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Florida Bay ENP Wrecks

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The Florida Keys The Paradise of the South

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A New Trend in Recreational Angling The Species Hunters

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Moldeando al Marlín: Leonardo Calzadilla Chávez


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ol y Mar Magazine es la primera y única revista digital bilingüe en el mundo que incluye información sobre turismo, pesca, industria marítima, hostelería, recreación, pesca deportiva y propiedades frente al mar, que ofrece a nuestros lectores una variedad de diferentes temas de interés en cada una de sus ediciones. Sol y Mar Magazine se puede encontrar fácilmente en los principales buscadores de Internet por texto o por palabras clave, así como en nuestra página web: www.solymarmagazine.com. Sol y Mar Magazine se envía a decenas de miles de personas e instituciones, de las cuales el 89% se encuentran en el sur de la Florida y el resto en distintos países de todos los continentes. La edad promedio de nuestros lectores oscila entre 20 y 65 años de edad. Si desea ampliar su negocio, especialmente en el poderoso mercado hispano, le sugerimos anunciarse en nuestra revista. ¡Bienvenido a bordo de Sol y Mar Magazine! www.solymarmagazine.com

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ol y Mar Magazine is the first and only digital bilingual publication in the world that includes information about tourism, fishing, waterfront properties, maritime industry, restoration, recreation, sport fishing and innovations among other things that are entertaining, informative and interesting to that appears in the advertiser’s own website and also (his/hers)our reader, who (will enjoy) a wide variety subjects and knowledge of different topics in our publication that addresses each of its editions. Sol y Mar Magazine can be easily found in the main Internet search engines by text or by key words, as well as on our web page: www.solymarmagazine.com. Sol y Mar Magazine is sent to tens of thousands individuals and institutions, of which 89% are located in southern Florida and the remaining to another countries in all continents. The average age of our readers is between 20 and 65 years old. If you want to expand your business, especially in the powerful Hispanic market, we suggest you advertise in our magazine. Welcome aboard Sol y Mar Magazine! www.solymarmagazine.com

PEDRO DÍAZ Presidente y Editor President and Editor info@solymarmagazine.com www.solymarmagazine.com

Cover/Portada: Pedro Díaz Back Cover/Contraportada: Dr. Martin Aróstegui Director de Arte: Mario Carpio graficos@mariocarpio.com Visit us at/ Visitenos en:

Prohibida la reproducción parcial o total de los artículos, fotos y anuncios aparecidos en Sol y Mar Magazine sin la autorización o el consentimiento del editor. Sol y Mar Magazine no se responsabiliza por el daño causado por las opiniones, expresiones, entrevistas, reportajes, artículos, declaraciones, ideas, imágenes, fotografías y anuncios publicados en las páginas de esta revista, ni asume tampoco responsabilidad alguna por los servicios o productos anunciados en sus páginas.

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The partial or total reproduction of any of the articles, photos or advertisements featured in Sol y Mar Magazine, absent the Editor’s express authorization or consent, is prohibited. Sol y Mar Magazine is not responsible for any potential damage caused by opinions, expressions, interviews, documentaries, articles, declarations, ideas, images, photographs or ads published on the pages of this magazine, nor does it assume any responsibility for the services or products advertised in its pages.

Publicity and advertising are not cost; they are an investment in your business that will attract possible costumers. Publicity and advertising have the power to convince potential customers by means of ideas, words and images to purchase your products and contract for your services. Advertise now in Sol y Mar Magazine at a very reasonable price. SOL & MAR MAGAZINE

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FLORIDA BAY /ENP WRECKS By Pat Ford

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ith all the hoopla going around about the multiple plans to close off a great many sections of Everglades National Park, a lot more attention is being directed to the various wrecks and patches just out side the Park boundaries. These shallow wrecks can be outstanding at times for grouper, snapper, big redfish, snook, cobia, barracuda , jacks, mackerel, occasionally tarpon and unfortunately big sharks and huge Goliath Grouper. Unfortunately, some days they can be deader than a dog’s water dish, but the initial problem is the same as with most wrecks – you’ve got to find them.

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I can remember way back around 40 years ago when guys from the fish clubs were lugging junk out past the boundaries of the Park and dumping it in a recorded GPS site. It doesn’t take much to attract fish out in that area…the bottom is just sand and anything that causes any kind of a break in the current will attract baitfish which then attract the predators. This plan worked pretty well for a while with only a select few knowing the coordinates and reaping the benefits…until the first hurricane blew in. Bye bye wreck! There are probably still some manmade wrecks out there, some of which are mounds of lobster traps just dumped at the end of the season, but al lot are major structures that hold up to the massive tidal surges of storms like Wilma and keep holding fish. Capt Randy Towe of Islamorada has over two dozen that he fishes regularly, hopping from one to another till he finds the one holding fish. Way out there, there are some ‘blue holes’ which are amazing at times, but they are a long run in a flats boat so the weather has to be perfect. One you find one of these secret corners of fish heaven, there are several ways to effectively fish them. There are sometimes schools of permit and/or cobia on the surface so it pays to have a spinning rod ready while you still trying to pinpoint the structure. At times there are schools of jacks busting bait in the area or turtles…every wreck seems to have its resident turtle. The very first time you spot the wreck on your depth sounder – throw out a buoy, just to be on the safe side. You don’t want to get distracted and have to start looking all over again. The next step is to anchor up current so your chum drifts back to the wreck. Frozen ground chum and pilchards or glass minnows can work wonders. Have a throw away buoy for your anchor 16

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because you do not want to fight a good fish over the wreck. It’s first instinct may be to run into the debris and cut you off, but the greater risk is that a goliath grouper will eat it. Even though most of these wrecks are in less than 20 feet of water, they still hold goliaths up to 800 lbs. I’ve had goliaths eat 25 lb permit right below the boat and bull sharks eat everything that the giant grouper miss. It can be tough but the best story comes from Capt Randy Towe who is a regular visitor to these shallow wrecks. One day he brought his friend, Dave Crusiger, out to the Blue Hole. Dave is a jet pilot and an experienced diver and wanted to take a first hand look at what was living around the rim of the whole; so after they’d caught a few snapper and grouper, Dave decided to hop over the side and see what was really happening below them. The water is usually pretty murky in the Gulf, but on this particular day, it wasn’t that bad and there wasn’t much current, so over he went. The depth to the edge of the ‘Hole’ is around 40 feet and the actual hole drops to 125’ or more. As Dave worked his way to the bottom, the first thing he noticed was a 600 lb goliath hovering directly under the boat. When he reached the 40’ bottom, he could see dozens of Goliath groupers holding on and just over the edge. There were lots of snapper and grouper but the goliaths were off the chart size wise. This explained why anything that got hooked and couldn’t be horsed to the surface got eaten. A goliath would suck in its prize and, as soon as it felt the rod tension, it would simply swim down into the safety of the ‘Hole’ and cut the line on the edge. As he crouched on the edge of the ‘Hole’, Dave looked up at a school of permit swimming overhead when suddenly he was covered by an immense shadow. It completely blocked out the light and looked like a boat except it wasn’t a boat – it was a bull shark. A huge bull shark. As he looked up and around, all he could see SOL & MAR MAGAZINE

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were sharks….dozens of them. That was the end of his ‘Blue Hole’ diving career. When he got back into the boat, and calmed down, he finally looked at Randy and said: “On a spook factor scale of 1 to 10, that was a 12”. He was in the water less than 8 minutes. If you want to know why it’s next to impossible to land a fish on some of the shallow Gulf wrecks…just ask Dave. My first trip to one of these wrecks was with Capt Andy Novak of LMR Custom Rods and Tackle in Ft. Lauderdale. We launched out of Chokoloski and ran south looking for pilchards. He had found a new wreck that was loaded with snook just a few days earlier and in was in 15’ of clear water, so he was pretty excited. We got lucky and netted up a bunch of pilchards in a relatively short time and headed offshore. About a half hour later we came up to a dark shape on a light colored bottom. The surface was ruffled by a light breeze and we could see a dark mass just off the wreck – it was a school of huge shook. Andy set up a drift , threw out a netfull of live pilchards and everything went nuts. I was using a 10 weight fly rod with a full sinking, hi density “striper” line – my favorite combination for deep water fly fishing. That day we caught over 20 snook on baitfish patterns and at least a dozen of them were over 20 lbs. I’ve never had a day like that in the Gulf before or after and that was many years ago. On subsequent trips with Andy we’ve specifically targeted permit. In the summer they school up on the wrecks and can be caught on crab flies pretty consistently, if you can find them. They usually aren’t right over the wreck, but they will come into the chum lie and suck in a live crab. However, the best way to take one on a fly is to look for the big schools that are usually circling the wreck, sometimes a good distance out. The strategy is to drift down on 20

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the school and throw a fly right into the middle of them. I use either a slow sinking clear line or the fast sinking striper line with six feet of leader tapered to 20 lb florocarbon on a 10 weight outfit. My favorite crab fly is a Velcro pattern tied by Capt. Chris Dean in Miami. The normal way to fish these shallow wrecks is with a sturdy spinning rod with 30-50 lb braid and a floro carbon leader. Live pinfish, pilchards and crabs are best for the bigger fish. If you use shrimp the little guys will eat you alive and the goliaths will destroy them and your tackle.. I like to bounce the baits on the bottom with a 3/8oz jig head. If you want to try a day on one of these shallow Gulf wrecks, give Randy Towe a call at 305-394-2667 or go looking for them yourself. Good luck with that second idea.

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The Florida Keys: T he Florida Keys are 15 miles away from Florida’s southern coast, right below Miami. There are about 137.3 square miles of keys and over 1700 islands, but only a handful of them are inhabited. There are about 42 bridges connecting the various islands but the Seven Mile Bridge is the longest of them all, and considered a landmark in South Florida. The Keys are part of Monroe County, which is comprised of seaside cities, Dry Tortugas National Park and a large chunk of the Everglades. Key West is considered the capital of the county, but also the most popular city in the area. For some historical background, the Keys were once occupied by the Calusa and

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The Paradise of the South

Tequesta Native American Tribes. Later on during European colonization, Juan Ponce de Leon discovered the islands and gave them the name “cayo” which means small island in Spanish. The islands were only accessible by boat until Henry Flagler built a railroad in the early 1910’s down into the keys. The Florida Keys are also known for having several biomes to explore, such as beautiful beaches and underwater reefs. The most popular of these is called Dry Tortugas National Park, which is a secluded key about 70 miles west from Key West. Much of the keys are isolated as well, which means there areas of the keys that not many people have visited before. Because of its biodiversity, ecotourism has


become for many years a large part of the economy of the Florida Keys. Tourism and fishing are definitely the major industries of the islands.

Since a lot of people come to Florida to retire, they often look for homes that provide them peace and comfort. The Florida Keys are perfect for those looking for a laid back life, but it is in fact one of the more quiet areas of South Florida, while still providing activities for those whom are a bit more adventurous. There are also properties depending on preference and budget, of course. The Keys offers condos in Key West to beachfront property in Islamorada. If owning property down in the Keys sounds like something you would be interested in, please feel free to contact me and I will work with you to find your dream home.

Tury CĂŠspedes MBA, Realtor Associate Century 21 Dorar Realty, Miami, Florida Member of the Luxury Homes Institute Cell: (305)-878-5442 Tury0606@yahoo.com SOL & MAR MAGAZINE

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A NEW TREND IN RECREATIONAL ANGLING THE SPECIES HUNTERS By Dr. Martin Arรณstegui

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artini Arostegui and Steve Wozniak have spent weeks preparing for their upcoming fishing expedition by networking with angling friends and studying maps on Google Earth. Their goals are very different than those of other anglers. They are not looking for the biggest fish or planning to enter a fishing tournament, instead they are looking to find new species of fish that they have not caught before. In this new angling trend, size doesn’t matter and in many cases the fish they seek are quite small, in fact so small that they require micro hooks, one pound test line and small clear plastic jars that can be used to properly photograph the fish before releasing them back safely. Meet the new “Species Hunters� Steve is the grand master of the sport; he has logged more than 1700 species of fish he has caught over the years while fishing in 91 countries and 49 states in both fresh and salt water. Martini met Steve while he was a student at Stanford University and was looking for a new fishing buddy. They became the best of friends and go fishing together every time they have a chance. Martini now has 600 fish species in his life list. Martini and Steve have also contributed many entries to the International Game Fish Association citizen science program by entering many of the fish they have caught which qualify as All Tackle World Records. Steve started species hunting in 1997 after winning an argument with a fellow angler as to how many species of fish each had caught. Steve and Martini feel that this sport is about all fish and not just a few increasingly scarce game fish. The concept of species hunting has gained many enthusiasts in the last few years and today there are many Internet based organizations where anglers can participate, log in their catches and communicate with fellow anglers. Recently, the State of Florida recognized this new trend in angling by creating a saltwater species life list as part of their angler recognition program. Anglers receive special recognition as they make progress in completing all the catches on the list. In my opinion, Species Hunting is a new and exiting way to participate in the sport of fishing.

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UNA NUEVA TENDENCIA EN LA PESCA RECREATIVA LOS CAZADORES DE ESPECIES Por Dr. Martin Arรณstegui

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artini Arostegui y Steve Wozniak han pasado semanas preparándose para su próxima expedición de pesca, mediante la creación de redes con amigos de pesca y el estudio de mapas en Google Earth. Sus objetivos son muy diferentes a los de otros pescadores. No buscan el pez más grande o planear ingresar a un torneo de pesca, sino que buscan encontrar nuevas especies de peces que no hayan capturado antes. En esta nueva tendencia de pesca, el tamaño no importa y en muchos casos los peces que buscan son bastante pequeños, de hecho tan pequeños que requieren micro anzuelos, una línea de una libra y pequeños frascos de plástico transparentes que se pueden utilizar para fotografiar adecuadamente el pescado antes de liberarlos de forma segura. Conoce a los nuevos “cazadores de especies” Steve es el gran maestro del deporte. Ha registrado más de 1700 especies de peces que ha capturado a lo largo de los años, en 91 países y 49 Estados en aguadulce y salada. Martini conoció a Steve cuando era estudiante en la Universidad de Stanford y estaba buscando un nuevo compañero de pesca. Se convirtieron en los mejores amigos y van a pescar juntos cada vez que tienen una oportunidad. Martini ahora tiene 600 especies de peces en su lista de vida. Martini y Steve también han contribuido a registrar muchas especies al programa de ciencia ciudadana de la Asociación Internacional de PescaDeportiva (International Game Fish Association) al ingresar a muchos de los peces capturados que califican como All Tackle World Records. Steve comenzó a pescar especies en 1997 después de ganar una discusión con un compañero pescador sobre cuántas especies de peces habían capturado. Steve y Martini sienten que este deporte se trata de todos los peces y no solo de unos pocos peces designados como peces deportivos los cuales son cada vez más escasos. El concepto de captura de especies ha ganado muchos entusiastas en los últimosaños y hoy en día existen muchas organizaciones en Internet, donde los pescadores pueden participar, iniciar sesión en sus capturas y comunicarse con otros pescadores. Recientemente, el Estado de La Florida reconoció esta nueva tendencia en la pesca al crear una lista de especies de agua salada como parte de su programa de reconocimiento de pescadores. Los pescadores reciben reconocimiento especial a medida que avanzan en completar todas lascapturas en la lista. En mi opinión, Cazadores de Especies es una novedosa y emocionante forma de participar en el deporte de la pesca. 136

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MOLDEANDO EL MARLIN Leonardo Calzadilla Chávez (La Habana, 1966) Fotos Dr. Martin Aróstegui y Autor

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onsagrado por haber sido el creador de las últimas 10 ediciones del Torneo Internacional de la Pesca de la Aguja Ernest Hemingway, el escultor y orfebre Leonardo Calzadilla Chávez (La Habana, 1966) se ha posicionado en el mundo de las artes plásticas a partir de una formación de oficios tributarios a su perfil que ha transitado, tanto en Cuba como en México, desde las técnicas de taladrado, fresado y buceo hasta el diseño, platería repujada, cincelado y alambrería artística, amén de otras igualmente asociadas a la orfebrería y la escultura. En particular, para confeccionar las piezas con picos del emperador (sword fish), usado para los trofeos del referido Torneo y de agujas (marlin), al igual que de huesos de vaca, vértebras de tiburón, tarros de chivos, madera o cualquier material que permita ser moldeado, utiliza principalmente las técnicas de bajo relieve y el tallado tridimensional de algunas muestras; todas elaboradas manualmente con el concurso de herramientas e insumos tradicionales. Las maderas empleadas por él son: yaba, caoba, jocuma, jiquí, ácana, sabicú, júcaro, majagua son recuperadas de demoliciones, lo que le da un cierto matiz ecológico muy actual a su obra al prolongar la vida útil de esas materias primas, a la par que preserva el medio ambiente. En su faceta de orfebre el versátil artista explota las técnicas de la joyería –fundición, laminado, trefilado, calado, soldadura, grabado al brillo y pulido y aplica a su vez el engastado, cincelado y repujado, incorpora también el trabajo de piedras semipreciosa. Se vale además de la alambrería artística, técnica milenaria usada por el hombre por los siglos de los siglos. Cobre, bronce, aluminio, acero inoxidable, hierro, alpaca y plata son algunos de los materiales utilizados, así como cualquier otro metal que pueda transformarse en prendas, frascos, broches y otros objetos utilitarios, bellos y artísticos que recrean la vista humana y el espíritu, sobre la base del propio principio del reciclaje y la concesión de otra vida útil.

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Una decena de donaciones al proyecto Rutas y Andares de la Oficina del Historiador de la ciudad de La Habana, congregaciones de plateros y otras instituciones culturales obran en su aval. Tres exposiciones personales y casi sesenta muestras en concursos, eventos y exposiciones colectivas, en hoteles, museos y galerĂ­as; y mĂĄs de treinta desfiles en vivo a manera de performances, en franco ascenso desde el 2003 a la fecha, confirman su quehacer artĂ­stico. SOL & MAR MAGAZINE

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Back Cover Photo/Contraportada: Dr. Martin Arรณstegui

Sol y Mar Magazine edición 50  

Sol y Mar Magazine es la primera y única revista digital bilingüe en el mundo que incluye turismo, pesca, propiedades frente al mar e indust...

Sol y Mar Magazine edición 50  

Sol y Mar Magazine es la primera y única revista digital bilingüe en el mundo que incluye turismo, pesca, propiedades frente al mar e indust...

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