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Contenido Content 4 Florida Shark Diving Adventure.

46 Migratory Birds of the Everglades.

Aves migratorias de los Everglades.

104 Auspicius takes top honors at the Casa de Campo International Blue Marlin Classic.

118 Carnival Magic to feature new guy fieri-designed open-air barbecue eatery offering traditional smokehouse favorites.

142 Incredible marine Habitats:

Mangroves “Rainforests of the Sea”

178 Bucket list weekend to meet legendary backcountry guides and chase a $10,000 prize and trophies during the inaugural Blazing Mako Tournament & Festival in Islamorada.

206 Why you will never see an exterminator spraying a pesticide in a hospital?

210 Tecnología Marina

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ol y Mar Magazine es la primera y única revista digital bilingüe en el mundo que incluye información sobre turismo, pesca, industria marítima, hostelería, recreación, pesca deportiva y propiedades frente al mar, que ofrece a nuestros lectores una variedad de diferentes temas de interés en cada una de sus ediciones. Sol y Mar Magazine se puede encontrar fácilmente en los principales buscadores de Internet por texto o por palabras clave, así como en nuestra página web: www.solymarmagazine.com. Sol y Mar Magazine se envía a decenas de miles de personas e instituciones, de las cuales el 89% se encuentran en el sur de la Florida y el resto en distintos países de todos los continentes. La edad promedio de nuestros lectores oscila entre 20 y 65 años de edad. Si desea ampliar su negocio, especialmente en el poderoso mercado hispano, le sugerimos anunciarse en nuestra revista. ¡Bienvenido a bordo de Sol y Mar Magazine! www.solymarmagazine.com

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ol y Mar Magazine is the first and only digital bilingual publication in the world that includes information about tourism, fishing, waterfront properties, maritime industry, restoration, recreation, sport fishing and innovations among other things that are entertaining, informative and interesting to that appears in the advertiser’s own website and also (his/hers)our reader, who (will enjoy) a wide variety subjects and knowledge of different topics in our publication that addresses each of its editions. Sol y Mar Magazine can be easily found in the main Internet search engines by text or by key words, as well as on our web page: www.solymarmagazine.com. Sol y Mar Magazine is sent to tens of thousands individuals and institutions, of which 89% are located in southern Florida and the remaining to another countries in all continents. The average age of our readers is between 20 and 65 years old. If you want to expand your business, especially in the powerful Hispanic market, we suggest you advertise in our magazine. Welcome aboard Sol y Mar Magazine! www.solymarmagazine.com

PEDRO DÍAZ Presidente y Editor President and Editor info@solymarmagazine.com www.solymarmagazine.com

Cover Photo Foto de Portada: Pat Ford Director de Arte: Mario Carpio graficos@mariocarpio.com

Prohibida la reproducción parcial o total de los artículos, fotos y anuncios aparecidos en Sol y Mar Magazine sin la autorización o el consentimiento del editor. Sol y Mar Magazine no se responsabiliza por el daño causado por las opiniones, expresiones, entrevistas, reportajes, artículos, declaraciones, ideas, imágenes, fotografías y anuncios publicados en las páginas de esta revista, ni asume tampoco responsabilidad alguna por los servicios o productos anunciados en sus páginas.

La publicidad no es un gasto, sino una inversión de su propio negocio para atraer a posibles compradores, espectadores y usuarios. La publicidad tiene el poder de convencer al consumidor, por medio de la comunicación de ideas, palabras e imágenes, de comprar un producto y contratar un servicio. ¡Anúnciese ahora en Sol y Mar Magazine por un precio módico!.

The partial or total reproduction of any of the articles, photos or advertisements featured in Sol y Mar Magazine, absent the Editor’s express authorization or consent, is prohibited. Sol y Mar Magazine is not responsible for any potential damage caused by opinions, expressions, interviews, documentaries, articles, declarations, ideas, images, photographs or ads published on the pages of this magazine, nor does it assume any responsibility for the services or products advertised in its pages.

Publicity and advertising are not cost; they are an investment in your business that will attract possible costumers. Publicity and advertising have the power to convince potential customers by means of ideas, words and images to purchase your products and contract for your services. Advertise now in Sol y Mar Magazine at a very reasonable price. SOL & MAR MAGAZINE

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FLORIDA SHARK DIVING ADVENTURE

By Pat Ford Photos: Pat Ford 4

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everal months ago Hunter Ledbetter asked me if I’d like to help him out on a photo shoot in Jupiter. Since Hunter is somewhat famous for photo shoots with beautiful models, I jumped at the chance. The details were a bit vague at first, but we’d be riding along with Bryce Rohrer, owner and operator of Florida Shark Diving. I had heard of Florida Shark Diving but never got organized enough to actually dive with them so this was a big bonus. The first few days we scheduled had to be canceled due to high winds but on our third try the weather gods smiled on us and we were good to go. We met Bryce and dive master, Mike Dornellas, at the U-Tiki Marina on Jupiter Inlet at 9 am. The sun was out and winds were under 10k, and a dozen of Hunter’s free diving models appeared right on time. Free divers take their trips very seriously…no one is late for a dive trip!

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The program was explained as follows: we were looking for sharks! We’d run a dozen or so miles outside of Florida state waters to a depth of almost 200 feet. Bryce had several frozen bonito to lure the sharks into viewing range. They had a safety line and a shorter line to a nylon crate holding the chopped up bonito. Mike was in charge of breaking off small chunks of bonito to bring the sharks in as close as possible. The girls could hang on the safety line and dive down to get closer to the sharks if the wished. Hunter, Mike and I all had cameras and would try to shoot as much of the action as possible. We could expect to see most any species of shark that inhabits Florida waters. We didn’t get to pick which fish flavor would appear on a given day but it didn’t really matter….it was all good. We hadn’t been drifting very long until Mike reported that we had a half dozen bull sharks in the chum line. I’m not particularly fond of bull sharks even though I’ve spent a lot of time diving with them in Bimini. They’re a bit creepy to be polite as well as very dangerous if the get excited. Bryce assured us that there was nothing to be concerned about as long as you didn’t do some thing radically stupid…such as getting in the water? Well that didn’t meet his criteria of ‘stupid’ enough to get yourself hurt and he added that the bull sharks were actually very skittish. If you dove down at them, they would see you as a predator and run. If I wanted to get some decent photos, I should dive down way ahead of them and come up below them. If I got deeper than the sharks and just let myself float up with them, they would think I was just a mutant critter that

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was also interested in a free snack and ignore me. The only glitch was that I’d have to free dive down about 30-40 feet to get below the sharks and I’m not an experienced free diver…I like those things that you put on your back that hold AIR! Some of the girls put me to shame but after a while I got the hang of it… sort of. Mike on the other hand was part fish and had no trouble deep diving and holding his breath about twice as long as I could. The bulls treated him like a brother and repeatedly swam right up to him to pose for photos. I got into fairly decent position a few times and had several sharks swim right up to me, but just the noise of the camera shutter would send them running. They were just as timid as predicted and seemed content to snack on the small pieces of bonito that Mike would portion out to them. It’s always best to keep the chum in small chunks with bull sharks. If you drift back a whole fish to them they can get pretty excited and competitive which is not good. You want to keep them calm and happy. During the course of the morning we saw maybe a dozen bull sharks and one sandbar shark. As the weather gets nicer, the bull sharks thin out and silkies, duskys, hammerheads and tigers appear on a regular basis along with Mahi and an occasional wahoo or other game fish…you never really know what’s going to show up on a specific day, but the summer days are the best. Bryce runs both morning and afternoon trips whenever the weather cooperates. Check out Floridasharkdiving.com for all the details and don’t forget to bring your GoPro or underwater camera. It’s an amazing experience that will last a lifetime. I’ll be a frequent passenger this summer for sure.

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MIGRATORY BIRDS OF THE EVERGLADES By Dr. Martin Ar贸stegui

During spring large numbers of wading birds can be found in the Everglades. They come to make their nests during the dry season, when it is easy to capture the fish they need to feed their young. This is the best time of the year to visit the Everglades in order to enjoy the beauty of all these birds.

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AVES MIGRATORIAS DE LOS EVERGLADES Por Dr. Martin Ar贸stegui

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n la primavera vienen muchas aves migratorias a los Everglades de la Florida para hacer sus nidos, porque como hay sequia el nivel de las aguas disminuye y ellas pueden capturar los peces fĂĄcilmente para darle de comer a sus crias cuando nacen. Por ese motivo esta es la mejor ĂŠpoca del aĂąo para visitar los Everglades y disfrutar la belleza de todas las aves migratorias.

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AUSPICIOUS TAKES TOP HONORS AT THE CASA DE CAMPO INTERNATIONAL BLUE MARLIN CLASSIC By Rick Alvarez Photos: Richard Gibson

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n an event characterized by awesome blue marlin fishing it was the team aboard Florida Keys based 74’ Viking, Auspicious, that held on at the end to take top honors in this year’s prestigious Casa de Campo Blue Marlin Classic with a total of nine blue marlin releases. Itwas at thishighly contested March 31st to April 3rdevent with a tournament fleet of twenty one boats representing 5 countries where an impressive total of 85 blue marlin were released in three days of fishing. All participating boats registered blue marlin releases resulting in a very respectable average of a little over four blues per boat. Auspicious took the lead on day one taking home the daily by releasing their fourth blue at the end of the day and they held on until the last day despite serious challenges by South Carolina’s Reel Passion who caught up with them on the last day unable to catch one more blue and was therefore edged out on time thus 104

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finishing second. “The final hour of the last day was nerve wracking as we had only released one blue in the early morning while Reel Passion caught up to us at around 3:00PM but we held on” commented a smiling Captain Danny Lombardo. “Danny did some very fine work for us” added anglersBrendan Burke and Joseph Rahman in a chorus of praise for their captain.Third place with seven blue marlin releases belonged to Virginia Beaches’ Waterman. In the individual angler category Top Angler wasWaterman’s Kevin Paul with six blue marlin releases, and Auspicious’ Joseph Rahman and Mathew Bierley taking second and third place High Point Angler honors with five and four blue marlin respectively. During the event thanks to hosts Casa de Campo and Marina Casa de Campo, participants were treated to Happy Hours at the docks after fishing where tall fish tales were traded hosted by IBC Shipyard and Fogo do Brasil Restaurant, plus fabulous entertainment during the evenings such as the By The Sea Party courtesy of Matusalem Rum, the now infamous and grueling Donkey Polo Match with delicious Emilio’s hot dogs by Productos Chef on the lay day and during the Awards Banquet an energetic and colorful ‘Perico Ripiao’ show by the Ministry of Tourism’s Folklore Ballet troupe. Next year’s dates are tentatively set March 21st thru the 25th. Please Save the Dates.

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AUSPICIOUS SE CONDECORA GANADORES DEL CASA DE CAMPO INTERNATIONAL BLUE MARLIN CLASSIC

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Por Rick Alvarez Fotos: Richard Gibson

n un evento caracterizado por incomparable pesca de marlin azul los miembros del equipo a bordo de la 74’ Viking, Auspicious, de los Cayos de la Florida, aguantaron hasta el final para condecorarse ganadores en el prestigioso Casa de Campo Blue Marlin Classic de este año con nueve capturas de azules. Fue durante este reñido evento entre el 31 de marzo y el 3 de abril cuando el grupo de 21 embarcaciones compitiendo, representando 5 países, se liberaron vivos después de la pelea un impresionante total de 85 marlin azules, durante los tres días de pesca. Todos los equipos que compitieron registraron capturas resultando en un respetable promedio de 4 azules por embarcación. Auspicios tomó la delantera el primer día al liberar su cuarto azul al final de esa primera jornada y aguataron la posición hasta el último día a pesar de ser fuertemente retados por el equipo a bordo de la ReelPassion de Carolina del Sur, 108

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quienes lograron empatarlos pero no superarlos casi al del final del último día por consiguiente logrando el segundo lugar bajo el reglamento que dice que ‘El que empata pierde’. “La ultima hora de pesca fue un ataque de nervios ya que habíamos liberado una sola azul en la mañana mientras que ReelPassion logró empatarnos a alrededor de las 3:00PMpero aguantamos” comento el Capitán Danny Lombardo sonriendo. “Danny hizo un gran trabajo para el equipo” añadieron en coro a dos voces los pescadores del equipo BrendanBurke y Joseph Rahman elogiando a su capitán. El tercer lugar le perteneció a la Waterman de Virginia Beach con siete azules liberadas. En la categoría de pescadores individuales Kevin Paul de la Waterman obtuvo el primer lugar con seis azules y los pescadores de la AuspiciousJoseph Rahman y Mathew Bierley ocuparon el segundo y tercer lugar con cinco y cuatro azules respectivamente. SOL & MAR MAGAZINE

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Patrocinados por IBC Shipyard y Restaurante Fogo do Brasil durante el evento y gracias a la hospitalidad de los auspiciadores Casa de Campo y Marina Casa de Campo los participantes disfrutaron de HappyHours en los muelles después de la pesca donde abundó el intercambio de cuentos del pez enorme que se escapó, de igual maneragracias al Ron Matusalem todos gozaron bailando y festejando la noche del segundo día de pesca durante la fiesta ByThe Sea. Adicionalmente la diversión continuó el día de descanso con el partido de Polo en Burro donde los patrocinadores Productos Chef sirvieron deliciosos Perros Calientes de Emilio’s. Las celebraciones culminaron con el Banquete de Premiación con una colorida y energética presentación de ‘Perico Ripiao’ por el Ballet Folclóricoy grupo musical del Ministerio de Turismo de RD (MITUR). Las fechas para el próximo año están tentativamente señaladas del 21 al 25 de marzo. Por favor anoten sus calendarios.

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CARNIVAL MAGIC TO FEATURE NEW GUY FIERI-DESIGNED OPEN-AIR BARBECUE EATERY OFFERING TRADITIONAL SMOKEHOUSE FAVORITES

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‘Guy’s Pig & Anchor Bar-B-Que Smokehouse’ To Offer Smoked-on-Board Pork Butt, Beef, Chicken, and Sausage, Delicious Sides, Fieri’s Own Sauces and More

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hef and restaurateur Guy Fieri, whose Guy’s Burger Joints on Carnival Cruise Line ships have earned a reputation as the best burgers at sea, has expanded his seagoing culinary offerings with a new authentic smokehouse and barbecue venue aboard Carnival Magic. Guy’s Pig & Anchor Bar-B-Que Smokehouse is a casual open-air eatery located on Carnival Magic’s Lanai on Promenade Deck featuring a wide variety of BBQ favorites smoked right on board over hickory and cherry wood using Guy’s signature recipes, rubs and spices. A member of the American Royal National Barbecue Hall of Fame, Fieri is cooking up real-deal smokehouse favorites like bone-in, dry-rubbed, slowsmoked and pulled Championship Pork Butt, dry-rubbed and grilled Blue Ribbon Chicken, smoked Andouille sausage and Sliced Smoked Round of Beef cooked “low and slow” and thinly sliced.   A rarity on cruise ships, Guy’s Pig & Anchor Bar-BQue Smokehouse features a traditional wood smoker which was installed on board as part of a recent dry dock. Guy’s Pig & Anchor Bar-B-Que Smokehouse also features Fieri’s own unique take on traditional side dishes with deliciously creative offerings like Mac Daddy Mac n Cheese, Old Skool Potato Salad, Scratch-Made Slaw, Collard Greens with Smoked Turkey, and Molasses Baked Beans with Bacon and Burnt Ends. All items at Guy’s Pig & Anchor Bar-B-Que Smokehouse will be available free of charge. Diners can spice up their dishes with Fieri’s signature BBQ sauces, including Award-Winning Brown Sugar (sweet and sticky), Kansas City (smoky and sweet), and Sriracha BBQ (spicy and tangy) and Carolina #6 (tangy with sweet heat).   A hot sauce bar, as well as a wide range of ice-cold beers and sodas, will be available, as well. Open sea days from noon to 2:30 p.m., Guy’s Pig & Anchor Bar-B-Que Smokehouse is part of Carnival Magic’s extensive multi-million-dollar renovation that spanned three weeks and added a variety of exciting new dining and bar concepts, SOL & MAR MAGAZINE

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including, of course, a Guy’s Burger Joint, a free-of-charge poolside venue serving hand-crafted burgers and fries with recipes created by the Food Network star. Including Carnival Magic, Guy’s Burger Joints are available on 11 Carnival ships and serve more than 1,000 burgers per ship per day.  Guy’s Burger Joint will also be featured aboard the new Carnival Vista when it debuts in May. Other newly added spaces on Carnival Magic include two poolside bars – the RedFrog Rum Bar and BlueIguana Tequila Bar – along with the BlueIguana Cantina serving authentic Mexican tacos and burritos, Pizzeria del Capitano offering hand-tossed artisanal pies, the cocktail pharmacy-themed Alchemy Bar, and a “candy and more store” called Cherry on Top. www.carnival.com/guysbbq

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INCREDIBLE MARINE HABITATS: MANGROVES “RAINFORESTS OF THE SEA” By Maria Bello Photos: NOAA Photo Library y Pedro Díaz

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angroves are a group of trees and shrubs that live in the coastal intertidal zone where rainforests meet oceans, being more than 35 mangrove tree species worldwide. Their intricate root system, provide food, shelter from predators and nursery areas for fish, birds, crustaceans and other marine or terrestrial organisms. They also provide a source of livelihood for many humans around the world, including wood for fuel, charcoal, timber and areas for fishing. Mangroves have a very specialized adaptations that enable them to live in salty waters. Breathing roots allow them to survive in anaerobic sediments. Buttresses and aboveground roots enable them to grow in unstable mud flats. Their foliage removes excess salt from the sap, and they conserve water to cope with periods of high salinity. Their seeds are buoyant to allow them to disperse and establish themselves in new areas. Mangroves can provide natural defenses against extreme weather events and disasters, helping to reduce the loss of property and the vulnerability of local communities. In combination with other risk-reduction measures, such as sea walls and early-warning systems, mangroves are often cheaper than conventional solutions to such risks, such as jetties or constructed breakwaters. These structures must be maintained and rebuilt over time. Mangroves can adapt to sea-level rises and land subsidence in ways that engineered defenses cannot. They are exceptionally good at storing greenhouse gas emissions, when mangroves are degraded or destroyed, these carbon stocks are released to the great detriment of our atmosphere. Emissions resulting from mangrove losses make up nearly one fifth of global emissions from

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deforestation, causing economic damages estimated in the billions annually. Today mangrove forests are one of the most threatened habitats in the world due to: • Natural threats: hurricanes, root clogging from increased water turbidity, and damage from boring organisms and parasites. • Human impacts: dredging, filling, diking, oil spills, and runoff of human waste and herbicides. Some coastal development results in total loss of habitat. Ironically, mangroves have been disappeared with an alarming speed. By some estimates, less than 50 percent of the world’s mangrove forests were intact at the end of the 20th century, and half of those that remain are in poor condition. As today, Thailand has lost 84 percent of its mangroves, the highest rate of mangrove loss of any nation, while the Ivory Coast, Guinea-Bissau, Tanzania, Mexico, Panama, Malaysia, Myanmar, Pakistan, and the Philippines have each lost more than 60 percent of their mangrove forests. Most mangroves grow on public land, only about 1 percent of which receives any sort of protection. Public awareness and education about the mangrove forests may help protect them, but it is necessary to involve local communities and governments in managing and protecting their mangroves. Despite great efforts in some countries creating designated conservation areas and regulations, the majority of national governments have not been able to enforce laws and regulate development and industry to save the wetlands as it is needed.

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HÁBITATS MARINOS INCREÍBLES: EL MANGLAR “SELVAS MARINAS”

Por Maria Bello Fotos: NOAA Photo Library y Pedro Díaz

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os manglares son un grupo de árboles y arbustos que viven en la zona intermareal de la costa, donde se encuentran las selvas tropicales y los océanos; existen más de 35 especies de árboles de mangle en todo el mundo. Su sistema de raíces intrincadas, proporciona alimento, refugio contra los depredadores y áreas de cría para peces, aves, crustáceos y otras especies marinas, así como a organismos terrestres. El manglar además es un medio de vida para muchas poblaciones costeras en todo el mundo, aportando madera como combustible, carbón, y zonas de pesca de subsistencia y recreativas. Los manglares tienen adaptaciones muy especializadas que les permiten vivir en aguas saladas; sus raíces con capacidad de respiración les ayudan a sobrevivir en sedimentos anaeróbicos. La forma peculiar de sus raíces les permite crecer en pisos de barros inestables. Su follaje elimina el exceso de sal de la savia, conservando el agua para hacer frente a períodos de alta salinidad. Sus semillas flotantes, presentan una gran capacidad de dispersión, por lo que constantemente se establecen en nuevas áreas. Los manglares pueden proporcionar defensas naturales contra los fenómenos meteorológicos extremos y desastres, ayudando a reducir la pérdida de la propiedad y la vulnerabilidad de las comunidades locales. En combinación con otras medidas de reducción del riesgo, tales como diques y sistemas de alerta temprana, los

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manglares son a menudo más baratos que las soluciones convencionales a este tipo de riesgos, tales como muelles o espigones construidos; estas estructuras deben ser mantenidas y reconstruidas a lo largo del tiempo. Sin embargo, los manglares pueden adaptarse a los aumentos del nivel del mar y al hundimiento del suelo donde la ingeniería no puede ayudar. Son excepcionalmente buenos en el almacenamiento de las emisiones de gases de efecto invernadero, cuando los manglares son degradados o destruidos, estas reservas de carbono se liberan con gran detrimento de nuestra atmósfera. Las emisiones resultantes de las pérdidas de manglares representan casi una quinta parte de las emisiones globales de la deforestación, causando daños económicos estimados en miles de millones al año. En la actualidad, los manglares son uno de los hábitats más amenazados en el mundo debido a: Eventos naturales: huracanes, sedimentación, obstrucción de las raíces, aumento de la turbidez del agua y daños ocasionados por organismos perforadores y parásitos. Impactos antropogénicos: dragado, relleno, construcción de diques, derrames de petróleo, escorrentía de desechos humanos y herbicidas, pérdida total de hábitat a consecuencia del desarrollo urbano costero y la acuacultura. Irónicamente, los manglares han desaparecido

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a una velocidad alarmante. Según los últimos estimados, menos del 50 por ciento de los bosques de manglares del mundo estaban intactos al final del siglo 20, y la mitad de los que quedan están en malas condiciones. Hasta la fecha, Tailandia ha perdido el 84% de sus manglares, la tasa más alta de pérdida de manglares de cualquier nación, mientras que Costa de Marfil, Guinea-Bissau, Tanzania, México, Panamá, Malasia, Myanmar, Pakistán y Filipinas han perdido más del 60 % de sus bosques de manglar. La mayoría de los manglares crecen en suelos públicos, recibiendo sólo alrededor del 1% algún tipo de protección. La conciencia pública y la educación sobre los manglares pueden ayudar a protegerlos, pero es necesario involucrar a las comunidades locales y gobiernos en la gestión y protección de sus manglares. A pesar de grandes esfuerzos en algunos países de crear áreas designadas y establecer regulaciones para la conservación, la mayoría de los gobiernos nacionales no han sido capaces de hacer cumplir las leyes y regular el desarrollo y la industria para salvar los manglares también conocidos como humedales. 152

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BUCKET LIST WEEKEND TO MEET LEGENDARY BACKCOUNTRY GUIDES AND CHASE A $10,000 PRIZE AND TROPHIES DURING THE INAUGURAL BLAZING MAKO TOURNAMENT & FESTIVAL IN ISLAMORADA Non-Profit June Event Presented by Nova Southeastern University and Guy Harvey Outpost Resorts to Fund Marine Science Student Scholarships By John Bell

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T

he tranquil Florida Bay, known to anglers as “the backcountry”, is an environmentally-sensitive estuary, home to hundreds of species of marine life, including top gamefish-bonefish, redfish, snook, permit, sea trout and the mighty silver king tarpon. Chasing these backcountry trophies strung along the six islands that comprise Islamorada are thousands of anglers on flat and bay boats often accompanied by the world’s largest collection of tournament grade captains and guides. “It’s truly the best place in the world to host an inshore fishing tournament,” said Captain Cliff Jensen, Director of Sport Fishing and Watersports for the Guy Harvey Outpost Resorts, which is managing the Father’s Day Blazing Mako Tournament & Festival scheduled for June 16-19 2016. “Islamorada is where backcountry sport fishing and saltwater fly fishing were pioneered.” Angler House Marina will be the venue for inshore boats to launch as well as fishing seminar for backcountry tournament anglers. Home to over 30 backcountry captains, the Angler House Marina includes some of the top fly fishing guides in the country. The Blazing Mako Tournament & Festival, named for Nova SOL & MAR MAGAZINE

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Southeastern University’s mascot— the mako shark— has designated a $2,500 entry fee (three anglers) for inshore competition. Whether fishing offshore or backcountry, teams are eligible for the $10,000 first prize and the perpetual Blazing Mako trophy, not to mention bragging rights as a top tournament angler. Jensen said tournament scoring will be based on a point system. These specially skilled guides employ techniques learned from some of the area’s fishing legends such as Ted Williams, Jimmy Albright, Cecil Keith and Stu Apte. Situated between the saltwater wilderness of Everglades National Park and Florida Strait, the backcountry and bays continue to provide great fishing on light tackle, many anglers stalking the prized tarpon, whose season runs from April through July. The fee is $5,000 per team (six anglers). To register for the inshore/ offshore division go to http://www. guyharveyoutpost.com/blazingmako/fishing.html. Please visit www.guyharveyoutpost. com for more information.

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WHY YOU WILL NEVER SEE AN EXTERMINATOR SPRAYING A PESTICIDE IN A HOSPITAL? Have you ever wondered how a hospital surgical room remains sterile, free from pests, the diseases they spread and from the toxic contamination of pesticides?

By Franklin Hernandez, President of NaturePest

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I

’m going to share with you the most guarded pest control industry secret. Chemical spraying is not pest control; this is the cheapest and most toxic service you can have. It will contaminate your floors, food surfaces and air. On top of that it will never remove your pest problem. This is why it’s banned in hospitals, schools, airports, and cruise ships and all government facilities. So why do you allow it in your home? There is a better more effective less toxic solution for your pest problems. The solution hospitals use is called IPM or Integrated Pest Management, unlike traditional pest control IPM focuses on how pests got in and how to prevent them thorough an understanding of individual pest biology. How, when, and where pests eat, nest, bread, and socialize so that we can prevent and solve pest problems with minimal use of pesticides. So why haven’t I heard of IPM before? IPM Requires a high level of training and most pest control people and companies don’t want to train themselves or their technicians, they don’t understand it, therefore don’t want you to know about it.   Yet IPM is taught by a every major state university such as The University of Florida Entomology, and is the only method recommended by the EPA, CDC, USDA, Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America, American Medical

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Association, American Veterinary Association, U.S Military and the American Academy of Pediatrics for its effectiveness and reduced toxicity. The best IPM program is now available to everyone. After 3 years in the pest control industry I realized that cheep toxic chemical spraying in homes was not only unhealthy, ineffective but wrong. We have developed an IPM program for residential and commercial clients’ that rivals any top level facility program with no contract at an affordable price, making it accessible to everyone. Don’t settle for cheep toxic pesticide sprays any longer, for a free no obligation consultation over the phone give us a call at 786-222-7069 or visit our website at www.NaturePest.com

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TECHNOLOGY A STABLE HULL IS CRITICAL WHEN VENTURING OFFSHORE Far offshore and distant from any other vessel, Ocean Master owners safely and confidently ply deep waters. This self-assurance is due in part to the inherent stability designed into each and every boat the company builds. Several factors come into play when considering seaworthiness. First and foremost is the hull shape itself. Ocean Masters are designed with a flaring vee form that softens aft for faster planning even with a single engine. The company purposefully does not sacrifice stability in pursuit of top-end speed by adding steps. Instead, it relies on a time-tested form that performs in grueling, real-world conditions. The hull is also formed to reduce spray. Combined with high gunnels and transoms, boaters remain dry when water gets rough. Ocean Master boats are overbuilt. Massive, full-height stringers are glassed into the laminate up to 20 layers in the larger models and the inner liner deck is permanently fused to the stringers and hull sides. www.oceanmasterboats.com

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TECHNOLOGY CAT, TRI, KEELBOAT ALL DESERVE OUT OF WATER STORAGE If there’s one thing owners of sailboats and power cats agree on, it’s that a clean hull makes for a fast boat with less maintenance. Storing boats out of the water is the best way to achieve this. Golden Boat Lifts manufactures custom Four- and Eight-Post Boat Lifts for power and sail catamarans, trimarans, and fin and winged keel vessels. With capacities of up to 56,000 lbs. for the Four-Post model and up to 240,000 for the Eight-Post version, Golden Boat Lifts will engineer and build a lift for almost any boat. Hulls and keels are thoroughly supported using strategically placed carpeted wood or optional aluminum bunks, placing no undue stress on any one part of the vessel. Golden Boat Lifts builds its fully welded units using 6061 T6 marinegrade aluminum. Cables and hardware are all 300 series stainless steel. This robust construction ensures a long life in a saltwater environment. The company’s reliable SeaDrive® unit provides unmatched power. It delivers a 480:1 ratio, harnessing its 8,000 in. lbs. of torque at .96 hp. This translates into smooth and effortless lifting capability. www.goldenboatlifts.com

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TECHNOLOGY DC POWER MAKES BOAT LIFTS SAFE AND RELIABLE ShoreStation broke the traditional molds when it introduced its FlexPowerŽ system, resulting in the fastest boat lifts on the market. DC battery power is the brawn behind FlexPower, purposely chosen for its safety and superior performance over AC in marine environments. Dependable DC power, combined with ShoreStation’s time-tested boat lift design, a solar charger and wireless remotes, results in a powerful and worry-free means to get a boat on and off the water. DC power performs better in wet environments where corrosion is inevitable. Corrosion in an AC circuit increases amp draw, resulting in aggravating GFCI tripping. DC systems may experience corrosion on the motor brushes, but the deep-cycle battery provides ample amperage to get it moving, obliterating corrosion and returning the system back to normal. www.shorestation.com

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TECHNOLOGY DEEP V OR KEEL, FOUR POST BOAT LIFT ACCOMMODATES The benefits of storing boats out of the water are well-known, from reduced bottom scrubbing to less chance of sinking due to a failed bilge pump. Golden Boat Lifts engineers and manufactures rugged, long-lasting lifts adaptable to a wide range of hull shapes, vessel weights and site-specific conditions. The company’s Four-Post Boat Lift is its most popular model and for good reason. There is hardly a boat shape it cannot be configured to lift, from inboard, outboard and sterndrive powerboats, to sailboats and PWC. It can be constructed to accommodate vessels from 4,500 to 56,000 lbs. Golden Boat Lifts offers Eight-Post Boat Lifts with up to 240,000 lb. capacity. Heavy-duty adjustable guide post bumpers gently lead the boat into place. Carpeted wood or optional aluminum I-beam or extruded bunks provide maximum hull support. When ready, the boater raises the vessel out of the water with the touch of a button. www.goldenboatlifts.com

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TECHNOLOGY FROM BASS BOAT TO POLING PLATFORM IN LESS THAN A MINUTE The 19 ACE Convertible from Action Craft is the one boat anglers can use to fish for largemouth one day and pole the flats for bonefish the next. In 50 seconds, bass seats can be removed and a sturdy, full-sized, folding poling platform mounted. A video of the process is at on.fb.me/1I8OPyh. The 18’ 11” craft is built from the ground up to catch fish. Its enormous fore and aft decks, 7’ 6” beam and generous 13” gunnels provide room for serious action. Storage abounds, including room for oversized equipment and fly rods, a built-in cooler compartment and an anchor locker, all with air strut lids. It comes with two LEDlighted and plumbed livewells, and a large insulated fish box for a total of 85 gallons. An 8’ Pro Series Power-Pole, 6” jack plate, console metal rod holders and poling platform rocket launchers are all standard. When it’s time to put in some serious miles, it has the widest bench seat in its class, offering room for three adults. With full width storage beneath, it folds down to fit flush with the deck for increased fishing space. The boat can accommodate a 200 hp power package and comes with a 45 gallon fuel tank. www.actioncraft.com

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TECHNOLOGY WEATHERMAX FABRIC USED ON FULLY AUTOMATIC PONTOON COVER Covering and uncovering a pontoon boat is no longer a necessary hassle. The Liberator from Jackson Canvas Company is a fully automatic, key-fob controlled mooring cover/cruising top combination. To help make this innovative cover stand up even more to the great outdoors, it’s constructed from Safety Components’ WeatherMAX 80 fabric. The Liberator from Jackson Canvas Company enables owners to uncover or cover their boat in less than 45 seconds, letting them spend more time enjoying the water. It has four separate positions: mooring cover, bimini, double bimini (full shade), and bridge for a low overpass. www.jacksoncanvas.com, www.weathermax.net

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Model Capt. Lace Allenius Photo: Pat Ford

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Profile for SOL Y MAR MAG

Sol y Mar Magazine Edición 37  

Sol y Mar Magazine es la primera y única revista digital en el mundo que incluye turismo, pesca, propiedades frente al mar e industria marít...

Sol y Mar Magazine Edición 37  

Sol y Mar Magazine es la primera y única revista digital en el mundo que incluye turismo, pesca, propiedades frente al mar e industria marít...

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