited late model track champion and current points leader, at Potomac won for the second time this season, in last Friday nights 20-lap event for the division. However, it would come at a hefty price. Dave Adams and Daniel Snead paced the field to the initial green-flag to start the event. Scott Adams, who started third, was scored the leader as the pack completed the first circuit. Adams appeared as though he would score his first-ever Potomac feature win as he lead effortlessly for the first nineteen-laps of the caution-plagued contest. Bowie, meanwhile, had been in second since lap-two but could not find a way by Adams, until the checkered flag was displayed to finish the race. Adams bobbled slightly coming off turn-four allowing Bowie a run to the inside where he would make the pass to squeak-out the win. As the duo crossed the stripe, disaster struck. Adams and Bowie made hard contact and as Bowie’s mount slid sideways on the front stretch the car dug in and started to flip violently. Bowie’s car got as high as the top of the catch fence at one point before landing on all four wheels at the entrance to turnone. As the car landed in a cloud of smoke and debris, fire erupted under the hood of the machine and after a few tense moments, Bowie clambered from the battered machine, shaken but otherwise ok after the spectacular incident. “Wow, I’ve flipped a race car down here before, but nothing like that.” Bowie stated. “I don’t know what he (Scott Adams) was thinking.” Bowie emphasized. “I was all the way down on the bottom of the racetrack coming off four, and he turned right into my door under the flagstand. I raced him as clean as I could the whole race and this is what I get in return? I just want to thank all the fans who support me, and we will be back the next time the limited’s are here.” Adams would take second. Dave Adams was third, Matt Murphy fourth and Tyler Emory completed the top-

five. Adams scored the heat race win. In the 25-lap ARDC midget feature Birdsboro Pa.’s Trevor Kobylarz scored his first-career feature win with the traveling ARDC club. Kobylarz came all the way from the eleventh-starting spot, but would have to survive a late-race surge from Nick Wean, who came from the rear of the field after a mid-race tangle, to score the breakthrough win. “Man this is awesome.” The young pilot stated. “This place is a blast to race at and to get my first club win here is really special.” Bruce Buckwalter Jr. was third, Dusty Heistand took fourth and Brendan Bright rounded out the top five. Heats for the 22-cars on hand went to PJ Gargiulo, Kobylarz and Heistand. Darren Alvey drove the race of his life to score his first-career Potomac feature win in the 16-lap street stock feature. Alvey started fifth and would take the race lead from Kyle Nelson on the tenth-lap and then hold-off three-time winner Mike Latham to post the win. Stephen Quade took third, Mike Raleigh was fourth and Kurt Zimmerman filled the front-five. Alvey swept the night as he was the heat race winner as well. Matt Tarbox appeared as though he won his second in a row and third of the season in the 15-lap hobby stock feature, however, Tarbox refused a post-race inspection and the win was awarded to current class points leader Brian Adkins, which was his third of the season at Potomac. Jonathon Raley was second, Jimmy Randall placed third, Don Breach fourth and James Sutphin completed the top-five. Tarbox and Bobby Miexsall won heats. In the nightcap 50-lap strictly stock feature former Potomac street stock champion Ed Pope jumped in Ray Bucci’s machine and would score his career-first win in the division after overtaking John Hardesty on the 44th-lap. Dave Moseley was second, Buddy Dunagan was third, Jimmy Suite fourth and Greg Morgan rounded out the top-five.

Cody Lear 7. Daniel Snead 8. Ryan Hackett

ARDC Midgets (top-10)

1. Trevor Kobylarz 2. Nick Wean 3. Bruce Buckwalter Jr. 4. Dusty Heistand 5. Brendan Bright 6. Tim Buckwalter 7. Brett Arndt 8. Mark Gilmore 9. Ryan Watt 10. Steve Craig

Street Stock Feature Finish

1. Darren Alvey 2. Mike Latham 3. Stephen Quade 4. Mike Raleigh 5. Kurt Zimmerman 6. Scott Wilson 7. Dave McBrayer 8. Kyle Nelson 9. Dale Reamy (DNS)

Hobby Stock Feature Finish

1. Brian Adkins 2. Jonathon Raley 3. Jimmy Randall 4. Don Breach 5. James Sutphin 6. John Burch 7. Jerry Deason 8. Will Nelson 9. Bobby Miexsall 10. Robbie Gass 11. Travis Hopkins 12. Tommy Randall 13.

Matt Tarbox (DQ)

Strictly stock Feature Finish

1. Ed Pope 2. Dave Moseley 3. Buddy Dunagan 4. Jimmy Suite 5. Greg Morgan 6. Meghan Emory 7. John Hardesty 8. JJ Silvious 9. Gage Perkins 10. Ed Pope Sr. 11. Nabil Guffey

Limited late model feature finish

1. Ben Bowie 2. Scott Adams 3. Dave Adams 4. Matt Murphy 5. Tyler Emory 6.

ST. MARY’S COUNTY COORS LIGHT SOFTBALL TOURNAMENT USSSA QUALIFIER JUNE 2 & 3, 2012 Cutoff to register is May 30 $235.00 ENTRY FEE

$500.00 1ST PLACE BASED ON 12 TEAMS ENTERED IN CLASS

Contact Steve Ramey @ 301-769-2060 fhammett@yahoo.com, or enter online @ www.usssa.com/sports/ISTSMenu.asp


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The County Times

Thursday, May 24, 2012

38

Snakehead in St. Jerome’s Creek The Ordinary

Angler

By Keith McGuire Contributing Writer Christy Henderson at Buzz’s Marina (www.buzzsmarina.com) in Ridge has been doing spring reconnaissance on the snakehead population in St. Jerome’s Creek. She has seen at least 3 different fish, maybe more! On Monday morning her husband, Mike Henderson, decided to take a short kayak trip with a spinning rod rigged with a spinner bait to the head waters of the creek near their marina to make a few casts to see if he could roust out one of the beasts. In no time he had a snakehead on the hook and flipped out of the yak! Undaunted, he walked back to the dock with the fish, rod and kayak in tow and climbed up on the bank to pose for the picture taken by Christy. The fish stretched the tape at 30 ½” and weighed 8 lbs 7 oz on his scale. The girth was 13 ¾” – as big as a coffee can! Snakeheads have been chasing min-

nows around the Buzz’s Marina dock all spring. Mike said that they herd the minnows right up onto the beach and gobble several of them up before they have the chance to flip back into the water. Mike caught a smaller snakehead last year. The occurrence of snakeheads in St. Jerome’s Creek defies the behavioral characteristics described by Maryland DNR. They have reported that the most common places to find snakeheads are in brackish and fresh water areas. St. Jerome’s Creek is a saltwater creek, and has tiny freshwater streams feeding it. Apparently, these streams provide enough fresh water to sustain the adaptable snakeheads around Buzz’s Marina. The wind blew badly last weekend, keeping most of us ashore. Those who did venture out found fish or crabs willing to take their baits.

Mike Henderson - Snakehead Hunter

The meetings that I told you about last week were indeed worth the time. I can recall two meetings recently that were absolutely the most beneficial presentations that I have ever seen. One was last month’s meeting of the Patuxent River Chapter of the Coastal Conservation Association where Captain Dennis Fleming gave a presentation on the Potomac River. His presentation outlined many subjects of interest about the river including the history of the river, the role of the Potomac River Fisheries Com-

mission, and the best locations to catch stripers, flounder, hardhead, white perch, shad, and catfish. I have never witnessed a more comprehensive collection of valuable information on the Potomac River. Learn more about fishing with Captain Fleming at http:// www.fishamajigguideservice.com. The other meeting that was most beneficial was the Southern Maryland Chapter of the Maryland Saltwater Sportfishing Association held last Thursday evening. At this meeting, Captain “Walleye” Pete Dahlberg and Captain Brady Bounds teamed up to give a presentation on light tackle fishing tactics and techniques that would rival any video or book that you can buy. The information they provided was truly unmatched in terms of useable information for catching fish in our area. The only thing that might teach you more is to spend a day with either of these Captains. You can checkout Captain “Walleye” Pete at www.walleyepete. com. You can call Captain Brady Bounds at 301-904-0471 to talk about a trip. If you’re an experienced kayak angler, ask Captain Bounds about his new services for kayakers. Remember to take a picture of your catch and send it to me with your story at riverdancekeith@gmail.com. Keith has been a recreational angler on the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries for over 50 years; he fishes weekly from his small boat during the season, and spends his free time supporting local conservation organizations.

Outlaw Drag Radial, ET, and Grudge Racing at MIR This Friday night, May 25, MIR will host the Speed Unlimited Midnight Madness series featuring Outlaw Drag Radial. The Midnight Madness series is a great place to check out street legal drag racing, hang out with your friends, enjoy great food, meet new people, and cruise the pits. You can even enter your own streetcar or street bike into the event for time runs, grudge runs, or trophy racing. It’s safe, fun, affordable, and legal. Plus, this Friday night will feature the wild 3,000 horsepower Out-

law Drag Radial heads-up class. Gates will open at 6:30pm and first round eliminations will start at 10pm for all classes. General Admission for adults is $10, and kids 11 & under are free. Race Entry Fee is only $20. On Saturday, May 26, MIR will host the Speed Unlimited ET series. The event will feature Top ET, Mod ET, Motorcycle ET, Junior Dragster, and Test & Tune. Come and check out the action with your family this Saturday and see a competitive sport with the whole family involved. Gates will

open at 1pm, with Junior Dragsters starting at 2 p.m. Time runs for all other classes will begin at 4:30pm, and eliminations will start at 7 p.m. This will be an awesome day of racing with something for everyone and $15 gets you in for the whole day. On Sunday, May 27, MIR will host the 4th annual Custom T’s DC Doorslammer Nationals! The event will feature Outlaw Pro Mods, Pro Mod Bike, Top Sportsman, and a full day Test & Tune. Plus, a free

$1,000 to win gamblers race will also be run. In addition to the great racing there will also be a custom car show. Gates will open at 9am. Racer entry is $30 and spectators are $20 each. For more info on this event visit www.customtsracing.com For more detailed information on these events call the 24-Hour Dragline Hotline at 301-884-RACE or visit us at www.mirdrag. com


39

Thursday, May 24, 2012

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The County Times

FIRST ANNUAL CAR SHOW SATURDAY June 2nd, 2012 Rain Date: June 3rd SHOW HOURS 8 A.M. - 3 P.M. REGISTRATION UNTIL NOON REGISTRATION FEE IS $20.00 AT THE GATE AND PRE-REGISTRATION is $15.00. Pre-registration form must be received by May 26, 2012. VENDOR FEE: $25.00 SPECTATOR FEE: $2.00 All Proceeds Benefit Mother Catherine Spalding School. •DJ •Vendors •Food and Drinks •Kid’s Games •Door Prizes •50/50 Raffle TROPHIES FOR THE TOP 20 DASH PLAQUES TO FIRST 100 CARS

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Thursday, May 24, 2012 40 The County Times FAMILY OWNED • FAMILY OPERATED • FAMILY TRADITIONS

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2012-05-24 The County Times  

The County Times newspaper. Serving St. Mary's County, Maryland. The online presence for The County Times is provided by Southern Maryland...

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