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Thursday December 16, 2010

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A ir Show To Return

2011 Marks 100 Years of Naval Aviation

Story Page 16

Judge Raley Retiring After Three Decades St. Mary’s County Circuit Court Judge C. Clarke Raley confirmed this week that he will retire from the bench after a long career. Story Page 6

Photo By Frank Marquart


What’s Inside

The County Times

Thursday, December 16, 2010

On T he Covers ON THE FRONT

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ON THE BACK

As part of the 100 Years of Naval Aviation, an air expo will return to Pax River in 2011. Pictured are one of the Blue Angels and a jet -Powered School Bus from the 2009 Expo.

St. Mary’s Ryken’s Katie McCormick puts up a shot during Thursday’s season-opener in girls’ basketball.

“You don’t change ethical standards to fit your behavior … I’m surprised it’s taken this long to bring to a head. I think the only thing left is to write another law.” Angel Systems Inc.

www.ANGELSYSTEMS.com

- Attorney Joe Densford, talking about changes needed for METCOM

Weather

1.800.NO.BUGGS

P.O. Box 304 20775 Old Great Mills Rd. Great Mills, MD 20634

Watch

Lauri Bruce, the program director and director of therapeutic yoga, demonstrates an assisted headstand on the yoga wall at the Evolve Yoga and Welness Center. Evolve held its grand opening Dec. 8. SEE PAGE 9

community

Leonard Hall Junior Naval Academy and Leonardtown High School Army ROTC competed in the first ever Army-Navy Challenge last weekend. SEE PAGE 20

Don’t let unwanteD

Decorations swarm your tree this season!

newsmakers

Soldier, Sniper, Hunter, Writer - Roy F. “Rocky” Chandler reflects on a fulfilling life of military service and writing. SEE PAGE 18

Also Inside

Auto - Home - Business - Life Serving Southern MD Leonardtown (301) 475-3151 LaPlata (301) 934-8437 Bryans Road (301) 743-9000 www.danburris.com

4 County News 7 Editorial 8 State News 9 Money 10 Crime 11 Obituaries 14 Education 16 Cover Story 18 Newsmakers 20 Community 22 Community Calendar 23 Columns 24 Entertainment 25 Business Directory 26 Games 27 Bleachers 28 Basketball 29 Hunting 30 Girls’ Basketball 31 Hockey

events calendar For The Community Calendar See Page 22 For Events Happening This Week.


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The County Times


The County Times

ews Legislators May Act on MetCom Reforms By Guy Leonard Staff Writer

state legislation that would also separate the directorship from the general counsel position, which Meiser also holds along with her own private law practice. Members of the local delegation to Annapolis are Despite criticism that Meiser holds too many pogearing up to act on recommendations to change the sitions at MetCom, she has been credited with doing way the county’s water and sewer provider, the Met- an effective and efficient job as the agency’s director, ropolitan Commission (MetCom) does business, par- with a penchant for administrative skill, by several ticularly when it comes to ethics requirements and the lawmakers. duties of its director. At a recent public forum on the MetCom recomThe 2011 legislative session starts in January. mendations, attorney Joe Densford, who co-chaired For weeks, the board of directors at MetCom have the task force, said that the only recourse left to the resisted calls to place the agency, which state might be to change the agency by is mandated by state law but does its force of law. business in the county, under the rules “You don’t change ethical stanthat other county agencies and employdards to fit your behavior,” Densford ees are under. said. “I’m surprised it’s taken this long Officials there have said that doing to bring to a head. I think the only thing so would jeopardize the continued leadleft is to write another law.” ership of Jacquelyn Meiser, the agency Densford has been critical of director and attorney, because doing so Meiser’s holding dual positions at would not permit her to represent private MetCom; he has argued that MetCom citizens in front of a county agency. board members need legal advice indeHouse Minority Leader Anthony pendent of the directorship. O’Donnell (R-Dist.29C) said that the Del. John Wood (D-Dist. 29A) said recent task force of county citizens who Del. Anthony O’Donnell that delegation members have not discame up with recommendations to change MetCom cussed the issues of MetCom reform formally but that operations did so not expecting them to be ignored. with MetCom doing most, if not all, of its business in “To me it makes sense to clarify the law when it St. Mary’s, local oversight might be necessary. comes to the ethics provisions,” O’Donnell told The “If it is a county agency somewhat, it probably County Times. “I think we should take very seriously should be under the county ethics ordinance,” Wood those recommendations. told The County Times. “I suspect we’ll consider actions very seriously.” County leaders are considering whether to support guyleonard@countytimes.net

Thursday, December 16, 2010

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Town Commissioners Approve Zoning Change By Guy Leonard Staff Writer A local developer is one step closer to getting a residential project moving in Leonardtown after the town council voted Monday to approve a zoning change of commercial land near the historic Tudor Hall mansion to accommodate single family homes. Dean Beck, of Beck and Beck, LLC, wants to build the single-family home project on land that was originally approved for an office space project of 33,000 square feet with 97 parking spaces back in 2006. The new plan would put six single family lots on the 1.81 acre parcel, according to town documents, with all of the lots filling the requirement of being at or above 80 feet wide and 100 feet deep. Beck told town council members Monday that the request for rezoning came as a result of an apparent mistake zoning the land as commercial in conflict with the surrounding residential neighborhood. The council, as well as the town’s planning and zoning board, agreed with Beck’s assessment of what the property’s zoning should be. Town research showed that the land was likely zoned as commercial office approved since the 1980’s because of its proximity to the Circuit Court on Court House Drive. Mayor J. Harry Norris said that the town government expected that the homes proposed to be built on the site would be in keeping with the community. “The town doesn’t have an architectural review committee but we do expect the homes would complement Tudor Hall and the surrounding neighborhood,” Norris said. “This [actions taken by the council] is not a plan approval.” Ed Lawrence, who lives on Breton Bay Drive and sits on the board or directors for the St. Mary’s County Historical Society, testified that the presence of a neighborhood would be better for the town and nearby historical assets than commercial development. “I think it’ll improve the neighborhood,” Lawrence said. “It’s a win-win situation all around.” guyleonard@countytimes.net


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The County Times

Chancellors Run Road to Open Fully Next Week By Guy Leonard Staff Writer After about two years of work, Chancellors Run Road, one of the county’s main thoroughfares and a major connector between neighborhoods, will be virtually completed by next week, said state highway officials. “We’re looking at getting everything open, Traffic barrels that have lined Chancellors Run Road for months should be removed turn lanes and ev- by next week, state officials say. erything by next The current base of asphalt is fine for Wednesday,” said Charles Gischlar, spokesdriving, Gischlar said, but is only temporary man for the State Highway Administration. and will be covered by a more permanent Work crews will spend Monday and coating once the weather warms up. Tuesday tying in turning lanes, Gischlar “It got cold quick,” Gischlar said. “We said, and an electronic sign will make drivers were lucky to put down the [temporary] base, aware of the pending changes. which allowed motorists to get on the new The project’s total price tag for widenroad configuration.” ing the road to four lanes, two north bound Despite the project’s lengthy construcand two southbound, with new stop lights tion schedule delays have been few and far at major intersections, was about $57 milbetween and complaints have been light relion including construction, land acquisition, garding traffic flow. planning and design, Gischlar said. Past elected officials have praised the Cold weather last year and this year decontractor on the job, Lane Construction, layed the project slightly, he told The County with keeping the traffic flowing. Times, but crews were able to get the bulk “We just wanted to make sure that evof the work done before the season’s change. eryone driving could get to where they were All that is left is for crews to pick up going easier during the holiday season,” Gisabout three miles worth of road barrels that chlar said. have dotted the project for months, freeing up all the lanes, and a final paving to take place guyleonard@countytimes.net in the spring.

Planned Unit Developments May Be Facing Changes By Sarah Miller Staff Writer The status quo for Planned Unit Developments (PUDs) may be changing in the future. During the St. Mary’s Planning Commission meeting Tuesday night, the commission got a status update on existing Planned Unit Developments. Bob Bowles, the manager of development services, and Phil Shire, the deputy director of St. Mary’s County Land Use and Growth management, gave a presentation describing the locations and the statuses of the PUDs, which include the Wildewood development and some other areas in the Lexington Park development zone. “The development potential is greater than for what it is zoned,” said Merl Evans, a member of the Planning Commission. There are also PUDs which appear to have more development potential than they actually have. Bowles said the reason for updating the PUDs is because some of them have been in existence since the mid 1970s and either haven’t been developed as planned or haven’t been developed at all in 15 years or more. A PUD is a specially zoned area for developments that gives the developers more flexibility to design and build over time. One issue with the PUDs is they may not have had very detailed plans when they were given that title, and several of them are under

different ordinances. Wildewood was one of the few PUDs with a detailed plan for development. Two PUDs have been named as Maryland Trusts, which meant the person or people who own the PUD have been paid to give up the ability to develop the land. Bowles said there’s no real reason to have those parcels of land designates as PUDs In order to remove the title from a PUD, the owner of the land has to agree to remove the PUD title. Bowles said According to the St Mary’s County Comprehensive Zoning Ordinance “The Board of County The Board of County Commissioners may revoke approval of a development plan or, on its own initiative, propose major amendment to the plan, at the Board’s discretion, if construction falls more than one year behind the schedule filed with the development plan or construction exceeds 15 years. The applicant shall be notified at least 60 days prior to any revocation hearing.” Bowles and Shire were given questions by the Planning Commission, which they will be addressing in a future meeting. For more information on PUDs, or how to name a zone a PUD, the guidelines can be found starting on page 44-1 of the St. Mary’s Comprehensive Zoning Ordinance. sarahmiller@countytimes.net

ews Audit of County Finances Shows It’s Still Strong By Guy Leonard Staff Writer An audit of assets, liabilities and the overall fiscal picture shows that St. Mary’s County is doing better than most in tough economic times, but the audit also warns that the next fiscal year will be even tougher than the last. The audit performed by Murphy & Murphy LLC, based in La Plata, stated that the county’s assets outpace its liabilities by about $204 million, with $15 million of that coming from the county’s enterprise funds while another $54.6 million of those assets can be used to meet obligations to either citizens or creditors to the county. The county government was able to increase the amount of assets available to it by $3.9 million over last year’s audit findings, the latest report shows. Governmental funds have also increased over the past fiscal year, the audit shows, with balances of just over $70 million, which is an increase of about $21.9 million. The county’s operating budget is $189.7 million. County Administrator John Savich said that the auditor’s report given to the Board of County Commissioners was a piece of good news during difficult economic times, especially when county departments cannot expect any increases in their budgets and cuts in the

next budget appear imminent. “He said everything was in good shape and that we’re doing really well compared to our peers,” Savich told The County Times on Tuesday. “It’s good news in the sense that we’re managing well in tough times. “All in all it’s a good report.” Commissioner Daniel Morris (R-Mechanicsville) said that the auditor was quick to caution commissioners on spending during the next fiscal year, given that the state will almost certainly make more revenue cuts to balance a projected $1.6 billion deficit. “He warned us on restraining expenditures,” Morris said. “He told us flat out to use fiscal restraint because of the anticipated cuts from the state.” Commissioner Todd Morgan (R-Great Mills) feared that the state could pass other costs down to the county this year, like teacher pensions, making the county’s fiscal outlook more precarious despite the audit’s findings. The O’Malley administration has said it does not want to raise taxes, Morgan said, which means that mandates like teacher pensions would have to find their funding elsewhere. “If you’re not going to raise taxes how are you going to pay for these unfunded mandates?” Morgan asked. guyleonard@countytimes.net


The County Times

Thursday, December 16, 2010

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ews St. Mary’s City is Facing Fences By Sarah Miller Staff Writer Historic St. Mary’s City is gearing up to host an exhibit from the Smithsonian Museum – “Between Fences.” “Between Fences focuses on every region of the United States. Its subjects include the defining of home, farm, and factory; the settling of the United States; and the making of fences,” according to the Smithsonian’s “Museum on Main Street” Web site. “It examines human relationships on an expanding scale: neighbor versus neighbor; gated communities; and the Mexican and Canadian borders of the U.S. The exhibition tells American stories through diverse fence types,” Along with hosting the traveling exhibit, there will be an exhibit set up in the Boyden Gallery at St. Mary’s College and other places in the county called “Facing Fences,” which is created

to be a complement to the exhibit from the Smithsonian, according to Regina Faden, the executive director of the Historic. St. Mary’s County Museum. “Between Fences” is a product of the Smithsonian Museum’s traveling exhibits, the Museum on Main Street. The exhibit at St. Mary’s City is only one of six locations “Between Fences” will be in Maryland. There is a soft opening for the “Facing Fences” exhibit scheduled for Jan. 17, with a grand opening slated for Jan. 22. One facet of the “Facing Fences” exhibit is painted fence posts, which will be displayed in St. Mary’s County. Students from the college’s Museum Studies class, taught by Faden, were in charge of the fence posts project. The posts were painted by students from St. Michael’s School in Ridge, Chesapeake Charter School in Great Mills, the Cub Scout Pack 787 from Town Creek Ele-

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mentary School, and the Boys and Girls Club at Spring Ridge Middle School. “They worked as if it were a stand alone project,” Faden said. In addition to the work the students did, and the exhibit form the Smithsonian, there also will be items on display from people in the community. These items, like the fence posts, will be on display both in the gallery and at other locations in the community. Mary Braun, the director of the Boyden Gallery and Fine Art Collection, said that people from Calvert County have gotten involved in the exhibit. “The thing blossomed and grew like crazy,” Braun said. The Calvert Library changed its lecture series to “Facing our Fences: Naming Barriers to Community,” and the Calvert Marines Museum is also doing things, Braun Said. “It’s turned into a wonderful community dialogue,” Braun said. sarahmiller@countytimes.net

Judge Raley to Retire After Nearly 30 Years By Guy Leonard Staff Writer Circuit Court Judge C. Clarke Raley confirmed this week that he will retire from the bench after a long career as one of the county’s most well-known jurists. Raley, 67, declined a lengthy interview with The County Times, but still shared some of the characteristic humor he has been noted for. “I’ll be retiring April 30 and that’s the beginning and the end of the story,” Raley said. “I think that’s the longest interview I’ve given the newspaper.” Rumors about Raley’s retirement had been circulating for months among employees and lawyers at the Leonardtown courthouse and some wondered if Raley would wait until the mandatory age of 70 to leave the bench instead of choosing to step down. Raley’s retirement opens the opportunity for local lawyers to apply for his seat because he is leaving before the next election; Gov. Martin O’Malley’s office has said that they have not started the application process for names to be appointed to Raley’s post. But lawyers in Leonardtown have already said privately that they may seek Raley’s position, and several other lawyers names have been whispered as potential candidates. Raley is known for being a tough jurist who jealously guards his prerogative for sentencing of defendants, sometimes chiding their attorneys for their suggestions of what sentence their client should receive. Raley often eschewed plea deals, preferring instead to try cases in front of a jury; he also had little to no patience for antics or outbursts from defendants.

Perhaps the most recent and famous case is that of accused bank robber Antonio Gantt, who Raley had literally gagged with duct tape for outbursts last year during his trial. Gantt will receive a new trial because the higher court ruled that he was not informed he would receive life without parole for robbing the same bank twice in 2007. Raley recused himself from the new trial, saying that he actually hated Gantt and believed that the Court of Appeals made a mistake in giving him a new trial. Oliver “Skip” Stewart, a sheriff’s deputy working courthouse security, said that as both a county state’s attorney and as a judge, Raley was just as tough on law enforcement. “He always made us make sure we had our case together,” Steward said of his more than 30 years of working with Raley. “He’s been short, sweet, to the point and no nonsense. “He doesn’t take any foolishness off the criminals.” John Getz, senior public defender for the county, said that Raley’s replacement would have their work cut out for them. “The county will be losing its most experienced jurist,” Getz said. “He’s fair and impartial and he will be missed.” State’s Attorney Richard Fritz said that whoever takes over the position would have a heavy reputation to live up to. “He’s an excellent judge, he’s fair to the defense and he’s fair to the state and he runs his court in an efficient manner,” Fritz said. “He gives appropriate sentences to defendants in the most severe types of cases and he has a dry wit that I’m going to miss … He’s going to be hard to replace.” guyleonard@countytimes.net


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Guest Editorial Is a Civil War Brewing Within the Tea Party? By Thomas A. Firey “God forbid we should ever be 20 years without such a rebellion,” Thomas Jefferson wrote to William S. Smith in 1787 - the same letter that observed the natural manure of the tree of liberty is “the blood of patriots & tyrants.” Thirteen years later, the Virginian found that rebellion need not require blood. His defeat of John Adams in the presidential election of 1800 - the “Revolution of 1800,” Jefferson called it - peacefully removed a sitting government from power. The election showed that in liberal democracies, dramatic change in governance can come from ballots, not bloodshed. This republic has experienced revolution not once, but three times in the past 20 years. In 1994, voters decided they had enough of Democratic business as usual on Capitol Hill and handed Congress to Republicans. Between 2006 and 2008, voters punished Republicans for their militaryadventurous and spendthrift neoconservatism by handing both the White House and Congress to Democrats. And just last month, voters decided that the change Democrats promised in 2008 was not the change the country needed. In each case, voters revolted with just cause. The next revolt - a civil war, actually - might not be for control of government, but for control of a political movement - the Tea Party. What happens inside the Tea Party over the next several months will shape the nation’s political course for the next 20 years. Let’s dispel a couple of myths about the Tea Party and the 2010 election. First, the movement did not inspire as many voters who oppose it as those who support it. Exit polls show that voters who claimed to support the Tea Party significantly outnumbered opponents last November. More importantly, 2010 independent voters had a more favorable view of the movement than either major political party. The polls dispel a second myth: The Tea Party is not an “Astroturf” operation ginned up by corporate interests. It is a legitimate, large grass-roots movement. And like other grass-roots movements, it is not a unified, homogeneous organization under a central leadership and with a single political philosophy. It is a loose affiliation of people with significantly different political philosophies. However, that heterogeneity could provide the battle lines for a Tea Party civil war. Polling data indicate that Tea Party members divide roughly equally into two distinct groups - libertarians and small-

government conservatives who worry about fiscal imbalances and government overreach at home and abroad, and neoconservatives and social conservatives who want government to actively pursue certain cultural and national goals. What allowed those two groups to unite and succeed in November is their shared opposition to President Obama and Capitol Hill Democrats’ “new progressive” agenda. The small-government crowd objected to new progressivism’s cost and government intervention into matters they consider private, while neoconservatives and social conservatives want government to undertake a very different set of interventions. What happens now, when the Tea Party can no longer simply oppose the country’s political leadership, but instead must provide some of that leadership? It will be difficult to maintain its internal alliance if neoconservatives and social conservatives start pushing their own activist agenda while small-government conservatives and libertarians demand less government. Civil War can be averted if the Tea Party’s two factions find common cause on a policy agenda. Returning the federal government to fiscal sustainability is a goal of both factions. A government focused on its core duties would please small-government conservatives while satisfying neoconservatives’ concern for national security. A renewed commitment to civil liberties would delight libertarians while protecting social conservatives’ freedom to (privately) follow their conscience. A policy agenda focused on those goals would maintain the Tea Party alliance and be highly attractive in an increasingly diverse nation. There is also opportunity for alliances between the left and some Tea Partiers. New progressives and neoconservatives could join together, resulting in a movement akin to original progressivism with its heavy-handed government interventionism both at home and abroad. Or the left could abandon progressivism and rediscover liberalism (that is, advocacy of civil liberties and concern over the concentration of power - foremost in government), finding common cause with libertarians and small-government conservatives. The Tea Party’s success means that it must now change - either through internal conflict and division or by uniting around a commonly embraced agenda. The course it chooses will determine the long-term viability of the movement and its effect on American politics. Thomas A. Firey is senior fellow for the Maryland Public Policy Institute and a Washington County native

To The Editor:

Hats Off to Carver Solar Project On Monday morning, Dec 13, many attended the introduction of the first major solar initiative in St. Mary’s County, at Carver Elementary School in Lexington Park. My hat is off to all those who had the vision and expertise to work through the many issues to make this happen. This solar project is attractive because it is a major investment to protect the environment and addresses, even if slightly, all those financial and political issues associated with domestic and foreign oil and coal production. The installer is a for-profit company and will likely do well with this financially, and all this is happening at no cost to the county. The power produced will cost the school system significantly less than the utility rate. I also like the goal of applying measured savings to additional projects. Innovative contracting to secure the financing obviously works, but greater financial rewards come with owning installations directly. Granted, this is attractive because electrical power in Maryland is comparatively expensive. It is also attractive because, while St. Mary’s is not the most ideal location for solar, it is not bad. In the Tri-county area currently there are approximately 80 residences using solar to provide 50% to 100% of electrical needs; ours is one. These are installed with a 6% to 15% return on investment, depending on your site conditions and tax bracket. They are on roofs or pole mounted; the two methods have comparable installation costs.

This particular project should do much to attract local commercial interests. It will demonstrate locally the industry’s established standard to install frame-mounted panels on flat roofs anchored with ballast and without the sometimes troublesome flat roof penetrations. It also demonstrates that field mounted panels have a natural spacing that meets the new state stormwater management standards, without additional measures or costs. If commercial owners take the time to explore the available savings, they will find their return is even better than the residential, primarily because of tax depreciation guidelines. As in many endeavors, owners need to take the time to explore the feasibility and effort vs the financial and environmental rewards. Even when convinced, owners still need the courage and financial ability to push the “go” button. Current solar panel technology is extremely reliable and progressing incrementally. Typically, ongoing system maintenance is absolutely minimal. Panel prices are now at a sweet point. If you are waiting for the next generation of clean power and a better opportunity, you may be watching others taking advantage of savings using solar for many years. Mike Thompson Hollywood, MD

Drive Raises Most Ever St. Mary’s Chapter 969 of the National Active & Retired Federal Employees Association (NARFE) would like to take this opportunity to say Thank You to all of the businesses in the area that so graciously participated in our recent Alzheimer’s & Hospice fundraiser (September 10, 11 & 12) by giving permission to our volunteers to collect donations – McKay’s, Wal-Mart, Giant, Food Lion, Raley’s Store in Ridge, and the Monterey Restaurant. Without their support and assistance, our fundraiser would not have been as successful. The kind and generous people of St. Mary’s

P.O. Box 250 • Hollywood, Maryland 20636 News, Advertising, Circulation, Classifieds: 301-373-4125

County outdid themselves this year in donating to our volunteers. Our drive raised $7,223.46 -- the most raised since St. Mary’s Chapter 969 began its weekend fundraising. Our thanks and appreciation go out to all of you that contributed to this fund drive. A big thanks as well to all the volunteers who gave of their time to assist in these very worthwhile causes. Patricia A. Myers, President St. Mary’s Chapter, NARFE

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James Manning McKay - Founder Eric McKay -Associate Publisher..................................ericmckay@countytimes.net Tobie Pulliam - Office Manager..............................tobiepulliam@countytimes.net Sean Rice - Editor......................................................................seanrice@countytimes.net Angie Stalcup - Graphic Artist.......................................angiestalcup@countytimes.net Sarah Miller - Reporter - Education, Entertainment......sarahmiller@countytimes.net Chris Stevens - Reporter - Sports......................................chrisstevens@countytimes.net Guy Leonard - Reporter - Government, Crime...............guyleonard@countytimes.net Sales Representatives......................................................................sales@countytimes.net


The County Times

Thursday, December 16, 2010

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STATE NEWS Eroding Cliffs Endanger Homes, Septic Systems By Laura L. Thornton Capital News Service When Phyllis Bonfield and Marcia Seifert bought their Calvert Cliffs home six years ago, they were looking forward to a peaceful retirement in a quiet Chesapeake Bay community. What they got instead was a succession of erosion-related dramas: the loss of more than 30 feet from their backyard at the edge of the cliff, a three-year battle with government agencies for permission to build a breakwater to control the erosion, and a major septic system failure that flooded the first floor of their 2,000-square-foot home with raw sewage. “We've both worked a lot of years to be able to have this little piece of heaven, and so it's been stressful,” Bonfield, 68, says. “It's not what we had hoped for.” Bonfield's and Seifert's home is one of 234 Calvert County houses standing within 100 feet of the county's cliffs, which are eroding at an average rate of up to two feet a year, according to state and county officials. Not one of those houses is connected to a public sewer line. And with many of them more than 20 years old, the potential exists for under-maintained backyard septic systems to erode into the Chesapeake Bay. An individual septic system consists of

an underground tank -- with a 1,500-gallon capacity for a three-bedroom house -- and retention chambers in which solid sewage settles. Liquids drain out of the tank into a septic drain field, an underground system of perforated pipes surrounded by gravel. Septic tanks should be cleaned out every two years and replaced every 20 years, says Paul McFaden, Maryland's director of environmental health. But Bonfield's and Seifert's original septic system didn't even last that long. Their “little piece of heaven” is a small, pie-shaped lot perched 70 feet above the Chesapeake near the southern-most tip of Calvert County. At the narrower end of the lot, near the road, is the house. It was built in 1986, Bonfield says, three years before the county enacted the Critical Area Program limiting development of land within 1,000 feet of the cliffs. At the wider end of the lot is the edge of an eroding cliff rising out of the bay. When Bonfield and Seifert, 74, first purchased the house, 53 feet stood between it and the cliff edge. Now, that distance is only about 20 feet, Bonfield says. And with the original septic drain field for the house's septic system designed to run under the backyard, the loss of land due to erosion posed a lurking but silent problem -until July 2004, when a giant sinkhole, 20 feet

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wide and 30 feet deep, developed in the backyard where the drain field was. At first, it was something of a mystery. A coastal engineer from Florida prescribed filling in the sinkhole with layers of straw, sand and dirt. He didn't pin the problem to a failing septic system, and in any case, the bad smell usually associated with septic system problems wasn't there, Bonfield says. But the backyard kept sinking. When Bonfield and Seifert contacted the state's environmental health department, McFaden gave the property a correct diagnosis - a failed septic system with an overworked drain field. With the loss of so much backyard land to erosion, what was left couldn't absorb what was filtering out of the septic tank - “it was too heavy for the land,” Bonfield says. With not enough backyard left for a proper drain field, they built a deep sewer pit in the front yard. The pit failed after a few years, flooding the first floor of the home with sewage. A second sewer pit was dug -- this time below the driveway. The pits retain solid sewage, while liquids flow into a ravine running alongside the property, and from there, into the Chesapeake Bay. The two-pit system seems to be working, Bonfield says. Altogether, Bonfield and Seifert sunk about $27,000 into the sinkhole -- $10,000 for each sewer pit in the front yard, and $6,000 -- $8,000 for the coastal engineer from Florida. For a septic system to make it over 20 years “would be rare,” McFaden says, “and if it's lasted that long, we'd be looking.” “That would throw up a red flag,” he says. “We're not going to play games with it.” Still, septic systems aren't inspected on a regular basis -- only when a homeowner calls in to the Department of Environmental Health to report a septic system problem, or when a property changes hands. Yearly inspections would be “impossible -- you couldn't have the money in the budget if you tried,” McFaden says. Calvert County's commissioners declined to comment on the issue. But “the reality is, in some cases, the septic systems were allowed (years ago) to be installed (between) the house -- and the

cliff,” says real estate broker Chris McNelis of The McNelis Group, which handles real estate listings and sales in Calvert, Charles and St. Mary's counties. Many of the lots along Calvert County's cliffs were surveyed in the 1930s, '40s, and '50s, “before any zoning restrictions were set in place,” says Gregory Bowen, director of the county's planning and zoning department. The lots are very small -- one-fourth or one-third of an acre, McNelis says -- so that when a house, driveway and septic system are “squeezed to fit ... on the lot, it (leaves room for) very few remedies.” “It's the planning of it years ago that certainly ... led to the demise of (some) of these properties on the cliffs,” she says. “If you disturb that soil, within 100 feet of a cliff, over time ... it could create a lasting impact.” When Bonfield, a retired public relations officer for a nonprofit organization, and Seifert, a retired history teacher, moved to Calvert County from Pennsylvania, they consulted with a county geologist about erosion on their property. They were told the cliffs were eroding at a rate of 12 to 18 inches a year, without stabilization. The rate has turned out to be more like 5 feet a year. “A tree goes down and you lose 10 feet,” Bonfield says. “You don't lose 12 inches.” After nearly three years of wrangling with government agencies, Bonfield and Seifert were able to secure a permit to build a breakwater - a five-foot-tall, 26-foot-wide, 165-foot-long engineer-designed, $75,000 pile of granite rocks near the shore of the narrow strip of beach at the foot of their cliff. Bonfield and Seifert financed it all themselves. Completed three and a half years ago, the breakwater has helped slow the erosion, but has not stopped it. Fortunately, their septic system is now in the front yard. But some of the older houses' septic drain fields may be about to ooze out into the bay. In the meantime, to keep septic systems healthy, McFaden recommends pumping septic tanks out every two years, and not using the garbage disposal, which creates suspended solids that don't settle easily in a tank's retention chambers. And don't use too much water, McFaden adds. “Being conservative with water usage is a big thing.”

Maryland, DC Tops in Female Business Ownership Top Row: Carolyn Quade, Shirley Mattingly and Barbara Livingston. Bottom Row: Betty West, Steve Mattingly and Alice Kingsley

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Maryland enjoys the highest percentage of women-owned businesses of any state except the District of Columbia, recent census statistics show. “We used to be in the top 10, but we were never No. 2,” said Joanne Saltzberg, CEO of Women Entrepreneurs of Baltimore. “It's very good news for Maryland.” The 2007 census figures show that women in Maryland own 33 percent of businesses, up from 31 percent in 2002, the last time the survey was conducted. That rate outstrips the nationwide pace of increasing women's ownership. Nationally in 2007, 29 percent of businesses were women-owned, up from 28 percent in 2002. Saltzberg attributes Maryland's success to other factors. Entrepreneurship thrives here “because we have a highly educated workforce and we have the government, you certainly can't minimize that. “Then there's D.C., which has for a long time been the leader for women-owned businesses. Some of this is momentum.” The Economic Census Survey is conducted only every five years, so the new release of the 2007 numbers don't reflect the economic downturn. And it's somewhat unclear how women businesses may have fared during this time. (Capital News Service)


9

The County Times

Thursday, December 16, 2010

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St. Mary’s Gains Yoga and Wellness Center By Sarah Miller Staff Writer Fans of yoga and Pilates now have a new location to patronize – the Evolve Yoga and Wellness Center in the Wildewood Shopping Center. The owner of the wellness center, Ann Hunt, said Evolve is the realization of her dream to have a wellness center relatively close to Leonardtown, Lexington Park and Lusby. “This is a vision that’s finally come to reality,” Hunt said. The center had its grand opening Dec. 8, and has been open since Nov. 29. The center includes two massage therapy rooms, a large studio with a bamboo floor that can fit about 45 people for a yoga class or up to 80 people for a meditation session and a smaller studio with a recycled rubber floor. “The response has been incredible,” Hunt said. “It’s been beyond what I imagined.” She said the response is telling her that this is the right time to introduce something like Evolve to the area. “I really felt it would be an important asset to the community,” Hunt said. There are classes for all age groups and ability levels offered at Evolve Yoga and Fitness. Classes for parents and their children are offered Monday mornings. Classes for older children, who can be in the class without parental supervision, are offered on Saturday mornings. Hunt said they purposely scheduled classes so the parents and their children can take classes at the same time in separate studios. There are also classes in Pilates and yoga offered for people with all ranges of experience and ability level. She said there are also private and semi-private classes available for people who are new to yoga or have physical concerns. In addition to Pilates and yoga, Hunt said there are Zumba and Tai Chi classes being offered, and belly dancing classes will be offered starting in January. The time blocks for the

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classes range from 60 to 120 minutes. Prices at the wellness center range from $12 through $18 for drop-in classes, $45 through $120 for class passes, which are good for between 5 and 10 classes and valid for three months, and $120-$900 for memberships, which include unlimited access to the classes. There are also gift cards which can be purchased on-line or at the center, which Hunt said make great Christmas gifts. For people who are just looking for a place to relax, there are meditation sessions one Friday a month. There are also massage therapists and energy practitioners with the wellness center. Hunt said people can contact the masseuses and energy practitioners directly because they schedule their own appointments. Their contact information is on the Web site for the center. Hunt said all the materials and paint used in the construction and renovation of the space are eco-friendly and sustainable. She said she it took about three months form the time she signed the least to get everything up and running. “It’s a center to bring people together to explore and learn,” Hunt said. For more information, or to sign up for classes, visit www.evolveyogawellness.com. sarahmiller@countytimes.net

Turkeys Free to a Good Home By Sarah Miller Staff Writer More than 1,500 turkeys are finding their way into the homes and kitchens of families in need in St. Mary’s County. The frozen, 10 to 12 pound turkeys with a compliment of a large bag of potatoes and canned goods, are being donated by Mike Schwartz, the owner of Mike’s Bikes in Lexington Park. He buys them with money he collets after Thanksgiving to avoid any holiday confusion. He said they have to order the birds specially, because a person cannot just go into a grocery store and buy 1,500 turkeys. “It’s a big program,” Schwartz said. “We try to help every needy family in the county.” He said he and the volunteers get a list of families who were not adopted during the Christmas season from the county’s family services department. They also give out toys and children’s books, which are collected by Esperanza Middle School. The turkey’s will be given out at Zion Methodist Church, located at 21291 Three Notch Road in Lexington Park every evening until Dec. 17, then the delivery point will move to

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Briefs Police arrest man on charges of brandishing knife, drug possession On December 10, 2010 deputies responded to a residence on Connelly Street in Leonardtown for a report of an assault. Investigation revealed Jamel Tiant Mitchell, 26, of Leonardtown was engaged in verbal dispute with the victim which escalated into a physical assault when Mitchell allegedly pointed a knife at the victim and spit in her face. Mitchell was arrested. A search conducted after the arrest revealed Mitchell was in possession of an alleged controlled dangerous substance, suspected marijuana. Mitchell was charged with first-degree assault, second-degree assault and possession of marijuana.

Pollce: Man pushes victim down stairs, threatens with gun On December 12, 2010 deputies responded to a residence on Carmen Woods Drive in Lexington Park for a report of an assault. Investigation revealed James Andrew Zalovick, 24, of Lexington Park was engaged in verbal dispute with the victim which escalated into a physical assault when Zalovick allegedly pushed the victim down a set of stairs and then choked and pointed a long gun at the victim. Zalovick was arrested and charged with both first-and-second-degree assault.

Police: Man arrested after disturbing the peace, resisting arrest On December 12, 2010 deputies responded to Friendly’s Sports Bar in Clements, Maryland to assist with a large crowd. While on the scene deputies observed Eric Lamar Carter Pence, 23, of Hollywood, who was reportedly intoxicated, yelling, cursing and drawing the attention of others at the business. Deputies told Pence several times to calm down and stop cursing. Pence refused, police state. Deputies told Pence he was under arrest for disorderly conduct. Pence attempted to resist arrest, police alleged, and after a brief struggle Pence was handcuffed. Pence was charged with disorderly conduct and resisting arrest.

By Guy Leonard Staff Writer A new system of radar and cameras will keep watch over the waters of the Chesapeake Bay, state officials announced this week, to bolster both search and rescue efforts by first responders as well as to keep tabs on criminal activity. The state could also use the system to help monitor its new oyster sanctuary program to deter poaching, state sources stated. “We can now better protect Marylanders’ lives, property and natural resources using this technology, which provides real time information to NRP (Natural Resources Police) and its allied agencies as situations unfold,” said NRP Superintendent Colonel George F. Johnson IV in a prepared statement. “MLEIN (Maritime Law Enforcement Information Network) will also assist first responders in finding stranded vessels or other emergencies, in cases where mariners lack the local familiarity or equipment to provide their exact location.” The new system received its funding of approximately $2.4 million through the Department of Homeland Security and other grant sources, a

Department of Natural Resources press release stated. The system will be phased throughout Maryland’s portion of the Chesapeake Bay, and will be monitored on a continual basis from the NRP’s Sandy Point Communication Center. NRP responds to more than 3,000 calls on the state’s waterways each year, the release stated, ranging from vessels in distress, search and rescue missions and boating violations. The system operates by using a series of sensors in the bay and tributaries that tracks vessels coming into and leaving regional waters, the release stated. Aside from radar sensors, the cameras will be in use both during the day and at night using infrared technology The state has already installed four radar sites and two camera sites along the Chesapeake Bay and the Potomac River, state information showed, but the exact locations of the monitoring sites will be kept secret for security reasons. guyleonard@countytimes.net

Clarke Sentencing Postponed By Guy Leonard Staff Writer A Circuit Court judge postponed the sentencing of Terry Clarke, who pleaded guilty to firing on young hunters near his property three years ago and became a grand jury witness in the criminal investigation of attorney John Mattingly and Daniel Brown’s alleged involvement in bribing the victims on his Terry Clarke behalf, but shot down the defense’s motion to have the state’s attorney’s office ejected from the case. Attorney Robert Bonsib argued that the prosecutor seeking the sentencing against Clarke, Daniel White, was too closely tied to the case and the ensuing political overtones that boiled over in the past election when Mattingly ran for state’s attorney while being indicted for numerous alleged crimes by that office. “Mr. Clarke has been the recipient of a lot of collateral damage,” Bonsib said of his client’s relationship to the Mattingly and Brown investigation. “Mr. Clarke has been an emotional wreck … he is desirous of having this resolved in the right time and the right way.” White refuted Bonsib’s arguments, which were laid out in a court filing Monday, by stating that Clarke’s sentencing was solely about the assault and gun charges he pleaded guilty to in January of 2009. “He took an AR-15 [assault rifle] and unloaded 30 rounds at these three young men who are here today,” White said. Clarke, co-owner of the Tiki Bar in Solomons Island and publisher of South-

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EMAIL: phild@dorseylaw.net

10

State Unveils New Search and Rescue System For Bay

Philip H. Dorsey III Attorney at Law

LEONARDTOWN: 301-475-5000 TOLL FREE: 1-800-660-3493

Thursday, December 16, 2010

ern Maryland Today newspaper, was arrested in December of 2007 for firing on three young men who were duck hunting near his property on St. Andrews Church Road. Clarke, who holds a felony drug conviction from 1986, was found to be in illegal possession of many firearms and ammunition when police searched his home, record show. In all, Clarke faces up to 75 years in prison for the 41 counts against him, which include assault, reckless endangerment and being a felon in possession of firearms. For the past several years Clarke had been cooperating with the state’s attorney’s office in the case against Mattingly, who was indicted and re-indicted in 2009 and 2010 along with Brown for allegedly taking $20,000 of Clarke’s money and using it to bribe the shooting victims to drop their case. Those charges against Mattingly were dropped by a special prosecutor later appointed in the case, Isabelle Cumming, and he was also found not guilty on all counts of a land fraud and theft case tried earlier this year. In all Mattingly successfully weathered over 100 indictments against him, though his real estate partner Brown was found guilty of several charges and is serving a two-year prison term. Judge William Missiouri, chief administrative judge for the 7th Judicial Circuit, said that while State’s Attorney Richard Fritz may have requested Cumming take over the case, that did not mean that he gave up his office’s right to prosecute Clarke in this separate matter. “The State’s Attorney has never abandoned jurisdiction in this case,” said Missouri, who was visiting from Prince George’s County. “There is no reason why the state’s attorney should be recused from this case.” guyleonard@countytimes.net

Detectives Awaiting Cause of Death www.dorseylaw.net

On Dec. 15, at 8:17 a.m. police units responded to a wooded area off of Great Mills Road in Lexington Park for a report of a person lying in the woods unresponsive. Upon arrival units discovered Gregory Glenn Gray, 50, of no fixed address deceased. Gray was transported to the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner in Baltimore where an autopsy will be performed to determine the cause and manner of death.


The County Times

Briefs Police arrest man on charges of brandishing knife, drug possession On December 10, 2010 deputies responded to a residence on Connelly Street in Leonardtown for a report of an assault. Investigation revealed Jamel Tiant Mitchell, 26, of Leonardtown was engaged in verbal dispute with the victim which escalated into a physical assault when Mitchell allegedly pointed a knife at the victim and spit in her face. Mitchell was arrested. A search conducted after the arrest revealed Mitchell was in possession of an alleged controlled dangerous substance, suspected marijuana. Mitchell was charged with first-degree assault, second-degree assault and possession of marijuana.

Pollce: Man pushes victim down stairs, threatens with gun On December 12, 2010 deputies responded to a residence on Carmen Woods Drive in Lexington Park for a report of an assault. Investigation revealed James Andrew Zalovick, 24, of Lexington Park was engaged in verbal dispute with the victim which escalated into a physical assault when Zalovick allegedly pushed the victim down a set of stairs and then choked and pointed a long gun at the victim. Zalovick was arrested and charged with both first-and-second-degree assault.

Police: Man arrested after disturbing the peace, resisting arrest On December 12, 2010 deputies responded to Friendly’s Sports Bar in Clements, Maryland to assist with a large crowd. While on the scene deputies observed Eric Lamar Carter Pence, 23, of Hollywood, who was reportedly intoxicated, yelling, cursing and drawing the attention of others at the business. Deputies told Pence several times to calm down and stop cursing. Pence refused, police state. Deputies told Pence he was under arrest for disorderly conduct. Pence attempted to resist arrest, police alleged, and after a brief struggle Pence was handcuffed. Pence was charged with disorderly conduct and resisting arrest.

By Guy Leonard Staff Writer A new system of radar and cameras will keep watch over the waters of the Chesapeake Bay, state officials announced this week, to bolster both search and rescue efforts by first responders as well as to keep tabs on criminal activity. The state could also use the system to help monitor its new oyster sanctuary program to deter poaching, state sources stated. “We can now better protect Marylanders’ lives, property and natural resources using this technology, which provides real time information to NRP (Natural Resources Police) and its allied agencies as situations unfold,” said NRP Superintendent Colonel George F. Johnson IV in a prepared statement. “MLEIN (Maritime Law Enforcement Information Network) will also assist first responders in finding stranded vessels or other emergencies, in cases where mariners lack the local familiarity or equipment to provide their exact location.” The new system received its funding of approximately $2.4 million through the Department of Homeland Security and other grant sources, a

Department of Natural Resources press release stated. The system will be phased throughout Maryland’s portion of the Chesapeake Bay, and will be monitored on a continual basis from the NRP’s Sandy Point Communication Center. NRP responds to more than 3,000 calls on the state’s waterways each year, the release stated, ranging from vessels in distress, search and rescue missions and boating violations. The system operates by using a series of sensors in the bay and tributaries that tracks vessels coming into and leaving regional waters, the release stated. Aside from radar sensors, the cameras will be in use both during the day and at night using infrared technology The state has already installed four radar sites and two camera sites along the Chesapeake Bay and the Potomac River, state information showed, but the exact locations of the monitoring sites will be kept secret for security reasons. guyleonard@countytimes.net

Clarke Sentencing Postponed By Guy Leonard Staff Writer A Circuit Court judge postponed the sentencing of Terry Clarke, who pleaded guilty to firing on young hunters near his property three years ago and became a grand jury witness in the criminal investigation of attorney John Mattingly and Daniel Brown’s alleged involvement in bribing the victims on his Terry Clarke behalf, but shot down the defense’s motion to have the state’s attorney’s office ejected from the case. Attorney Robert Bonsib argued that the prosecutor seeking the sentencing against Clarke, Daniel White, was too closely tied to the case and the ensuing political overtones that boiled over in the past election when Mattingly ran for state’s attorney while being indicted for numerous alleged crimes by that office. “Mr. Clarke has been the recipient of a lot of collateral damage,” Bonsib said of his client’s relationship to the Mattingly and Brown investigation. “Mr. Clarke has been an emotional wreck … he is desirous of having this resolved in the right time and the right way.” White refuted Bonsib’s arguments, which were laid out in a court filing Monday, by stating that Clarke’s sentencing was solely about the assault and gun charges he pleaded guilty to in January of 2009. “He took an AR-15 [assault rifle] and unloaded 30 rounds at these three young men who are here today,” White said. Clarke, co-owner of the Tiki Bar in Solomons Island and publisher of South-

-Serious Personal Injury Cases-

EMAIL: phild@dorseylaw.net

10

State Unveils New Search and Rescue System For Bay

Philip H. Dorsey III Attorney at Law

LEONARDTOWN: 301-475-5000 TOLL FREE: 1-800-660-3493

Thursday, December 16, 2010

ern Maryland Today newspaper, was arrested in December of 2007 for firing on three young men who were duck hunting near his property on St. Andrews Church Road. Clarke, who holds a felony drug conviction from 1986, was found to be in illegal possession of many firearms and ammunition when police searched his home, record show. In all, Clarke faces up to 75 years in prison for the 41 counts against him, which include assault, reckless endangerment and being a felon in possession of firearms. For the past several years Clarke had been cooperating with the state’s attorney’s office in the case against Mattingly, who was indicted and re-indicted in 2009 and 2010 along with Brown for allegedly taking $20,000 of Clarke’s money and using it to bribe the shooting victims to drop their case. Those charges against Mattingly were dropped by a special prosecutor later appointed in the case, Isabelle Cumming, and he was also found not guilty on all counts of a land fraud and theft case tried earlier this year. In all Mattingly successfully weathered over 100 indictments against him, though his real estate partner Brown was found guilty of several charges and is serving a two-year prison term. Judge William Missiouri, chief administrative judge for the 7th Judicial Circuit, said that while State’s Attorney Richard Fritz may have requested Cumming take over the case, that did not mean that he gave up his office’s right to prosecute Clarke in this separate matter. “The State’s Attorney has never abandoned jurisdiction in this case,” said Missouri, who was visiting from Prince George’s County. “There is no reason why the state’s attorney should be recused from this case.” guyleonard@countytimes.net

Detectives Awaiting Cause of Death www.dorseylaw.net

On Dec. 15, at 8:17 a.m. police units responded to a wooded area off of Great Mills Road in Lexington Park for a report of a person lying in the woods unresponsive. Upon arrival units discovered Gregory Glenn Gray, 50, of no fixed address deceased. Gray was transported to the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner in Baltimore where an autopsy will be performed to determine the cause and manner of death.

11

Thursday, December 16, 2010

Sonja Bailey, 73 S o nja Marie Bailey, 73, of Lexington Park, MD passed away at St. Mary’s Nursing Center on December 1, 2010. B o r n November 1, 1937 in Warren, PA, she was the daughter of the late Richard William Weller and Mildred Elizabeth (Magnusson) Weller. Sonja was a devoted wife and mother and grandmother. She enjoyed bowling, playing on several local bowling leagues, and working with arts and crafts. She is survived by her loving husband Herbert Earl Bailey of Lexington Park, MD; four children, Mark Bailey of Lexington Park, MD, David Bailey of Washington, DC, Jeffery Bailey of Hollywood, FL, and Debbie Bailey of Leonardtown, MD; five siblings, Emily Turay of Williamsville, NY, Richard Weller of Forked River, NJ, Sharon Meinecke of Lexington Park, MD, John Weller of Lincoln Park, NJ, and Douglas Weller of Chesapeake, VA. Also survived by three grandchildren. Private Services to be held at a later date. Contributions in memory of Sonja may be made to the Hospice of St. Mary’s, P.O. Box 625, Leonardtown, MD 20650 Condolences to the family may be made at www.brinsfieldfuneral.com. Arrangements by the Brinsfield Funeral Home, P.A, Leonardtown, MD.

James Farr, 86 James Samuel Farr, 86, of Leonardtown, p a s s e d away December 11, 2010 in St. Mary’s Hospital, Leonardtown, MD. Born May 12, 1924 at Indiantown Farm in Chaptico, MD. He was the son of the late Benjamin McKinley and Amy Gertrude Swann Farr. Mr. Farr was the loving husband of Ruth (Swann) Farr whom he married on May 3, 1947 in St. Joseph’s Catholic Church, Morganza, MD. Mr. Farr is survived by his wife Ruth (Swann) Farr of sixty three years and children; Margret Ann Farrell (James) of Chaptico, MD, James B. Farr (Christine) of White Plains, MD, George L. Farr (Carol Ann) of Avenue, MD, Thomas Farr (Malinda) and Richard A. Farr (Joan) both of Clements, MD. He is also survived by his sister Lillian Norris of Hollywood, MD and 10 grandchildren; Michelle Connolly, Jennifer Farr, Timothy Farrell, Cindy Reynolds, Matthew Farr, Todd Farr, Amy Farr, Brian

The County Times

Farr, Patrick Farr, and Emily Farr as well as two great grand children; Travis and Lindsey Farrell. Mr. Farr was preceded in death by his sister Mae Downs. His family moved to Montpelier Farm in Clements, MD in 1931. After his father’s death, he took over the farm as a teenager to support his mother and two sisters. James enjoyed visiting family and friends, playing cards and going to baseball and softball games. The family received friends on Wednesday, December 15, 2010 in the Mattingley-Gardiner Funeral Home, Leonardtown, MD where prayers were recited. A Mass Christian burial will be celebrated on Thursday, December 16, 2010 at 10:30 a.m. in St. Joseph’s Catholic Church, Morganza, MD with Fr. Brian Sanderfoot officiating. Interment will follow in the church cemetery. Pallbearers will be Matthew Farr, Todd Farr, Brian Farr, Patrick Farr, Sammy Swann, and Sam Nelson. Contributions may be made to Leonardtown Vol. Rescue Squad, P.O. Box 299, Leonardtown, MD 20650, Seventh District Vol. Rescue Squad, P.O. Box 206, Avenue, MD, and St. Francis Xavier Catholic Church Picture Fund, 21370 Newtowne Neck Road, Compton, MD 20627. To send a condolence to the family please visit our website at www.mgfh.com. Arrangements provided by the Mattingley-Gardiner Funeral Home, P.A.

Viola Gardner, 97 Viola Murphy Gardner, 97, of Maddox, MD died at St. Mary’s Hospital, Leonardtown, MD on Tuesday, December 7, 2010. Mrs. Gardner was born in Harrisburg, PA on November 4, 1913 the daughter of the late Edward Murphy and Viola Belle Harding Murphy. After graduating from the Berean School in Philadelphia, she attended Howard University and later received her B.A. and M.S. Degrees in Adult Education-Administration from Federal City College (now the University of the District of Columbia). She held positions with the State of Pennsylvania, the Federal Government, and Howard University. At the start of World War II, she left Howard and joined the staff of the National American Red Cross. She was assigned to duty in London as a staff assistant and later became the Assistant Club Director for a large club for service men. In 1945, while stationed in London, she met her future husband, George “Joe” Gardner, who served in the U.S. Navy. After the war, she returned to the U.S. and became a secretary to a judge in the D.C. Court of General Sessions. Later, she became an Administrative Assistant to a Federal Magistrate. She retired from Federal Service in 1971. She then served as the Assistant to the Board of Commissioners for St. Mary’s County and later as Administrative Assistant to the Director of the St. Mary’s City Commission. She retired a second time in 1975. Mr. and Mrs. Gardner were entrepreneurs and owners of one of St. Mary’s County’s premier inns, The Brambly Inn at Longview

Beach, until his passing. They were married for over fifty years. Throughout her life, Mrs. Gardner has dedicated herself to service in her community. Organizations in which Mrs. Gardner was associated include; The St. Clement’s Hundred, The Board for the St. Clements Island-Potomac River Museum, The Board for Christmas in April, The St. Mary’s Chapter of the Delicados, The St. Mary’s Chapter of the American Red Cross, The African American Coalition, The Democratic Club of St. Mary’s County, the NAACP, various groups associated with her church, (All Saints Episcopal Church and The Episcopal Diocese of Washington), and many other organizations. The recipient of numerous awards, Mrs. Gardner has been recognized by the St. Mary’s Chapter, of the American Red Cross with it’s Clara Barton Medal for Meritorious Service as a Volunteer; recognized by the Maryland Governor Glendening as a Maryland Woman of Achievement; Inductee in 1999 into the Seniors Hall of Fame for the State of Maryland; St. Mary’s Woman of the Year; Volunteer of the Year for St. Mary’s Hospital; Human relations Award from the St. Mary’s County Human Relations Commission; 2010 Lifetime Achievement Award from the St. Mary’s Commission for Women; and many other honors and recognitions that are too numerous to list. Ms. Gardner was recently quoted in the Southern Maryland News, “If she could turn back time, she would do it all over again, with one exception.. I would even try to do more than I did, she said. It’s fulfilling. You get

great satisfaction out of helping somebody else and you have that feeling that you have done something good for someone”. Mrs. Gardner devoted her free time to her community, running the Brambly Inn, and spending time with her friends and family. Mrs. Gardner was predeceased by her husband George W. Gardner, and her siblings, sisters Mary Jones, Eleanor Davis, Doris Murphy, and brother George Murphy. She is survived by Madeline Guinn, niece, Waymon Guinn, nephew, Jenifer Guinn, niece, Danielle Daniels, niece and many nieces, nephews and Grand nieces and nephews. Family and friends were invited to Mrs. Gardner’s Life Celebration at the Brinsfield Funeral Home, 22955 Hollywood Road, Leonardtown, MD on Tuesday, December 14, 2010 followed by funeral service with the Reverend Doctor Kathleen Vermillion Price officiating. Interment followed in All Saints Episcopal Church Cemetery, Oakley, MD. Serving as pallbearers were DeSales Tyer, Brian Trivers, Joseph Harris, Gerald Draper, Waymon Guinn, and Dennis Felton. Serving as honorary pallbearers was Bernard Lucas, Melvin Rogers, Richard Gass, Theodore Newkirk and James Voss. Memorial contributions may be made to the American Red Cross, Southern Maryland Chapter, 9255 W&W Industrial Drive, LaPlata, MD 20646. Condolences to the family may be made at www.brinsfieldfuneral.com. Arrangements made by the Brinsfield Funeral Home, P.A., Leonardtown, MD.

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The County Times

Thursday, December 16, 2010

12

Continued Charles Latham, Sr., 90 Charles Zachariah Latham, Sr., 90, of Leonardtown, MD died December 9, 2010 at the Hospice House in C a l l a w a y, MD. Born April 27, 1920 in Clements, MD, he was the son of the late Andrew Clarence and Jane Celeste Mattingly Latham, Sr. Mr. Latham was the loving husband of Emily Rebecca Farr Latham whom he married on October 1, 1950 in Sacred Heart Catholic Church, Bushwood, MD. He is also survived by his daughter Susan Emily Hill (Mike) of Hollywood, MD, his grandchildren; William Michael Hill, Jr. (Amanda), Mary Rebecca Bowser (Jim), Charles Z. Latham, III (Tracy) and Brent Lawrence Latham, 5 greatgrandchildren as well as his sister Helen Celeste Bowles and his late son Charles Z. Latham, Jr’s fiancée Sandy Lake of Mechanicsville, MD. In addition to his son Charles Z. Latham, Jr. Mr. Latham was preceded in death by his siblings; Clara May Wills, William Enders “Skinny” Latham, Harry Mattingly Latham, Andrew Clarence Latham, Jr., Leonard Johnson “Dick” Latham and Joseph Aloysius “Barts” Latham. Mr. Latham was a lifelong resident of St. Mary’s County and attended Margaret Brent High School before enlisting in the United States Army Air Corps in 1942. He served his country for three years stationed in North Africa and Italy; he was a part of the 99th Bombardment Group and the 347th Squadron. He was the Public Works Supervisor for Patuxent River Naval Air Station for 30 years and after his retirement in 1977 he became a Real Estate Agent for B & B Reality before becoming the President of the Board of Elections for St. Mary’s County. Mr. Latham was a member of the Leonardtown Lions Club. The family received friends on Tuesday, December 14, 2010 in the MattingleyGardiner Funeral Home, Leonardtown, MD, where prayers were said. A Mass of Christian burial was celebrated on Wednesday, December 15, 2010, in St. Aloysius Catholic Church, Leonardtown, MD at 10:00 AM with Fr. John Dakes officiating. Interment followed in St. Joseph’s Catholic Church Cemetery. Pallbearers were William Michael Hill Jr., Brent Lawrence Latham,

Charles Z. Latham, III, Vernon Dorsey, Donnie Poe and Charles “Teeny” Woodburn. Contributions in memory of Mr. Charles Zachariah Latham, Sr. can be made to the Leonardtown Vol. Rescue Squad, P.O. Box 299, Leonardtown, MD 20650. To send a condolence to the family please visit our website at www.mgfh.com. Arrangements provided by the MattingleyGardiner Funeral Home, P.A.

Margaret Parks, 95 Margaret “Elsie” Parks, 95 of St. Mary’s City died November 23, 2010 at St. Mary’s Hospital. Born July 31, 1915 in Manitoba, Canada, she was the daughter of the late Robert Bruce MacIntosh and Margaret (Durin) MacIntosh. Elsie is survived by her husband of 68 years, Edgar Parks of St. Mary’s City; her son, Greig Parks (Tricia) of Dameron, MD; her daughter, Shelly Boyleston of Hickory, NC; her grandchildren, Missy Brewer, Becky Von Osinski, Cory Lane Parks and Haylie Parks; and 3 great grandchildren. Services will be private. Memorial contributions may be made to the Ridge Volunteer Fire and Rescue Squad, P.O. Box 520, Ridge, MD 20680. Condolences to the family may be made at www.brinsfieldfuneral.com. Arrangements by the Brinsfield Funeral Home, P.A, Leonardtown, MD.

Price of Ft. Washington, MD and Florence Price of Columbia, MD, sisters; Mildred Ann Graham and Sarah Smith of Hollywood, MD. In addition to his parents and wife, he was preceded in death by his son, James Aloysius Price. Family received friends on Tuesday, December 14, 2010 in St. Aloysius Catholic Church, Leonardtown, MD. A Mass of

Christian Burial was celebrated. Interment followed in Queen of Peace Cemetery. Condolences to the family may be made at www.brinsfieldfuneral.com. Arrangements by the Brinsfield Funeral Home, P.A., Leonardtown, MD.

13

Thursday, December 16, 2010

The County Times

Everything Amish

Agnes Courtney May 1, 1950 – December 18, 2009

John Price, 79 John I. Price, 79 of Holly wood , MD better known as “Tim” died December 7, 2010 at Anne Ar undel Medical Center in Annapolis, MD. He was born December 20, 1930 at Cedar Point to the late Charles

E. and Bernice C. Price. John attended St. Mary’s County public schools. He worked for Roger H. Dean and Son before joining the State Highway Administration from which he retired after twenty-two years. He was married to the late Dorothy Lucille “Tilly” Ford of New Market, MD for fifty-two years. He is survived by seven children; David Price of Hollywood, MD, John “Iggie” (Doris) Price of North Carolina, Charles “Blue” Price (Carolyn) of La Plata, MD, William Price of Loveville, MD, Janet Price of White Plains, MD, Joyce

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Thursday, December 16, 2010

The County Times

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Know

In The

Education

The County Times

Thursday, December 16, 2010

14

Students of All Ages Get Involved in ‘Facing Fences’

By Sarah Miller Staff Writer In preparation for the Facing Fences community exhibit with Historic St. Mary’s City, students from all over the area have been painting fence posts to be displayed in St. Mary’s County. The fence post painting project was the product of a semester of work by the students in the Museum Studies class at St. Mary’s College of Maryland (SMCM). In addition to passing out

the fence posts, the students had to develop the timeline and the press releases for the project, coordinate the event at the gallery and other things to successfully put the exhibit together. “Students at St. Mary’s College of Maryland are very studious and capable of doing this sort of thing,” said Regina Faden, the executive director at the Historic St. Mary’s Museum.. She said the exact locations that the students’ posts will be found are not yet set. One school involved in painting the fence

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posts is St. Michael’s School Michael’s School. Her class’s in Ridge. Carol Morris, the theme was hermit crabs, and art teacher with St. Michael’s how their shells were like School, said the students have fences, keeping them safe and been working on their fence keeping predators away from posts since early October. Each them. student, from pre-kindergarten Some students saw the through eighth grade, received a fence posts project as a learnfence post to decorate. ing experience about what Morris said the younger fences mean, and the different students were given themes to ways they can be used. use when they were decorating “Fences sometimes their posts, but the older students make good things and somewere allowed to come up with times make bad things,” said their own ideas. Matthew Eagan, a fifth grader “The students are really at St. Michael’s School. “They excited over the project,” Morris Photos Courtesy of Carol Morris can keep people away form said. the things they want to see.” Rebekah Schmidt, a fifth grade stuShe said the themes were dent at St. Michael’s School, shows In addition to St. Midesigned to connect with the off her fence post. The fifth grader’s chaels School, the SMCM student’s curriculum and add fence posts visually describe Robert students have been working another dimension to the fenc- Frost’s poem “Mending Wall.” with Katherine Sullivan and es lesson. One example is the Chesapeake Charter School fourth grade students assigned theme being Na- in Great Mills, Lee Capristo and the Cub Scout tive Americans in Maryland, and their interac- Pack 787 from Town Creek Elementary School, tions with the colonists. The students had been and with Ai’sha Palston and the students at the learning about Native Americans and the fences Boys and Girls Club at Spring Ridge Middle project dovetailed with their scheduled lessons. School. “I tried to make it the best thing I could,” said Presley Pickeral, a first grade student at St. sarahmiller@countytimes.net

More Alumni Are Giving to St. Mary’s College By Sarah Miller Staff Writer The Alumni at St. Mary’s College of Maryland are supporting their Alma Mater. Since the last fiscal year, there has been an 18 percent increase in the number of alumni giving to St. Mary’s College, according to David Sushinsky, the director of alumni relations with the college. It is the role of the alumni relations office to make alumni feel like they’re still a part of the school, which will give them a reason to donate to the institution, he said. “You look for ways to keep alumni connected to St. Mary’s,” Sushinsky said. Sushinsky said it’s a common misconception among alumni that unless they can give large amounts of money, they shouldn’t bother giving at all. He said even $5 or $10 is useful, especially in combination with other small gifts. “I hope we see the numbers continue to climb,” Sushinsky said. Sushinsky said many alumni don’t want

to see their alma mater in trouble, and if financial problems are brought to their attention they will help. He said there have been several alumni-centered fundraising campaigns “Alumni want to see their school do well,” Sushinsky said. Joe Urgo, the president of St. Mary’s College, said he’s pleased to see the increase in the number of alumni giving to the school. “It’s not surprising, but at the same time it’s gratifying,” Urgo said. The increase in the number of alumni giving back to the school shows people want to help students in the same position they were in at one point, and a willingness to “give back to the school that gave to them,” Urgo said. He said in addition to appealing to the students who have already graduated from St. Mary’s College of Maryland, the school is trying to make sure current students understand why it’s important to give to the school. “One of the college’s most valuable assets is our alumni,” Urgo said. sarahmiller@countytimes.net

Scholarship Available for CSM Students and Alumni Students and recent alumni from the College of Southern Maryland are eligible to apply for the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation’s Undergraduate Transfer Scholarship Program. Through this initiative the private foundation will award up to $30,000 annually per recipient to help students and recent alumni from community colleges and two-year institutions pursue bachelor degrees at any accredited college or university in the United States and abroad. These scholarships can be used for tuition, fees, books, and room and board, for the length of the undergraduate degree, generally two years. Current CSM students with 30 or more credits by Dec. 31 or CSM alumni who have earned an associate’s degree since spring 2006 and have not since transferred to a fouryear college are eligible to apply. CSM may only nominate two individuals. Interested students and recent graduates must obtain application instructions and a list of minimum qualifications directly from the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation at www.jkcf.org and apply online by Jan. 19. For additional information, contact CSM Professor Mike Green, the college’s faculty representative for the Jack Kent Cooke Scholarship at 301-934-7598 or mikeg@csmd.edu.


15

The County Times

Thursday, December 16, 2010

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The County Times STORY By Sarah Miller Staff Writer From biplanes made of wood and canvas to unmanned planes made of cutting edge and experimental materials – aviation has certainly come a long way since 1911. In celebration of all that has been achieved in the past 100 years, the Naval Air

Thursday, December 16, 2010

16

17

Thursday, December 16, 2010

The County Times

2011 Marks 100 Years Of Naval Aviation

Forces will be hosting the Naval Aviation Centennial next year. There will be events all throughout 2011, beginning with the San Diego Centennial Kickoff Celebration and Aerial Review on Feb. 10 through 12. To bring things a little closer to home, the Naval Air Station Patuxent River is also getting ready for the Naval Aviation Centennial.

“To say I’m looking forward to this is an understatement,” said Capt. Stephen Schmeiser, commanding officer of Naval Air Station Patuxent River, who is the event’s point of contact for the Naval District Washington. Patuxent River will be hosting an Air Expo on Labor Day weekend, Sept. 3 through 4. The air expo is classified as a Tier One event, which Katie Coughlan, the events coordinator at Naval Air Station Patuxent River, said encompasses several larger air expos and gala events. “Everything will build up to the expo,” Coughlan told The County Times. Coughlan said some of the exhibitions at the Air Expo will include older planes, like war birds, and the headliners, the Blue Angels. They’re still in negotiations with people who fly in air shows and the owners of static displays, which are larger displays that are meant to stay in one location for a longer period of time and can contain a component for people to explore that they night not normally get to see, like the inside of a cockpit. Some of the pilots and static displays were brought to the attention of the people at the Naval Air Station Patuxent River during a seminar in Las Vegas, Nev. during the first week of December. Not all the pilots who perform in Air Expos are in the military. Many of them are private groups and individuals who restore the plains, or build working models of antiquated planes. They are also in the planning stages for other community events as part of the celebration, including a static display

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that can be moved from place to place around the community. “I feel we have good ideas,” Coughlan said. “We just have to develop them.” Coughlan said the celebration is for 100 years of Naval Aviation, but it includes people from all branches of the military. The Patuxent River Naval Air Museum is also getting in on the celebration with a special speaker series. Coughlan said the four speakers’ events will each cover a 25 year span of the 100 years of Naval aviation. The first of the lectures was “Life Before NAS Pax,” presented by members of the community who lived in St.

family,” she said. She said in addition to celebrating and recognizing the people in the military who make sacrifices for freedom, they will be recognizing non-military community members who also make life safe for people. “We want to hit home with the local community,” Coughlan said. Capt. Ted Mills, Executive Officer at Naval Air Station Patuxent River, said celebrations across the country will be going on all year. “I think the navy is working to make it a celebration due the honor of the occasion,” Mills said. Mary’s County before the base was installed. The moderator for the event was Julia King and the speakers included Agnes Dean, Jane Yowaiski, State Senator Roy Dyson, Nell Levay, Webster Dyson and Ann Lancaster. The speaker series is open to the public and not limited to people working on the base or members of the military. “The idea is to get Pax in the community,” Coughlan said. She said there is a lot of history between the base and the St. Mary’s community, and part of the celebrations for the 100 years of aviation will be to get the community involved in and informed about that history. Coughlan also said there are plans to get the students in the surrounding community involved in the Naval Aviation Centennial. “We’re looking for a way to involve the schools,” Coughlan said. To that end, she said they will be getting the school liaison officer, Dawn Simpson, involved in the planning. “I’m pretty excited about the whole year,” Schmeiser said. The Naval Aviation Centennial is meant to celebrate all the strides and accomplishments made in the past 100 years. Schmeiser said it is also a time to look to the future in hopes that there will be as much progress and advancements made in the next 100 years. Coughlan said the plan is to do enough things to get the community excited without making everybody tired of the event before the air expo. “As much as we’re celebrating 100 years of aviation, we’re celebrating freedom and

He said it didn’t come as a surprise that the Air Expo at NAS Patuxent River was a Tier One event. He said nobody was really worried about it not being a Tier one event because of the significance of the naval Air Station Patuxent River to the history and current development of naval aviation. According to a document supplied by Coughlan about the history of Naval Air Station Patuxent River, “Naval Air Station Patuxent River was commissioned at 11 a.m. April 1, 1943 – three days short of a year from breaking ground for construction. The station’s birth came about as an effort to centralize Navy testing facilities.

STORY Spurred by events of World War II, the consolidation efforts were swift and farming operations at Cedar Point, Md., were replaced by flight test operations within a year after groundbreaking.” Currently, “… more than 22,200 people work on station. Thus, the Navy is the largest employer in the community. Pax is also home to more than 140 aircraft of various types, models and series, which represent the past, present and future of Navy and Marine Corps Aviation… Pax River now hosts the full spectrum of acquisition management, research and development capabilities, air and ground test and evaluation, aircraft logistics and maintenance management. This distinctive synergy supports land-based and maritime aircraft and engineering, T&E, integration, and life cycle support for ship/ shore electronics. These combined capabilities are unique within the Department of Defense and ensure Patuxent River's status as an aviation leader working effectively to continue progress into the 21st century.” Other events for the Naval Aviation Centennial across the country include the NAS Corpus Christi Salute to 100 Years of Naval Aviation in April, the NAS Jax, Birthplace of the Blue Angels Air Show in November and the Washington, D.C. Centennial Closing Gala in December. For more information, visit www.navalaviationcentennial.org or www.public.navy. mil. sarahmiller@countytimes.net

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Newsmakers

The County Times

Thursday, December 16, 2010

18

Soldier, Sniper, Hunter, Writer

By Guy Leonard Staff Writer Roy F. “Rocky” Chandler looks like a grandfatherly figure at first glance. Eloquent and erudite, it’s not difficult to imagine that he is the author of nearly 70 books. But every good writer writes about the subjects with which they are familiar, and that’s where Chandler separates from most. As a U.S. Army veteran of both World War II and the Korean War, Chandler’s expertise is all about shooting, infantry combat, sniping and even big game hunting in the wilds of Alaska. Chandler has co-written seven non-fiction books about combat sniping as well as his own titles on big game hunting. He has also delved into fiction in his literary career dating back to the late 1960’s. His novels, with titles such as Hawk’s Revenge and Pardners, are tales for and about men, the brotherhood of arms and strong comradeship with a generous helping of action, adventure and ensuring the bad guys always get their comeuppance. “In my books the good guys always win and the bad guys always lose,” Chandler says unapologetically, stressing that his heroes always act out of a sense of personal honor and commitment to their friends. Chandler, 84, is unsure whether he will write another book, but he says he’s always careful not to reveal plot details.

It spoils the creative juices, he says. “You lose the richness and the flavor of the plot if you talk about it,” Chandler said. Chandler’s love of the written word and of story telling matches his love of military service, from which much of his life story and concurrent story telling repertoire comes. He said he never attained his desired officer’s rank in the U.S. Army, but that didn’t stop him from taking part in the close-knit relationships forged in combat and hard service. Chandler retired from the service in 1965 as a Master Sergeant. “All I ever wanted to be was a captain in the U.S. Army,” Chandler said from his residence just south of St. Mary’s City, “I wanted my 220 guys, but as a first sergeant I could have that.” At the age of 18 Chandler volunteered to fight and found himself in the Pacific taking part in the invasion of Guam in 1944. As a member of the 77th Infantry Division, Chandler took part in brutal and close quarter jungle fighting, facing the redoubtable Japanese foe. He and other young soldiers soon learned to respect the enemy’s tenacity and will to fight to the death, he said. “The Japanese fought so hard; they were expert fighters,” Chandler, who was shot in the leg during the island campaign, said. “We captured about a dozen but we killed thousands.”

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Thursday, December 16, 2010

The County Times

Low-Maintenance, Low-Stress, High-Quality Lifestyle LIVE THE

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Roy Chandler, local author and war veteran, keeps copies of the nearly 70 books he has written in his career.

During the Korean War, Chandler used the skills he learned since childhood about shooting and marksmanship to harass and demoralize North Korean and Chinese soldiers. He doesn’t talk much about the number of soldiers he killed as a sniper in that war, only saying that he was taking effective shots out to 800 yards or so. Chandler said that in the hill-to-hill style fighting common in that war, he would shoot up and down the enemy’s lines from the flank using a scoped, bolt action rifle. “That’s when I did a lot of sniping,” Chandler said of his Korean War service. “I’d be shooting going down the line and often they’re not protected from the side.” Chandler’s exploits have been documented in documentaries on venues such as the History Channel, and he is well known to local law enforcement for his expertise on tactics and marksmanship. Chandler is noted as an honorary sniping instructor for Iron Brigade Armory, an outfit that builds custom sniper rifles under the direction of retired Marine Lt. Colonel Norman Chandler II, Rocky’s brother, who is a weapon’s specialist. Among the group’s training cadre is Sheriff Timothy K. Cameron, who is part of what Chandler would call the “one-shot brotherhood.” During the war, Chandler also ran a sniper school for the U.S. Army teaching advanced marksmanship to soldiers headed for combat. Chandler’s tales of combat in Korea range from harrowing to weird. “It was pretty hard, dirty fighting,” Chandler said. “By the time I got there the Chinese had come down… their attacks were all frontal assault. “They blew the whistle and down they came.” He recounted one story when the enemy over ran a position where he was entrenched but they were moving so fast that they didn’t even engage soldiers who were dug in.

“They ran right over us and we fired at them as they passed,” Chandler said. Cameron, a close friend of Chandler, said that he had learned a lot from the stories of his experiences and counted him as his favorite author. “He is the real deal,” Cameron said. “He’s always been drawn to the shooters and the street cops more than the policy makers. “His books are my favorite books and his characters are the ones who don’t exist enough in real life.” After Korea, Chandler was eventually posted in Alaska where he performed weapons testing and found time to get in a great deal of big game hunting. “I like the hunt, the difficulty of the shot,” Chandler said, adding that it was always a bittersweet moment. “There was always a feeling of regret I had … when I killed it,” Chandler said of his prey. “I wished it could get up and run off again, it was such a beautiful animal.” “I killed everything in Alaska [the first year he was there] except polar bear and musk ox; we never hunted those.” Despite all of his past exploits, Chandler has given up shooting and hunting, mostly because of eye problems that could be exacerbated by recoil from guns, he said. “Now I have three ground hogs under my motorcycle shed and they’re as safe as could be,” Chandler said. Though he has felt twinges of regret from the hunting of animals, his time in combat on the battlefield have given him no such problems. Chandler doesn’t consider himself anyone special, he just counts himself as one who has been on the scene in tumultuous times. “I have never felt the least bit bad about that,” Chandler said of his military service. “I’m not a hero, I was just one of the guys who was there.” guyleonard@countytimes.net

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Newsmakers

The County Times

Thursday, December 16, 2010

18

Soldier, Sniper, Hunter, Writer

By Guy Leonard Staff Writer Roy F. “Rocky” Chandler looks like a grandfatherly figure at first glance. Eloquent and erudite, it’s not difficult to imagine that he is the author of nearly 70 books. But every good writer writes about the subjects with which they are familiar, and that’s where Chandler separates from most. As a U.S. Army veteran of both World War II and the Korean War, Chandler’s expertise is all about shooting, infantry combat, sniping and even big game hunting in the wilds of Alaska. Chandler has co-written seven non-fiction books about combat sniping as well as his own titles on big game hunting. He has also delved into fiction in his literary career dating back to the late 1960’s. His novels, with titles such as Hawk’s Revenge and Pardners, are tales for and about men, the brotherhood of arms and strong comradeship with a generous helping of action, adventure and ensuring the bad guys always get their comeuppance. “In my books the good guys always win and the bad guys always lose,” Chandler says unapologetically, stressing that his heroes always act out of a sense of personal honor and commitment to their friends. Chandler, 84, is unsure whether he will write another book, but he says he’s always careful not to reveal plot details.

It spoils the creative juices, he says. “You lose the richness and the flavor of the plot if you talk about it,” Chandler said. Chandler’s love of the written word and of story telling matches his love of military service, from which much of his life story and concurrent story telling repertoire comes. He said he never attained his desired officer’s rank in the U.S. Army, but that didn’t stop him from taking part in the close-knit relationships forged in combat and hard service. Chandler retired from the service in 1965 as a Master Sergeant. “All I ever wanted to be was a captain in the U.S. Army,” Chandler said from his residence just south of St. Mary’s City, “I wanted my 220 guys, but as a first sergeant I could have that.” At the age of 18 Chandler volunteered to fight and found himself in the Pacific taking part in the invasion of Guam in 1944. As a member of the 77th Infantry Division, Chandler took part in brutal and close quarter jungle fighting, facing the redoubtable Japanese foe. He and other young soldiers soon learned to respect the enemy’s tenacity and will to fight to the death, he said. “The Japanese fought so hard; they were expert fighters,” Chandler, who was shot in the leg during the island campaign, said. “We captured about a dozen but we killed thousands.”

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Thursday, December 16, 2010

The County Times

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Roy Chandler, local author and war veteran, keeps copies of the nearly 70 books he has written in his career.

During the Korean War, Chandler used the skills he learned since childhood about shooting and marksmanship to harass and demoralize North Korean and Chinese soldiers. He doesn’t talk much about the number of soldiers he killed as a sniper in that war, only saying that he was taking effective shots out to 800 yards or so. Chandler said that in the hill-to-hill style fighting common in that war, he would shoot up and down the enemy’s lines from the flank using a scoped, bolt action rifle. “That’s when I did a lot of sniping,” Chandler said of his Korean War service. “I’d be shooting going down the line and often they’re not protected from the side.” Chandler’s exploits have been documented in documentaries on venues such as the History Channel, and he is well known to local law enforcement for his expertise on tactics and marksmanship. Chandler is noted as an honorary sniping instructor for Iron Brigade Armory, an outfit that builds custom sniper rifles under the direction of retired Marine Lt. Colonel Norman Chandler II, Rocky’s brother, who is a weapon’s specialist. Among the group’s training cadre is Sheriff Timothy K. Cameron, who is part of what Chandler would call the “one-shot brotherhood.” During the war, Chandler also ran a sniper school for the U.S. Army teaching advanced marksmanship to soldiers headed for combat. Chandler’s tales of combat in Korea range from harrowing to weird. “It was pretty hard, dirty fighting,” Chandler said. “By the time I got there the Chinese had come down… their attacks were all frontal assault. “They blew the whistle and down they came.” He recounted one story when the enemy over ran a position where he was entrenched but they were moving so fast that they didn’t even engage soldiers who were dug in.

“They ran right over us and we fired at them as they passed,” Chandler said. Cameron, a close friend of Chandler, said that he had learned a lot from the stories of his experiences and counted him as his favorite author. “He is the real deal,” Cameron said. “He’s always been drawn to the shooters and the street cops more than the policy makers. “His books are my favorite books and his characters are the ones who don’t exist enough in real life.” After Korea, Chandler was eventually posted in Alaska where he performed weapons testing and found time to get in a great deal of big game hunting. “I like the hunt, the difficulty of the shot,” Chandler said, adding that it was always a bittersweet moment. “There was always a feeling of regret I had … when I killed it,” Chandler said of his prey. “I wished it could get up and run off again, it was such a beautiful animal.” “I killed everything in Alaska [the first year he was there] except polar bear and musk ox; we never hunted those.” Despite all of his past exploits, Chandler has given up shooting and hunting, mostly because of eye problems that could be exacerbated by recoil from guns, he said. “Now I have three ground hogs under my motorcycle shed and they’re as safe as could be,” Chandler said. Though he has felt twinges of regret from the hunting of animals, his time in combat on the battlefield have given him no such problems. Chandler doesn’t consider himself anyone special, he just counts himself as one who has been on the scene in tumultuous times. “I have never felt the least bit bad about that,” Chandler said of his military service. “I’m not a hero, I was just one of the guys who was there.” guyleonard@countytimes.net

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The County Times

Thursday, December 16, 2010

20

Community

Adopt A Pet! First Army-Navy Challenge

Held at Leonard Hall

By Sarah Miller Staff Writer

Chris Marchand 301-475-5665

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Hi my name is Jessie. I am a very sweet and loving four-year-old shepherd mix. I am a very happy go lucky girl that gets along great with dogs and doesn’t pay any attention to the cats. I don’t ask for much and would really love to have my own home for the holidays. I have been patiently waiting for someone to come along and think that I am that special someone. I am house trained, crate trained, spayed, current on vaccinations, heartworm negative and identification micro chipped. If you would like to have me as a part of your family please call 240-925-0628 or email lora@secondhope rescue.org. Please Adopt, Don’t Shop!!

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In anticipation of the Army-Navy football game last weekend, the Leonard Hall Junior Naval Academy and Leonardtown High School Army ROTC competed in the first ever ArmyNavy Challenge. “We wanted to do some sort of spirit week build up to the Army-Navy Game,” said Craig Guy, the Battalion Director at Leonard Hall Junior Navy Academy. Because Leonard Hall is such a small school, Guy said they don’t play in normal inter-school games. The Army-Navy Challenge was the first time he remembers Leonard Hall going up against another school in a physical challenge. “I thought it went really well,” Guy said. “I was impressed with the sportsmanship and the comradery.” The schools had five competitions they played – an obstacle course, a relay race, a plank run, a soccer shoot out, and a military-themed “Simon Says”. Leonard Hall won the first three challenges and Leonardtown High School won the other two. “The relationship and the rapport build that day was probably the most important thing,” Guy said. sarahmiller@countytimes.net

WWII Hero Gets Birthday Bash

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John Love celebrated his 88th birthday at Toot’s Bar yesterday. Love spent six years of his life in serving on submarines in World War II, serving on a total of five submarines, including the USS Cobia, Lapon and Balao. He moved to Southern Maryland in 2002 to live with his son in Lusby. The people at Toot’s Bar, including the owner, Ray Harding, decided to throw Love a celebration when he mentioned his birthday a couple weeks ago. “It’s such a surprise,” Love said. “I didn’t expect this.” AFCM (AW/SW)Vince DiAngelis from the Naval Air Station Patuxent River said he’s glad to see a birthday partly like the one at Toot’s. “These guys are valuable, there’s one fewer every day,” DiAngelis said.


The County Times

Thursday, December 16, 2010

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The County Times

Thursday, December 16, 2010

22

23

The County Times

Thursday, December 16, 2010

A Journey Through Time Thursday, Dec. 16

Saturday, Dec. 18

• Piney Point Lighthouse Holiday Exhibit Piney Point Lighthouse (44720 Lighthouse Road, Piney Point) – 12 p.m. The Piney Point Lighthouse, Museum and Historic Park will host a militarythemed holiday exhibit set up in the lighthouse keepers’ quarters. Visitors must check in at the museum to begin the tour which includes the holiday exhibit located on the south campus. Each room of the keeper’s quarters offers a display of military history from the Civil War to World War II. The tour also includes a visit to the lighthouse and the Potomac River Maritime Exhibit. The museum is open today from 12 to 4 pm. Admission is $3 for adults, $2 for senior citizens and members of the military, $1.50 for kids 6 to 18 and free for children under the age of 5. For more information, call 301-994-1471.

• Naval Orange and Pink Grapefruit Sale St. John’s School (43900 Saint Johns Road, Hollywood) – 8 a.m. St. John’s School will be having a citrus-themed fundraiser. For more information, visit www.sjshollywood.org/AboutSJS/ Fundraising.aspx.

• Volunteers Needed For Mike’s Food Fund Zion Methodist Church (21291 Three Notch Road, Lexington Park) – 5 p.m. Mike’s Food Fund is looking for volunteers to deliver Christmas Dinner to over 1,500 needy families in St. Mary’s County. Food will be passed out Dec. 13 through 17 at Zion Methodist Church and Dec. 18 until Christmas Eve at Mike’s Bikes on Great Mills Road in Lexington Park. Volunteers are needed to deliver any remaining dinners and walk-ins are accepted until all available dinners are gone. For more information, contact Brigid Kenney at 301-481-1233 or Mike’s Bikes at 301-863-7887.

Friday, Dec. 17 • The Southern Maryland Traditional Music and Dance Holiday Open Mic Christ Church Parish Hall (37497 Zach Fowler Road, Chaptico) – 7 p.m. The doors open at 7 p.m., and the music starts at 7:30 p.m. The price of admission is $5, and performers are admitted fors free. Refreshments will be provided. For more information, or to sign up to perform, contact John Garner at carthagena@wildblue.net. • American Legion Post 221 Steak and Shrimp Dinner American Legion Post 221 (21690 Colton Point Road, Avenue) – 5 p.m. The American Legion Post 221 has a Steak and Shrimp Night on the third Friday of every month. The menu will include New York Strip cooked to order, steamed shrimp and hamburgers. Platters and sandwiches are available for dine-in or carryout. For more information, call 301-769-2220 or 301-8844071 or visit www.alpost221.webs.com. • VFW 2632 Texas Hold ‘Em Tournament VFW 2632 (23282 Three Notch Road, California) – 7 p.m. Buy in will be $50. Of that money, $40 will go into the prize pool and $10 will go to charity. Pre-registration is recommended but not required. Late players will be accepted until the end of the first break. Payouts will be determined by the number of entries. 
The event is open to the public. People must be 18 or older to play. Food will be available for purchase and side games will be available. For more information, or to pre-register, contact Brian at poker@vfw2632.com
 or 240-925-4000

• Christmas Cookie Sale Hollywood United Methodist Church (24422 Mervell Dean Road, Hollywood) – 9 a.m. Assorted containers of homemade cookies can be purchased for $10. The sale will be open until the cookies are sold out. For more information, call 301-373-2500. • Santa Visits Hollywood Hollywood Volunteer Rescue Squad (43256 Rescue Lane, Hollywood) – 12 p.m.. Santa will be visiting the Hollywood Volunteer Rescue Squad. There will be refreshments and cookies. There will be a raffle for a sack of goodies for a boy and girl with the winners to be drawn on December 19th. Children can have their picture taken with Santa for a small fee. Hope to see you all there. For more information, call 301-373-3131 • Sanford Concert Series Annual Christmas Event St. Andrew’s Church (44078 St. Andrew’s Church Road, California) – 7:30 p.m. The Price for admission is $25 for adults and $10 for students. The concert will feature four members of the Washington National Opera - Patricia Hussey, mezzosoprano, Tim Augustin, tenor, Linda Kirk, soprano and Donald Schramm, baritone as well as the COSMIC Flute Choir and Two Rivers Harmony under the direction of Lyn Schramm. The concert, which features songs of Christmas and the winter season, will include traditional carols to which the audience is invited to sing along. Reservations are required. For more information, call Schramm at 301-862-9541.

Sunday, Dec. 19 • Hughesville Baptist Church presents “Glorious Impossible” Hughesville Baptist Church (8505 Old Leonardtown Road, Hughesville) – 10:30 a.m. The Hughesville Baptist Church’s Adult Choir will present the Christmas musical “Glorious Impossible.” For more information, call 301-884-8645 or 301-274-3672. • Solomons Ninth Annual TUBACHRISTMAS Hollywood United Methodist Church (24422 Mervell Dean Road, Hollywood) – 4 p.m. Our Lady Star of the Sea Catholic Church will be hosting the event. The TUBACHRISTMAS performance is free and open to the public. TUBACHRISTMAS features traditional Christmas carols arranged for tuba and baritone horn players. For more information, visit www.tubachristmas.com.

Monday, Dec. 20 • Family Yoga Class Evolve Yoga and Wellness Clinic (23415

Three Notch Road, California) – 10 a.m. A family yoga class for parents and children between the ages of 3 and 7. It’s an ongoing class, with drop-in or passes accepted. For more information, call 301-862-1236 or visit www.EvolveYogaWellness.com.

The

• St. Mary’s Democratic Club Pot Luck Dinner Democratic Headquarters (Breton Place, Leonardtown) – 7 p.m. The event is open to the public and everyone is encouraged to bring a dish to pass. For more information, contact Georgia Wheeler at 301-994-1960.

John Leigh, the immigrant ancestor, was in Maryland by 1701 and had, by that time married Dorothy Guyther (daughter of William Guyther and Barbara Christina D’Hinoyosea). According to family lore: “John Leigh, the founder of the family in St. Mary’s County, and who it is said belonged to the Leighs of Stoneleigh Abbey, Warwick-

Tuesday, Dec. 21 • Patuxent High School Band Fundraiser Roy Rogers Restaurant (14000 Solomons Island Road, Solomons) – 5 p.m. Santa arrives at 6:30 p.m. for the festivities. A “Rob Your Neighbor” gift exchange will also be going on. Bring a gift under $5 for the exchange. For more information, email Traci Lowery tracilowery@verizon.net. • Winter Solstice, Full Moon and Eclipse Celebration Joy Lane Healing Center (43288 Joy Lane, Hollywood) – 7 p.m. There will be a celebration of the first day of winter and the the full moon. This year there is not only a full moon on the 21st, but also an eclipse, around 3 a.m. They will be doing pipe ceremony inside if it is cold and then go outside to the Fire Circle for some drumming, singing and s’mores around a fire and best of all. Children are welcome. Dress for going outside. Bring a drum, or rattle, a story or song to share.

Wednesday, Dec. 22 • Christmas Doll and Train Exhibit St. Clements Island Museum (38370 Point Breeze Road, Colton’s Point) – 12 p.m. The St. Clement’s Island Museum presents the 25th Annual Christmas Doll and Train Exhibit. This holiday exhibit includes antique and collectible dolls, toys, and miniature trains. Admission is $3 per adult, $2 for senior citizens and members of the military, $1.50 for children between the ages of 6 and 18, and kids under the age of 5. For more information, call 301-769-2222. • Longaberger Basket Bingo Fundraiser Holy Angel’s Hall (21340 Colton Point Road, Avenue) – 2 p.m. All proceeds go to benefit the Chopticon High School Air Force JROTC. Admission is $20, which buys a book of 20 games. Extra books will be available for $5. There will be food, door prizes and 50-50 raffles. For more information, or to reserve a table, call 301-904-6607. • Fraternal Order of Police Poker Tournament Fraternal Order Of Police (21215 Chancellors Run Road, Lexington Park) – 7 p.m. Buy in will be $25 and there is going to be cash games. For more information, call 301-863-6007.

Chronicle

By Linda Reno Contributing Writer

L ibrary Items • Holiday closings announced The libraries will be closed on Thursday, Dec. 23 through Sunday, Dec. 26 and Friday, Dec. 31 through Sunday, Jan. 2. The Internet branch will be open for customers to manage their accounts, download both eBooks and audio books, and to do research. Each branch has a 24 hour book drop for returns. • Libraries have NOOKcolor eReaders A NOOKcolor eReader has been purchased for each library to allow staff to demonstrate how easy it is to download eBooks from the library’s collection. Customers can check the NOOK out to use within the library. This is a great way to try an eReader before purchasing one. Before buying, the library suggests customers check to see which devices are compatible with the library’s collection. A list of devices can be found on the library’s website. The library has a collection of both eBooks as well as audio books that can be downloaded at no cost. • Leonardtown’s TAG to celebrate holiday A holiday party with holiday treats and games is planned at the Leonardtown’s TAG (Teen Advisory Group) meeting to be held on Dec. 22 at 6 p.m. TAG members will receive certificates for community service hours. All teens are welcome. • Family movie to be shown at Leonardtown Families can attend a free PG rated movie about a criminal mastermind who uses a trio of orphan girls as pawns for a grand scheme finds himself profoundly changed by the growing love between them. The movie will be shown at Leonardtown on Dec. 30 at 2 p.m. Snacks will be provided. • Suggestions for entertaining holiday guests If this holiday season means out of town guests and the challenge of entertaining them, the libraries offer some solutions. The library is the perfect place for all ages to browse and read anything from picture books to magazines. The Active Learning Centers at Charlotte Hall and Lexington Park will provide fun entertainment and the opportunity for meaningful play for the grandchildren or those young, active guests while at the same time helping the children to develop early reading skills. Leonardtown only has a few activity centers due to space limitations. Children can use TumbleBooks, an online collection of animated, talking picture books, accessible from the library’s website either in the library or at home. The library’s DVDs and Blu-rays can be checked out and used for a fun afternoon or night of movie watching for any age.

shire, England, arrived in the Province. Being a younger son, John Leigh had been placed in the British Navy. His ship was ordered to America, and while here he met at a dance given to the officers, a Miss Guyther, with whom he fell in love and married in spite of the opposition of his parents, who, it is said, never forgave him. He resigned his commission in the navy and settled in America.” George Singleton Leigh, great-great grandson of John Leigh and Dorothy Guyther, was born in 1799. In 1823 he married Sophia Leeds Kerr of Talbot County. They both died in 1843 at “Woodbury”, near Leonardtown.

They had 9 children, only five of whom would outlive their parents. Their two surviving sons were George Howell Leigh and Arthur Kerr Leigh, who both moved to Texas. Not much has been found on the life of George Leigh. In 1850 he was living in New York City. By 1854 he had acquired 243 acres of land in Montgomery County, Texas so he must have been there by that time. He is said to have died in Galveston in 1866. On July 1, 1851 Arthur Leigh was admitted to West Point and graduated in 1855. One of his classmates was Major Marcus Alfred Reno (a distant cousin of my husband’s) who fought at the Battle of the Little Big Horn. On March 1, 1862 Arthur enlisted as a lieutenant in the 2nd Texas Infantry (CSA). He fought in the Battle of Corinth (Mississippi) where he was wounded on October 3, 1862 and lost one of his legs as a result. Afterwards he was promoted to the rank of Captain and assigned to the staff of Major General John B. Magruder (graduated from West Point in

Wanderings of an Aimless

By Shelby Oppermann Contributing Writer

No Sugar

When I hear “no sugar” playing over and over in my head, my sub-conscious tries to divert my attention away from food by playing “no sugar tonight in my coffee, no sugar tonight in my tea… “ . The old song by The Guess Who. The sub-conscious is devious. Do we unknowingly control that or is there more of a pre-programmed second soul within us at all times. The second soul must store everything bad or discouraging it hears. The subconscious means we deposit everything by ourselves. I’d like to think that we aren’t attempting to destroy ourselves. Oops, off the track like usual. I can divert myself away from the topic of sugar all be myself it seems. Why is it every time I think I’m eating really good, I find out I’m really eating bad. Usually for breakfast I eat cornflakes with no sugar, which would probably amaze my friends since they all are used to seeing me use a lot of sugar in my hot tea. That is the only thing I add sugar to knowingly. Everything else is hidden in lots of sneaky ways. Some foods are naturally low in sugar and fat, like Cream of Wheat: 0 sugar, 0 fat, 0 cholesterol, and relatively low in sodium - 85 grams per serving. Calories are 120 per serving. When you add fat free milk (which I might not ever scale down to), the calories jump up to 220. The 2% milk we use, I’m sure, jumps that up a few hundred points. Still not bad. So, I think I’m doing really good when I fix a 2/3 full cereal bowl full of Cream of Wheat for breakfast. A few days ago I thought I’d read the nutrition label even closer. This can’t be right, let me get my reading glasses and check for sure. Much to my surprise, I read that the serving size we are supposed to eat is 3 tablespoons. Who eats 3 tablespoons of Cream of Wheat! They don’t even show that on their commercials. What you see is a full, steaming bowl of Cream of Wheat! Three tablespoons must be the child-sized portion. There is a small logo size picture on the back of the box which must be the real amount you should eat. I have never measured out the farina accurately. Maybe I will try that tomorrow and see if I can get out the door without being ravenous.So, In actual-

d

Min

ity, I have used my entire 1200 daily calorie allotment on breakfast. The “small plate” movement is becoming fashionable now, so I guess I will use the “small cup” measurement for breakfast now. I think I have some demitasse cups around here somewhere. My breakfast would fit in an Anisette glass come to think of it. I’m going to check out my Special K cereal real quick. More depression – high fructose corn syrup is number six on the list of ingredients. That stuff is lurking everywhere. In the last year, we finally found bread we like without any fructose risk in it. The serving portion for Special K isn’t bad though. One cup fills half of a cereal bowl. If I transfer that to my tea cup then I feel like I am overindulging and can think of it as a guilty pleasure. Special K also uses fat free milk as their example. Are there really a lot of people who use fat free milk. Could I just add water to my cereal instead? I am really considering using a small plate for my dinner from now on. Maybe that will do the trick. We don’t eat fried foods anymore (O.k., o.k. Well, once in a very great while some fried chicken does find it’s way into our home). I am just beginning to remember the trick of serving no food over the size of your fist. When my mother served dinner, the food was coming out over the sides. My Mother recounted one dinner where she asked my brother Billy where his dessert was and he replied that it was under the mashed potatoes. My Mother didn’t know how to cook small. I cook like that too. I always think, “Are three pieces of chicken enough for my husband, my Mother-in-law, and me? Maybe I should bake the other two that are in the pack, just in case someone wants a second piece.” Usually the extra pieces become lunch for a day or two. But it is tempting to see them all baked and juicy in the pan. Well, I am going to find my demitasse cup now and have my breakfast. Bon Appétit! To each new day’s food adventure, Shelby Please send comments or ideas to: shelbys. wanderings@yahoo.com.

1830). Captain Leigh would have been involved in the Battle of Galveston on January 1, 1863 when General Magruder was credited with recapturing the city and port for the Confederacy from Union forces. He died October 7, 1864 in Galveston. Arthur Kerr Leigh……found it “sweet to die for his country” at the same place, being on General Magruder’s staff and Inspector General of the defence at Galveston at that time. He was, in the words of a friend, beloved by all who knew him, and no officer of his rank made more reputation during the war. He commanded the left wing of his regiment at Corinth [MS] and lost his leg in that desperate fight. At the first appearance of the fever (yellow fever), of which he died, he was urged by General Magruder to leave Galveston, saying ‘it would be no disparagement to one so disabled and noted for his courage,’ but he refused to leave his post, and died a martyr to his high sense of honor.”

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c.2010, Dutton

$19.95 / $25.00 Canada

By Terri Schlichenmeyer Contributing Writer Sometimes, you imagine the fun you could’ve had. Every Christmas, you missed out on mayhem, hid from hassles, and avoided all agitation while your partners in crime had a good time without you. Dreaming of piles of presents, you dialed down the mischief to ensure that Santa would be generous but in the end, come to think of it, your pals always got just as much loot as you did. Don’t blame Santa, though. He only brings toys, and as you’ll see in “The Fat Man: A Tale of North Pole Noir” by Ken Harmon, it almost kills him to do it. About a thousand years ago, give or take, back when Gumdrop Coal started the Coal Patrol, Santa was reluctant to punish bad kids with bad presents but Gumdrop was persuasive. Kids who found lumps of coal in their Christmas stockings had nobody to blame but themselves, according to Gumdrop. For a thousand years, he was proud of the program he started and the job he’d done. At least he was until he was fired and replaced by his nemesis, Charles “Candy” Cane, who never liked the Coal Patrol. Being out of a job gave Gumdrop a chance to think, and he began realizing that parents were just as guilty of raising naughty kids as the kids were for being naughty. Maybe it was parents who needed the punishing. But Santa didn’t look too fondly upon one of his Elves physically assaulting a human. He scolded Gumdrop.

275 pages

And then things got worse: Raymond Hall Senior, Gumdrop’s first punishee, was found dead in his sealed trophy room and Santa started looking kind of sick himself. Since everyone knew about Gumdrop’s little escapade, fingers in Kringle Town pointed straight at the disgruntled former elf-ployee. Fleeing by ferry to the Island of Misfit Toys, Gumdrop knew that he had to vamoose until he could clear his own name. He also knew that there were a lot of people who wanted to see him framed for something he didn’t do. With the help of his best friend, Dingleberry Fizz and beautiful Marshmallow World Gazette reporter Rosebud Jubilee, Gumdrop Coal tried to solve the crime before his chestnuts were roasted. What do you get when you add together a 1,300-year-old curmudgeonly elf, a “monster nutcracker” named Tannenbomb, several disenfranchised toys, a Red Ryder BB gun, and a Frank Capra movie? You get “The Fat Man”, and it’ll make you ho-ho-ho. With definite Raymond-Chandlerish flair and every Christmas cliché and character you can think of, author Ken Harmon brings a dark and darkly funny world to life in this un-holiday-like holiday book. I loved that Harmon surprised me with pop-culture references of Christmases past and that he put images in my head for Christmases future. Seriously, I’ll never think of Santa’s reindeer in quite the same way again… If you love to skew tradition a little, of if you’ll have a blue Christmas without a few laughs, you need to find this book. “The Fat Man” more fun than any reindeer games.


The County Times

Thursday, December 16, 2010

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The County Times

Thursday, December 16, 2010

A Journey Through Time Thursday, Dec. 16

Saturday, Dec. 18

• Piney Point Lighthouse Holiday Exhibit Piney Point Lighthouse (44720 Lighthouse Road, Piney Point) – 12 p.m. The Piney Point Lighthouse, Museum and Historic Park will host a militarythemed holiday exhibit set up in the lighthouse keepers’ quarters. Visitors must check in at the museum to begin the tour which includes the holiday exhibit located on the south campus. Each room of the keeper’s quarters offers a display of military history from the Civil War to World War II. The tour also includes a visit to the lighthouse and the Potomac River Maritime Exhibit. The museum is open today from 12 to 4 pm. Admission is $3 for adults, $2 for senior citizens and members of the military, $1.50 for kids 6 to 18 and free for children under the age of 5. For more information, call 301-994-1471.

• Naval Orange and Pink Grapefruit Sale St. John’s School (43900 Saint Johns Road, Hollywood) – 8 a.m. St. John’s School will be having a citrus-themed fundraiser. For more information, visit www.sjshollywood.org/AboutSJS/ Fundraising.aspx.

• Volunteers Needed For Mike’s Food Fund Zion Methodist Church (21291 Three Notch Road, Lexington Park) – 5 p.m. Mike’s Food Fund is looking for volunteers to deliver Christmas Dinner to over 1,500 needy families in St. Mary’s County. Food will be passed out Dec. 13 through 17 at Zion Methodist Church and Dec. 18 until Christmas Eve at Mike’s Bikes on Great Mills Road in Lexington Park. Volunteers are needed to deliver any remaining dinners and walk-ins are accepted until all available dinners are gone. For more information, contact Brigid Kenney at 301-481-1233 or Mike’s Bikes at 301-863-7887.

Friday, Dec. 17 • The Southern Maryland Traditional Music and Dance Holiday Open Mic Christ Church Parish Hall (37497 Zach Fowler Road, Chaptico) – 7 p.m. The doors open at 7 p.m., and the music starts at 7:30 p.m. The price of admission is $5, and performers are admitted fors free. Refreshments will be provided. For more information, or to sign up to perform, contact John Garner at carthagena@wildblue.net. • American Legion Post 221 Steak and Shrimp Dinner American Legion Post 221 (21690 Colton Point Road, Avenue) – 5 p.m. The American Legion Post 221 has a Steak and Shrimp Night on the third Friday of every month. The menu will include New York Strip cooked to order, steamed shrimp and hamburgers. Platters and sandwiches are available for dine-in or carryout. For more information, call 301-769-2220 or 301-8844071 or visit www.alpost221.webs.com. • VFW 2632 Texas Hold ‘Em Tournament VFW 2632 (23282 Three Notch Road, California) – 7 p.m. Buy in will be $50. Of that money, $40 will go into the prize pool and $10 will go to charity. Pre-registration is recommended but not required. Late players will be accepted until the end of the first break. Payouts will be determined by the number of entries. 
The event is open to the public. People must be 18 or older to play. Food will be available for purchase and side games will be available. For more information, or to pre-register, contact Brian at poker@vfw2632.com
 or 240-925-4000

• Christmas Cookie Sale Hollywood United Methodist Church (24422 Mervell Dean Road, Hollywood) – 9 a.m. Assorted containers of homemade cookies can be purchased for $10. The sale will be open until the cookies are sold out. For more information, call 301-373-2500. • Santa Visits Hollywood Hollywood Volunteer Rescue Squad (43256 Rescue Lane, Hollywood) – 12 p.m.. Santa will be visiting the Hollywood Volunteer Rescue Squad. There will be refreshments and cookies. There will be a raffle for a sack of goodies for a boy and girl with the winners to be drawn on December 19th. Children can have their picture taken with Santa for a small fee. Hope to see you all there. For more information, call 301-373-3131 • Sanford Concert Series Annual Christmas Event St. Andrew’s Church (44078 St. Andrew’s Church Road, California) – 7:30 p.m. The Price for admission is $25 for adults and $10 for students. The concert will feature four members of the Washington National Opera - Patricia Hussey, mezzosoprano, Tim Augustin, tenor, Linda Kirk, soprano and Donald Schramm, baritone as well as the COSMIC Flute Choir and Two Rivers Harmony under the direction of Lyn Schramm. The concert, which features songs of Christmas and the winter season, will include traditional carols to which the audience is invited to sing along. Reservations are required. For more information, call Schramm at 301-862-9541.

Sunday, Dec. 19 • Hughesville Baptist Church presents “Glorious Impossible” Hughesville Baptist Church (8505 Old Leonardtown Road, Hughesville) – 10:30 a.m. The Hughesville Baptist Church’s Adult Choir will present the Christmas musical “Glorious Impossible.” For more information, call 301-884-8645 or 301-274-3672. • Solomons Ninth Annual TUBACHRISTMAS Hollywood United Methodist Church (24422 Mervell Dean Road, Hollywood) – 4 p.m. Our Lady Star of the Sea Catholic Church will be hosting the event. The TUBACHRISTMAS performance is free and open to the public. TUBACHRISTMAS features traditional Christmas carols arranged for tuba and baritone horn players. For more information, visit www.tubachristmas.com.

Monday, Dec. 20 • Family Yoga Class Evolve Yoga and Wellness Clinic (23415

Three Notch Road, California) – 10 a.m. A family yoga class for parents and children between the ages of 3 and 7. It’s an ongoing class, with drop-in or passes accepted. For more information, call 301-862-1236 or visit www.EvolveYogaWellness.com.

The

• St. Mary’s Democratic Club Pot Luck Dinner Democratic Headquarters (Breton Place, Leonardtown) – 7 p.m. The event is open to the public and everyone is encouraged to bring a dish to pass. For more information, contact Georgia Wheeler at 301-994-1960.

John Leigh, the immigrant ancestor, was in Maryland by 1701 and had, by that time married Dorothy Guyther (daughter of William Guyther and Barbara Christina D’Hinoyosea). According to family lore: “John Leigh, the founder of the family in St. Mary’s County, and who it is said belonged to the Leighs of Stoneleigh Abbey, Warwick-

Tuesday, Dec. 21 • Patuxent High School Band Fundraiser Roy Rogers Restaurant (14000 Solomons Island Road, Solomons) – 5 p.m. Santa arrives at 6:30 p.m. for the festivities. A “Rob Your Neighbor” gift exchange will also be going on. Bring a gift under $5 for the exchange. For more information, email Traci Lowery tracilowery@verizon.net. • Winter Solstice, Full Moon and Eclipse Celebration Joy Lane Healing Center (43288 Joy Lane, Hollywood) – 7 p.m. There will be a celebration of the first day of winter and the the full moon. This year there is not only a full moon on the 21st, but also an eclipse, around 3 a.m. They will be doing pipe ceremony inside if it is cold and then go outside to the Fire Circle for some drumming, singing and s’mores around a fire and best of all. Children are welcome. Dress for going outside. Bring a drum, or rattle, a story or song to share.

Wednesday, Dec. 22 • Christmas Doll and Train Exhibit St. Clements Island Museum (38370 Point Breeze Road, Colton’s Point) – 12 p.m. The St. Clement’s Island Museum presents the 25th Annual Christmas Doll and Train Exhibit. This holiday exhibit includes antique and collectible dolls, toys, and miniature trains. Admission is $3 per adult, $2 for senior citizens and members of the military, $1.50 for children between the ages of 6 and 18, and kids under the age of 5. For more information, call 301-769-2222. • Longaberger Basket Bingo Fundraiser Holy Angel’s Hall (21340 Colton Point Road, Avenue) – 2 p.m. All proceeds go to benefit the Chopticon High School Air Force JROTC. Admission is $20, which buys a book of 20 games. Extra books will be available for $5. There will be food, door prizes and 50-50 raffles. For more information, or to reserve a table, call 301-904-6607. • Fraternal Order of Police Poker Tournament Fraternal Order Of Police (21215 Chancellors Run Road, Lexington Park) – 7 p.m. Buy in will be $25 and there is going to be cash games. For more information, call 301-863-6007.

By Linda Reno Contributing Writer

L ibrary Items • Holiday closings announced The libraries will be closed on Thursday, Dec. 23 through Sunday, Dec. 26 and Friday, Dec. 31 through Sunday, Jan. 2. The Internet branch will be open for customers to manage their accounts, download both eBooks and audio books, and to do research. Each branch has a 24 hour book drop for returns. • Libraries have NOOKcolor eReaders A NOOKcolor eReader has been purchased for each library to allow staff to demonstrate how easy it is to download eBooks from the library’s collection. Customers can check the NOOK out to use within the library. This is a great way to try an eReader before purchasing one. Before buying, the library suggests customers check to see which devices are compatible with the library’s collection. A list of devices can be found on the library’s website. The library has a collection of both eBooks as well as audio books that can be downloaded at no cost. • Leonardtown’s TAG to celebrate holiday A holiday party with holiday treats and games is planned at the Leonardtown’s TAG (Teen Advisory Group) meeting to be held on Dec. 22 at 6 p.m. TAG members will receive certificates for community service hours. All teens are welcome. • Family movie to be shown at Leonardtown Families can attend a free PG rated movie about a criminal mastermind who uses a trio of orphan girls as pawns for a grand scheme finds himself profoundly changed by the growing love between them. The movie will be shown at Leonardtown on Dec. 30 at 2 p.m. Snacks will be provided. • Suggestions for entertaining holiday guests If this holiday season means out of town guests and the challenge of entertaining them, the libraries offer some solutions. The library is the perfect place for all ages to browse and read anything from picture books to magazines. The Active Learning Centers at Charlotte Hall and Lexington Park will provide fun entertainment and the opportunity for meaningful play for the grandchildren or those young, active guests while at the same time helping the children to develop early reading skills. Leonardtown only has a few activity centers due to space limitations. Children can use TumbleBooks, an online collection of animated, talking picture books, accessible from the library’s website either in the library or at home. The library’s DVDs and Blu-rays can be checked out and used for a fun afternoon or night of movie watching for any age.

Chronicle

shire, England, arrived in the Province. Being a younger son, John Leigh had been placed in the British Navy. His ship was ordered to America, and while here he met at a dance given to the officers, a Miss Guyther, with whom he fell in love and married in spite of the opposition of his parents, who, it is said, never forgave him. He resigned his commission in the navy and settled in America.” George Singleton Leigh, great-great grandson of John Leigh and Dorothy Guyther, was born in 1799. In 1823 he married Sophia Leeds Kerr of Talbot County. They both died in 1843 at “Woodbury”, near Leonardtown.

They had 9 children, only five of whom would outlive their parents. Their two surviving sons were George Howell Leigh and Arthur Kerr Leigh, who both moved to Texas. Not much has been found on the life of George Leigh. In 1850 he was living in New York City. By 1854 he had acquired 243 acres of land in Montgomery County, Texas so he must have been there by that time. He is said to have died in Galveston in 1866. On July 1, 1851 Arthur Leigh was admitted to West Point and graduated in 1855. One of his classmates was Major Marcus Alfred Reno (a distant cousin of my husband’s) who fought at the Battle of the Little Big Horn. On March 1, 1862 Arthur enlisted as a lieutenant in the 2nd Texas Infantry (CSA). He fought in the Battle of Corinth (Mississippi) where he was wounded on October 3, 1862 and lost one of his legs as a result. Afterwards he was promoted to the rank of Captain and assigned to the staff of Major General John B. Magruder (graduated from West Point in

Wanderings of an Aimless

By Shelby Oppermann Contributing Writer

No Sugar

When I hear “no sugar” playing over and over in my head, my sub-conscious tries to divert my attention away from food by playing “no sugar tonight in my coffee, no sugar tonight in my tea… “ . The old song by The Guess Who. The sub-conscious is devious. Do we unknowingly control that or is there more of a pre-programmed second soul within us at all times. The second soul must store everything bad or discouraging it hears. The subconscious means we deposit everything by ourselves. I’d like to think that we aren’t attempting to destroy ourselves. Oops, off the track like usual. I can divert myself away from the topic of sugar all be myself it seems. Why is it every time I think I’m eating really good, I find out I’m really eating bad. Usually for breakfast I eat cornflakes with no sugar, which would probably amaze my friends since they all are used to seeing me use a lot of sugar in my hot tea. That is the only thing I add sugar to knowingly. Everything else is hidden in lots of sneaky ways. Some foods are naturally low in sugar and fat, like Cream of Wheat: 0 sugar, 0 fat, 0 cholesterol, and relatively low in sodium - 85 grams per serving. Calories are 120 per serving. When you add fat free milk (which I might not ever scale down to), the calories jump up to 220. The 2% milk we use, I’m sure, jumps that up a few hundred points. Still not bad. So, I think I’m doing really good when I fix a 2/3 full cereal bowl full of Cream of Wheat for breakfast. A few days ago I thought I’d read the nutrition label even closer. This can’t be right, let me get my reading glasses and check for sure. Much to my surprise, I read that the serving size we are supposed to eat is 3 tablespoons. Who eats 3 tablespoons of Cream of Wheat! They don’t even show that on their commercials. What you see is a full, steaming bowl of Cream of Wheat! Three tablespoons must be the child-sized portion. There is a small logo size picture on the back of the box which must be the real amount you should eat. I have never measured out the farina accurately. Maybe I will try that tomorrow and see if I can get out the door without being ravenous.So, In actual-

d

Min

ity, I have used my entire 1200 daily calorie allotment on breakfast. The “small plate” movement is becoming fashionable now, so I guess I will use the “small cup” measurement for breakfast now. I think I have some demitasse cups around here somewhere. My breakfast would fit in an Anisette glass come to think of it. I’m going to check out my Special K cereal real quick. More depression – high fructose corn syrup is number six on the list of ingredients. That stuff is lurking everywhere. In the last year, we finally found bread we like without any fructose risk in it. The serving portion for Special K isn’t bad though. One cup fills half of a cereal bowl. If I transfer that to my tea cup then I feel like I am overindulging and can think of it as a guilty pleasure. Special K also uses fat free milk as their example. Are there really a lot of people who use fat free milk. Could I just add water to my cereal instead? I am really considering using a small plate for my dinner from now on. Maybe that will do the trick. We don’t eat fried foods anymore (O.k., o.k. Well, once in a very great while some fried chicken does find it’s way into our home). I am just beginning to remember the trick of serving no food over the size of your fist. When my mother served dinner, the food was coming out over the sides. My Mother recounted one dinner where she asked my brother Billy where his dessert was and he replied that it was under the mashed potatoes. My Mother didn’t know how to cook small. I cook like that too. I always think, “Are three pieces of chicken enough for my husband, my Mother-in-law, and me? Maybe I should bake the other two that are in the pack, just in case someone wants a second piece.” Usually the extra pieces become lunch for a day or two. But it is tempting to see them all baked and juicy in the pan. Well, I am going to find my demitasse cup now and have my breakfast. Bon Appétit! To each new day’s food adventure, Shelby Please send comments or ideas to: shelbys. wanderings@yahoo.com.

1830). Captain Leigh would have been involved in the Battle of Galveston on January 1, 1863 when General Magruder was credited with recapturing the city and port for the Confederacy from Union forces. He died October 7, 1864 in Galveston. Arthur Kerr Leigh……found it “sweet to die for his country” at the same place, being on General Magruder’s staff and Inspector General of the defence at Galveston at that time. He was, in the words of a friend, beloved by all who knew him, and no officer of his rank made more reputation during the war. He commanded the left wing of his regiment at Corinth [MS] and lost his leg in that desperate fight. At the first appearance of the fever (yellow fever), of which he died, he was urged by General Magruder to leave Galveston, saying ‘it would be no disparagement to one so disabled and noted for his courage,’ but he refused to leave his post, and died a martyr to his high sense of honor.”

w e i v e R k o o B “The Fat Man: A Tale of North Pole Noir” by Ken Harmon

Photo Courtesy of Helen Carroll Beavers Patterson

c.2010, Dutton

$19.95 / $25.00 Canada

By Terri Schlichenmeyer Contributing Writer Sometimes, you imagine the fun you could’ve had. Every Christmas, you missed out on mayhem, hid from hassles, and avoided all agitation while your partners in crime had a good time without you. Dreaming of piles of presents, you dialed down the mischief to ensure that Santa would be generous but in the end, come to think of it, your pals always got just as much loot as you did. Don’t blame Santa, though. He only brings toys, and as you’ll see in “The Fat Man: A Tale of North Pole Noir” by Ken Harmon, it almost kills him to do it. About a thousand years ago, give or take, back when Gumdrop Coal started the Coal Patrol, Santa was reluctant to punish bad kids with bad presents but Gumdrop was persuasive. Kids who found lumps of coal in their Christmas stockings had nobody to blame but themselves, according to Gumdrop. For a thousand years, he was proud of the program he started and the job he’d done. At least he was until he was fired and replaced by his nemesis, Charles “Candy” Cane, who never liked the Coal Patrol. Being out of a job gave Gumdrop a chance to think, and he began realizing that parents were just as guilty of raising naughty kids as the kids were for being naughty. Maybe it was parents who needed the punishing. But Santa didn’t look too fondly upon one of his Elves physically assaulting a human. He scolded Gumdrop.

275 pages

And then things got worse: Raymond Hall Senior, Gumdrop’s first punishee, was found dead in his sealed trophy room and Santa started looking kind of sick himself. Since everyone knew about Gumdrop’s little escapade, fingers in Kringle Town pointed straight at the disgruntled former elf-ployee. Fleeing by ferry to the Island of Misfit Toys, Gumdrop knew that he had to vamoose until he could clear his own name. He also knew that there were a lot of people who wanted to see him framed for something he didn’t do. With the help of his best friend, Dingleberry Fizz and beautiful Marshmallow World Gazette reporter Rosebud Jubilee, Gumdrop Coal tried to solve the crime before his chestnuts were roasted. What do you get when you add together a 1,300-year-old curmudgeonly elf, a “monster nutcracker” named Tannenbomb, several disenfranchised toys, a Red Ryder BB gun, and a Frank Capra movie? You get “The Fat Man”, and it’ll make you ho-ho-ho. With definite Raymond-Chandlerish flair and every Christmas cliché and character you can think of, author Ken Harmon brings a dark and darkly funny world to life in this un-holiday-like holiday book. I loved that Harmon surprised me with pop-culture references of Christmases past and that he put images in my head for Christmases future. Seriously, I’ll never think of Santa’s reindeer in quite the same way again… If you love to skew tradition a little, of if you’ll have a blue Christmas without a few laughs, you need to find this book. “The Fat Man” more fun than any reindeer games.


The County Times The County Times is always looking for more local talent to feature! To submit art or band information for our entertainment section, e-mail sarahmiller@countytimes.net.

Thursday, Dec. 16 • Dave Norris DB McMillan’s (23415 Three Notch Road, California) – 5 p.m.

Flat Iron Farm Lights Up At Night By Sarah Miller Staff Writer Tucked away on Flat Iron Road, there is a large festive Christmas light display encompassing nearly every building on Flat Iron Farm. The lights aren’t just flashing at random either. They are choreographed to music. If visitors tune their radios to 88.7 FM as they drive into Flat Iron Farms they will see the lights on the houses flash in time with the music. The songs include the theme from Peanuts, “Carol of the Bells” and the TransSiberian Orchestra’s version of “The Nutcracker Suite.” The entire display is entirely funded by Bubby Knott, owner and operator of Flat Iron Farm. He even owns the radio frequency so will remain the same every year. He uses a small radio tower on the farm that has about a two-mile broadcast radius. Knott said synchronizing the music with the lights is one of the more time consuming parts of getting the light display set up. He said the entire thing is run electronically through a programmed switchboard. “Every note you have to get a light,” Knott said. The lights aren’t the only things to see at Flat Iron Farm during the winter. Just off the light circuit there is a parking lot near the barns on the farm. In each of the barns there is a different activity or shop. The activities include pony rides, pictures with Santa, a petting zoo and an outdoor station for people to roast marshmallows. There is also a candy store and an ornament shop. The shops accept cash or check, but no debit or credit cards. Knott said most of the merchandise is either made at Flat Iron Farm or produced locally. There is also an antique toy display in one of the bars, including a working model train display. Chrissy Long gives riding lessons at Flat Iron Farm and her students give the pony rides at night. “It’s a good way to give back to the county,” Long said. Entry into Flat Iron Farm is completely free. The only thing people pay for is the merchandise they buy in the shops, or $5 for

• Garden in Lights at Annmarie Garden Annmarie Garden (13480 Dowell Road, Solomons) – 6 p.m. • Book Discussion of “Little Women” by Louisa May Alcott Leonardtown Library (23415 Three Notch Road, California) – 7 p.m. • Live Music with Hydra FX Ruddy Duck Brewery (13200 Dowell Road, Dowell) – 7:30 p.m. • All You Can Drink Ladies Night with DJ Chris Big Dogs Paradise (28765 Three Notch Road, Mechanicsville) – 8 p.m. • Thursday Poker Night R.T.S. Building (21367 Great Mills Road, Lexington Park) – 8 p.m.

a pony ride. “I do it for the kids,” Knott said. If he was to charge even a dollar for admission, he said there would be fewer people willing to bring their children to Flat Iron Farm. Knott said he started the lights display at Flat Iron Farms about 26 years ago, when his children were still young. He said many of the people who help put up the lights, and who work when it’s up during December, are family. One of his young relatives, Austin Archer, is a parking attendant; guiding and directing traffics with flashing, spinning light toys and decked out in a safety vest and light-studded Santa hat and sunglasses. Knott said some of the white lights stay up during the summer, but the colored lights and the lights in the trees come down to keep them from fading or getting damaged. Flat Iron Farm opened the day after Thanksgiving, but the preparations begin much sooner. Setting up for Christmas at Flat Iron Farm is something that begins in August, according to Donna Morris, the clerk in the candy store. She said she has been working there for two years, and likes that it’s a family-oriented event. “Children. That’s the thing is children,” Morris said. Knott said new attractions are added every year, but he wouldn’t reveal what was new this year. “I can’t tell them, they have to come see,” Knott said. Christmas at Flat Iron Farm is open Thursday through Sunday, from 5 until 9 p.m. The busy nights tend to be Friday and Saturday. Knott said between 1,500 and 2,000 people will pass through on a busy night, but he doesn’t really keep a formal count. “It’s nice to see people still do things like this,” said Penny Shaw, a visitor to Flat Iron Farm. Flat Iron Farm is approximately 2 miles down Flat Iron Road past the intersection of Point Lookout Road and Indian Bridge Road.

• Staff and Friend’s Christmas Party with John Luskey Apehangers Bar and Grill (9100 Crain Highway, Bel Alton) – 9 p.m.

Friday, Dec. 17 • Dave Norris DB McMillan’s (23415 Three Notch Road, California) – 5 p.m. • Free Wine Tasting Guenther’s Fine Wine and Spirits (25470 Point Lookout Road, Leonardtown) – 5 p.m. • Randy Richie on Piano Cafe Des Artistes (41655 Fenwick Street, Leonardtown) – 6:30 p.m. • The Southern Maryland Traditional Music and Dance Holiday Open Mic Christ Church Parish Hall (37497 Zach Fowler Road, Chaptico) – 7 p.m. • Live Music with Jeff Miller Ruddy Duck Brewery (13200 Dowell Road, Dowell) – 7:30 p.m. • Line Dancing At Hotel Charles Hotel Charles (15110 Burnt Store Road, Hughesville) – 7:30 p.m. • All You Can Drink Night with DJ Chris Big Dogs Paradise (28765 Three Notch Road, Mechanicsville) – 8 p.m. • Bob Wire and the Fence Posts Cheeseburger in Paradise (23415 Three Notch Road, California) – 8 p.m.

sarahmiller@countytimes.net tainment Page contained incorrect information. The play “Woman; revised” is being submitted to the Maryland State One Act Festival, not "Witch Hunt” as was stated. The correct title of the one-act play written by George Johnson mentioned in the article is “The Importance of Being Hairy.” And, Tina Fratanuono played Vaginitis in a previous production, not Crone as was stated.

We post nightlife events happening in Calvert, Charles and St. Mary’s counties. To submit an event for our calendar, e-mail sarahmiller@countytimes.net. Deadline for submissions is Monday by 5 p.m.

• D.J. Just Jeff Martini’s Lounge (10553 Theodore Green Boulevard, White Plains) – 9 p.m. • Surfer on Acid Party at the River Rustic River Bar and Grill (40874 Merchant’s Lane, Leonardtown) – 9:30 p.m. • Christmas Party with Full Steam Gilligan’s Pier (11535 Popes Creek Road, Newburg) – 9:30 p.m.

Saturday, Dec. 18 • Sloe Jim Gilligan’s Pier (11535 Popes Creek Road, Newburg) – 4 p.m. • Randy Richie on Piano Cafe Des Artistes (41655 Fenwick Street, Leonardtown) – 6:30 p.m. • Billy Breslin Back Creek Bistro (14415 Dowell Road, Dowell) – 6:30 p.m. • Live with Jennifer Ann Cooper and Band Ruddy Duck Brewery (13200 Dowell Road, Dowell) – 7:30 p.m. • True Blue Country St. Mary’s Landing (29935 Three Notch Road, Charlotte Hall) – 7:30 p.m. • Not So Modern Jazz Quartet The Westlawn Inn (9200 Chesapeake Avenue, North Beach) – 8 p.m. • Nuttin’ Fancy Cryer’s Back Road Inn (22094 Newtowne Neck Road, Leonardtown) – 8 p.m.

24

• Hughesville Baptist Church presents “Glorious Impossible” Hughesville Baptist Church (8505 Old Leonardtown Road, Hughesville) – 10:30 a.m. • Big Dog Zone Big Dogs Paradise (28765 Three Notch Road, Mechanicsville) – 11 a.m. • Cowboys/Redskins $100 To Win Hot Wing Cook Off And Beer Pong Tourney Big Dogs Paradise (28765 Three Notch Road, Mechanicsville) – 1 p.m.

Monday, Dec. 20 • Mason Sebastian DB McMillan’s (23415 Three Notch Road, California) – 5 p.m. • Salsa Night Ruddy Duck Brewery (13200 Dowell Road, Dowell) – 8 p.m.

Tuesday, Dec. 21 • Fair Warning DB McMillan’s (23415 Three Notch Road, California) – 5 p.m.

• Captain John DB McMillan’s (23415 Three Notch Road, California) – 5 p.m. • Karaoke with D.J. Harry Big Dogs Paradise (28765 Three Notch Road, Mechanicsville) – 7 p.m.

• Karaoke with D.J. Mango Lexington Restaurant and Lounge (21736 Great Mills Road, Lexington Park) – 9 p.m.

• Fraternal Order of Police Poker Tournament Fraternal Order Of Police (21215 Chancellors Run Road, Lexington Park) – 7 p.m.

• Craze and $150 to Win Sexiest Ms. Claus Contest Big Dogs Paradise (28765 Three Notch Road, Mechanicsville) – 9:30 p.m.

• Band in a Box St. Mary’s Landing (29935 Three Notch Road, Charlotte Hall) – 7:30 p.m.

Sunday, Dec. 19 • NFL at the Duck Ruddy Duck Brewery (13200 Dowell Road, Dowell) – 6 a.m.

Business

Call to Place Your Ad: 301-373-4125

Directory Phone 301-884-5900 1-800 524-2381

Phone 301-934-4680 Fax 301-884-0398

Cross & Wood

AssoCiAtes, inC. Serving The Great Southern Maryland Counties since 1994 Employer/Employee

Primary Resource Consultants Group & Individual Health, Dental, Vision, AFLAC, Life, Long Term Care, Short & Long Term Disability, Employer & Employee Benefits Planning

12685 Amberleigh Lane La Plata, MD 20646

28231 Three Notch Rd, #101 Mechanicsville, MD 20659

Law Offices of

P.A. Hotchkiss & Associates Since 1987

WHERE YOUR LEGAL MATTER-MATTERS

Heating & Air Conditioning

Auto Accidents – Criminal – Domestic Wills – Power of Attorney DWI/Traffic – Workers’ Compensation

“THE HEAT PUMP PEOPLE” 30457 Potomac Way Charlotte Hall, MD 20622 Phone: 301-884-5011

301-870-7111 1-800-279-7545 www.pahotchkiss.com

Serving the Southern Maryland Area Accepting All Major Credit Cards

Est. 1982

snheatingac.com

Lic #12999

Wednesday, Dec. 22

• Full Steam Apehangers Bar and Grill (9100 Crain Highway, Bel Alton) – 9 p.m.

• Surfer on Acid Party at the River Rustic River Bar and Grill (40874 Merchant’s Lane, Leonardtown) – 9:30 p.m.

The County Times

Thursday, December 16, 2010

• Fair Warning DB McMillan’s (23415 Three Notch Road, California) – 6 p.m.

• Longaberger Basket Bingo Fundraiser Holy Angel’s Hall (21340 Colton Point Road, Avenue) – 2 p.m.

• The Zoo with Blackout Brigade Hotel Charles (15110 Burnt Store Road, Hughesville) – 9 p.m.

25

• Solomons Ninth Annual TUBACHRISTMAS Hollywood United Methodist Church (24422 Mervell Dean Road, Hollywood) – 4 p.m.

• Karaoke with D.J. Tommy and D.J. T California’s Applebee’s (45480 Miramar Way, California) – 9 p.m.

n O g n i o G

What’s

Corrections: An article in last week’s edition about the Southern Maryland Originals on the Enter-

• Wolf’s Hot Rods and Old Gas Open Blues Jam Fat Boys Country Store (41566 Medleys Neck Road, Leonardtown) – 8 p.m.

Thursday, December 16, 2010

• D.J. Just Jeff Martini’s Lounge (10553 Theodore Green Boulevard, White Plains) – 9 p.m. • Comedy Night with Kelly Terranova and Irwin Lowing Rustic River Bar and Grill (40874 Merchant’s Lane, Leonardtown) – 9:30 p.m

For family and community events, see our calendar in the community section on page 20.

In Entertainment

301-866-0777

I AM AN ABSOLUTE LOVE GIRL!

Pub & Grill 23415 Three Notch Road California Maryland

www.dbmcmillans.com

97 Days Till St. Patrick’s Day Entertainment All Day

301-737-0777

Prime Rib • Seafood • Sunday Brunch Banquet & Meeting Facilities 23418 Three Notch Road • California, MD 20619 www.lennys.net

Hello I am Rocki. I was born on 2007 and am quite the beauty as you can see. But it is not just what is on the outside. I shine on the inside too. I am sweet and loving. I love to be loved and to be petted and love you back. My fur is incredibly amazing. To pet me is divine. Softness doesn’t even describe it. I am fully vetted and wishing for a forever home. Do you think you could love me? I know I would love you. I am instant love. Please call my foster mom at 301-884-8777 or email her at moonandhunt@hotmail.com. Applications can be filled out online at www.feralcatrescue.org if you prefer. Shall we meet soon? Yours Truly, Rocki

Advertising That Works!

Ca ll 30 ! d A 1-373 r -4125 to Place You

Deadlines for Classifieds are Tuesday at 12 pm.

To Place a Classified Ad, please email your ad to: classifieds@countytimes.net or Call: 301-373-4125 or Fax: 301-373-4128 for a price quote. Office hours are: Monday thru Friday 8am - 4pm. The County Times is published each Thursday.

Classifieds Real Estate Beautiful water front home with view of Historic St. Clements Island, Blessing of the Fleet and amazing sunsets. 65 ft pier with electric, running water and boat lift.Storage shed,work shop and tree house on property. Closed in porch on back side. 2 car -carport. Price: $675,000. Call 240-298-6227.

Real Estate Rentals Spilt Foyer - Single Family Home. Home is centrally located - just 5 minutes North of NAS Patuxent River. It has brand new carpet in 50% of the house, and the rest have been cleaned and are in excellent condition. The home is equipped with all electric for ease of use. New refridgerator, and completely new HVAC system have been installed. Brick fireplace with insert. It has a side patio deck with a fully enclosed 6’ privacy fence surrounding the entire back yard---perfect for kids. Storage includes ample attic space, and a 5x8 shed under the rear deck. Home is in like new condition. No smoking allowed, and no indoor pets. Rent: $1450. Call (240) 925-9225.

Employment $$ EARN EXTRA MONEY $$ DELIVER THE NEW VERIZON® TELEPHONE DIRECTORIES MEN & WOMEN 18 YEARS AND OLDER WITH INSURED VEHICLES NEEDED TO DELIVER IN LA PLATA, WOLDORF, MECHANICSVILLE AND SURROUNDING AREAS. DELIVERY IS IN PROGRESS WORK A MINIMUM OF 4 DAYLIGHT HOURS PER DAY AND GET PAID WITHIN 48 HOURS, UPON SUCCESSFUL COMPLETION OF ROUTE. CALL 301-392-3572 BETWEEN 8 AM AND 4:30 PM MON – FRI. DISTRIBUTION OF THE VERIZON YELLOW PAGES ARE CONDUCTED ON BEHALF OF SUPERMEDIA THE OFFICIAL PUBLISHER OF VERIZON PRINT DIRECTORIES. EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER

Immediate opening for an experienced Commercial Electrician. Must be able to follow blueprints. Own transportation and hand tools required. Send resume to officemanager@hotcoldcorporation.com or call 301-868-2600. Immediate opening for an experienced Plumber/ Pipe Fitter. Must be able to follow blueprints. Own transportation and hand tools required. Send resume to officemanager@hotcoldcorporation.com or call 301-868-2600.

Important

The County Times will not be held responsible for any ads omitted for any reason. The County Times reserves the right to edit or reject any classified ad not meeting the standards of The County Times. It is your responsiblity to check the ad on its first publication and call us if a mistake is found. We will correct your ad only if notified after the first day of the first publication ran.


The County Times The County Times is always looking for more local talent to feature! To submit art or band information for our entertainment section, e-mail sarahmiller@countytimes.net.

Thursday, Dec. 16 • Dave Norris DB McMillan’s (23415 Three Notch Road, California) – 5 p.m.

Flat Iron Farm Lights Up At Night By Sarah Miller Staff Writer Tucked away on Flat Iron Road, there is a large festive Christmas light display encompassing nearly every building on Flat Iron Farm. The lights aren’t just flashing at random either. They are choreographed to music. If visitors tune their radios to 88.7 FM as they drive into Flat Iron Farms they will see the lights on the houses flash in time with the music. The songs include the theme from Peanuts, “Carol of the Bells” and the TransSiberian Orchestra’s version of “The Nutcracker Suite.” The entire display is entirely funded by Bubby Knott, owner and operator of Flat Iron Farm. He even owns the radio frequency so will remain the same every year. He uses a small radio tower on the farm that has about a two-mile broadcast radius. Knott said synchronizing the music with the lights is one of the more time consuming parts of getting the light display set up. He said the entire thing is run electronically through a programmed switchboard. “Every note you have to get a light,” Knott said. The lights aren’t the only things to see at Flat Iron Farm during the winter. Just off the light circuit there is a parking lot near the barns on the farm. In each of the barns there is a different activity or shop. The activities include pony rides, pictures with Santa, a petting zoo and an outdoor station for people to roast marshmallows. There is also a candy store and an ornament shop. The shops accept cash or check, but no debit or credit cards. Knott said most of the merchandise is either made at Flat Iron Farm or produced locally. There is also an antique toy display in one of the bars, including a working model train display. Chrissy Long gives riding lessons at Flat Iron Farm and her students give the pony rides at night. “It’s a good way to give back to the county,” Long said. Entry into Flat Iron Farm is completely free. The only thing people pay for is the merchandise they buy in the shops, or $5 for

• Garden in Lights at Annmarie Garden Annmarie Garden (13480 Dowell Road, Solomons) – 6 p.m. • Book Discussion of “Little Women” by Louisa May Alcott Leonardtown Library (23415 Three Notch Road, California) – 7 p.m. • Live Music with Hydra FX Ruddy Duck Brewery (13200 Dowell Road, Dowell) – 7:30 p.m. • All You Can Drink Ladies Night with DJ Chris Big Dogs Paradise (28765 Three Notch Road, Mechanicsville) – 8 p.m. • Thursday Poker Night R.T.S. Building (21367 Great Mills Road, Lexington Park) – 8 p.m.

a pony ride. “I do it for the kids,” Knott said. If he was to charge even a dollar for admission, he said there would be fewer people willing to bring their children to Flat Iron Farm. Knott said he started the lights display at Flat Iron Farms about 26 years ago, when his children were still young. He said many of the people who help put up the lights, and who work when it’s up during December, are family. One of his young relatives, Austin Archer, is a parking attendant; guiding and directing traffics with flashing, spinning light toys and decked out in a safety vest and light-studded Santa hat and sunglasses. Knott said some of the white lights stay up during the summer, but the colored lights and the lights in the trees come down to keep them from fading or getting damaged. Flat Iron Farm opened the day after Thanksgiving, but the preparations begin much sooner. Setting up for Christmas at Flat Iron Farm is something that begins in August, according to Donna Morris, the clerk in the candy store. She said she has been working there for two years, and likes that it’s a family-oriented event. “Children. That’s the thing is children,” Morris said. Knott said new attractions are added every year, but he wouldn’t reveal what was new this year. “I can’t tell them, they have to come see,” Knott said. Christmas at Flat Iron Farm is open Thursday through Sunday, from 5 until 9 p.m. The busy nights tend to be Friday and Saturday. Knott said between 1,500 and 2,000 people will pass through on a busy night, but he doesn’t really keep a formal count. “It’s nice to see people still do things like this,” said Penny Shaw, a visitor to Flat Iron Farm. Flat Iron Farm is approximately 2 miles down Flat Iron Road past the intersection of Point Lookout Road and Indian Bridge Road.

• Staff and Friend’s Christmas Party with John Luskey Apehangers Bar and Grill (9100 Crain Highway, Bel Alton) – 9 p.m.

Friday, Dec. 17 • Dave Norris DB McMillan’s (23415 Three Notch Road, California) – 5 p.m. • Free Wine Tasting Guenther’s Fine Wine and Spirits (25470 Point Lookout Road, Leonardtown) – 5 p.m. • Randy Richie on Piano Cafe Des Artistes (41655 Fenwick Street, Leonardtown) – 6:30 p.m. • The Southern Maryland Traditional Music and Dance Holiday Open Mic Christ Church Parish Hall (37497 Zach Fowler Road, Chaptico) – 7 p.m. • Live Music with Jeff Miller Ruddy Duck Brewery (13200 Dowell Road, Dowell) – 7:30 p.m. • Line Dancing At Hotel Charles Hotel Charles (15110 Burnt Store Road, Hughesville) – 7:30 p.m. • All You Can Drink Night with DJ Chris Big Dogs Paradise (28765 Three Notch Road, Mechanicsville) – 8 p.m. • Bob Wire and the Fence Posts Cheeseburger in Paradise (23415 Three Notch Road, California) – 8 p.m.

sarahmiller@countytimes.net tainment Page contained incorrect information. The play “Woman; revised” is being submitted to the Maryland State One Act Festival, not "Witch Hunt” as was stated. The correct title of the one-act play written by George Johnson mentioned in the article is “The Importance of Being Hairy.” And, Tina Fratanuono played Vaginitis in a previous production, not Crone as was stated.

We post nightlife events happening in Calvert, Charles and St. Mary’s counties. To submit an event for our calendar, e-mail sarahmiller@countytimes.net. Deadline for submissions is Monday by 5 p.m.

• D.J. Just Jeff Martini’s Lounge (10553 Theodore Green Boulevard, White Plains) – 9 p.m. • Surfer on Acid Party at the River Rustic River Bar and Grill (40874 Merchant’s Lane, Leonardtown) – 9:30 p.m. • Christmas Party with Full Steam Gilligan’s Pier (11535 Popes Creek Road, Newburg) – 9:30 p.m.

Saturday, Dec. 18 • Sloe Jim Gilligan’s Pier (11535 Popes Creek Road, Newburg) – 4 p.m. • Randy Richie on Piano Cafe Des Artistes (41655 Fenwick Street, Leonardtown) – 6:30 p.m. • Billy Breslin Back Creek Bistro (14415 Dowell Road, Dowell) – 6:30 p.m. • Live with Jennifer Ann Cooper and Band Ruddy Duck Brewery (13200 Dowell Road, Dowell) – 7:30 p.m. • True Blue Country St. Mary’s Landing (29935 Three Notch Road, Charlotte Hall) – 7:30 p.m. • Not So Modern Jazz Quartet The Westlawn Inn (9200 Chesapeake Avenue, North Beach) – 8 p.m. • Nuttin’ Fancy Cryer’s Back Road Inn (22094 Newtowne Neck Road, Leonardtown) – 8 p.m.

24

• Hughesville Baptist Church presents “Glorious Impossible” Hughesville Baptist Church (8505 Old Leonardtown Road, Hughesville) – 10:30 a.m. • Big Dog Zone Big Dogs Paradise (28765 Three Notch Road, Mechanicsville) – 11 a.m. • Cowboys/Redskins $100 To Win Hot Wing Cook Off And Beer Pong Tourney Big Dogs Paradise (28765 Three Notch Road, Mechanicsville) – 1 p.m.

Monday, Dec. 20 • Mason Sebastian DB McMillan’s (23415 Three Notch Road, California) – 5 p.m. • Salsa Night Ruddy Duck Brewery (13200 Dowell Road, Dowell) – 8 p.m.

Tuesday, Dec. 21 • Fair Warning DB McMillan’s (23415 Three Notch Road, California) – 5 p.m.

• Captain John DB McMillan’s (23415 Three Notch Road, California) – 5 p.m. • Karaoke with D.J. Harry Big Dogs Paradise (28765 Three Notch Road, Mechanicsville) – 7 p.m.

• Karaoke with D.J. Mango Lexington Restaurant and Lounge (21736 Great Mills Road, Lexington Park) – 9 p.m.

• Fraternal Order of Police Poker Tournament Fraternal Order Of Police (21215 Chancellors Run Road, Lexington Park) – 7 p.m.

• Craze and $150 to Win Sexiest Ms. Claus Contest Big Dogs Paradise (28765 Three Notch Road, Mechanicsville) – 9:30 p.m.

• Band in a Box St. Mary’s Landing (29935 Three Notch Road, Charlotte Hall) – 7:30 p.m.

Sunday, Dec. 19 • NFL at the Duck Ruddy Duck Brewery (13200 Dowell Road, Dowell) – 6 a.m.

Business

Call to Place Your Ad: 301-373-4125

Directory Phone 301-884-5900 1-800 524-2381

Phone 301-934-4680 Fax 301-884-0398

Cross & Wood

AssoCiAtes, inC. Serving The Great Southern Maryland Counties since 1994 Employer/Employee

Primary Resource Consultants Group & Individual Health, Dental, Vision, AFLAC, Life, Long Term Care, Short & Long Term Disability, Employer & Employee Benefits Planning

12685 Amberleigh Lane La Plata, MD 20646

28231 Three Notch Rd, #101 Mechanicsville, MD 20659

Law Offices of

P.A. Hotchkiss & Associates Since 1987

WHERE YOUR LEGAL MATTER-MATTERS

Heating & Air Conditioning

Auto Accidents – Criminal – Domestic Wills – Power of Attorney DWI/Traffic – Workers’ Compensation

“THE HEAT PUMP PEOPLE” 30457 Potomac Way Charlotte Hall, MD 20622 Phone: 301-884-5011

301-870-7111 1-800-279-7545 www.pahotchkiss.com

Serving the Southern Maryland Area Accepting All Major Credit Cards

Est. 1982

snheatingac.com

Lic #12999

Wednesday, Dec. 22

• Full Steam Apehangers Bar and Grill (9100 Crain Highway, Bel Alton) – 9 p.m.

• Surfer on Acid Party at the River Rustic River Bar and Grill (40874 Merchant’s Lane, Leonardtown) – 9:30 p.m.

The County Times

Thursday, December 16, 2010

• Fair Warning DB McMillan’s (23415 Three Notch Road, California) – 6 p.m.

• Longaberger Basket Bingo Fundraiser Holy Angel’s Hall (21340 Colton Point Road, Avenue) – 2 p.m.

• The Zoo with Blackout Brigade Hotel Charles (15110 Burnt Store Road, Hughesville) – 9 p.m.

25

• Solomons Ninth Annual TUBACHRISTMAS Hollywood United Methodist Church (24422 Mervell Dean Road, Hollywood) – 4 p.m.

• Karaoke with D.J. Tommy and D.J. T California’s Applebee’s (45480 Miramar Way, California) – 9 p.m.

n O g n i o G

What’s

Corrections: An article in last week’s edition about the Southern Maryland Originals on the Enter-

• Wolf’s Hot Rods and Old Gas Open Blues Jam Fat Boys Country Store (41566 Medleys Neck Road, Leonardtown) – 8 p.m.

Thursday, December 16, 2010

• D.J. Just Jeff Martini’s Lounge (10553 Theodore Green Boulevard, White Plains) – 9 p.m. • Comedy Night with Kelly Terranova and Irwin Lowing Rustic River Bar and Grill (40874 Merchant’s Lane, Leonardtown) – 9:30 p.m

For family and community events, see our calendar in the community section on page 20.

In Entertainment

301-866-0777

I AM AN ABSOLUTE LOVE GIRL!

Pub & Grill 23415 Three Notch Road California Maryland

www.dbmcmillans.com

97 Days Till St. Patrick’s Day Entertainment All Day

301-737-0777

Prime Rib • Seafood • Sunday Brunch Banquet & Meeting Facilities 23418 Three Notch Road • California, MD 20619 www.lennys.net

Hello I am Rocki. I was born on 2007 and am quite the beauty as you can see. But it is not just what is on the outside. I shine on the inside too. I am sweet and loving. I love to be loved and to be petted and love you back. My fur is incredibly amazing. To pet me is divine. Softness doesn’t even describe it. I am fully vetted and wishing for a forever home. Do you think you could love me? I know I would love you. I am instant love. Please call my foster mom at 301-884-8777 or email her at moonandhunt@hotmail.com. Applications can be filled out online at www.feralcatrescue.org if you prefer. Shall we meet soon? Yours Truly, Rocki

Advertising That Works!

Ca ll 30 ! d A 1-373 r -4125 to Place You

Deadlines for Classifieds are Tuesday at 12 pm.

To Place a Classified Ad, please email your ad to: classifieds@countytimes.net or Call: 301-373-4125 or Fax: 301-373-4128 for a price quote. Office hours are: Monday thru Friday 8am - 4pm. The County Times is published each Thursday.

Classifieds Real Estate Beautiful water front home with view of Historic St. Clements Island, Blessing of the Fleet and amazing sunsets. 65 ft pier with electric, running water and boat lift.Storage shed,work shop and tree house on property. Closed in porch on back side. 2 car -carport. Price: $675,000. Call 240-298-6227.

Real Estate Rentals Spilt Foyer - Single Family Home. Home is centrally located - just 5 minutes North of NAS Patuxent River. It has brand new carpet in 50% of the house, and the rest have been cleaned and are in excellent condition. The home is equipped with all electric for ease of use. New refridgerator, and completely new HVAC system have been installed. Brick fireplace with insert. It has a side patio deck with a fully enclosed 6’ privacy fence surrounding the entire back yard---perfect for kids. Storage includes ample attic space, and a 5x8 shed under the rear deck. Home is in like new condition. No smoking allowed, and no indoor pets. Rent: $1450. Call (240) 925-9225.

Employment $$ EARN EXTRA MONEY $$ DELIVER THE NEW VERIZON® TELEPHONE DIRECTORIES MEN & WOMEN 18 YEARS AND OLDER WITH INSURED VEHICLES NEEDED TO DELIVER IN LA PLATA, WOLDORF, MECHANICSVILLE AND SURROUNDING AREAS. DELIVERY IS IN PROGRESS WORK A MINIMUM OF 4 DAYLIGHT HOURS PER DAY AND GET PAID WITHIN 48 HOURS, UPON SUCCESSFUL COMPLETION OF ROUTE. CALL 301-392-3572 BETWEEN 8 AM AND 4:30 PM MON – FRI. DISTRIBUTION OF THE VERIZON YELLOW PAGES ARE CONDUCTED ON BEHALF OF SUPERMEDIA THE OFFICIAL PUBLISHER OF VERIZON PRINT DIRECTORIES. EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER

Immediate opening for an experienced Commercial Electrician. Must be able to follow blueprints. Own transportation and hand tools required. Send resume to officemanager@hotcoldcorporation.com or call 301-868-2600. Immediate opening for an experienced Plumber/ Pipe Fitter. Must be able to follow blueprints. Own transportation and hand tools required. Send resume to officemanager@hotcoldcorporation.com or call 301-868-2600.

Important

The County Times will not be held responsible for any ads omitted for any reason. The County Times reserves the right to edit or reject any classified ad not meeting the standards of The County Times. It is your responsiblity to check the ad on its first publication and call us if a mistake is found. We will correct your ad only if notified after the first day of the first publication ran.


The County Times

Thursday, December 16, 2010

26

27

Thursday, December 16, 2010

Fri., Dec. 17 Boys’ Basketball Chopticon at Northern, 7 p.m. Great Mills at Leonardtown, 7 p.m. St. Mary’s Ryken at St. John’s, 7:30 p.m. Girls’ Basketball Leonardtown at Great Mills, 7 p.m. St. John’s at St. Mary’s Ryken, 7 p.m. Northern at Chopticon, 7:30 p.m. Hockey Leonardtown vs. La Plata at Capital Clubhouse (Waldorf), 5 p.m. St. Mary’s Ryken vs. Thomas Stone at Capital Clubhouse (Waldorf), 6:45 p.m. Wrestling Chopticon, Great Mills, St. Mary’s Ryken at Lackey Tournament, 4 p.m.

Sat., Dec. 18 Boys’ Basketball St. Mary’s Ryken vs.

n er

e i d d i K Kor

CLUES ACROSS

1. Dodge truck model 4. Launch, note or mattress 7. 22nd Greek letter 10. Elderly 12. Sheep genus 14. Swiss river 15. Pulsate repeatedly 17. Not gained or won 18. Red organic pigment containing iron 19. Mother of Ishmael 20. Financial gains 22. Point midway between E and SE 23. Strikingly appropriate 25. Examine with care 28. Indian for carrying sling 31. Saddle horse 32. 92860 33. A field of mowed grass 34. Animal for heavy loads 39. Transport, usually in a truck 40. Protoctist 41. An eagle’s nest 42. More massive & firm 45. Public squares 48. Type of paint base

49. Daman and ___, India 51. Anesthetized 54. 55120 56. A person who inherits 58. Indian frock 59. Training by multiple repetitions 60. Dentist’s group 61. Not crazy 62. Opposed to prefix 63. Spanish Mister 64. Preceded 65. Obtained

CLUES DOWN

1. Ripening early 2. Struck with fear or dread 3. Combination of two companies 4. A person active in party politics 5. River in England 6. Flat circular plate 7. Pause in a line of verse 8. The thigh of a hog 9. Wrath 11. Arrived extinct

13. Opposite of go 16. Shouts of approval 18. Hailed 21. Of I 24. Opposite of starboard 26. Past participle of “saw” 27. Point that is one point N of due E 29. One who examines methodically 30. Davenports 34. Aegle marmelos fruit 35. About Eurasia 36. Stained with blood 37. Tangelo fruit 38. Vituperated 39. Come to pass 43. Outer border strip 44. Island in Venice 46. In the year of Our Lord 47. Impertinence 50. Not set afire 52. Afrikaans 53. European sea eagle 55. Macaws 56. Birthed 57. Tokyo

Oct. 7th’s Puzzles Solutions

Wed., Dec. 8 Boys’ Basketball Huntingtown 56, Chopticon 36 St. Mary’s Ryken 58, St. Anslem’s Abbey 34 Girls’ Basketball Thomas Stone 47, Leonardtown 43 Hockey Leonardtown 15, Bowie 2 Boys’ Swimming Great Mills 168, Thomas Stone 82 Northern 140, Great Mills 136 Girls’ Swimming Great Mills 134, Thomas Stone 129 Northern 166, Great Mills 110 Wrestling St. Mary’s Ryken 40, Bishop McNamara 33 DeMatha 67, St. Mary’s Ryken 3

Thurs., Dec. 9 Girls’ Basketball Good Counsel 84, St. Mary’s Ryken 47

Fri., Dec. 10 Boys’ Basketball Lackey 60, Leonardtown 48 St. Mary’s Ryken 72, Lansdowne 59 Girls’ Basketball Lackey 56, Leonardtown 51

Friendly at Wise High School (Upper Marlboro), 6 p.m. Wrestling Chopticon, Great Mills, St. Mary’s Ryken at Lackey Tournament, 9 a.m.

Mon., Dec. 20 Boys’ Basketball Great Mills at Glen Burnie, 6:30 p.m. Girls’ Basketball Great Mills at Meade, 6:30 p.m. Chopticon at Fallston, 6:45 p.m. Leonardtown at Westlake, 7 p.m. Paul VI at St. Mary’s Ryken, 7 p.m.

Wed., Dec. 22 Boys’ Basketball Glen Burnie at Chopticon, 6:30 p.m. Wrestling Great Mills/New Town at Manchester Valley, 5 p.m.

Hockey Leonardtown 4, DeMatha 2 St. Mary’s Ryken 14, Thomas Stone 3 Boys’ Swimming Calvert 134, Chopticon 114 La Plata 171, Chopticon 96 Great Mills 161, Patuxent 104 Great Mills 143, Lackey 129 Leonardtown 183, Northern 85 Girls’ Swimming Calvert 160, Chopticon 118 La Plata 153, Chopticon 122 Lackey 151, Great Mills 120 Patuxent 149, Great Mills 122 Leonardtown 179, Northern 95

Sat., Dec. 11 Girls’ Basketball Georgetown Day Invitational Tournament St. Mary’s Ryken 66, Georgetown Day 55

Mon., Dec 13 Boys’ Basketball La Plata 69, Chopticon 39 North Point 82, Great Mills 58 Girls’ Basketball Chopticon 59, La Plata 41 North Point 67, Great Mills 50

The County Times

A View From The

Bleachers Static Free By Ronald N. Guy Jr. Contributing Writer

Trust me when I say this: it is hard to be a fan of the Washington Bullets/Wizards. The franchise hasn’t won a title since 1978, when polyester was the dominant fabric in wardrobes and vocal cords strained during singalongs with the Bee Gees. During the 1980’s, the team was competitive but habitually made early playoff exits. For the last 20 years, Washington D.C. has been where hope for success in professional basketball has gone to die. As a loyal fan of the franchise, you look for reasons to carry on in spite of being emotionally punch drunk from constant losing. When psychologically wrestling with despair, it is common to draw strength from those who have carried a heavier burden. While at a ridiculously lower level from real life issues, sports fans do the same. For Wizards fans, there are plenty of NBA co-occupants of the land of misfit franchises. The obvious choice is the amazingly horrendous L.A. Clippers. But for me, I find solace in the Portland Trail Blazers. To be fair, since their respective late-70s titles, the Blazers, the 1977 NBA champs and two-time Western Conference champions in the early 90’s, have been a much better franchise than the Wizards. Don’t let the resume fool you though. The Blazers make this long-suffering Wizards fan feel better because of two fateful and eerily similar decisions that altered the course of two generations of the franchise’s history. Entering the 1984 NBA Draft, the Blazers sought another young talent to couple with 1983 #1 pick and future Hall of Famer Clyde Drexler. Selecting 2nd overall and with Hakeem Olajuwon off the board, the Blazer chose Kentucky center Sam Bowie. Bowie, who had suffered terrible lower leg injuries in college, was a risky selection; but as the adage goes, you can’t teach size, and Bowie, at 7’1”, had it. It was a disastrous choice, first because Bowie’s injury history repeated itself during his career in Portland and second because they passed on a slashing guard from North Carolina by the name of Michael Jordan. I’m guessing you’ve heard of him. Fast-forward to the 2007 NBA Draft when a young, budding Trail Blazers team held the #1 overall pick. Consensus opinion was that either Center Greg Oden or Small Forward Kevin Durant was the top prospect. Similar to 1984, the Blazers had a talented young swingman in Brandon Roy that played a similar position to Durant. Thus, the Blazers went big and selected the

7’0” Oden. After two season-ending knee surgeries, Oden looks like the star-crossed reincarnation of Bowie and likely no more than a career role player. Meanwhile, while it’s foolish to compare Durant to Jordan, he at least appears destined to be one of his generation’s better players. That stroll down a very bumpy memory lane is indeed a good tonic for self-loathing Wizards fans. Unlike the Blazers, the Wizards have at least been courteous losers: so effectively inept over the last 30 years that they’ve rarely even flirted with sustained success. Blazers fans, meanwhile, must perpetually bang their heads against the wall muttering “what if?”, haunted by Jordan and Durant. Stopping one’s consideration of Blazers history at its effectiveness as an antidepressant for Wizards fans misses its broader importance. Portland’s draft gaffes highlight the power of a single decision on

the basketball court. Life, though, is filled with countless “draft days” - the selection of a college, the choice of a spouse, the decision to have children and the acceptance of a job or a career change – that significantly chart the paths of our lives. It is fascinating to think about the complex series of events that aligned the form the lives we now lead; and how only subtle changes to a few moments would have drastically altered our existences. Put in this context, what an exciting and dynamic thing life is. Whether you’re one that believes in a grand plan or individual choice matters little; the experience itself is just a heck of a lot of fun…insofar as we avoid Sam Bowie or Greg Oden-like selections in our personal lives. Sorry…and thanks….Blazers fans. Send comments to rguyjoon@yahoo.com

Over 250,000 Southern Marylanders can’t be wrong!


The County Times

Thursday, December 16, 2010

26

27

Thursday, December 16, 2010

Fri., Dec. 17 Boys’ Basketball Chopticon at Northern, 7 p.m. Great Mills at Leonardtown, 7 p.m. St. Mary’s Ryken at St. John’s, 7:30 p.m. Girls’ Basketball Leonardtown at Great Mills, 7 p.m. St. John’s at St. Mary’s Ryken, 7 p.m. Northern at Chopticon, 7:30 p.m. Hockey Leonardtown vs. La Plata at Capital Clubhouse (Waldorf), 5 p.m. St. Mary’s Ryken vs. Thomas Stone at Capital Clubhouse (Waldorf), 6:45 p.m. Wrestling Chopticon, Great Mills, St. Mary’s Ryken at Lackey Tournament, 4 p.m.

Sat., Dec. 18 Boys’ Basketball St. Mary’s Ryken vs.

n er

e i d d i K Kor

CLUES ACROSS

1. Dodge truck model 4. Launch, note or mattress 7. 22nd Greek letter 10. Elderly 12. Sheep genus 14. Swiss river 15. Pulsate repeatedly 17. Not gained or won 18. Red organic pigment containing iron 19. Mother of Ishmael 20. Financial gains 22. Point midway between E and SE 23. Strikingly appropriate 25. Examine with care 28. Indian for carrying sling 31. Saddle horse 32. 92860 33. A field of mowed grass 34. Animal for heavy loads 39. Transport, usually in a truck 40. Protoctist 41. An eagle’s nest 42. More massive & firm 45. Public squares 48. Type of paint base

49. Daman and ___, India 51. Anesthetized 54. 55120 56. A person who inherits 58. Indian frock 59. Training by multiple repetitions 60. Dentist’s group 61. Not crazy 62. Opposed to prefix 63. Spanish Mister 64. Preceded 65. Obtained

CLUES DOWN

1. Ripening early 2. Struck with fear or dread 3. Combination of two companies 4. A person active in party politics 5. River in England 6. Flat circular plate 7. Pause in a line of verse 8. The thigh of a hog 9. Wrath 11. Arrived extinct

13. Opposite of go 16. Shouts of approval 18. Hailed 21. Of I 24. Opposite of starboard 26. Past participle of “saw” 27. Point that is one point N of due E 29. One who examines methodically 30. Davenports 34. Aegle marmelos fruit 35. About Eurasia 36. Stained with blood 37. Tangelo fruit 38. Vituperated 39. Come to pass 43. Outer border strip 44. Island in Venice 46. In the year of Our Lord 47. Impertinence 50. Not set afire 52. Afrikaans 53. European sea eagle 55. Macaws 56. Birthed 57. Tokyo

Oct. 7th’s Puzzles Solutions

Wed., Dec. 8 Boys’ Basketball Huntingtown 56, Chopticon 36 St. Mary’s Ryken 58, St. Anslem’s Abbey 34 Girls’ Basketball Thomas Stone 47, Leonardtown 43 Hockey Leonardtown 15, Bowie 2 Boys’ Swimming Great Mills 168, Thomas Stone 82 Northern 140, Great Mills 136 Girls’ Swimming Great Mills 134, Thomas Stone 129 Northern 166, Great Mills 110 Wrestling St. Mary’s Ryken 40, Bishop McNamara 33 DeMatha 67, St. Mary’s Ryken 3

Thurs., Dec. 9 Girls’ Basketball Good Counsel 84, St. Mary’s Ryken 47

Fri., Dec. 10 Boys’ Basketball Lackey 60, Leonardtown 48 St. Mary’s Ryken 72, Lansdowne 59 Girls’ Basketball Lackey 56, Leonardtown 51

Friendly at Wise High School (Upper Marlboro), 6 p.m. Wrestling Chopticon, Great Mills, St. Mary’s Ryken at Lackey Tournament, 9 a.m.

Mon., Dec. 20 Boys’ Basketball Great Mills at Glen Burnie, 6:30 p.m. Girls’ Basketball Great Mills at Meade, 6:30 p.m. Chopticon at Fallston, 6:45 p.m. Leonardtown at Westlake, 7 p.m. Paul VI at St. Mary’s Ryken, 7 p.m.

Wed., Dec. 22 Boys’ Basketball Glen Burnie at Chopticon, 6:30 p.m. Wrestling Great Mills/New Town at Manchester Valley, 5 p.m.

Hockey Leonardtown 4, DeMatha 2 St. Mary’s Ryken 14, Thomas Stone 3 Boys’ Swimming Calvert 134, Chopticon 114 La Plata 171, Chopticon 96 Great Mills 161, Patuxent 104 Great Mills 143, Lackey 129 Leonardtown 183, Northern 85 Girls’ Swimming Calvert 160, Chopticon 118 La Plata 153, Chopticon 122 Lackey 151, Great Mills 120 Patuxent 149, Great Mills 122 Leonardtown 179, Northern 95

Sat., Dec. 11 Girls’ Basketball Georgetown Day Invitational Tournament St. Mary’s Ryken 66, Georgetown Day 55

Mon., Dec 13 Boys’ Basketball La Plata 69, Chopticon 39 North Point 82, Great Mills 58 Girls’ Basketball Chopticon 59, La Plata 41 North Point 67, Great Mills 50

The County Times

A View From The

Bleachers Static Free By Ronald N. Guy Jr. Contributing Writer

Trust me when I say this: it is hard to be a fan of the Washington Bullets/Wizards. The franchise hasn’t won a title since 1978, when polyester was the dominant fabric in wardrobes and vocal cords strained during singalongs with the Bee Gees. During the 1980’s, the team was competitive but habitually made early playoff exits. For the last 20 years, Washington D.C. has been where hope for success in professional basketball has gone to die. As a loyal fan of the franchise, you look for reasons to carry on in spite of being emotionally punch drunk from constant losing. When psychologically wrestling with despair, it is common to draw strength from those who have carried a heavier burden. While at a ridiculously lower level from real life issues, sports fans do the same. For Wizards fans, there are plenty of NBA co-occupants of the land of misfit franchises. The obvious choice is the amazingly horrendous L.A. Clippers. But for me, I find solace in the Portland Trail Blazers. To be fair, since their respective late-70s titles, the Blazers, the 1977 NBA champs and two-time Western Conference champions in the early 90’s, have been a much better franchise than the Wizards. Don’t let the resume fool you though. The Blazers make this long-suffering Wizards fan feel better because of two fateful and eerily similar decisions that altered the course of two generations of the franchise’s history. Entering the 1984 NBA Draft, the Blazers sought another young talent to couple with 1983 #1 pick and future Hall of Famer Clyde Drexler. Selecting 2nd overall and with Hakeem Olajuwon off the board, the Blazer chose Kentucky center Sam Bowie. Bowie, who had suffered terrible lower leg injuries in college, was a risky selection; but as the adage goes, you can’t teach size, and Bowie, at 7’1”, had it. It was a disastrous choice, first because Bowie’s injury history repeated itself during his career in Portland and second because they passed on a slashing guard from North Carolina by the name of Michael Jordan. I’m guessing you’ve heard of him. Fast-forward to the 2007 NBA Draft when a young, budding Trail Blazers team held the #1 overall pick. Consensus opinion was that either Center Greg Oden or Small Forward Kevin Durant was the top prospect. Similar to 1984, the Blazers had a talented young swingman in Brandon Roy that played a similar position to Durant. Thus, the Blazers went big and selected the

7’0” Oden. After two season-ending knee surgeries, Oden looks like the star-crossed reincarnation of Bowie and likely no more than a career role player. Meanwhile, while it’s foolish to compare Durant to Jordan, he at least appears destined to be one of his generation’s better players. That stroll down a very bumpy memory lane is indeed a good tonic for self-loathing Wizards fans. Unlike the Blazers, the Wizards have at least been courteous losers: so effectively inept over the last 30 years that they’ve rarely even flirted with sustained success. Blazers fans, meanwhile, must perpetually bang their heads against the wall muttering “what if?”, haunted by Jordan and Durant. Stopping one’s consideration of Blazers history at its effectiveness as an antidepressant for Wizards fans misses its broader importance. Portland’s draft gaffes highlight the power of a single decision on

the basketball court. Life, though, is filled with countless “draft days” - the selection of a college, the choice of a spouse, the decision to have children and the acceptance of a job or a career change – that significantly chart the paths of our lives. It is fascinating to think about the complex series of events that aligned the form the lives we now lead; and how only subtle changes to a few moments would have drastically altered our existences. Put in this context, what an exciting and dynamic thing life is. Whether you’re one that believes in a grand plan or individual choice matters little; the experience itself is just a heck of a lot of fun…insofar as we avoid Sam Bowie or Greg Oden-like selections in our personal lives. Sorry…and thanks….Blazers fans. Send comments to rguyjoon@yahoo.com

Over 250,000 Southern Marylanders can’t be wrong!


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The County Times

Thursday, December 16, 2010

28

Boys’ Basketball

North Point Pressure Shuts Down Hornets By Chris Stevens Staff Writer GREAT MILLS – Even though they were playing their fourth game in seven days, the North Point boys’ basketball team still had enough energy to use a suffocating defensive effort to get easy baskets and come away with an 82-58 win over Great Mills Monday night, handing the Hornets their first loss of the season.

Photo by Chris Stevens

The Hornets’ Earl Castain makes a move toward the hoop.

“Their run and jump defense was phenomenal,” Hornets coach Frank Peck said. “We had to try to gamble, but North Point is too good of a team to come back from the lead that they had.” The Eagles (4-0 0-0 SMAC) zoomed out to a 16-3 lead early in the first quarter before Great Mills (1-1, 0-0 SMAC) rallied to get within seven points (22-15) at the end of the period. “I was pleased with how the kids did after we got down early,” Peck said. “We wanted to see how they would react.” The Hornets would never get any closer as the Eagles, led by senior guard Devonte Thomas’ 18 points picked up the pace again and led by as many as 25 points (77-52) in the Photo by Chris Stevens fourth quarter. Great Mills’ Johannes Chavez plays defense on Edward Mouton of North Point during “We’ve been working on defense since Monday night’s boys’ basketball game. we started practice,” Eagles coach Jimmy Ball said. “We’re starting to get teams to play the kind of ball we want played hard and didn’t give up,” he said. “I’m sure we’ll bounce back.” to play.” Peck knows that the Hornets will be better – it will just take Great Mills senior forward Brandon Teston, who led the some time. Hornets with 15 points (junior forward Joseph Courtney added “We don’t have enough varsity experience to where we can 14 points), felt the Eagles’ defense took the Hornets out of what handle pressure defense for 32 minutes,” he explains. “We have a they wanted to do offensively. “North Point is definitely an aggressive team,” Teston said. long way to go.” “We were able to get to the basket in spurts, but we settled for the chrisstevens@countytimes.net outside shot and didn’t run our offense.” Teston was encouraged that his teammates continued to play even as North Point pulled away late. “We didn’t want to get embarrassed on our home floor, so we

Lackey Rally Dooms Raiders By Chris Stevens Staff Writer

half) converted a four-point play with a minute left in the third quarter to give Lackey a 38-35 lead. The Chargers (2-0 overall, 0-0 SMAC) continued to take advantage of Leonardtown turnovers (18 on the night) and missed shots to build a 54-42 lead with 1:50 to go. Shade knew that the Raiders’ struggles at the free throw line probably cost them a 2-0 start. “We finished 9 for 26 at the line - that’s 17 points we left on board,” he said. “That’s a big factor.” Even with Lackey, led by Valdis McFall’s 13 points, running by them, Layman felt his team would be up to the task as the season progressed. “We’re not a sit and hold the ball team,” he said. “We can play any style and we can get up and down the floor with teams. We just have to play with enthusiasm and play all four quarters.” Shade agreed with his coach. “We slacked off in the second half and didn’t close out on their shooters,” he said. “We have to make our free throws and finish the game strong.” Chris Campeggio joined Shade in double figures with 10 points Photo by Chris Stevens for Leonardtown.

LEONARDTOWN – The Leonardtown boys’ basketball team got off to a good start Friday night, but saw their lead evaporate as Lackey High School rallied for a 60-48 win in a nonconference match-up of two Southern Maryland Athletic Conference schools. “We were able to find our rhythm and dictate the tempo in the first half,” first-year head coach David Layman said. “In the second half, we had trouble finding offense and Lackey hit some shots and was able to go on a run.” The Raiders (1-1 overall, 0-0 SMAC) led for much of the first three quarters, as senior point guard Nick Shade had his way driving to the basket on the slower Charger defenders. “My goal is to get to basket and look for guys to pass to,” said Shade, who led all scorers with 21 points. “Guys weren’t making shots, so I took it upon myself.” “We’re looking for dribble penetration from Nick,” Layman added. “We want to get points in the paint and to be able to kick the ball out from the penetration, but we just weren’t hitting the shots.” Leonardtown’s grip on the lead loosened for Leonardtown’s Nick Shade, who led all scorers good when Dhonte Ford with 21 points, drives past Valdis McFall of Lackey. (11 points in the second

chrisstevens@countytimes.net

High-School Tennis Clinic Series 2010

St. Mary’s County Rec and Parks Volleyball Standings Women’s League

Safe Sets 15-3 Yellow Bus 15-3 Easy Wash 17-4 Spaulding Consulting 14-7 R & S Bus Service 14-7 Rita's of Solomons 9-12 Bud Light 7-14 NBE 6-15 ABC 4-17 Big Dogs 1-20

Co-Ed Competitive League Olde Town Pub 18-6 Ark N Spark 16-8 Kinky Sets 14-7 Latitude Yacht Services 11-13 Chili Peppers 7- 17 Spikers 3-18

Co-Ed League Recreational Dig This 23-4 Bump Set Oops 20-7 Serves You Right 20-7 Dicks diggers 20-7 Doc Hoc 20-7 St. Mary’s Automotive- 16-11 Side Out 14-13 After Shock 13-14 Geezer World 9-18 Well Pet 9-18 Heavy Dinkers 9-18 Smokin Aces 7-20 Scared Hitless 5-22 Sloppy Sets 4-23

Dates: February 27, 2011. Location: St. Mary’s College of Maryland, Somerset Tennis Complex 18952 East Fisher Road (Outdoor Facility) St. Mary’s City, Maryland 20686 Times: Sundays, 9:30 am – 11:30 am (Mini-matches included) Instructors: St. Mary’s College Coaching Staff and Players Cost: $25.00 per session!! Players: Beginning 9th graders to Seniors!!!! Registration: Contact Derek Sabedra, Head Tennis Coach, St. Mary’s College Cell: 410-610-4300 and/or email ddsabedra@smcm.edu

Smcm to Host Baseball Spring Training Program St. Mary’s College of Maryland will host a six-week Spring Training 2011 baseball program for players in grades 1 through 12 from January 2 to February 6. St. Mary’s College head coach Lew Jenkins will direct the program in conjunction with U.S. Baseball Academy. Sessions are offered in advanced hitting, pitching and catching lessons at a cost as low as $99 for six weeks. Space is limited. Registration is now under way. For more information, visit www.USBaseballAcademy.com or call toll-free 866-622-4487.

Ryken seeks JV Softball and JV Girls’ Lacrosse Coaches St. Mary’s Ryken High School is accepting resumes for two coaching positions: JV Softball and JV Women’s Lacrosse. Please send resumes to Athletic Director Dave Tallman at dtallman@smrhs.org,


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The County Times

Thursday, December 16, 2010

28

SMCM

29

Thursday, December 16, 2010

The County Times

North Point Pressure Shuts Down Hornets By Chris Stevens Staff Writer GREAT MILLS – Even though they were playing their fourth game in seven days, the North Point boys’ basketball team still had enough energy to use a suffocating defensive effort to get easy baskets and come away with an 82-58 win over Great Mills Monday night, handing the Hornets their first loss of the season.

Photo by Chris Stevens

Limi te

The Hornets’ Earl Castain makes a move toward the hoop.

150

eO Tim nly!

$

d

“Their run and jump defense was phenomenal,” Hornets coach Frank Peck said. “We had to try to gamble, but North Point is too good of a team to come back from the lead that they had.” The Eagles (4-0 0-0 SMAC) zoomed out to a 16-3 lead early in the first quarter before Great Mills (1-1, 0-0 SMAC) rallied to get within seven points (22-15) at the end of the period. “I was pleased with how the kids did after we got down early,” Peck said. “We wanted to see how they would react.” The Hornets would never get any closer as the Eagles, led by senior guard Devonte Thomas’ 18 points picked up the pace again and led by as many as 25 points (77-52) in the Photo by Chris Stevens fourth quarter. Great Mills’ Johannes Chavez plays defense on Edward Mouton of North Point during “We’ve been working on defense since Monday night’s boys’ basketball game. we started practice,” Eagles coach Jimmy Ball said. “We’re starting to get teams to play the kind of ball we want our home floor, so we played hard and didn’t give up,” he said. “I’m sure we’ll bounce back.” to play.” Peck knows that the Hornets will be better – it will just take Great Mills senior forward Brandon Teston, who led the some time. Hornets with 15 points (junior forward Joseph Courtney added “We don’t have enough varsity experience to where we can 14 points), felt the Eagles’ defense took the Hornets out of what handle pressure defense for 32 minutes,” he explains. “We have a they wanted to do offensively. “North Point is definitely an aggressive team,” Teston said. long way to go.” “We were able to get to the basket in spurts, but we settled for the chrisstevens@countytimes.net outside shot and didn’t run our offense.” Teston was encouraged that his teammates continued to play even as North Point pulled away late. “We didn’t want to get embarrassed on

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High-School Tennis Clinic Series 2010

St. Mary’s County Rec and Parks Volleyball Standings Women’s League

Safe Sets 15-3 Yellow Bus 15-3 Easy Wash 17-4 Spaulding Consulting 14-7 R & S Bus Service 14-7 Rita's of Solomons 9-12 Bud Light 7-14 NBE 6-15 ABC 4-17 Big Dogs 1-20

Co-Ed Competitive League Olde Town Pub 18-6 Ark N Spark 16-8 Kinky Sets 14-7 Latitude Yacht Services 11-13 Chili Peppers 7- 17 Spikers 3-18

Co-Ed League Recreational Dig This 23-4 Bump Set Oops 20-7 Serves You Right 20-7 Dicks diggers 20-7 Doc Hoc 20-7 St. Mary’s Automotive- 16-11 Side Out 14-13 After Shock 13-14 Geezer World 9-18 Well Pet 9-18 Heavy Dinkers 9-18 Smokin Aces 7-20 Scared Hitless 5-22 Sloppy Sets 4-23

Dates: February 27, 2011. Location: St. Mary’s College of Maryland, Somerset Tennis Complex 18952 East Fisher Road (Outdoor Facility) St. Mary’s City, Maryland 20686 Times: Sundays, 9:30 am – 11:30 am (Mini-matches included) Instructors: St. Mary’s College Coaching Staff and Players Cost: $25.00 per session!! Players: Beginning 9th graders to Seniors!!!! Registration: Contact Derek Sabedra, Head Tennis Coach, St. Mary’s College Cell: 410-610-4300 and/or email ddsabedra@smcm.edu

Smcm to Host Baseball Spring Training Program St. Mary’s College of Maryland will host a six-week Spring Training 2011 baseball program for players in grades 1 through 12 from January 2 to February 6. St. Mary’s College head coach Lew Jenkins will direct the program in conjunction with U.S. Baseball Academy. Sessions are offered in advanced hitting, pitching and catching lessons at a cost as low as $99 for six weeks. Space is limited. Registration is now under way. For more information, visit www.USBaseballAcademy.com or call toll-free 866-622-4487.

Ryken seeks JV Softball and JV Girls’ Lacrosse Coaches St. Mary’s Ryken High School is accepting resumes for two coaching positions: JV Softball and JV Women’s Lacrosse. Please send resumes to Athletic Director Dave Tallman at dtallman@smrhs.org,

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Discover a Hidden Cave

Fur and Feathers By Keith McGuire Contributing Writer You may have heard of Mammoth Cave in central Kentucky. A friend of mine told me a story of how it was discovered many, many years ago. Despite the extraordinary size of the cave, the original entrance was barely a speck on a hillside. A Tennessee man was bear hunting in Kentucky and actually shot a bear but didn’t kill it. He had to track it by following the blood trail. As it turns out, he tracked the wounded bear to the small entrance of a cave and thus Mammoth Cave was discovered. Kentuckians purport this to be a true recap of the event, noting that if a Kentuckian had shot the bear, tracking

would not have been required and Mammoth Cave would have remained undiscovered to this day. Deer invariably run when struck with a

bullet or an arrow. Sometimes they actually fall on the spot only to get up and run off. On rare occasions, they will tumble where they stood and stay there. When I’ve shot a deer and it runs, my heart always skips a beat while I watch and listen for it to fall dead, hoping that it won’t go so far that it might be difficult to find. It could be that the shot missed altogether, but we won’t make that assumption here. Tracking a deer that runs out of sight or earshot after being shot can be very difficult, so here are some tips. Before you leave your tree stand or blind, memorize the location. Pick out one or two trees, a bush, or some other characteristic in the area where the deer was when you shot it. If you have a range finder, mark the distance from your location to the tree nearest to where the deer was when you shot. Wait for at least 20 minutes and get safely down from the tree or out of your blind and walk to the location you marked. Take your gun or bow and your rangefinder with you. When you get there, give a quick look for evidence of the hit: blood, hair, disturbed leaves, etc. If you don’t

see anything, use your rangefinder to mark the distance from where you think the deer was to your blind or tree stand and compare this to the reading you had when you were in the stand marking the spot, adjust if necessary, and look again. When you find the spot, mark the location with something you can see from a distance. Toilet paper squares work well for tracking wounded animals if you have some. Carefully move from this spot in the direction that the deer ran, taking care not to disturb the leaves and ground on the actual trail. Thoroughly search for blood on the leaves and ground as you go. Each time you find some – even a tiny amount – mark it with a toilet paper square. Proceed in this way until you find the dead or wounded deer. If it is still alive, humanely dispatch the animal with another shot. Despite the musing of the Kentuckians, there’s no shame in tracking a wounded animal. They nearly always run away and you have to be prepared to track them down. To do otherwise would be wasteful, illegal and a wanton disregard for the sport. Besides, you might find the biggest cave in St. Mary’s County! I will be offering stories of hunting adventures in future articles for this column. If you have a particularly interesting story, drop me an email at riverdancekeith@hotmail.com. Be safe and enjoy the season.

SMCM Seahawk Women and Men Roll Hood ST. MARY’S CITY – The St. Mary’s College men’s and women’s basketball teams both cruised in their Saturday afternoon doubleheader, defeating Capital Athletic Conference foe Hood College 87-58 and 70-45 respectively. In the women’s game, freshman center Sophie Pruden recorded her second double-double of the season, leading St. Mary’s with 13 points and 11 rebounds as the Seahawks will start the 2011 calendar year as the CAC’s first place team. The Seahawks (6-3, 3-0 CAC) never trailed in the game as the Seahawks jumped out to a 20-7 lead at 9:14 en route to a 32-15 halftime advantage. Hood struggled from the floor in the first half, making only six of 27 attempts. The Seahawks capitalized on Hood’s 27 turnovers, tallying 30 points off those miscues. The bench offense for the home team was huge as well, picking up 44 points to the four points by the Blazers’ reserves. St. Mary’s finished with a 46-33 rebounding advantage while registering 15 steals as first-year forward Shana Lewis (Bowie, Md./Bowie) had five of them. All 12 players that suited up today for St. Mary’s scored as several first-years scored season-highs. Marche Pearson (Laurel, Md./Laurel) led the way with

nine points while Jasmine Smith (Millersville, Md./Old Mill) added eight points and two caroms. First-year forward Bridget Wilkins (Washington, D.C./Washington Waldorf) chipped in five points and two rebounds. In the men’s game, All but one of the 16 suited players scored for the Hawks as they cruised to their 25th straight regular season win at home. With the win, the Seahawks (7-2, 3-0 CAC) are tied for first in the league standings with University of Mary Washington. Senior guard Alex Franz (Catonsville, Md./Cardinal Gibbons) and junior forward Mikey Fitzpatrick (Bethesda, Md./Walt Whitman) had nearly identical box score lines as both finished with 12 points on 5-of-5 shooting, going 2-of2 from downtown. Franz added two assists and one steal while Fitzpatrick had three assists, career-best three steals and one rebound. St. Mary’s never trailed and led by a double-digit margin for nearly 26 minutes of the 40-minute contest. The Seahawks biggest lead came at the 9:19-minute mark of the second half as the home team was up by 40 points when senior forward Kyle Jarczynski (Bel Air, Md./Calvert Hall) converted two free throws to cap a 9-0 run.

The Seahawks owned a 49-21 halftime advantage as Fitzpatrick and junior guard James Davenport (Owings Mills, Md./Loyola Blakefield) each notched 10 first-half points to lead all players. Davenport finished the game with his 10 points in 12 minutes of action. In the first half, St. Mary's shot 64.0% from the floor, including a blistering 77.8% (7-of-9) from downtown. The Seahawks finished 10-of-15 from behind the arc for their second-most number of three-point field goals made this season. St. Mary’s racked up 34 points off of 22 Hood turnovers while the Seahawk bench notched 46 points to 15 from the Blazer reserves. Before fouling out, first-year center Christian MacAuley (Silver Spring, Md./Paint Branch) picked up seven points and team-best six rebounds for the home team. The Seahawk women will be out of action until Saturday January 2 when they’ll take on Scranton at the Days Inn tournament in Gettysburg, Pa. The men return to action Friday in Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. against Olivet College in the Cruzin Classic.


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The County Times

Thursday, December 16, 2010

30

Girls Basketball

Knights Hope to Forget About Season-Opening Loss By Chris Stevens Staff Writer

31

Thursday, December 16, 2010

Hockey

The County Times

Ryken Underclassmen Key Raiders Play Rout of Thomas Stone “Game of Their Lives,” Shock Dematha By Chris Stevens Staff Writer

Myla Somerville of St. Mary’s Ryken drives to the basket.

The season was one game old for the St. Mary’s Ryken girls’ basketball team and by all accounts, it was one game they would hope to soon forget. “It’s very important that we forget this game tonight,” junior guard Katie McCormick said after Good Counsel rolled to an 84-47 win Thursday evening in the Washington Catholic Athletic Conference opener for both teams. “We’ve got to wash it off.” The Knights, minus senior guard Zakiya Chambers-Hunter (out until January with an ACL injury) played their first game of the season against a Good Counsel team that moved the ball extremely well and had balanced scoring – 10 different Falcons got their names in the scoring column, led by Amanda Fioravanti’s 14 points. Gillian Abshire, Sara Woods and Sydney Lewis joined Fioravanti in double figures with 13, 11 and 10 points respectively. “That’s a key for us, our depth,” Falcons head coach Tom Splaine said. “We know SMR is tough to play, so we went all the way down to the very end of our bench.” The Falcons (4-0 overall, 1-0 in WCAC play) took advantage of sev-

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By Chris Stevens Staff Writer

Leonardtown hockey Rob Barthelemes was honest in admitting that he didn’t expect the Raiders to beat DeMatha Friday night, but led by two goals each from freshman Cullen Bonnel and senior Charlie Yates, that’s just what happened a 4-2 upset over the Stags at the Gardens Ice House in Laurel, their second straight win. “The result wasn’t what I expected, but the younger kids stepped up and played the game of their lives,” Barthelemes said. “The older players were leaders and that allowed the younger players to follow. It was a super game for us.” Goalie Brett Kibler also stopped 17 saves for the Raiders, who Barthelemes said have really come together after a meeting following a 13-1 loss to Huntingtown “We didn’t come to play that first game, we were defeated before it started,” he said. “We sat down with the older kids and said ‘You’ve got to lead,’ and they’ve started to take this team in the direction they want to go in.” Before meeting up with DeMatha, the Raiders punished Bowie 15-2 last Wednesday for their first MSHL Southern Division win. They followed the momentum up with a shock over the Stags who Barthelmes admitted may not have been at their peak form. “DeMatha’s had some injuries and if I were a betting man, I’d say they came out sluggish, but a win’s a win, he said. “We’ll take it.” Barthelmes wasn’t ready to predict a long winning streak or more upsets down the line, but he is pleased that his team is learning what it takes to be successful. “This was a great win for our team. It’s good for them to see if they come to play that you can win,” he said. chrisstevens@countytimes.net

After nearly a month of games against some of the best the state of Maryland has to offer, the St. Mary’s Ryken hockey team took care of business Friday, clobbering Thomas Stone 14-3 for their first MSHL Southern Division win of the season. “We’ve played very challenging teams (DeMatha, Gonzaga and Huntingtown) at the start of this season, and the guys were very determined and wanted this win,” head coach Chris Palombi said. “They just came together and it was a great team effort.” That team effort was spearheaded by a second line of freshmen that accounted for five points (four goals and one assist). In one of two personnel tweaks by Palombi (junior Michael Booz moved back to defenseman), Ryan Billman moved up to the second line with fellow first-year players Evan Brennan and Stephen Meyers and scored two goals in the first 2:05 of the game to jumpstart the Knights (2-5-0 overall, 1-1-0 in Southern Division games). Senior Matt McGowan led all skaters with a six point night (three goals and three assists) while Stephen Meyers, Nathan Blondino and T.J. Munns also scored two goals for Ryken. John Bouchard scored his first varsity goal and Ben Walter also found the back of the net, while junior Greg Meyers stopped 26 of 29 shots in goal. Palombi was pleased with the results of his

experiment. “Those guys are exciting to watch, fun to coach and they give us an added scoring threat,” Palombi said. He also had praise for Brennan, who assisted on one of Billman’s goals and provided Ryken with a valuable boost of energy. “Even after the Huntingtown game, he got compliments from a couple of their players who say he’s a blast to watch on the ice,” Palombi said. “They might underestimate him because of his size, but he’s got the body of a mouse with the heart of a lion.” Palombi also felt it was necessary to get the younger players more playing time because they were bystanders when the Knights had their rough early schedule. “It was nice to get them time to see what they can do and they all contributed,” he said. The Knights will face off against the very same Cougars Friday at Capital Clubhouse at 6:45 p.m., and Palombi would like to see the defense tighten up in tomorrow night’s game. “We had 66 shots on goal, but they still had 29. We had a lot of odd-man rushes against us and that’s not good, disciplined hockey,” he explained. “If we don’t let our emotions get the best of us and play together as a team, I think we’ll be fine.” chrisstevens@countytimes.net

Photo by Frank Marquart

eral Ryken turnovers and missed shots and scored baskets in transition. Good Counsel led by double digits from the first quarter on and were up by as many as 39 points in the final minute of action. “They played hard and shot the ball really well – sometimes with two people on them and a hand in their face, it is what it is,” Knights head coach Tara Everly said. Everly noted that Ryken (0-1 overall, 0-1 WCAC) made just 12 of 50 shots from the floor, including 2 of 12 from three-point range but she was pleased with the overall effort. “They didn’t give up or hang their heads, they battled all the way to the end,” she said. McCormick, who led all scorers with 21 points, knew exactly where Ryken went wrong on the evening. “We didn’t execute on offense,” she said simply. “We had some spurts where we ran our plays and our high pick and roll is good when we’re running it right.” Molly Grund and Bryanna Robinson added eight and six points for the Knights, who will host St. John’s Friday night at 7 p.m. Everly was happy to get this game over with, as she believes it was better for this kind of game to happen now than later in the season. “I’d rather us peak in February than start Photo by Frank Marquart out too fast and cool off,” she said. Molly Grund attempts a pass between two Good Counsel defenders durchrisstevens@countytimes.net ing St. Mary’s Ryken’s girls basketball season-opener Thursday night.

The Knights’ Bryanna Robinson soars past Good Counsel’s Amanda Fioravanti for a lay-up.

Photo by Frank Marquart

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Sp rts

The County Times

Thursday, December 16, 2010

30

Girls Basketball

Knights Hope to Forget About Season-Opening Loss By Chris Stevens Staff Writer

31

Thursday, December 16, 2010

Hockey

The County Times

Ryken Underclassmen Key Raiders Play Rout of Thomas Stone “Game of Their Lives,” Shock Dematha By Chris Stevens Staff Writer

Myla Somerville of St. Mary’s Ryken drives to the basket.

The season was one game old for the St. Mary’s Ryken girls’ basketball team and by all accounts, it was one game they would hope to soon forget. “It’s very important that we forget this game tonight,” junior guard Katie McCormick said after Good Counsel rolled to an 84-47 win Thursday evening in the Washington Catholic Athletic Conference opener for both teams. “We’ve got to wash it off.” The Knights, minus senior guard Zakiya Chambers-Hunter (out until January with an ACL injury) played their first game of the season against a Good Counsel team that moved the ball extremely well and had balanced scoring – 10 different Falcons got their names in the scoring column, led by Amanda Fioravanti’s 14 points. Gillian Abshire, Sara Woods and Sydney Lewis joined Fioravanti in double figures with 13, 11 and 10 points respectively. “That’s a key for us, our depth,” Falcons head coach Tom Splaine said. “We know SMR is tough to play, so we went all the way down to the very end of our bench.” The Falcons (4-0 overall, 1-0 in WCAC play) took advantage of sev-

Sp rts

By Chris Stevens Staff Writer

Leonardtown hockey Rob Barthelemes was honest in admitting that he didn’t expect the Raiders to beat DeMatha Friday night, but led by two goals each from freshman Cullen Bonnel and senior Charlie Yates, that’s just what happened – a 4-2 upset over the Stags at the Gardens Ice House in Laurel, their second straight win. “The result wasn’t what I expected, but the younger kids stepped up and played the game of their lives,” Barthelemes said. “The older players were leaders and that allowed the younger players to follow. It was a super game for us.” Goalie Brett Kibler also stopped 17 saves for the Raiders, who Barthelemes said have really come together after a meeting following a 13-1 loss to Huntingtown “We didn’t come to play that first game, we were defeated before it started,” he said. “We sat down with the older kids and said ‘You’ve got to lead,’ and they’ve started to take this team in the direction they want to go in.” Before meeting up with DeMatha, the Raiders punished Bowie 15-2 last Wednesday for their first MSHL Southern Division win. They followed the momentum up with a shock over the Stags who Barthelmes admitted may not have been at their peak form. “DeMatha’s had some injuries and if I were a betting man, I’d say they came out sluggish, but a win’s a win, he said. “We’ll take it.” Barthelmes wasn’t ready to predict a long winning streak or more upsets down the line, but he is pleased that his team is learning what it takes to be successful. “This was a great win for our team. It’s good for them to see if they come to play that you can win,” he said. chrisstevens@countytimes.net

After nearly a month of games against some of the best the state of Maryland has to offer, the St. Mary’s Ryken hockey team took care of business Friday, clobbering Thomas Stone 14-3 for their first MSHL Southern Division win of the season. “We’ve played very challenging teams (DeMatha, Gonzaga and Huntingtown) at the start of this season, and the guys were very determined and wanted this win,” head coach Chris Palombi said. “They just came together and it was a great team effort.” That team effort was spearheaded by a second line of freshmen that accounted for five points (four goals and one assist). In one of two personnel tweaks by Palombi (junior Michael Booz moved back to defenseman), Ryan Billman moved up to the second line with fellow first-year players Evan Brennan and Stephen Meyers and scored two goals in the first 2:05 of the game to jumpstart the Knights (2-5-0 overall, 1-1-0 in Southern Division games). Senior Matt McGowan led all skaters with a six point night (three goals and three assists) while Stephen Meyers, Nathan Blondino and T.J. Munns also scored two goals for Ryken. John Bouchard scored his first varsity goal and Ben Walter also found the back of the net, while junior Greg Meyers stopped 26 of 29 shots in goal. Palombi was pleased with the results of his

experiment. “Those guys are exciting to watch, fun to coach and they give us an added scoring threat,” Palombi said. He also had praise for Brennan, who assisted on one of Billman’s goals and provided Ryken with a valuable boost of energy. “Even after the Huntingtown game, he got compliments from a couple of their players who say he’s a blast to watch on the ice,” Palombi said. “They might underestimate him because of his size, but he’s got the body of a mouse with the heart of a lion.” Palombi also felt it was necessary to get the younger players more playing time because they were bystanders when the Knights had their rough early schedule. “It was nice to get them time to see what they can do and they all contributed,” he said. The Knights will face off against the very same Cougars Friday at Capital Clubhouse at 6:45 p.m., and Palombi would like to see the defense tighten up in tomorrow night’s game. “We had 66 shots on goal, but they still had 29. We had a lot of odd-man rushes against us and that’s not good, disciplined hockey,” he explained. “If we don’t let our emotions get the best of us and play together as a team, I think we’ll be fine.” chrisstevens@countytimes.net

Photo by Frank Marquart

eral Ryken turnovers and missed shots and scored baskets in transition. Good Counsel led by double digits from the first quarter on and were up by as many as 39 points in the final minute of action. “They played hard and shot the ball really well – sometimes with two people on them and a hand in their face, it is what it is,” Knights head coach Tara Everly said. Everly noted that Ryken (0-1 overall, 0-1 WCAC) made just 12 of 50 shots from the floor, including 2 of 12 from three-point range but she was pleased with the overall effort. “They didn’t give up or hang their heads, they battled all the way to the end,” she said. McCormick, who led all scorers with 21 points, knew exactly where Ryken went wrong on the evening. “We didn’t execute on offense,” she said simply. “We had some spurts where we ran our plays and our high pick and roll is good when we’re running it right.” Molly Grund and Bryanna Robinson added eight and six points for the Knights, who will host St. John’s Friday night at 7 p.m. Everly was happy to get this game over with, as she believes it was better for this kind of game to happen now than later in the season. “I’d rather us peak in February than start Photo by Frank Marquart out too fast and cool off,” she said. Molly Grund attempts a pass between two Good Counsel defenders durchrisstevens@countytimes.net ing St. Mary’s Ryken’s girls basketball season-opener Thursday night.

The Knights’ Bryanna Robinson soars past Good Counsel’s Amanda Fioravanti for a lay-up.

Photo by Frank Marquart

ng

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Vehicle Wraps & Full Color Banners

• Vehicle Wraps • Vehicle Lettering • Banners • Graphic/Logo Design • Decals/Stickers • Screen Printing • Custom T-Shirt Printing

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THURSDAY December 16, 2010

Chancellor’s Run Road to Open Next Week Story Page 5

Yoga and Wellness Center Opens Story Page 9

Rough Start for Ryken Girls

Page 30

Photo By Victor Marquart

2010-12-16 The County Times  

2010-12-16 The County Times

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