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Selected Works

of

Sol Wagner

1


Education March 2016

Master of Urban Planning; Urban Design Specialization University of Washington - Seattle, WA Rijksuniversiteit Groningen - Groningen, Netherlands Thesis: A New Direction for Bellevue: From Cars to People and a Livable Community (link) Concept for a redesigned downtown Bellevue, WA to improve the area’s pedestrian experience and livability by creating and improving pedestrian paths and open spaces.

June 2013

Certificate in Ruby on Rails Programming University of Washington - Seattle, WA

June 2009

Bachelor of Arts in International Studies; Japanese Minor University of Washington - Seattle, WA Kyushu University - Fukuoka, Japan

Experience June 2016 Present

Capitol Hill Renter Initiative • Seattle • WA Policy Advocate Volunteer

Jan 2015 June 2015

Bellevue Downtown Association • Bellevue • WA Public Outreach & Design Intern

Jan 2015 June 2015

Telegraph Cove Venture, Inc. • Seattle • WA Development Associate

Volunteering Yes! for Homes Campaign Low Income Housing Institute Seattle reLeaf 2

Skills • Autodesk Revit • Adobe Creative Cloud (Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign, Lightroom) • Trimble SketchUp • Esri ArcGIS • Esri BAO • R statistical computing and graphics language • Ruby on Rails web framework • Microsoft Office (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook) • Hand sketching • Woodworking • Laser cutter • Public speaking (Toastmasters) • Urban design guidelines • Low impact development • Land use law • Commute trip reduction • Environmental impact statements

Contact Information • Phone: (206)-407-9870 • Email: Solomon.Wagner@gmail.com • Address: 1530 Belmont Ave Apt 314 Seattle, WA 98122


Table of Contents 4 A New Direction for Bellevue

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Data: Jobs-Housing Balance

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Revit: Fire Station

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GIS: Capitol Hill Parklet

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Hand Sketching

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Photography 3


A New Direction for Bellevue Downtown Bellevue is expected to densify significantly in the near future. Worsening traffic congestion and an inhospitable street environment are major issues that need to be resolved if the area is to be a high-functioning urban center. Encouraging walking, cycling, and the use of public transportation will come with a variety of social, economic, and environmental benefits and create a more livable downtown Bellevue.

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This thesis project presents a concept for a highlywalkable and livable core of downtown Bellevue. The concept is comprised of several elements: pedestrian paths and the street crossings linking them, and public open spaces. Each element serves a purpose in reaching the goal of creating a walkable core of downtown Bellevue with improved appeal and accessibility for all residents and visitors.

View of the centrally-located public square.


Streets (vehicle priority) Streets beyond core district

Streets (neutral priority) Pedestrian-only spaces

Plan diagram of existing rights-of-way in downtown Bellevue. Existing Conditions Downtown Bellevue is made up of superblocks that are inherently bad for the walking experience for a number of reasons. They are also the cause of other major issues like the area’s harrowing streets, scarcity of public open space, and lack of pedestrian-oriented businesses. Redesign Concept Broadly speaking, this design consists of spaces for moving and spaces for staying. Pathways and street crossings are the elements that fall under the umbrella of moving spaces. A primary path called the Corridor and secondary paths that branch off called Alleys provide pedestrians and people on bicycles with pleasant and safe environments that are efficient

Streets (vehicle priority) Streets beyond core district

Streets (neutral priority) Pedestrian-only spaces

Plan diagram of rights-of-way after implementation of concept. for travel between downtown locations. The new and improved street crossings are designed to make the walking experience as uninterrupted as possible. A bustling urban square and a collection of smaller, more intimate spaces called Groves are the elements of this concept designed as destinations and focal points. The hierarchy of the Square and the Groves is designed to mirror the hierarchy of the Corridor and the Alleys. The Square is the largest open space and offers an expansive space with potential to host large public events. The Groves, in contrast, are more intimate settings.

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Section cut diagram of the Corridor. Green band Trees Light columns Permeable paving Gentle slope toward drains 40’

Awnings The Corridor The Corridor provides a direct route from the Bellevue Transit Center and the future light rail station on the eastern edge of the district to Bellevue Square and the western edge of the district. Features of the path are designed to create a strong identity for the walkable areas and to enhance people’s sense of comfort utilizing theory related to concepts like the “edge effect” and the dimensionality of spaces. The Corridor’s defining feature is the green band through its center. The green band provides user comfort and adds character to the space. Its height varies along the path for variation, to allow users to cross it at level areas, and to act as seating at raised areas.

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Flags for each establishment Tivoli lights Underdrain 11’

Elevation diagram of the Corridor.

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Permeable paving

Section cut diagram of an Alley.

Trees Reversible benches Light columns Gentle slope toward permeable paving and drain

30’

Awnings The Alleys The Alleys cut through downtown blocks as they currently exist and branch off from the Corridor and greatly extend the area of ideal pedestrian convenience to an area of twenty-two square blocks, assuming typical block sizes. They are similar in character to the Corridor, but there are points of departure that facilitate a distinct environment. Their features and layout promote an atmosphere of greater intimacy. The Alleys are secondary to the Corridor — not in importance, but grandiosity and centrality — and their design relays this infrastructural hierarchy to users. Design elements of the alleys are pared down compared to their counterparts found in the Corridor. The Alleys are also arranged so that they do not meet at right angles. This allows users to see some, but not all of what lies ahead of them on their path, creating a sense of curiosity for users and making them mor engaged with their surroundings.

Elevation diagram of an Alley.

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2’

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Paving pattern conveys directionality

Flashing caution lights

Truncated dome detection tiles

Painted stop bar

Bollards with pedestrian signals

Traffic signal

Slope between street grade and crossing grade Plan view diagram of the design of the new mid-block crossings. Improved existing crossings New mid-block crossings

The Crossings The crossings are designed to make the pedestrian experience as seamless as possible, while also maintaining a high standard of safety. Pedestrians are not required to request permission to cross by way of pressing a button. All crossings also feature dedicated-cycle signal patterns that help to avoid conflicts between vehicles and pedestrians. The design of the crossings is consistent with other parts of the pedestrian infrastructure. They use the same pavers, but the paving patterns are designed to convey information about the crossing to users, such as in which directions pedestrian paths are located and in which directions vehicle traffic flows. The entire crossing is raised from the street and level with the pedestrian paths for pedestrian comfort and to indicate to vehicle traffic to use extra caution. 8

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Ground floors recessed 10 ft. Maple tree and circular bench Fenced dog run Small field for general use Fountain play area Food truck space Open Space: The Square Outdoor dining space The Square is centered along the axis created by the Corridor. This Seating with tables for location is in close proximity to the general public major transportation hubs and is in the center of the district, and the whole of downtown Bellevue by extension. The Square has sides 150 feet in length and the facades of the buildings fronting the Square are 55 feet in height. These dimensions make for an ideal ratio for a comfortable pedestrian area that is easily recognizable as a distinct location. The ground floors of the buildings are recessed 10 feet to create a strong edge effect and to pique people’s curiosity. People along the perimeter of the Square will feel a strong sense of shelter while still being able to view the activity of the Square and feel connected to it. Section cut diagram of the Square looking east.

Plan view diagram of the Square.

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Border of Grove

Open space

Outdoor dining space

Trees

Large umbrellas and space heaters

Awnings

Bench and bookshelf

Open Space: The Groves There are six Groves located at the intersections of the Alleys. They are roughly square in shape, save for the non-right angles created by the irregular intersections. In contrast to the Square, which is physically and thematically central and grand, the Groves are auxiliary in nature and offer users a “tucked away� atmosphere. Paths do not directly flow into them. Each Grove is meant to be somewhat unique, with its character defined in part by the establishments surrounding it. Restaurants and retail locations, for example, can utilize the Groves for seating or other purposes and add their own funiture or art to the space. The Groves offer an ideal solution for users who would like the benefits of a walkable urban environment, but would also like a degree of tranquility.

Plan view of an example of how one of the groves could be designed. 10


library(gdata)

# eh_balance[is.na(eh_balance)] <­0

library(sp)

library(ggplot2)

# eh_balance <­

choropleth(choro_balance,

library(ggmap)

# eh_balance[eh_balance$balance > 0, ]

dem = ‘balance’,

library(UScensus2010)

# Already had UScensus2010 and tract2010

cuts = list(“quantile”,

census <­ This choropleth map visualizes the ratio of jobs to units of housing read.csv(url(“http://faculty.washington.edu/ per census tract in the four Puget abassok/udp520/udp520_assignment3.csv”)) Sound counties. summary(census) Using the R statistical computing and graphics language, sd(census$population) census data on the number of jobs sd(census$housing_units) and the number of housing units was sd(census$total_employment, = TRUE) manipulated. Then a newna.rm data field was populated with the results of library(modeest) the comparison of those two figures mlv(census$population, method = “mfv”) for each census tract. Lastly, the mlv(census$housing_units, method = “mfv”) ratio figures were mapped by census tract using census tract identification mlv(census$total_employment, method = numbers. “mfv”, na.rm = TRUE)

seq(0, 1,per 0.1)),Census Tract 2010 packages installed Puget Sound Jobs-Housing Balance

Data: Jobs-Housing Balance library(rgdal)

color = list(fun = “hsv”,

PSTracts <­

attr = list(h = c(0.4, 0.5, 0.6, 0.7),

readOGR(dsn=”/Users/capnsol/Documents/

s = 0.6,

Grad Files/520 Quant Meth/tract2010”,

v = 0.6,

layer=”tract2010”)

alpha = 1)),

PSTracts <­

main = ‘Puget Sound Jobs­Housing Balance

spTransform(PSTracts, CRS(“+init=EPSG:4326”))

per Census Tract in 2010’,

# just taking a look

sub = NULL,

plot(PSTracts, col=”transparent”,

border = “transparent”,

border=”peach puff”)

legend = list(pos = “bottomright”, title = NULL),

head(PSTracts@data)

type = ‘spplot’)

eh_balance <­

library(plyr)

# does it make sense?

census[c(1,23,24)]

eh_balance[is.na(eh_balance)] <­0

summary(choro_balance)

eh_balance <­

choro_balance <­merge(x=PSTracts,

# and in case you wanted to go blind!

transform(eh_balance, new=total_employ-

y=eh_balance,

choropleth(choro_balance,

ment / housing_units)

by=c(“GEOID10”, “GEOID10”))

dem = ‘balance’,

colnames(eh_balance) <­

head(choro_balance@data)

cuts = list(“quantile”,

c(“GEOID10”, “employment”, “housing”, “balance”) The R code written to create this map is reproduced in the background of summary(eh_balance$balance) this page. sd(eh_balance$balance, na.rm = TRUE)

head(PSTracts@data)

seq(0, 1, 0.1)),

class(choro_balance@data$balance)

color = list(fun = “rainbow”, attr = list(4)),

class(choro_balance@data$employment)

main = ‘Monkeyyy’,

class(choro_balance@data$housing)

sub = NULL,

# Tried to remove the balance values of 0

library(mapproj)

border = “transparent”,

but when doing this, the choropleth didn’t

library(maptools)

legend = list(pos = “bottomright”, title = NULL),

work.

library(rgeos)

type = ‘spplot’)

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Revit: Fire Station Perspective from northeast

Perspective from northwest

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GIS: Capitol Hill Parklet In this project, I determined an ideal location for a new parklet in Seattle’s Capitol Hill neighborhood through GIS analysis of the neighborhood’s characteristics relevant to open spaces. After my analysis, I chose a vacant parcel on the corner of Madison Street and Terry Avenue as the location of the hypothetical “Madison Parklet”. Analysis revealed that the site was ideal for a number of reasons: • • • • •

The site has excellent public transit access The site is in a densely populated and heavily trafficked area The area is lacking in open green space The area has a relatively high number of elderly people The area has a high proportion of people of racial minorities

“Madison Parklet” site at the intersection of Madison Street and Terry Avenue. 16


Bus Distance Map

Park Distance Map

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Legend

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Legend

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Parklet site

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Bus stop Potential sites Capitol Hill Boundary

Distance to nearest bus stop 0 - 264 ft

Parklet site Park Potential sites Capitol Hill Boundary

Distance to nearest park 0 - 264 ft

264 - 528 ft

264 - 528 ft

528 - 1,056 ft

528 - 1,056 ft

1,056 - 2,640 ft

1,056 - 2,640 ft

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0.2

0.3

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0.5 Miles

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Demographics Map: Housing Occupancy

Demographics Map: Age

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Demographics Map: Race

Context Map

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Legend

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Parklet site Park Potential sites Capitol Hill Boundary

Distance to nearest park 0 - 264 ft

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Hand Sketching

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Photography

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Sol Wagner Portfolio